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Issue 136 JANUARY 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

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A place of Pilgrimage

Inside this issue:

Safeguarding in the Archdiocese

St Cecilia’s Educate Award Winners

Colette Byrne Cafod Coordinator


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contents Welcome A happy and blessed new year to all, and what a year this promises to be. It is already nearly a month since the Holy Year of Mercy was inaugurated and during that time we have had the opportunity to reflect on the mercy of the Father during our Christmas celebrations. This month we look at the Masses that were celebrated in the Metropolitan Cathedral; in Holy Cross, St Helens and in St Mary’s, Leyland to begin the year. Holy Doors were blessed and opened as the ‘Jubilee Churches’ were designated to be places of pilgrimage for us. More details of our celebration of the Year of Mercy can be found at: www.yearofmercyliverpool.org.uk Our main feature looks at the work of safeguarding in the Archdiocese, valuable work which is deeply rooted in the fact that every human being has a value and dignity which we, as Catholics, recognise as coming directly from God’s creation of male and female in his own image and likeness. If we are to show mercy during this coming year we have to recognise and keep in mind the God given value and dignity of every human being.

From the Archbishop’s Desk I hope you won’t let the spirit of Christmas disappear too quickly. In the ancient church the Christmas season did not end until Candlemas when we celebrate the Presentation of our Lord in the Temple on 2 February. This meant that the ‘season of light’ lasted from the feast of Saint Lucy on 13 December, through Christmas for a good seven weeks. Christ is the light of the nations not just during the dark days of winter but throughout the year. We need to remind ourselves of that truth constantly. These past months have been particularly dark for the nations. Terrorism has a cast a very big shadow over the world and the way we live our daily lives. Although we must do our utmost to help refugees and the victims of terror and poverty, and try to remove the root causes of this dreadful state of affairs, ultimately it will be our Lord who will bring light and peace to our world. The Light of Christ is the true spirit of Christmas that will endure when all the festive lights have been extinguished, decorations taken down and unwanted presents sent to charity shops. Keeping the Light of Christ burning in our hearts is a daily challenge but we will see the effect on other people if we make the effort. This will be a good way of being ‘Merciful like the Father’, who showed his mercy towards us by giving us Jesus to be a light for our path.

Contents 4

Main Feature Keeping the vulnerable safe in our Archdiocese

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News From around the Archdiocese

12 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Overwhelming generosity from our supporters and donors 16 Welcoming the Year of Mercy 19 Profile Colette Byrne Cafod Coordinator 21 Animate Youth Ministry Reflections and resolutions as a new year begins 25 Cathedral Record A chorister for a day

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures © Mazur,catholicnews.org.uk © www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Copy deadline February issue 11 January 2016 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

28 Pic Life Steadfast parents give us lesson in true faith 29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Nothing just in Syrian war

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Keeping the vulnerable safe in our Archdiocese Diocesan Safeguarding department is helping to enforce safeguarding standards ‘Our parishes and communities must be a place of welcome.’ These words come from the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Service and help to sum up the purpose of a small, but significant, department of people working under the auspices of Liverpool Archdiocese. The four-strong team in our Diocesan Safeguarding department do a job which did not exist 20 years ago, a job which has come into being only in recent times yet which is no less important for it. Their task, after all, is to ensure that our parish clergy and volunteers take responsibility for making their communities safe places and keep sight at all times of the value of children and vulnerable adults’ lives.

the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Service (CSAS), which are fully expressed as follows: ‘The Catholic Church in England and Wales is striving towards a culture of safeguarding where all are safe from harm and abuse and where every person is encouraged and enabled to enjoy the fullness of life in Jesus Christ through the prayerful, caring, nurturing, supportive and protective endeavours of the Catholic community, both individually and collectively.

They are a cog in a sizeable machine which has been assembled by the Church in England and Wales to ensure that clergy and volunteers, through training and application of safeguarding policies and procedures, take a bestpractice approach in their parish work with children and vulnerable adults and know what to do if a concern about any vulnerable person surfaces.

‘Every human being has a value and dignity which we, as Catholics, recognise as coming directly from God’s creation of male and female in his own image and likeness. Our parishes and communities must be a place of welcome, where each person is respected and loved, and in which everyone receives and shares their unique gifts. Parishes must be communities where we support and protect each other. We must take particular care of those who may be vulnerable because of age, illness or disability or who may be vulnerable because of current or past life experiences.’

It is all geared towards putting into practice the aforementioned principles of

The history of safeguarding work dates back to 1995 when the Catholic Church

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The Safeguarding Team: Deacon Des Bill, John Lynch, Claire Newton and Sylvia Cawley

in England and Wales produced its first document on the subject of child abuse, ‘Child Abuse Pastoral and Procedural Guidelines’. Three years later, in 1998, the Archdiocese of Liverpool appointed a Child Protection Officer and published its own set of guidelines titled ‘Protecting Our Children’. The next step nationally was the review of the Church’s child protection arrangements undertaken by Lord Nolan which led, in 2001, to a ‘Programme for Action’ document. This contained 80 recommendations for the Church to act on, forming the basis of initial national policies and procedures for use in all dioceses across England and Wales. It led also to the creation of a national child protection office, the Catholic Office for the Protection of Children and Vulnerable adults (COPCA). In 2007 a review of Nolan’s recommendations was undertaken by Baroness Cumberlege, whose ‘Safeguarding with Confidence’ report made recommendations on improvements to existing arrangements. This precipitated another change as COPCA morphed into the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Service (CSAS). This move from child protection to safeguarding took place to embrace the needs of all vulnerable people. Today, the Catholic Church and other Christian denominations are seen as a key provider of safeguarding arrangements by statutory agencies. This brings a respect towards our


