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Issue 144 SEPTEMBER 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

Inside this issue:

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contents Welcome Two pilgrimages dominate this edition of the ‘Catholic Pic’: our archdiocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes and the one made by our young people to Krakow for World Youth Day with Pope Francis. Although Lourdes can be a very demanding week for many people, not least our assisted pilgrims and our young people who care for them, it never ceases to refresh those who go, both spiritually and emotionally. We hear their stories from the shrine and see the smiling faces, more so now in the days of social media. Not very many years ago our pilgrims would depart by train from Lime Street station and we would hear nothing until their return. Social media, if used responsibly, can help in our work of evangelisation. So too for our young people in Krakow where news of their pilgrimage reached us almost instantly. The days in Jaworzno in the Diocese of Sosnowiec and in Krakow are recorded in our main feature. Please remember Bernard Atherton, our long serving and loyal ‘Pic’ cartoonist. Bernard’s wife Doreen died last month after a long illness. May she rest in peace. Our thoughts and prayers are for and with Doreen, Bernard and all his family.

From the Archbishop’s Desk This has been a wonderful summer for the young people of our archdiocese. Animate, the university chaplaincy and other groups went to Poland to celebrate World Youth Day in this Jubilee Year of Mercy. There was a great emphasis on Mary as the Black Madonna has a special place in the devotion of the Polish people. And I have returned from Lourdes with our diocesan pilgrimage which had around 500 young pilgrims. Therefore let us see where Mary fits in to our lives. Mary is the first of the believers of the new covenant. Mary is the beginning of the fulfilment of the promise made to Abraham and the beginning of actual salvation for all who follow. Throughout the biblical message, the gospel of the incarnation is at the same time fulfilment and new promise. The God of the bible is always a God who speaks and acts, and Mary is now involved for good in God’s saving action. In other words Mary is involved with me. Mary who was the lowliest, from ‘the poor of the Lord’, who was from that group who wanted nothing for themselves yet relied on God for everything was chosen to fulfil God’s promise made to Abraham. Her ‘lowliness’ relativises human ability and produces a strong sense of dependence on human beings and being open to God’s grace. May Mary accompany us as we face the challenges of an uncertain future but sure in the promises of her Son. Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures: Cover and Main feature © Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk Advertising Sales team 0151 709 7567 Publisher CPMM 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Contents 4

Main Feature World Youth Day A time none of us will forget

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News From around the Archdiocese

12 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News A community rich in spirit, resourcefulness and compassion 16/17 Lourdes Pilgrimage 19 Profile Justine Silcock Seeking volunteers to spread the word of Cafod’s work 21 Animate Youth Ministry Coping with the post-pilgrimage comedown 25 Cathedral Record ‘Exemplary’ Cathedral earns £140,000 Getty Foundation grant 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Copy deadline October issue 9 September 2016 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

28 Pic Life A priestly life 29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Responding to the Pope’s call … a year on

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‘It was a time none of us will forget’ Sarah Beatty was among the pilgrims from the Archdiocese of Liverpool who attended World Youth Day 2016 in Krakow. She describes a memorable experience for the Liverpool group in Poland. Wednesday 20 July The Liverpool pilgrims gathered in the early hours of Wednesday morning at Manchester airport for our flight to Krakow. Once landed, we were taken to Jaworzno, a town in the Diocese of Sosnowiec for the first leg of our stay – the ‘Days in the Diocese’. We were split between two parishes – St Charles Borromeo and Divine Mercy – and after meeting our host families and seeing our homes for the next few days, a tour of Jaworzno and an ice cream followed! Thursday 21 July We gathered for morning Mass in the town centre with fellow visitors from the United States, Ghana, Hong Kong and Italy. Afterwards, we were taken to ‘GEOsfera’, an old quarry now turned into a centre for conservation. While there, each group planted a tree as a memory of our time of pilgrimage. We then visited Lake Sosina and after a pedalo outing, our moment came to shine as we took the stage in the surrounding parkland to lead both locals and fellow pilgrims in a song or two. We wouldn’t have been a group from Liverpool if we’d not sung a Beatles tune, so out came the songbook and a version of ‘Hey Jude’. Friday 22 July An early start as we met at 5.15am in the town centre for a planned 15km walk

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to the Jasna Gora monastery in Czestochowa, venue for the 1991 World Youth Day. Fortunately, due to a mix-up involving Italians and buses, our walk was reduced to a 5km stroll around Czestochowa to the monastery where we visited the chapel that houses the famous Black Madonna icon We celebrated afternoon Mass in the grounds of the monastery, where Archbishop Philip Wilson from Australia reminded us that ‘Jesus gave the church to St John, a young man, and He gives it to you.’ Saturday 23 July We made a morning visit to the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial and museum. On our return, we had a time of prayer for those who had died there during World War Two and all who are still persecuted today for their faith and beliefs. After lunch, we were taken to the local outlet mall – the Polish version of Cheshire Oaks! – and then it was off to Sosnowiec for Mass on ‘Pope Square’, where St John Paul II had celebrated Mass in 1999. We were reminded that

the world needs its young people to be leaders, to make a better Church and a better world. Sunday 24 July The two groups celebrated Sunday Mass with their parish communities, having the opportunity to read and lead worship. Afterwards there was a picnic with families and members of both parishes, which began with a game of football: England v Poland. Our team scored three goals but, alas, were no match for our Polish friends. Later, we were taught some traditional Polish dances (not unlike our ‘YMCA’ dance routine!) before the day ended with a final drink in Jaworzno town centre with the families who had taken such good care of us. Monday 25 July On arrival in Krakow, we had time to explore the city, with some of the group visiting Oskar Schindler’s factory. Later, we gathered for prayer and for a chance to share our experiences so far. After dinner, we walked together to the main square, Rynek Glowny, where we were able to get a sense of the diverse range of nationalities who made their way to Krakow. Tuesday 26 July In the evening we joined some 200,000 other young people at Blonia Park for a Welcome Mass celebrated by the Archbishop of Krakow, Archbishop Stanislaw Dziwisz, who welcomed us to Poland and reminded us of the reason we were here. It was amazing to see so many pilgrims in the one place and really gave us a taste of what WYD is about. Wednesday 27 July The WYD catechesis programme has begun. We were allocated the Tauron Arena – a large venue much like Liverpool’s Echo Arena – in which tens of thousands of Englishspeaking pilgrims gathered to hear Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston speak on the theme of mercy. In the evening, there was a ‘Night of Mercy’


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feature ‘We wouldn’t have been a group from Liverpool if we’d not sung a Beatles tune, so out came the songbook and a version of ‘Hey Jude’’

led by Bishop Robert Barron from the Archdiocese of Los Angeles along with North American singer-songwriters Matt Maher and Audrey Assad. The atmosphere was amazing and to see the arena full, with thousands outside unable to get in, the Bishop spoke of the vibrancy of the Church and the answer to the Holy Father’s call to be merciful like the Father. Thursday 28 July We were back at the Tauron Arena for a morning of catechesis. Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle reminded us to allow ourselves to be open to God and to be touched by his mercy. We then headed off to the hotel of our very own Bishop Tom Williams, who celebrated Mass for us, offering us a reflection on the

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feature

parable of the lost coin. Later in the day, we went to Blonia Park to help welcome Pope Francis – so many people had gathered to welcome him and to celebrate our faith together.