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feature

organisation, but also an expectation of high standards within our practice and work undertaken is done in partnership with Local Children and Adult Safeguarding Boards. Our diocesan Safeguarding department is staffed by Des Bill, the safeguarding

coordinator, who is also a deacon of the Archdiocese, along with administrators Sylvia Cawley and Claire Newton, and John Lynch, the safeguarding advisor. All clergy and volunteers have access to training opportunities to support them in their work, and the Church’s safe recruitment procedures require that

everybody working with vulnerable groups must undergo a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Check as well as providing references. The department is now able to make DBS Check applications electronically, speeding up the process for applicants. Looking nationally, the national

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feature allegation management and those who may be directly involved from a parish perspective.They are often a contact point for an alleged victim and, on a daily basis, provide advice on any number of queries in relation to best practice or safe recruitment. Parish reps are a key component in the safeguarding structure and oversee policy implementation in every parish. There are nearly 300 in our diocese and the Safeguarding department are appreciative of the selfless work they undertake. A range of activities take place with children and vulnerable adults in parishes on Sundays and throughout the week, ranging from Children’s Liturgy of the Word on Sundays to midweek youth groups.

safeguarding structure involves a chain of bodies: • National Catholic Safeguarding Commission (NCSC) • Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Service (CSAS): • Diocesan Safeguarding Commissions • Diocesan Safeguarding Departments • Local Parish Volunteer Safeguarding Representatives (parish reps). To explain the links in the chain, the NCSC oversees the development and implementation and review of policies and procedures. The CSAS then supports these policy developments and implementation in dioceses.

‘We must take particular care of those who may be vulnerable because of age, illness or disability ’ 6

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The Diocesan commission oversees the work of diocesan safeguarding departments. The chair of our commission is Dr Margaret Goddard, a GP with experience of safeguarding issues and involvement with a number of safeguarding and health forums. There are also members from the police and national probation services; professional safeguarding expertise from professionals from Alder Hey Hospital, the Catholic Blind Institute and Nugent Care; and lay representation including a parish rep and clergy representative. The Safeguarding department, as already mentioned, handles documentation and processes around safe recruitment and the DBS process. The team also respond to concerns or allegations, whether current or historical, and liaise with professionals involved in

All volunteers are required to undertake the safe recruitment and DBS process, and once appointed receive a safeguarding booklet offering advice on what steps to take should a problem surface, and a code of conduct card. For further advice, go to: www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/safeguarding Visitors to the website will also find details about a programme of ELearning Safeguarding Awareness Training. This includes modules on child protection; child protection in education; child exploitation and online safety; safeguarding adults; and mental capacity. The training is free and open to all members of the Catholic community. Those interested can email the Safeguarding department on safeguarding@rcaol.co.uk or call 0151 522 1043 Face-to-face training is available also to parishes, delivering the Church’s nationally developed policies covering safe recruitment, responding to allegations and concerns, and creating a safe environment. For any further information on policies and procedures, go to: NCSC: www.catholicsafeguarding.org.uk CSAS: www.csas.uk.net

• Celebrate the Child The Safeguarding department organises an annual Mass for children, their familes and parish volunteers to celebrate the gift of children and those who care for them at home and in church. The 2016 Mass will be in South Liverpool and further information is available from the department.


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Gen Verde in Liverpool

40th anniversary in Bridle

Pupils and staff at Brindle St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School celebrated 40 years of the school being on its present site with a Mass celebrated by Parish Priest Father Raphael Jones OSB with all the children taking part. At the end of Mass former teacher, Mr Malone and former pupil Mrs Park (nee Sharples) cut a special cake to celebrate the occasion.

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Gen Verde together with students from St Julie’s Catholic High School and a street percussion group from Liverpool Hope University gave a concert at the University following a week of workshops in song, dance and drama at the school. The concert, called ‘Start Now’, was a reminder of a quote from the founder of the Focolare Movement, Chiara Lubich, ‘when you find it hard to love, don’t waste time, simply start again, now in the present moment’. The Focolare is an ecumenical movement that includes people from all backgrounds, ages and beliefs who draw on this spirituality as a basis for their own lives and for responding to the people and situations around them. Chris Gibson who attended the concert said, ‘It was a diverse concert that connected with everyone whatever your beliefs, not just religious people. I was really touched by the song that was written for the Syrian refugee children, it made me think that we all have a part to play’. Stacie Leadbetter was uplifted, ‘it gave me a real boost to help spread peace and see the good in everyone. I felt very happy being there. It was lovely to see so many young people living this too and this gave me hope’. The group also inspired the students from St Julie’s, with one saying, ‘Inspirational! Gen Verde had such a passion about what they do and their message that we were all inspired too’.

Fun Zumba at St Edwards Pupils from Year 7 at St Edward’s College took part in a fun zumba to raise money for Lepra raising a fantastic £1,965.84 enabling seventy-eight young people who have leprosy to receive life changing treatment. Jacqui Fairbairn from Lepra said, ‘students and their families from St Edward’s College have always gone the extra mile each and every year with their fund raising and have to date donated £14,544.75 helping 581 people to regain their health and their lives thanks to this wonderful school.’


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Pilgrimage to Banneux by Monsignor John Furnival At Banneux, a small village near Liege in Belgium where the Church officially declared Mary, Mother of God, to have appeared, in all eight times to a poor peasant girl called Mariette Beco in 1933 and many miracles of healing were attested to in the early years. The Year of Mercy would be the ideal time to travel on pilgrimage to Banneux as the Shrine of the Virgin of the Poor is intended to be an open door of welcome, respect and care. It is a source of grace for all comers of every religious adherence and none and an antidote to the strife and division affecting our world. The Feast of the Assumption continues to draw the crowds there where the sick and needy are cared for and English pilgrims gather, including a group from the Archdiocese of Liverpool last year. Indifferent weather meant indoor celebrations only but this did not dampen the enthusiasm of the thousands that came for the International Mass, the prayer and the picnics. Surrounded by dense pine woods the Shrine of Our Lady, Virgin of the Poor, is

lovingly cared for and devoutly respected. At the spring of water, ‘La Source’, which was discovered by Mariette at Mary’s prompting, we met each night to pray for the needs of the sick, the Church and for ourselves. Petitions and invocations mark the rosary procession and the quiet torchlight walks through the illuminated path of the Way of the Cross. All nations are represented by their flags in the Place des Nations and many different languages can be heard all around. Banneux stands near the juncture of five countries which can all be viewed together from a vantage point not far away. This made Banneux an important place of refuge during World War II. Here it is clear that faith and mercy have no language barriers. Our pilgrim group from the Archdiocese, with its organiser Tommy England and myself and Deacon Ernest Diggory as spiritual leaders, were joined at various points on the journey by others from Crewe, Kent, the Midlands and London. People always seem to appreciate the prayerful atmosphere, relative lack of commercialism, the companionship and many blessings of the four days in Banneux

Six generations in Lydiate When Father Tom Wood, Parish Priest of Our Lady’s, Lydiate baptised Vincent Gerard Witter he could have been setting a record. The family of Vincent who was born on Saint Gerard's feast day, 16 October 2015 and baptised on 6 December have a very long association with the church. He was the sixth generation on his grandfather Thomas Gerrard's side of the family and the fifth generation on his grandmother Pauline's side of the family to be baptised at Our Lady's. His great, great, great grandfather John Edmund Whalley was baptised on 9 January 1860. His father’s side of the family have ancestors going back for further generations who are buried at St Catherine's Chapel in Lydiate which was in use before Our Lady’s was built in 1854.

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news diary Serving the Church as a school governor

Have you ever thought of being a foundation governor in a Catholic school? Service as a foundation governor is a significant way in which members of the Catholic faith community can support the Church’s divine mission of helping all to arrive at the fullness of Christian life. Foundation governors come from all walks of life and there are no special requirements, save that the foundation governor must be a Catholic who attends Sunday Mass regularly and gives true witness to the teachings of the Church. The role is challenging but rewarding. As well as attending meetings of the full governing body (normally three a year) and of committees with special duties, such as staffing, governors are encouraged to visit their school to see at first hand the different activities under discussion. There is no requirement to become directly involved day to day but many governors choose to visit their school to gain a greater understanding, perhaps by taking an interest in a specific subject or non-academic aspect such as safety. Most school governing bodies are a mixture of parents elected by the parent body (normally two), an elected member of staff, a representative of the local authority and the headteacher. In most Catholic schools, these five are joined by seven foundation governors appointed by the Church. The foundation governors must be prepared to work with discretion as members of the full governing body and to attend training events to build up a body of knowledge and expertise. There are some responsibilities common to governing bodies in all schools. These include: • Oversight of and accountability for the standards and quality of education provided • Managing the performance of the headteacher and senior staff 10

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• Managing the budget and other material resources In addition, the governors of Catholic schools must: • Ensure that religious education and religious worship is in accordance with the teachings, doctrines and norms of the Catholic Church • Ensure that the headteacher, deputy headteacher, head of department/subject leader for RE and chaplain are practising members of the Catholic Church • Ensure that priority is given to Catholic children when determining admissions • Act as the employer of all staff at the school • Manage the buildings and site on behalf of the trustees Those interested must complete an application form and also provide the name of two referees – one must be the priest of the church where they normally worship who must testify that they are a Catholic who regularly attends Sunday Mass; the second must be someone who will testify that they have the necessary skills to perform this duty. ‘Skills’ does not mean professional qualification or experience in particular fields, but includes the ability to work with discretion as part of a larger group, the ability to absorb information and ask a challenging question and provide sound judgement. At the moment, there are over 1,600 foundation governors with a vacancy rate of around 100 at any one time. The archdiocese needs a pool of suitable candidates to fill vacancies as they arise. Applicants will be asked to name schools where they would particularly wish to serve, but the Church also needs to match peoples’ skills and interests with vacancies. For more information and an application form visit the website at http://www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/schools or contact Fran Coldicutt at LACE on 0151 522 1071.


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Bishop Eton: place of pilgrimage by Patrick Hart The shrine to Our Lady of Perpetual Succour at Bishop Eton parish in Childwall has been made an official place of pilgrimage for the months leading up to June 2016. The Redemptorist priests and brothers at Bishop Eton owe this rare privilege to the fact that in 1866 the original copy of the miraculous icon of Our Mother of Perpetual Succour was enshrined in the Redemptorist Church of St Alphonsus in Rome upon the invitation of Pope Pius IX. The Pontiff duly instructed the Redemptorists to ‘make her known’, and soon afterwards the first copy of the icon to leave Rome arrived at Bishop Eton. With April 2016 set to mark the 150th anniversary of the installation of the original icon, which shows the Blessed Virgin Mary carrying the Child Jesus, in the church of St Alphonsus, Pope Francis has granted a ‘Jubilee Year with the associated Plenary Indulgence to be gained in the church of St Alphonsus in Rome and in the individual churches of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeeemer by the Christian faithful who make a pilgrimage to the icon of Blessed Virgin Mary of Perpetual Help’. This year of divine grace officially runs from 27 June 2015 to the same date, the shrine’s titular feast day, in 2016; aptly coinciding with the Jubilee Year of Mercy proclaimed by Pope Francis. Bishop Eton’s direct connection with the sacred Byzantine image began a month after the commencement of public veneration at St Alphonsus in 1866. An English Redemptorist based in Childwall, Father Francis Hall, made a remarkable recovery from illness following prayers to Our Lady of Perpetual Succour – prompting the Redemptorists in Rome to send one of the first two copies of the original to Liverpool. This is now kept in the community oratory and is displayed on special occasions. The other copy went to Pope Pius IX. The image in Bishop Eton’s permanent shrine today is a later copy.