‘It was amazing to see so many pilgrims in the one place and really gave us a taste of what WYD is about’ 6

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Friday 29 July For catechesis, we decided to stay local and so ended up in the Augustine church on the street opposite our hotel, where we were led in some classic praise and worship tracks, including our hymn of choice, ‘Trading my sorrows’. Bishop Frank Caggiano from Bridgeport, USA spoke to us about how we can each be a missionary of mercy: we must not be afraid, we need to let go of anger and to perform the works of mercy. If we do these things, he said, we will receive the joy of Christ. At the end of Mass, he encouraged us to get some rest, warning us that we wouldn’t sleep at the vigil. That afternoon, Pope Francis was once again at Blonia Park for the Stations of the Cross, which was very moving. Each station featured a different performance, from mime to dance, each linked to the works of mercy.

Saturday 30 July Vigil time! Taking the advice of Bishop Caggiano our group rested until 3pm before setting off for the vigil site, Campus Misericordiae, in the neighbouring village of Brzegi. After a three-hour walk, we arrived and set up camp. At 7.30pm it was time to welcome Pope Francis and begin the vigil, a celebration which included praying the Chaplet of the Divine Mercy, praise and worship, and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. Sunday 31 July We were woken early by various acts performing on stage – one of them treating us to a Sister Act medley! Pope Francis celebrated the Mass that followed at 10am, and during his homily he said that it does not matter which phone you use or clothes you wear as God loves you unconditionally. He also spoke about how we need not be afraid to say yes to God. Then came the announcement that Panama would host the next World Youth Day in 2019, and that was that: WYD 2016 was over. Gone, but not forgotten; this, after all, was a time that none of us will forget.


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Jessica wins Public Speaking trophy

The Liverpool Archdiocese Secondary Schools’ Partnership held the first Liverpool Catholic Schools’ Public Speaking Event at Archbishop Beck Catholic Sports College. The overall aim of the contest was to foster presentation and communication skills in young students, as all walks of life, especially the business world, are increasingly reliant on these abilities. The three judges; Geraldine Poole, from Soroptimist International Liverpool, Paul Holleley from the English Speaking Union and Partnership Director Paul Greenall were overwhelmed by the confidence, knowledge and talent of the students delivering their speeches on subjects such as ‘Popular culture provides no role models for young people’, ‘You learn more in failure than you ever do in success‘ and ‘Whatever you are - be a good one’. The standard of the competition was very high, and after some deliberation Jessica Haycock from Year 7 at Archbishop Beck was announced the winner with her topic ‘To frack or not to frack’. Jessica was awarded the trophy for the winning school to retain for year and a £25 book voucher. All of the participants received a certificate and a £5 book voucher. Chair of the judging panel, Paul Holleley, said ‘Jessica’s speech was really outstanding, well delivered and she totally engaged with her chosen topic’. Paul Greenall said, ‘this was a marvellous opportunity to showcase the talent of our students and we look forward to building on this success by making this an annual event.’

Diamond jubilee celebration for Dickinsons The Reverend Adrian Dickinson and his wife, Margaret, recently celebrated their diamond jubilee at St Mary’s, Woolton. Adrian is the retired deacon at St Mary’s and also served in that role at St Clare’s near Sefton Park, and St Hugh of Lincoln in Wavertree. Father Pat O’Brien celebrated a special anniversary Mass to mark 60 years of marriage for the couple, who were then joined by family and friends for refreshments in the parish centre. The gathering included Adrian and Margaret’s four children – Tricia, Richard, Peter and Paul – along with ten grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren.

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news diary Our Lady’s Youth Club remembered Obituary of Rev

John Birchall

Former parishioners from Our Lady of Mount Carmel visited Canon James Commins in James Nugent Court to relive memories of the Youth Club he ran in the parish in the 1940s. Newly ordained Father Commins took over the Club started by visiting Irish priest Father Timothy O’Donovan. The visit was organised by Joan Luxon who was a member of the club and who, with Bishop Vincent Malone, presented the Canon with a framed group picture of life at the Club.

Father John Birchall who served as a prison chaplain for over twenty years and as Parish Priest of Sacred Heart, Wigan, died aged 82 on Monday 25 July, in the 57th year of his priesthood. John Birchall was born in Railway Road, Golborne, on 21 November 1933, the son of John and Margaret Birchall. He attended All Saints School, Golborne, and St Helens Grammar School and studied for the priesthood at St Joseph’s College, Upholland, where he was ordained priest by Archbishop John Carmel Heenan on 11 June 1960 in the college chapel. He had three appointments as assistant priest: in October 1960 at St Matthew’s, Liverpool; in September 1966 at Holy Family, Southport and at St Dominic, Huyton in September 1973. In 1975 Archbishop Beck released him from parochial duties to serve as a full-time prison chaplain. During his secondment to the Home Office he served as chaplain in the following prisons: Walton (1975-1981); Holloway and Pentonville (1981-1989) and Armley, Leeds (1989-1997). Though he found some of the work expected of the prison chaplain difficult, his kind and gentle personality made him popular with both prisoners and staff alike. During his period in London he celebrated the Silver Jubilee of his priesthood at Sacred Heart, Holloway. Upon his return to the archdiocese in September 1997, Father Birchall took up his appointment as parish priest at Sacred Heart, Wigan, where he remained until his retirement in November 2009. He continued to live in the presbytery until 2014, when he moved to a house nearby. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at Sacred Heart, Wigan, on Friday 5 August.

Obituary of Deacon Terry Gilvin Deacon Terry Gilvin died on Sunday 7 August aged 90 having been a deacon in the Archdiocese for 31 years. John Terence Gilvin was born on 5 June 1926 and baptised in St Boniface's parish in Salford. He went to school at St Elizabeth's, Litherland, and later studied Economics, Industrial Management and Personnel Management at Liverpool College of Commerce. He married Mary Gough in St Philomena's parish on 12 September 1953 and they had two sons, Philip John and Stephen Terence. The family later grew to include five grandchildren. From the age of 16 he was very much involved with the YCW and later with the

Family Social Action movement. In 1977 Terry left his job at the British American Tobacco Company to become a Community Worker with Catholic Social Services, working for the Netherton Ecumenical Action Team. Terry was an active parishioner of St Philomena's parish, playing the organ and looking after the parish accounts, serving as a School Governor and representing the parish at the Deanery Pastoral Council and later the Archdiocesan Pastoral Council. He represented the Archdiocese on the National Laity Commission and was the convenor of the Commission's Working Party on Christian Formation.

Terry was also involved in various other initiatives and groups, including supporting the families of Hillsborough. In the early 1980s he was encouraged by Canon Eugene Hopkins, then parish priest of St Philomena's, to apply for the diaconate and he was ordained in the Metropolitan Cathedral on 30 June 1985. He served faithfully as deacon in St Philomena's until his retirement at the age of 75 in 2001 and remained actively involved until very recently. He moved into Nazareth House, Crosby, earlier this year and died there peacefully on the morning of Sunday 7 August. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Philomena's Church, Sparrow Hall Road, Liverpool, on Tuesday 23 August, followed by interment at Everton Cemetery.