It is believed that the miraculous icon was produced in Cyprus in the 1400s but stolen by a visiting Italian merchant. From 1499 until 1798 it was venerated at the church of San Matteo in Via Merulana after Our Lady had appeared and requested that it be placed between the basilicas of St Mary Major and St John Lateran. Though the perfectly positioned San Matteo was subsequently demolished during the French occupation in 1798, the Redemptorists acquired virtually the same site on Via Merulana some 57 years later to set up their headquarters and, later, a house of Marian veneration – the church of St Alphonsus. Consequently, the Redemptorists have been both custodians and missionaries of the icon for almost 150 years. The Novena Devotions take place at Bishop Eton, Woolton Road, Liverpool L16 8NQ each Wednesday at 7.30 pm.

50 years a Vincentian Members of the SVP conference at St. Anthony's, Onchan, Isle of Man held a surprise presentation for member Peter Denver to celebrate his 50 years as a Vincentian. He was presented with a medal and certificate by Monsignor John Devine and conference President Joan Corran. During his 50 years in the SVP Peter had been District President of the Isle of Man and hosted a National Conference on the island which is still fondly remembered by older members of the SVP in the UK. Left: Peter being presented with medal and certificate by Monsignor John Devine and Conference President Joan Corran)

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What’s On in January Sunday 10 January Liverpool Bach Collective. Johann Sebastian Bach Cantata 7: ‘Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam’ (‘Christ our Lord came to the Jordan’) 6.30 pm at St Joseph’s Church, Warren Road, Blundellsands L23 6UE. Singers and Players directed by Philip Duffy.

St Cecilia’s Educate Award Winners

Monday 11 January Quiet Day 10.30 am-3.00 pm at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Thursday 14 January ‘Mercy? ME?!’ with Fr Phillip Harries (Diocese of Menevia). 7.00 pm at Holy Cross and St Helen, Corporation Street, St Helens, WA10 1EF. Tuesday 19 January God’s word for Today: An Introduction. 6.30 pm-9.30 pm at Liverpool Hope University (Eden Building) (four evening sessions). Details: Pastoral Formation Department Tel: 0151 522 1040 or email: formation@rcaol.co.uk Wednesday 20 January Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral visit to Oscott College and Maryvale, Birmingham. Pick up points: 8.30 am at St Helen’s church, Crosby. 9.00 am at the Metropolitan Cathedral. Return to the Metropolitan Cathedral at approximately 6.30 pm. Cost including coach travel, all entry charges, two course lunch with tea /coffee and refreshments at Oscott, £45 payable to The Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral. Please apply to Miss Claire Hanlon, Secretary to the Friends with a SAE at Cathedral House, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool L3 5TQ. Centenary of St Sebastian’s church, Lockerby Road, Liverpool. Mass of Thanksgiving at 7.00 pm. Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. In 1904 the mission of St Sebastian was established with Mass celebrated in a local convent. By 1913 work on a church building had begun and were completed in three years. Mass was celebrated for the first time on the Feast of St Sebastian, 20 January 1916. Sunday 24 January Merseyside Ecumenical Service during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. 4.00 pm at St. John Stone Roman Catholic Church, Southport PR8 3RN in the presence of Rt Rev Richard Blackburn, Bishop of Warrington; Monsignor John Furnival, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Liverpool and Rev Andrew Edwards, LEP Coordinator for CTMR. Preacher: Major Drew McCombe, North Western Divisional Commander of the Salvation Army. Looking ahead: Wednesday 3 February Preparing for the Rite of Election. An evening for priests and catechists, catechumens and candidates. 7.00 pm-9.00 pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Sunday 28 February ‘A way of Living the Gospel message today.’ Reflection, conversation and hospitality. 1.00 pm5.00 pm at St Timothy’s, Rockwell Road, West Derby, Liverpool, L12 4XY. Details: Brother David Ryan Tel: 07826 759184 Email: david2.cfc@gmail.com

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by Hannah Fowler St Cecilia’s Catholic Junior School in Tuebrook, won the Outstanding Commitment to Sport in a Primary School award at the annual Educate Awards ceremony. Sport has been revolutionised with the completion of the school’s very own ‘Anfield, Goodison and Olympic Stadium’ and the huge commitment and drive by staff has ensured the school’s sport provision is now outstanding. 500 guests gathered at Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral. The awards, sponsored by Connex Education, is now in its fourth year and celebrate the inspiring work that goes on inside and outside the school gates. Liverpool actor Neil Fitzmaurice hosted the ceremony, while guests were treated to special performances by schools shortlisted for the outstanding arts awards. The Belvedere Academy Chamber Choir opened proceedings, while pupils from Holly Lodge Girls’ College performed a scene from its production of ‘Blowin a Gale’. Next, the talented Darci Shaw from The Belvedere Academy sang ‘Where is Love’ from its 2014/15 production of Oliver. Lastly, Andrew Woolcock from Archbishop Temple School entertained guests on the marimba, playing ‘Land’ by Takatsuga Maramatsu. On the night, 19 awards were handed out to schools in the Liverpool City