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news diary ‘God in His Mercy cares for you’ On Sunday 25 September Archbishop Malcolm will be the Celebrant at a celebration Mass for and with disabled people with the theme: ‘God in His Mercy cares for you’. The Mass, organised by Nugent Care begins at 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King with Mike Anderson and ‘Tongues of Fire’ leading the music. The theme for the Mass is based on the reading from Luke 12:22-31 about how God cares for the birds of the air and the lilies of the field, but cares for us even more. People will be gathering outside the Cathedral at 2.30 pm when there will be an opportunity to join in the craft making of the flowers and birds processing into the Cathedral through the Holy Door.

After Mass there will be refreshments available in the Gibberd Room. No booking is necessary, for further details contact: mary.beatham@nugentcare.org

Anniversary Afternoon Tea in Wigan celebrations at Brindle On Sunday 3 July 2016, parishioners of St Mary's and St John's RC churches, Standishgate, Wigan, their friends and families enjoyed a most successful Community Afternoon Tea, hosted by the Friends of St John's. Throughout the afternoon there was great entertainment: piano playing by talented parishioners; singing courtesy of Wigan Musical Theatre Group and 'Mark the Magician' who intrigued all with his magic tricks. All cakes were made by the parish community, and donations given on the day raised £249 for the latest Cafod appeal. Parish Priest Father John Johnson, who wholeheartedly supported the event was delighted with its success.

Heritage Open Days

Parishioners at St Joseph’s, Brindle, presented their Parish Priest, Father Raphael Jones OSB, with a special cake to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of his ordination. Father Raphael was ordained on 23 June 1996. 10

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The following churches in the Archdiocese will be open as part of the Heritage Open Days programme between Thursday 8 and Sunday 11 September: Holy Cross and St Helen Corporation Street, St Helens, WA10 1EF. Saturday 10 September: 11.00 am to 4.00 pm (Tours at 12.30 pm and 2.30 pm) Sunday 11 September: 1.00 pm to 3.30 pm (Tour at 2.15 pm) St Anthony of Egypt Scotland Road, Liverpool, L5 5BD. Thursday 8 and Friday 9 September: 10.00 am to 4.00 pm Saturday 10 September: 10.00 am to 4.00 pm (Mass at 12.00 noon; Lecture and Tour from 12.30 pm to 2.30 pm) Sunday 11 September: 11.00 am to 3.00 pm St Clare Arundel Avenue, Sefton Park, L17 2AU. Saturday 10 September: 10.00 am to 5.00 pm St Francis Xavier Salisbury Street, Liverpool L3 8DR. Thursday 8 September to Sunday 11 September: 10.00 am to 4.00 pm St Mary Buttermarket Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. Friday 9 September: 1.00 pm to 5.00 pm Saturday 10 September: 1.00 pm to 5.00 pm (Organ Recital at 1.15 pm) St Matthew Queens Drive, Clubmoor, Liverpool, L13 9DL. Thursday 8 and Friday 9 September: 10.00 am to 4.00 pm Saturday 10 September: 12.00 noon to 4.00 pm


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Silver Celebration

On Saturday 30 July Father John McLoughlin celebrated the Silver Jubilee of his Ordination to the Priesthood with Mass at Carmel Monastery Maryton Grange, Liverpool. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, Archbishop Emeritus Patrick

Kelly, Archbishop Paul Gallagher and Bishop Vincent Malone were among the visiting clergy. Father John will take up his new appointment as Parish Priest of St Stephen, Warrington, this month.

Gospel choir inspires Picton primary schools

Harvest Fast Day Harvest is a time of abundance and plenty, a time to celebrate and share the fruition of a hard year’s work. On this Harvest Fast Day, Cafod are asking their supporters to join together on 7 October to help the families of the Altiplano in the South American country of Bolivia to grow more food. At 4,000 metres above sea level, the Bolivian Altiplano plain is a difficult place to live, and now the highly agricultural community is being adversely affected by the effects of climate change. Unpredictable rains and frequent hailstorms are destroying crops which the community relies on. Men are being forced to leave their families for months at a time, travelling to the cities to find work, leaving the women and children to work the land by themselves. In Bolivia, nearly 60% of the rural population are living below the poverty line. By investing in the building of greenhouses, the provision of seeds and materials, the teaching of new farming techniques and by providing technical staff to educate the community on how to build wormeries and make their own organic fertiliser, Cafod’s partners help people not only to grow enough food to feed their families but also to have some left to sell. To find out more about how you can get involved in the Harvest appeal, the two year ‘Hands On’ project or by speaking at Mass on Harvest fast day visit: www.cafod.org.uk/harvest or contact liverpool@cafod.org.uk

‘Leaving fear behind once you start singing.’ This was one child’s response to the experience of performing in a Liverpool gospel choir which has had a telling impact on the development of pupils from two primary schools. The Circle of Voices Gospel Choir has brought together over 70 youngsters from two Catholic primary schools in the Picton ward of Liverpool – St Hugh’s and St Clare’s – in a project organised by the Catholic Association for Racial Justice (CARJ). These are schools with high numbers of established and recent immigrant pupils and they were selected for the programme, which began in September 2014, at the suggestion of Frank Cogley, former Director of Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Liverpool. For Mr Cogley, who is on the board of CARJ Liverpool, a clear motivation was to give support to youngsters from diverse backgrounds and from one of the city’s more deprived areas. The ensuing success of the choir, guided by director Mel Birkett and CARJ Liverpool staff member Dale Bradshaw – a former community police officer – was the subject of a report issued earlier this summer, which describes how the children, aged from six to 11, met for an hour a week over a period of 36 weeks during the 2014/15 academic year. They went on to perform at Christmas concerts at both the Metropolitan and Anglican Cathedrals and at Liverpool Parish Church. The choir is now embarking on its third year together and Bill Chambers, who helped compile the report, said: ‘The major achievement of the Circle of Voices Gospel Choir was the raising of self-esteem, achievement and aspirations of all engaged. It has been a superb example of the power and value of singing to the all-round development of young people.’ Another positive consequence, according to the report, is that ‘by encouraging parents to experience choir performances, it was also felt that barriers between different racial, cultural and faith groups were being reduced.’ These school communities include people of a variety of faiths and from British, Irish, Asian, Afro-Caribbean and Central European backgrounds. The final word goes to the children themselves. ‘It helps you feel more confident and less shy,’ said one. ‘Singing in front of an audience is exciting as well as making us feel proud,’ said another of a project which has sprinkled a good deal of pride on two of our archdiocese’s school communities.