Region, Lancashire and Cheshire. A great variety of projects and skills were represented, from entrepreneurial awareness, dazzling stage performances, creative literacy initiatives to inspiring community partnerships. Kim O’Brien, founder of the Educate Awards, says: ‘Every year the judges and I are blown away by the school’s entries and this year was no exception. It’s fantastic to award so many hard working schools and teachers who create such an engaging learning environment. Congratulations to all the winners and shortlisted schools, and thank you to each and every school that submitted an entry this year.’ The winners are chosen by a panel of judges which this year included footballer Robbie Fowler; Radio City breakfast host Leanne Campbell; Olympian and managing director of Raise The Bar, Steve Smith; Councillor Gary Millar, Liverpool’s cabinet member for business, enterprise and investment; Chris Walker, regional managing editor of Trinity Mirror North West and North Wales; Lesley MartinWright, chief executive of Knowsley Chamber; Mark Beedles, managing director of Connex Education; Fiona Barnet, director of The Foundry Agency; Andrew Pimbley of Claremont Farm and Wirral’s Farm Feast; and the education team at the respected Everyman and Playhouse Theatres.


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On a liturgical note On 25 January, the Church commemorates the conversion of Saint Paul – a conversion which was as dramatic as it was influential. The zeal and dedication with which Saul had set about persecuting the early followers of ‘The Way’ of Jesus is now transformed into the powerful and energetic proclaiming of Jesus as Lord, the one to whom all the Hebrew scriptures (the ‘Old Testament’) bore witness and whose influence and mind-set was to embrace every aspect of life. The week leading up to this feast will be held as a time of particular prayer for the unity of all Christians in the mission of proclaiming the Lordship of this same Jesus, the one who is the source of every spiritual blessing (Ephesians 1:3). The theme this year is given to us as ‘Salt of the Earth’ – the call for Christians to give flavour and interest (and, in a sense, depth and meaning) to the world and the society in which we live. This call to unity is as important for our own lives as individuals, parishes and communities within

Sunday thoughts Last month’s Pic had a photo of Bishop Tom and me at my induction as parish priest in the Isle of Man. The rite of induction lists the priest’s duties, but not in the order you might expect. Presbyterium Ordinis (1965), the Vatican II document on the priesthood, lists the functions of priests as ‘Ministers of God’s Word’, ‘Ministers of the Sacrament and the Eucharist’ and ‘Rulers of God’s People’. The same priorities are reflected in the induction rite. First comes the duty to study, meditate on and proclaim the Word of God. Then comes the duty to gather the people for prayer and to support them as they carry out their mission to the world. Next comes the duty to nourish the people in the celebration of the sacraments: baptising, witnessing marriage vows, reconciliation, anointing the sick and the dying with holy oil. After this comes the duty to celebrate the holy sacrifice of the Mass, to proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes, and to

sunday reflections Canon Philip Gillespie

the life of the Church. During Advent we heard many times in the readings at Mass the invitation to integrity, to be holy as the Lord our God is holy. It is this witness of words and actions in harmony and in unity which will lead others to ask those questions in their own lives which – we firmly believe – will lead them to Christ and to the wisdom of His teaching and His Gospel. Lord Jesus, Lord of wholeness, your prayer for unity amongst your disciples has often fallen on closed ears and on hard hearts. Forgive us our closed ears, forgive us our hard hearts which perpetuate suspicion, prejudice and division: forgive us our fractured mission. Open our hearts, eyes and minds to your love and truth within all Christian people and strengthen in us the resolve to work to restore the unity of your Church and your creation to the glory of your name. Amen.

Mgr John Devine OBE

feed God’s people with the body and blood of Christ. The rite, however, is not priest-centred. Each successive commitment demanded of the priest asks for a corresponding commitment from the people. They, too, are called to ‘listen and listen again’ to the Good News and to preach Christ to others. They are called to pray with their priest and to collaborate in preparing for the reception of the sacraments. They, too, are to faithfully participate in celebrating and living out the sacred mysteries of Christ’s body and blood. The older I get the more conscious I am of my shortcomings. The reassuring thing about the induction rite was that I am not called to serve the Lord alone. The rite of induction provides an opportunity for the whole parish to refresh and renew itself.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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Come follow me I recently met a man at a conference who was a joy, brimming with life and humour. He shared with me something of his journey, of his lifelong search for God. He experienced God in his wife, children and grandchildren and in the unexpected encounters that set him alight within, but he said that there was always more. Every day he found himself facing the Gospel question ‘Who do you say I am?’ Each day he had to answer it again because he said, ‘Every day I’m different and I see things from a different perspective’. That is the question each one of us must answer on our faith journey. It is not just an invitation to answer at a cerebral level but a deeper call to intimacy. Does he make sense of my life? Do I have a living personal relationship with him? In the Gospels, Peter answers and says, ‘You are the Christ, the anointed one, the one set apart to give life real meaning’. Jesus then reflects on what it means to be a disciple and it is a hard message to take. The son of man was destined to suffer. If you are going to say that Jesus is the Christ and walk in his way then you will discover that real life only comes through suffering. It is a real challenge not to run away from the pain of the world but to enter into it. To follow Jesus is to take on the pain of others and somehow, in the doing of that, transform it into life. We are to do the same with our own pain – not to run away from it but to discover what it means. The hardest times in my life have also been the most life-giving as I have tried to discover what my pain was telling me. Don’t try and protect yourself from hurt. Don’t put up the barriers against love which always hurts at some point. The only way to enter into life is to enter it through death. You’ve got to let yourself be vulnerable. You've got to let yourself be weak. You've got to let yourself be touched and broken. Otherwise Christianity remains poetry or philosophy. That is the example of Jesus. It cost to heal the sick emotionally and physically. It cost Jesus not to give in to his own needs and desires. It cost him to face his own pain and hurt but he did it so we would know the truth that from each death comes life. At the beginning of a new year, let us pray for the courage to follow the Lord wherever that leads us and let us pray that in dying we might find life Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Overwhelming generosity from our supporters and donors by Marie Reynolds