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what’s on Thursday 1 September Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Saturday 3 September Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Sean Montgomery (Hebden Bridge). Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 4 September Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Tuesday 6 September Support Group for people living with dementia and their carers 2.00 pm at Our Lady Help of Christians, Portico Parish Hall, Prescot, L34 2QT. Details: Joan O’Hanlon Tel: 07984 735590. Everyone welcome. Wednesday 7 September Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher : Father Joe Kendall. UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St Margaret Mary’s, Pilch Lane, Liverpool, L14 0JG. Friday 9 September to Sunday 11 September ‘Women at the Well.’ A weekend of reflection for women led by Sister Moira Meeghan. at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 10 September Car Boot Sale 8.00 am onwards in the Cathedral Car Park. Pitches £10. Details from Claire Hanlon 0151 709 9222, Ext. 201 or c.hanlon@metcatherdal.org.uk Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Martyn Noble (HM Chapel Royal). Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 11 September Education Day Cathedral Community Solemn Mass 11.00 am in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. 18th Annual ‘Pause for Hope’ Service for all affected by cancer 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King led by led by Bishop Tom Williams, Auxiliary Bishop of Liverpool, Rev Dr

september The Marriage and Family Life Department of the Archdiocese offers support meetings for Divorced and Separated Catholics. These begin on Wednesday, 7 September. We welcome Catholics and other Christians who are divorced or separated (recently or in the past) or who are experiencing the breakdown of a marriage or a long term relationship. The small groups are informative, affirming, free and confidential. For information about the meetings and the venues and dates or to book a place please contact Frances Trotman Tel: 0151 727 2195. General enquiries may be directed to Maureen O’Brien at LACE Tel: 0151 522 1044 Email: m.obrien@rcaol.co.uk Crispin Pailing, Anglican Rector of Liverpool and Baptist Minister Rev Phil Jump. Music by the Birkenhead Operatic Society Trust (BOST) and by Dave, Danielle and Emily Flynn. Emily is head chorister at the Cathedral. Main speaker: Professor Chris Holcombe, senior breast cancer surgeon at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital. Professor Holcombe is a well known and highly respected surgeon, who is much admired and appreciated by the hundreds of patients whom he has treated over the years. He is a committed Christian and will be talking about his work and the influence his faith has had on this. Details: Professor Ray Donnelly Email: raymund.donnelly@roycastle.org Tel: 07540 637449. www.pauseforhope.org.uk Liverpool Bach Collective Johann Sebastian Bach Cantata 85: ‘Ich bin ein gutter Hirt’ (‘I am the Good Shepherd’) 6.30 pm at Christ Church, Crosby Road South, Waterloo, L22 1RQ. Singers and Players directed by Philip Duffy. Tuesday 13 September Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Wednesday 14 September Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher : Father Tom Leigh. Saturday 17 September Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Sunday 18 September Home Mission Day. Wednesday 21 September Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury,

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2016

Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher : Father Dominic Curran. Thursday 22 September Newman Association Talk: ‘From the Beginnings to the Nicene Creed’. Speaker: Michael Tunnicliffe. 7.30 pm (after 7.00 pm Mass) at St. Helen's Parish Centre, Alexandra Road, Crosby, L23 7TQ. Details: John Potts Tel:07889 841096. Saturday 24 September Music for the Year of Mercy Concert with the Cathedral Choir 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or Email: bookings@cathedralconcerts.org.uk www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 25 September Day of Prayer in thanksgiving for the Harvest and fruits of human work. Celebration Mass for and with disabled people With the theme: ‘God in His Mercy cares for you’. 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. Wednesday 28 September Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher : Father Tom Neylon.

Looking ahead: October 2016 Saturday 1 October ‘Praise the Lord with Music.’ An opportunity to explore how to lead the community in prayer, as church music groups led by Sister Moira Meeghan. You are invited to bring along a favourite hymn or piece of music and your instruments. 10.00 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Cost £10 (light lunch provided) Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Sunday 2 October Rosary Sunday Day of Prayer for Nugent Care. 56th St Helens Annual Family Rosary Procession led by Bishop Tom Williams and local Civic Dignitaries. 3.00 pm from Church Square in the town centre, to the church of Holy Cross and St. Helen, concluding with solemn Benediction.


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sunday reflections On a liturgical note ‘Come ye thankful people…’ Thankfulness is not a passing moment in a Christian’s life, but needs to be an attitude of our daily living. At this time of year in many parts of our Archdiocese there will be harvest festivals in our churches and our schools and we express thanks for the harvest of the earth – and recognise that we should never take it for granted. Even when it comes to us pre-packed or tinned, the food that we enjoy has its roots in the earth which is tilled and cared for by human ingenuity and skill – it is quite literally ‘fruit of the earth and the work of human hands’. So, when we keep the harvest festival and when we respond to Cafod’s call to a fast day, this is not just thanksgiving for the bounty of the earth and the sea, but also gratitude for those who work so hard on the earth and sea to bring home to us these good things. Mindful also of the exploitation both of natural resources and indeed of human labour, we work and pray for justice and for wisdom in our daily choices and our taking care of the Earth. On the Isle of Man there is a lovely

Sunday thoughts Why is Christianity assumed to be a regime requiring rigour, determination, and restriction? This is the view of outsiders looking in – and also of many cradle Catholics who have never gone on to make their inherited faith their own. They walk away for the best of reasons: rather than offering fullness of life, Christian commitment seems to demand a closing down of all the exciting possibilities that life has to offer. The Pharisees found Jesus insulting because of the relish with which He demolished their assumptions about their faith. We need to be challenged in the same way today. Matthew’s Gospel reading for Sunday 11 September relates three stories which Jesus tells in response to the Pharisees’ obsession with virtue and their severity in judging those who fall short. Each story turns the Pharisees’ assumptions on their head: the shepherd recklessly abandons his entire flock to rescue one stray sheep; rather than rejoicing over nine golden coins that are safe and secure, a

Canon Philip Gillespie

evening hymn which, while sung throughout the year, is particularly suited to this time of the Harvest Thanksgiving: ‘We thank Thee, Lord, for sunshine, dew and rain, Broadcast from Heav’n by Thine almighty hand Source of all life, unnumbered as the sand – Bird, beast, and fish, herb, fruit, and golden grain. O Bread of Life, Thou in Thy word hast said, Who feeds in faith on Me shall never die! In mercy hear Thy hungry children’s cry, Father, give us this day our daily bread! Sow in our hearts the seeds of Thy dear love, That we may reap contentment, joy, and peace; Then, when at last our earthly labours cease, Grant us to join Thy harvest home above.’

Mgr John Devine OBE

woman tears her house apart in a frenzy of destruction to find the one coin that is missing; an overindulgent parent with a selfish waster of a son responds to his latest irresponsible binge by indulging him further. What does each story have in common? The shepherd, the woman and the father can’t help themselves in their determination to save what is theirs and, in the case of the ‘weak’ father, he acts without the slightest evidence of any effort on the son’s part to make matters easier. (My fantasy version of the story has the son slinking off again once he has recovered from his hangover. He’s a serial offender.) We are indulged every day of our lives. The Lord is obsessively determined to chase after us, irrespective of our indifference and hostility. He never gives up. The good news is simple: let God do the heavy lifting. God loves us because He can’t help himself. Why is this such a wellkept secret?