Gifts being left at the Schools Advent Service

As I write this article many of you will have celebrated a joyous Christmas with your family and friends. Did you receive a special gift this year? Who gave you that gift and what made it special? We received so many gifts during Advent and we were bowled over by the generosity of our supporters and donors. Children in our schools donated over 1000 toys, the smiles on the faces of the children as they handed over their toys at the carol concerts in the cathedral was a joy to witness. Many schools made up shoeboxes filled to the brim with toiletries, hats, scarfs and Christmas goodies, cars kept arriving at Nugent Care with their boots crammed full of donations, in all over 250 shoeboxes were donated. People packed into St Peter and St Paul’s church in Crosby to join in festive carols at a fundraising carol concert. The children from Holy Family High School and Great Crosby Primary School raised the roof with their angelic voices and Liverpool Voice led us in community singing. 700 mince pies were donated from Tesco and these went in to hampers. St Matthews’s parish filled a car with toiletries. An appeal went out on Facebook to buy a PlayStation 4 for children in care and we ended up with the PlayStation, games and an extra console. One kind lady knitted and donated five bags of hats, scarfs and

gloves to help keep people warm this winter. We received last minute requests for help, one from a head teacher, one of the families from the school was in urgent need of a washing machine and had no way to pay for one, and from a grandmother who is the sole carer of her grandchildren, she fled her house days before Christmas due to domestic violence and there was no cooker in the new house. Our generous donors were able to supply the goods needed. The Lord Mayor along with our charity partner Carrington’s Catering put their support behind the appeal to businesses in the city to donate food so that we could make up hampers for families and older people who are struggling to make ends meet. The gift of time was given by so many of our volunteers who visited isolated and vulnerable people, many gave their time and talents to help others make Christmas cards and sing carols. Special prayers were said for all those who gave gifts in abundance. Thank you to everyone who shared their gifts with us, the gifts of time, skills, friendship, love and financial donations, thank you all for your generosity throughout the year. We are truly blessed with the support from people within the Archdiocese.

Nugent Care is discussing values, beliefs and behaviours. Currently, we are consulting with staff, service users, volunteers, families and other stakeholders that work with us on our Strategic Direction 2016-2020. At this juncture we have held several consultations and at the time of writing this article, we are just about to start with service users and volunteers. The ideas underpinning these discussions are to identify common values, beliefs and behaviours. Once values are understood and agreed, then the beliefs associated can be identified. Further, if we have identified the values, and the beliefs, then we should be able to identify the positive behaviours that are congruent with those values and beliefs. For example, if I have a value of courage, and believe that I should stand up for what is right, I may have a behaviour of appropriately, and kindly, challenging others language or behaviour or champion as the voice for others when they are not able to speak up themselves. Having these clearly identified within the strategic plan greatly assists in ensuring that we remain true to our core purpose and values and always strive do what is in the best interest of the people we serve. What was so heartening to see was that a group of people who were diverse in their ages, their faiths, their cultures and their communities, expressed such congruency and authenticity in their responses. Across all of the consultations thus far, common values such as dignity, respect, honesty trust, ambition, courage, kindness, and compassion have reliably been identified. The beliefs that were associated with these values, although different in sentence structure, were in essence, very similar to each other, and again with the beliefs. What this suggests is that we have even more in common with each other than just being employed by the same organisation. It suggests we are associating because of a shared value base. Serving and working with people who see dignity as a core value, well that works for me. I am excited to see what perspectives our services users, stakeholders and volunteers bring to the discussion next. Watch this space! Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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jubilee year of mercy 2016

Welcoming the Year of The Holy Year of Mercy was welcomed in the Archdiocese with the opening of Holy Doors in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King; Holy Cross, St Helens and St Mary’s, Leyland, all established as places of pilgrimage during the coming year. In Rome on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception Pope Francis celebrated Mass

in St Peter’s Square with a congregation of 60,000 before opening the Holy Door at the Basilica. In his homily he said, ‘this Extraordinary Year is itself a gift of grace. To pass through the Holy Door means to rediscover the infinite mercy of the Father who welcomes everyone and goes out personally to encounter each of them. It

is he who seeks us! It is he who comes to encounter us! This will be a year in which we grow ever more convinced of God’s mercy. How much wrong we do to God and his grace when we speak of sins being punished by his judgement before we speak of their being forgiven by his mercy! But that is the truth. ‘We have to put mercy before judgement, and in any event God’s judgement will always be in the light of his mercy. In passing through the Holy Door, then, may we feel that we ourselves are part of this mystery of love, of tenderness. Let us set aside all fear and dread, for these do not befit men and women who are loved. Instead, let us experience the joy of encountering that grace which transforms all things.’ At the end of Mass Pope Francis opened the Holy Door reciting the words of Psalm 118: ‘Open to me the gates of justice’. On the previous Sunday Archbishop Malcolm McMahon blessed and opened the Holy Door at the Metropolitan Cathedral with the words: ‘Bless this door which we consecrate to this time of Jubilee. Here, may we enter your presence as humble worshippers. From here, may we go forth as instruments of reconciliation to a troubled world.’