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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God understands Many years ago, Jean Vanier, the founder of L’Arche – a network of homes for people with learning disabilities – came to speak at one of our ‘Come and See’ conferences. I think that I have met many holy people on my journey and he was certainly one of them. The hall was full of people of every Christian persuasion looking for a word that would bring life. Vanier is a giant of a man in every way. I can still see him stooping over the lectern on the stage at the Floral Hall as he listed human weaknesses, punctuating each one with the same phrase: ‘God understands.’ That was his word to us. That was God’s word to us. People began to weep as they experienced God breaking into their lives through this man. I wonder how many of us believe that word to be true? My experience of listening to people and walking with people on their faith journey is that most of us don’t really accept it. Partly it is bad theology, but mostly I think it is because we have never experienced the kind of love that is in the heart of God for us, a love that is irrevocable, unconditional and neverending. At a human level we presume that anyone who slips behind the masks that we wear and sees us as we are will, at the very least, be disappointed in us and at worst reject us. So how much more true will that be of God? Father Ronald Rolheiser, the Canadian theologian, says: ‘At the end of the day we expect that God is disappointed with us and will greet us with a frown.’ Yet God understands. I have two friends who know me probably better than I know myself. Despite what I believe about myself, they accept me and love me. If they can do that, how much more can the God that Jesus reveals do it? God, understands us, accepts us, and even delights in us. Why not take the risk to come to God, trusting and believing in the power of that love that was poured out on Calvary? Let it heal you of your disappointment in yourself. Let it touch your poor self-image. Let it be balm for your wounded-ness and brokenness. Let it transform you deep within. After all, this God of ours understands. Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news

‘A community rich in spirit, resourcefulness and compassion’ Epsom Street Community Centre was asset transferred to Nugent from Liverpool City council in January 2015, due to funding cuts. Following in the footsteps of Father Nugent, and true to our mission to care, educate, protect and inspire those in need, Nugent recognised that the community of Vauxhall desperately needed a safe haven in their community. Margy, with daughter Jessica, with her AQA certificate for Communication and Listening Skills, with Julie Murphy from Targeted Services)

We took up the Challenge and employed two members of staff, Mandi and Donna, to support the project and by listening to the local community through consultation we are able to create opportunities within the local area to meet their growing needs.

The Kirkdale area is one of the most deprived in EU. Unemployment, health inequalities, educational attainment, historical issues of urban gang culture, drugs and alcohol misuse and domestic abuse are some of the daily challenges people of the community face. However, this community is very rich in spirit, resourcefulness, and compassion and support for each other with a strong sense of humour. The team at the centre have developed and opened up opportunities to engage and encourage local adults and their family members into volunteering opportunities, educational, projects, confidence building courses while looking at their health care through exercise and complimentary therapies. Our youth groups have a more structured sessional focus eg the ‘YAG’ Youth Advisory Group have been able to be part of media training, to promote digital inclusion and funding training in local grant application decision making. They have completed AQAs in communication and finance and Emergency First Aid qualifications. The project would not be as successful if

it wasn't for the support and hard work from Nugent's wider family. We only have to pick up the phone to the fundraising team for any number of items needed for this community, everything from cots, beds, clothes, food, etc. We have been lucky enough to have been accepted in to this vibrant community, being able to support people through bad times and times of celebration. Within the eighteen months we have been open we feel privileged as the community trust us and know we will always offer a friendly listening supportive ear. Recently Nugent's financial director, Mark Roche ran in the London Marathon to raise funds for Epsy to take seventy local people on holiday to Pontins, North Wales for a long Weekend. Each family are taking a bag of food which has been donated by Barclays Bank and each chalet will receive £5 for their electricity to take any pressure off finding the money, allowing the families to relax, have fun and build great memories. Mandi and Donna are looking forward to having a challenging, exciting, fun filled time with the group they have worked hard to build a relationships with and have had the privilege to be part of their life. This holiday will have a huge impact on the families we serve and will be in their memories for a lifetime which is priceless.

This summer has been a positively eventful season within Nugent Care. I was fortunate enough to visit two of our projects with our Archbishop: to our high school and also our children’s home in Formby. Whilst at Clarence, the children were celebrating their final day of the school year by acknowledging the Olympic spirit. On that exciting last day, they were competing in the high jump. The young people’s energy level was contagious and before long all of the spectators on the sidelines were caught up in the enthusiastic whooping and cheering for the young students. Some of the young students achieved their personal best. How great it was to be reminded of our purpose at Clarence and to see Father Nugent’s mission in action. We even had a flip through dusty journals from the 1920s and naturally tried to surmise what it must have been like for both the students and the administration at the time. After all Nugent Care is 135 years old this year, there are probably so many interesting stories within those walls. After the sports day at Clarence we visited Clumber Lodge Children’s home which has a legacy in its own right in that it is celebrating its 75th birthday this year. Sister Ben has been there 46 years as well. Clumber Lodge provides a loving and supportive environment for young children and teenagers and even has a Mother and Baby apartment. Visiting Clumber is always a great experience. As we walked up to the front door, a young person was assisting one of the staff to plant flowers in the home’s border gardens. Once inside we were greeted warmly and one of the young people had baked a cake for the visitors (and was quite proud of the cake, too). We observed such compassion from the staff to the children who in turn showed such a gentleness to the young baby that shared the home with them. Words cannot express how uplifted I was when I left the house to know that the love that is surrounding this home, will have such a positive impact on the young people. With September fast approaching, we are looking forward to seeing the young people return to their schools with the same enthusiasm that they had at the start of the holidays. Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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Reflections on Lourdes nybody scanning social media in the days after the Lourdes pilgrimage ended will have seen hashtags such as #PLD (Post-Lourdes Depression) and #TakeMeBack. It left me wondering why our young people might feel ‘depressed’ at not being away on pilgrimage, with the early starts and late nights and hard work in the hot sun.

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If we could put our finger on one specific reason, maybe we would have churches brimming with exultant youth, but it may well be more a combination of things that come together in perfect harmony for one week in the year. After all, to try to pigeonhole the Lourdes experience might be to restrict the free movement of the Holy Spirit in that week; one person’s wish to be ‘taken back’ might have a different motivation than another’s. Lourdes is a place of peace and tranquillity (at least once you get away

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from the tat shops and into the domain). The young people on the pilgrimage can take a step away from the stresses of their lives to think about what is most important to them. When they take part in the Blessed Sacrament procession, they are reminded beforehand by their coach chaplains that they are walking with the Lord just as the disciples did 2,000 years ago. Just as those disciples came to the Lord with questions about their place in the world, so too can our young pilgrims take their questions to the same Lord. Similarly with the Torchlight Procession, they have the chance to pray the rosary and walk with uplifted candles to ask the Lord to enlighten their lives. Lourdes is also about the service the youth offer to our assisted pilgrims. In this Holy Year of Mercy, the corporal and spiritual works of mercy were never far from the minds of our youth pilgrims. Service has always been a vital

component of the pilgrimage but this year allowed us to reflect more thoughtfully on why we act in merciful ways: to add spiritual and theological ballast to the work that goes on. It is said that we live in a world that looks increasingly to the individual over the needs of society. As someone once said, ‘There is no such thing as society’, and for young people growing up in this world, it can be difficult to acquire a broader vision of what can be done for our fellow humans. Yet in Lourdes they need not look far. They are asked to play a part in ensuring mercy is shown to those around them. It might be no surprise, then, that young people might want to be ‘taken back’ to Lourdes, where they can act in service of others. Finally, it would be a grave mistake to downplay the social aspect of Lourdes. The social side of being away from home with strangers has always been a vital component of pilgrimage – just read


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s 2016

Father Simon Gore ask why Lourdes leaves a mark on our youth pilgrims

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales! There is something different about social time in Lourdes. Our young people are not judged for what they wear or how they look. Lourdes is a shared community. You can end up singing in a bar with a person you have not met before. The judgement of the world is, for a time, ignored. You are free to chat to people you might not normally talk to, to make friends without thinking about what Facebook will say. In short, the #PLD and #TakeMeBack sentiments are no surprise. Perhaps we can summarise the reasons with three S’s: spirituality, service, social. The challenge now is how to harness these in the everyday lives we all return to. Over to you… What our youth pilgrims said Two members of Coach Three from St Helens give their verdict on the 2016 pilgrimage:

Sian Nathaniel At first, the thought of spending 27 hours on a coach with complete strangers was quite scary. However, waking up with these people and seeing their earlymorning smiles on the journey down had me deciding rather quickly that Coach 3 wasn’t a group of strangers but one huge, welcoming and extraordinary family of young people and staff which I was now a part of. As this was my first time in Lourdes you can understand that I was surprised when I was chosen to be on VIP (visually impaired pilgrim) duty. I was privileged to take care of the same lady all week and being the one she relied on when she needed help was the icing on the cake for me. As our connection strengthened I realised that I couldn’t have asked for a better person to care for and share an ice cream with. Yes, the earlymorning wake-ups weren’t to my liking and I would have preferred it if my legs didn’t ache after a day of pushing

wheelchairs but the relationships I made both with my fellow pilgrim and the members of Coach 3 and other coaches made up for it. Honestly, there is no place like Lourdes. Frankie Lennon Throughout the week I was helping a visually impaired pilgrim (VIP) with my friend James. He was a young man called John and we had such a fantastic time with him. We went to all of the Masses and processions – our favourite was the torchlight procession, especially as John couldn't stop laughing at my great singing! Throughout the week with my coach we had a great laugh but we were also reflective and took time to think of family, friends and our relationship with God. It's times like this that I miss in my usually hectic everyday life and I'm sure I’ll return next year with Coach 3 for my third Lourdes pilgrimage.

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profile

Justine Silcock Seeking volunteers to spread the word of Cafod’s work by Simon Hart afod might be best known for its charitable efforts abroad but, as Justine Silcock will vouch, the Catholic aid agency has plenty going on at home too. In Justine’s case, she is one of ten education volunteers working in Liverpool to spread the word about Cafod’s endeavours – delivering primary and secondary-school assemblies and workshops on topics such as climate change, the refugee crisis, and water and sanitation shortages elsewhere in the world. It is a role that she embarked on in 2012, and one that she relishes for the opportunity to raise awareness and understanding about poverty and injustice. ‘The children and young people give me such encouragement with their understanding and desire to find out more about the concerns of others living in less privileged parts of the world, and how we all, through Cafod, can help them,’ she says. A former teacher at Wigan and Leigh College, Justine has also taken on the task, over the past year, of co-ordinating and supporting the charity’s new education volunteers in Liverpool Archdiocese. ‘This has been a great opportunity to share the experiences of

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the work with others and also to help to support the development of the Cafod Liverpool Volunteer Centre into an open and resourceful place for volunteers to visit,’ she says. With Cafod keen to attract new volunteers, Justine explains that the structure is in place to help ease people into the role. ‘Although education volunteering may be thought to appeal mostly to those with a teaching background, in fact anyone with a desire to, and an interest in, spreading the word on overseas development to children, young people and their teachers and families, would be a welcome member of the team,’ she says. ‘Cafod provides excellent training and resources to use for assemblies and workshops.’ Justine’s involvement with Cafod stretches some way back. She has been a committed and active volunteer in the parish of Margaret Clitherow in her local community of Holy Family, Boothstown for many years. One notable venture there is the Community Fairtrade Café, organised during Lent with a special focus on Cafod’s concerns. This year each weekly café session was sponsored by a different parishioner. Justine’s work also involves helping to train parish volunteers on the

‘Understanding Cafod’ training course, which is something parishes are increasingly requesting. Additionally, she is an active campaigner for Cafod’s concerns and was a recent visitor to the Houses of Parliament to lobby the Catholic MPs in Parliament on climate change issues. On top of this, she is an active member of the Archdiocesan Justice and Peace Commission, cochairing its meetings with Terry Phillips and assisting the commission’s fieldworker, Steve Atherton, throughout the year. It is no surprise, given her involvement with the activities of Cafod, and the Church, that she is eager for others to follow suit. ‘If anyone reading the article, or anyone they know, would like to be part of our expanding team of volunteers, they should know we are recruiting now,’ she adds, issuing a call well worth considering. • Cafod’s next training days are on Tuesday 27 September and Tuesday 15 November, with a shadow visit in between. To find out more details, go to www.cafod.org.uk or contact Colette Byrne or Ged Edwards at the Liverpool Volunteer Centre – tel. 0151 228 4028 or email liverpool@cafod.org.uk

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youth ministry

Coping with the post-pilgrimage comedown By Father Simon Gore As I return home from the World Youth Day pilgrimage, there are certain things I’m looking forward to – starting with a proper shave. I’m also looking forward to being able to wash my clothes properly, including my mud-splattered alb (the product of the Papal welcome Mass taking place on a rainy day in a large field in Krakow). Such things, though, are part of the pilgrimage journey. Whether it is Lourdes or WYD, we know we have to pack light and make do without our creature comforts. And we know that as we have to wear pilgrimage t-shirts every day, so we’ll end up having to wash them once or twice in a sink. Yet we also know that the pilgrimage will come to an end and that within 48 hours, the mud and sweat will have been washed from our pilgrimage clothes. Within a week, the marks of our time away will hardly be visible, and therein lies the challenge for all of us who embark on any type of pilgrimage. Pilgrimage can be the

mountain-top experience in our spiritual lives. Those of us returning home in August from Lourdes and WYD are treated to the feast of the Transfiguration. We can, maybe, empathise with the feelings of the disciples on the mountain top. We have seen the glory of God and we want to be nowhere else. But we must return to the base of the mountain, we must return home, and the question is how much of the mountain-top experience do we take with us back to our everyday lives? It can be too easy to have the transfiguration experience – to see the Lord in His glory in a time of pilgrimage – but then return home and allow that experience to be washed slowly away, to allow the glow to fade. The challenge for us all, then, as we return to normality is to not allow the pilgrimage high to vanish like the mud from an alb or the sweat from a t-shirt. Those reading this who went away on pilgrimage should think of one moment that they would not want to

forget from their time away, one moment they wish to keep stored. As the WYD group in Krakow celebrated our final Mass together we pondered the readings of the day and the Gospel, in particular. The Gospel was the story of Jesus walking on the water and Peter rushing to greet Him but taking his eyes off Jesus and starting to drown. We reflected that, as we return home, we might be a little like Peter: wishing to rush to be close to the Lord. But, inevitably, as home life starts to take its toll, we might take our eyes off the Lord, just as Peter did. Our faith life might suffer, we might start to lose our sense of walking toward God and before we know it, we are going down under the waves. At this point in the Gospel, Jesus reaches out His hand and draws Peter back to surface. So what can draw us from the danger of drowning in the toils of life? Maybe it is that one moment brought back down from the mountain peak. That is the moment to treasure in your heart. When the year moves on and the nights start to darken and the pilgrimage season seems so distant, we can each seek that one memory that we have stored away and bring it out once again. We can be transported back to the mountain top and remember the glory of God in our midst and we can move on in our journey of life. So as you begin to wash, iron and generally start to feel like your ‘old self’ take a moment to store one memory away and pray that you will never be your ‘old self’; for pilgrimage can change us all and will change us all if only we allow that change to occur in our hearts.