Archbishop Malcolm enters the Cathedral after the Blessing of the Holy Door

The Archbishop began his homily by asking the congregation to reflect on the request of Pope Francis that the Church become ‘an oasis of mercy’, he went on to outline the challenge of the Year of

Mass to inaugurate the Holy Year in the Cathedral

Opening the Holy Door at St Mary’s, Leyland

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f Mercy

Archbishop Malcolm prays at the Holy Door at Holy Cross, St Helens

Pupils from Holy Cross Primary school with Archbishop Malcolm and Parish Priest Father Sean Riley

Mercy, ‘the challenge this year is to make it a spiritual year, a year of pilgrimage, the pilgrimage of our hearts so that our lives will be changed by the joy and peace that we discover within ourselves, within the Church and within Jesus present to us’.

kingdom of this world so as to enter the new life of grace of the Kingdom of God, that is the power of the symbol of the Holy Door.’

Archbishop Malcolm explained the symbolism of the Holy Door saying, ‘to pass through the door is to confess with firm conviction that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, the Lord and the Saviour who suffered, died and rose for our salvation. With great courage a person decides to cross the threshold leaving behind the

On the Feast of the Immaculate Conception Archbishop Malcolm celebrated Mass at lunchtime in Holy Cross church, St Helens before which he blessed and opened the Holy Door and in the evening he blessed and opened the Holy Door at St Mary’s, Leyland before celebrating Mass. The Jubilee of Mercy is the first extraordinary Jubilee of this century. In

the 20th century Pope Pius XI proclaimed a Holy Year in 1933 to commemorate the nineteenth centenary of the death of Christ, and Pope Paul VI inaugurated another in 1966 that lasted five months, dedicated to the closure of the Second Vatican Council. Pope St John Paul II proclaimed the Holy Year of Redemption in 1983, for the 1950th anniversary of the Redemption. More details of the celebration of the Year of Mercy in the Archdiocese can be found at: www.yearofmercyliverpool.org.uk

Mass at St Mary’s, Leyland

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Leisure Time Travel

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0151 287 8000 The North West’s Leading Pilgrimage Company 18

Catholic Pictorial

REFLECTION CONVERSATION HOSPITALITY 28 February 2016 - 1.00pm-5.00pm St Timothy’s, Rockwell Road, West Derby Liverpool L12 4XY Br David Ryan: david2.cfc@gmail.com 07826 759184


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profile

Colette Byrne Seeking to make a difference with Cafod By Simon Hart Colette Byrne is reflecting on her new job with Cafod. She has only been with the Catholic aid agency for a couple of months but already she senses it is a place where she can make a difference. ‘Growing up in a Catholic family I was brought up going to church and always heard of Cafod through school,’ she explains. ‘I started working in the charity sector but was looking for a change from fundraising. I wanted to do something where I was making a difference to people’s lives. In my previous job at Marie Curie we gave dignity in death and I thought I wanted to start offering people dignity in life – everybody should have the right to basic resources and basic means of living and that is not the case across the world. It is nice to work for a charity where you really feel you are making a difference to people who really need it to survive.’ In her role as community participation co-ordinator, the 31-year-old has the responsibility of finding and managing volunteers both in Liverpool and North Wales, although this not the only aspect of her work. Last month, for instance,

she helped to organise the charity’s carol concert and its Christmas fun run. The month before, she made the trip down to London to participate in the march against climate change. ‘I spend two and a half days a week in Liverpool and two and a half days a week in Wrexham,’ she explains of her normal routine. ‘The role is volunteer management and recruitment and will entail recruiting volunteers to represent Cafod in their parish and schools to educate people about the work of Cafod and encourage more people to support and possibly volunteer.’

a Justice and Peace group and they spend a lot of time focusing on Laudato Si and how they can spread the word and encourage other parishes to get involved and look at themselves and how they live their lives. The fact they take the time to go out of their way and discuss this and think of how they can encourage others to get involved really shows passion and commitment’ A former pupil of Saints Peter and Paul Catholic College in Widnes, she grew up in St Basil’s parish where her mother Margaret was secretary for 20 years.

Colette worked previously for Marie Curie in Woolton, following her graduation from Sheffield Hallam University with a degree in Communication Studies in 2006. Her role was community fundraiser and, as she adds, ‘relationships and communication skills I learned and developed there have led me to be able to do this role in Cafod now’.

Today she lives in south Liverpool where she spends her free time singing in the Liverpool Rock Choir and dancing with Mersey Swing. ‘I do swing dancing,’ she laughs. ‘I do Lindy Hop and Charleston. I was a complete beginner – I had two left feet and couldn’t dance at all.’ She has found her feet on the dance floor now – and is fast doing the same at Cafod.

What has impressed her most about Cafod is the impressive dedication of its volunteers. By way of example, she says: ‘I’ve got volunteers who are members of

• To become a Cafod volunteer, contact Colette via email cbyrne@cafod.org.uk or telephone 0151 228 4028.