Image: © Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

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cathedral ‘Exemplary’ Cathedral earns £140,000 Getty Foundation grant he ‘architectural significance’ of Liverpool’s Metropolitan Cathedral has received ‘international recognition’ in the form of a £140,000 grant from the Getty Foundation to fund conservation and repair works.

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Image: © Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

These were the words of Canon Anthony O’Brien, the cathedral dean, in response to the news of the announcement of the grant, which will allow for a programme of research and conservation centred on the so-called ‘crown of glass’, the distinctive lantern of Sir Frederick Gibberd’s Grade II-listed cathedral, which was consecrated in 1967. Canon O’Brien said: ‘On behalf of the Metropolitan Cathedral we are very grateful and honoured to receive this grant from the Getty Foundation. Not only will this provide valuable financial assistance for research into the best methods of conserving “dalle de verre” glass that forms such an important part of the architectural design of our cathedral but our research and trials will also be of assistance to other buildings with similar problems as ours.

‘Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral is an exemplar building demonstrating innovative and unique 20th century architecture’ ‘This award gives international recognition to the architectural significance of our Cathedral as one of the exemplary buildings of the twentieth century.’ The lantern is a highly significant as a piece of pioneering 20th century design which utilised an innovative mix of stained glass fragments supported by epoxy resin, known as ‘dalle de verre’. It was designed and made by artists John Piper and Patrick Reyntiens, who also collaborated on the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral. For the restoration work, it is vital to preserve as much existing material as technically possible.

organisation and to be awarded this grant as part of their “Keeping it Modern” scheme is an honour. Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral is an exemplar building demonstrating innovative and unique 20th century architecture, and the preservation of the building and the lantern is of the highest importance. I look forward to implementing the money from the grant to ensure that future generations will be able to enjoy and appreciate the building as we do.’

Matt Dyer from Purcell, the architects leading the project, said: ‘The Getty Foundation is such a renowned

The project team has already undertaken extensive analysis and testing to understand the condition and stability of

the glass and resin. Their next steps will be to introduce environmental and water monitoring systems, to upgrade all of the maintenance access to facilitate internal inspections and to prepare sample panels for laboratory testing. Purcell’s heritage experts have also produced a conservation statement for the funding application and are planning to produce a conservation management plan for the whole site. The programme of investigation and testing will commence shortly, with trial repairs to be undertaken in the next 12 months.

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Pic extras Mums the Word The Union of Catholic Mothers are joining the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (SPUC) in a postcard campaign marking the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Abortion Act. The campaign asks us to sign postcards addressed to our MPs and forward them to SPUC where they will be sorted into constituencies for delivery. The postcards ask MPs to ‘recognise the humanity of unborn children from the time of conception’. The campaign also alerts MPs about moves by the Royal College of Midwives to support the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) in its efforts to decriminalise abortion altogether, thereby paving the way for abortion up to full term, an action too terrible to contemplate. The chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives is Cathy Warwick who, it is reported, has taken this decision without balloting her members. Is it significant that Professor Warwick is also chair of the BPAS? How can it be that the people who train to become midwives in order to help women bring babies into the world would be required to destroy these babies? Our national and archdiocesan committees ask us all to support this initiative and request that our parish priests support it too. Please volunteer to hand out postcards after Masses and to post them on to SPUC – and please let us all play our part in this campaign. As I occasionally write about powerful and influential women in the Church, I was delighted to read that Mother Teresa of Calcutta is to be canonised on 4 September this year, and that the Vatican has issued a special stamp in her honour. Let us pray to her that she will intercede for the world, especially its poorest people whom she served so well. I hope to see you all at the bi-monthly Mass at St Margaret Mary’s on Wednesday 7 September. Madelaine McDonald, Media Officer

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Catholic Pictorial

News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

KSC members accompany pilgrims to Lourdes The Knights of St Columba were well represented once more on the annual Liverpool Archdiocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes, notably Aintree council whose members have been helping with the sick and disabled pilgrims for a number of years. This year, KSC members were privileged to be chosen to act as bearers of Our Lady’s statue in the torchlight procession, as our photo (right) indicates. The grand knight of Aintree council, Alf Swain, used the occasion to present meritorious medals and certificates to Terry Carroll, Peter Kinsey and Charlie Newport in recognition of their devoted service to the Church and the Order over a long period. • Canon Phillip Gillespie (pictured below), the rector of the Beda College in Rome, has been made a member of honour of the KSC for his services as chaplain to the Isle of Man council during his time as parish priest of St Mary of the Isle in Douglas. He received a certificate of membership from the council’s grand knight, Ivan Park, in a ceremony during Mass at St Mary’s on 2 August. • The Harkirk Chapel is a hidden gem in Little Crosby, an historic monument to the courage and tenacity of Catholics in South Lancashire who refused to abandon their faith during the Reformation. The Knights have been attending the annual memorial Mass each July at the chapel, which is served by St Mary’s Catholic Church nearby, and we have been invited back for the 11.15am Mass on Sunday 18 September – an invitation issued by

the parish priest, Father Dustan Harrington, to celebrate the annual harvest festival. The chapel’s rich history, and connection to the Order, will come into focus when we approach the centenary of our foundation in 1919. During the Reformation era, the chapel was provided by the Blundell family on their estate as a burial ground for those Catholics denied this right unless they conformed to the requirements of the Established Church. A later member of the Blundell family – Nicholas Blundell, a Member of Parliament and KSC member – was instrumental in the repeal of legislation in 1926 preventing Catholics from taking part in public displays of their faith such as May processions. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life A priestly life By Moira Billinge I never did ask the title of the cartoon that changed the course of my father’s life and which, according to him, was ‘the most stupid film that I’ve ever seen!’. It was likely that I veered away from questioning him out of respect for the residual sensitivities that I knew he harboured (though certainly not with any bitterness). St Joseph’s College, in Upholland, Lancashire, was both a minor and major seminary and the complete training for the priesthood lasted for 13 years. My father started there at the age of 11 and he remained there, happily, until the age of 22 having survived the cold of the under-heated, huge building and the frugal food. The late Canon James B Mullan (my former parish priest) joined the seminary on the same day as my father, although he was five years older. He wrote in his memoirs, ‘A Priestly Life’, that ‘students accepted restrictions as a necessary part of seminary life’. Moreover, he added: ‘They had in mind the challenge which the lifelong commitment of the priesthood entailed, and the personal discipline and the grace of God required to meet it.’ Canon Mullan observed, however, that ‘some of those expelled from the college for minor, even trivial breaches of the rules, I have no doubt, deprived the Church of many worthy ministers.’ Around the corner from the seminary was a small cinema. Although this was strictly out of bounds, one afternoon, a half-day holiday for the college, my father and four other students in his year, decided to go to see the film. Unfortunately, the dean of studies happened to be there too, sitting towards the back. He spotted them all – except one, who had gone to the toilet first and,

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seeing the member of staff on the way in, scarpered. Technically, this meant that he hadn’t seen the film: he was exonerated and was a most wonderful priest for the many years up to his death. On their return to the seminary, the rector summoned the other four miscreants to his office and expelled them immediately. Canon Mullan told me that he would never forget, the next morning, seeing the empty seats in front of him in the chapel, previously allocated to the young men whom he had known for 11 years. Dad would have been ordained by Archbishop Downey in 1945, alongside the Canon, had it not been for that ‘stupid cartoon’. One of the boys expelled with my father had a brother in the college and another brother who was later killed in action serving as an army chaplain. I’ve often wondered how they made their way home afterwards because, in those days, very few people had either cars or phones. Did they all just turn up unannounced on their parents’ doorsteps? What I do know – from one of my father’s cousins – was that he was so upset that he distanced himself for a long time from his wider family and friends until he joined the army as a commando. I was very proud to find out, a lifetime later, that at the end of the war as he was rounding up some Japanese prisoners, one of them said that my father was the only one who hadn’t sworn at them. He lived a life still deeply immersed in the Church but after developing dire health problems, he died at the age of 58. His marriage to my mother (a convert to Catholicism) produced eight children and even later in his life, by when he was totally housebound, people used to flock to him with their problems, seeking his advice. They never left unaided. Things may not have turned out as he had envisaged – as an ordained priest – but, nevertheless, his life was priesthood.

Quote from Pope Francis for the Year of Mercy “We forget about trust in the Lord, this is the key to success on life. “Trust in the Lord this is risk we must take, trust in Him, He never disappoints”.

Worth a visit

Explore a capital city which has survived war and division and today plays a leading role in world affairs, writes Lucy Oliver. Founded in the 13th century as the capital of Prussia, Berlin became the focal point of the newly established German Empire in 1871. At the end of World War Two, it was divided into East and West, and surviving sections of the Berlin Wall offer a reminder of this split. Checkpoint Charlie was the name given to the crossing point between East and West Berlin during the Cold War. Located on Friedrichstrasse in the American-occupied centre, it was the only gateway which East Germany permitted for Allied diplomats, military personnel and foreigners to pass into Berlin’s Soviet sector. The choice of a small guardhouse, located just feet away from a much larger East German checkpoint, was a deliberate political move on the Allies’ part to symbolise the idea that the Berlin Wall should not be a permanent or legitimate border. Visit the nearby BlackBox Kalter Krieg Museum just feet from the checkpoint to learn more about many attempted (and some successful) escapes into West Berlin – an opportunity to reflect on barriers still needing to be broken down in our world.


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search The Feast of the Triumph of the Cross is celebrated on September 14. Our clues will help you to know more of this special feast.

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SALVATION SON OF GOD HUMBLED

LOVE RESURRECTION

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy Father Mullarkey and Rabbi Silverberg are good pals. The other morning they were sitting at the kitchen table in the presbytery enjoying tea and chocolate digestives. ‘That young curate of yours seems a decent lad,’ said the Rabbi. ‘He’s fine,’ said Father Mullarkey. ‘His heart’s in the right place, though he takes himself a bit seriously at times. But maybe we all did at his age.’ ‘He was telling me about his family the other day,’ said old Silverberg. ‘Oh he’s always going on about them. Says they went over to America on the Mayflower.’ ‘That’s what he told me,’ said Rabbi Silverberg, ‘and he said one them signed the Declaration of Independence. I said that was nothing … one of mine signed The Ten Commandments!’

Celebrate autumn by driving into our countryside, catch the way nature is changing and marvel at the colours before trying a meal at one of our listed spots. Blue Mallard Burscough Wharf, Burscough 01704 893954 Red Lion New Street, Mawdsley 01704 822208 Royal Oak Chester Road, Kelsall 01829 751208 Windmill Mill Lane, Parbold 01257 462935 Church Green Higher Lane, Lymm 01925 752068 Hurlston Hall Scullery Restaurant Hurlston Lane, Scarisbrick 01704 840400

Greeting Cards from Carmel

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

We show just a few of the lovely greeting cards on sale at Carmel Monastery Visit the Monastery at: Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com The cards are high quality and you will be pleased you took the time to visit the monastery card shop.

Catholic Pictorial

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justice & peace

Responding to the Pope’s call … a year on By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker It is now a full year since Pope Francis made his Angelus appeal for solidarity with refugees. His words were as follows: ‘Faced with the tragedy of thousands of refugees fleeing from death from war or hunger, heading for the hope of a new life, the Gospel is calling us and asking us to be “neighbours” to the littlest ones, the most abandoned ones. To give them real hope. Not just to say, “Be strong, be patient ...!” ‘Christian hope fights with the tenacity of someone aiming for a definite goal ... I am appealing to the parishes, religious communities, monasteries and shrines of the whole of Europe to show how real the Gospel is by welcoming a family of refugees ... Every parish, every religious community, every monastery and every sanctuary in Europe ought to host a family.’ These words are as challenging now as they were when we first heard them. In our diocese we responded by producing a booklet titled ‘A guide: Refugees, Asylum Seekers & Migrants. Welcoming the Stranger’ which has been distributed at the Metropolitan Cathedral during Year of Mercy pilgrimages and can be downloaded from the diocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/refuge esituation. Copies for your parish are available free from the J&P desk in the diocesan office (0151 522 1080). When the British government announced an agreement to resettle 20,000 Syrians over four years, it asked local authorities to volunteer to organise the process. These local authorities were cautious in case they were taking on extra responsibility

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without any extra resources. For our part, we continue to hold meetings across the diocese in groups based on local authority boundaries and now we have some good news about two practical ways for parishes, or groups of parishes, to get involved: • Community Sponsorship Scheme It is possible to follow the example of St Monica’s parish in Salford diocese and provide a home and support for a Syrian family. In this scheme, which requires a five-year commitment, the sponsoring group must have the agreement of the local authority and the approval of the local MP. They must be able to provide a house and structured ESOL classes, have a ring-fenced income of £4,500 for each adult in the family to use if necessary, and be able to find appropriate school places for children. A housing association could help with finding a house and maybe a group of churches could raise the money together. • Green Pastures Scheme Organised by the Evangelical Shoreline Church in Southport, this scheme involves a) identifying a suitable house that Green Pastures will buy and b) providing a group of at least ten people to offer ‘pastoral’ support to a Syrian family. Shoreline has devised a business model that allows them to buy property as investments for their shareholders while at the same time providing accommodation for homeless or refugee families. It makes no financial demands on the ‘pastoral’ accompaniers.

There are certain things to do before anything can happen with either scheme: 1) Find a group of like-minded people 2) Get the approval of your parish priest 3) Get the approval of the local authority In addition, it would be useful to consider: 1) Working with other parishes in your pastoral area 2) Inviting other Christian churches to work with you 3) Identifying people with useful experience and expertise, eg parents, people with knowledge of the local area, medical and educational systems, familiarity with local authority, etc. Contact Steve Atherton at LACE for a full explanation of the process or to arrange an information meeting. Phone 0151 522 1080 or email s.atherton@rcaol.co.uk


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Catholic Pic September 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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