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The Christmas Tale of Camden Town! College captures the Christmas Spirit or was that Christmas Spirits! The Performing Arts Department of the College presented their version of the all-time Charles Dickens classic, A Christmas Carol on Tuesday 15th December 2015. The concert captured the essence of the Christmas spirit with wonderful contributions from Music, Dance and Drama. As Scrooge said, (played by Tom Patterson from Year 13) "May it be truly said of us, and us all, that we know how to keep Christmas well each and every day of the year by good deeds, friendship and laughter" he added, " A Merry Christmas to you all"


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youth ministry

Reflections and resolutions as a new year begins By Tom Hallsworth, Animate Youth Ministries team member Well it is January, so it wouldn’t be right to start without some kind of reflection on the year – or at least on our working year to date. One expression I like is ‘Life is like driving, it is quite important to look at the rear-view mirror from time to time but you can’t stare at it for too long.’ It is certainly true that you cannot go forward if you do not know where you are coming from. So, as Christians, to reflect on our lives and our work should be very important as we work towards bettering ourselves. And also to acknowledge the good we’re already doing. And I must say it has been a good few months since September and the school year started.

It has been a busy period, working with two schools most days. Casting my mind back to last year I would say we are definitely busier this time around. But the new team have thrown themselves right into working with the young people. We had a brilliant end to our first half-term with an exciting mission in Wales and we signed off before Christmas with an excellent mission at Our Lady Queen of Peace, Skelmersdale. Of course, you cannot always look backwards; we have to look towards the future too. We have a lot of work booked for the rest of the academic year, and I cannot wait to get right into working with some new schools

as well some of the schools I am familiar with from last year. There is another mission booked for Saints Peter and Paul High School in Widnes, and extra booked time for the primary schools too. One downside to being so busy is that you can struggle to keep your focus on the important things. You can spend so much time talking about God to others that you forget about the importance of your own relationship with Him. I think this can be true of everybody and we have to find that time to connect with God because that is the most important thing. We have just spent December marvelling over the birth of Jesus, but our relationship with God should not be confined to Christmas and Easter. I am not really one for setting New Year’s resolutions but one resolution that I do commit to constantly is for a renewed relationship with God. I try to find more time in my day-to-day life for God and not let the secular focuses of life bog me down. A resolution for us all for 2016 could be to let our religious beliefs shine through at all moments. That might well be a difficult task for anyone. I know that I struggle, and the fact is that the first step is trying. However, we can always aim to be more in line with and more like Jesus. So what’s your New Year’s resolution?

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cathedral

Be a Chorister for a day by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

information pack and ask them to consider registering for one of the following events:

After a hectic Advent and Christmas things quieten down a little in the Cathedral music department in January. Our focus early in the new year turns to chorister recruitment. Children’s choirs, such as we have at the Cathedral, require ongoing recruitment to replace choristers whose voices change (boys) and who finish school to go off to university (girls). During the Spring term we focus on recruiting boy choristers, and in the Summer term, girl choristers.

‘Boys Make Noise’: Tuesdays, 12 January – 1 March 2016: 18.00-18.40 A perfect way for boys currently in years 2-4 to try out singing together with other boys of a similar age at the Cathedral. Sessions will include learning vocal and aural skills, practicing new songs and meeting new friends. Places available on a first come first served basis and limited to no more that 20 boys. Cost of each session £2.

The choir of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral offers boys and girls the very best musical education along with unique opportunities to take part in numerous liturgies, concerts, tours and broadcasts on Radio and TV. Being a chorister provides a unique musical education, and opens up a world of new experiences. All choristers are educated at the two Cathedral Choir Schools: Runnymede St Edwards (Boys, age 711) and St Edwards College (Boys and Girls, age 11-16.) If you know of any boys who might be interested in the Cathedral Choir, please do ask them to get in touch for an

Chorister for a day: Sunday 28 February 2016 An opportunity for boys currently in years 2-4 to come and meet the Cathedral choristers and find out what they get up to on a typical Sunday. Included in the day is a ‘mock voice trial’ so that boys and their parents can see what is expected in the forthcoming voice trials. Voice trials: Saturday 5 March 2016 The auditions for entrance into the Cathedral Choir for boys in years 2-4. To register for any of these events, contact the Music Department Administrator Sarah O’Keeffe music@metcathedral.org.uk/0151 708 7283.

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean We begin a new year hopefully rested after the hectic Christmas schedule. As the year unfolds may it be for us all a year with many blessings and very few sorrows. One of the immediate tasks for the Cathedral as we begin 2016 is to focus more attention on the Jubilee year of mercy. We marked the beginning of the Holy Year on 6 December with the blessing of the Pilgrim Door. With the busy run up to Christmas it was not possible to arrange things within the Cathedral for those who come on pilgrimage during the Holy Year. We now need to follow this up with a set of Stations of Mercy and other staging points within the Cathedral allowing the opportunity for prayer and reflection for those who visit. The schools joint Catholic/Anglican Epiphany service takes place at our Cathedral this year on Friday 8 January at 2.00 pm. No doubt some wise men from our twin City of Cologne’s Cathedral will join us for this children’s celebration. Later in the month to mark the start of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity there will be a joint Cathedrals Evening Prayer at our Cathedral on Sunday 24 January at 3.00 pm. Both Cathedral choirs will be taking part with Dean Pete Wilcox as guest preacher. For most of the month of January the Crypt Hall is booked up for exams for the University students which means a lot of tired and stressed looking young students visiting the Cathedral to say a quick prayer before the ordeal ahead. The month concludes on a happier academic note with Liverpool Hope University’s Winter Graduations on 26 January. A Happy and Blessed New Year to you all.

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Pic extras

Mums the Word Happy New Year for 2016 to you all. At this time, I am reminded of that lovely Irish blessing: ‘May the road rise up to meet you, May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face And rain fall soft upon your fields, And until we meet again May God hold you in the palm of His hand.’ • At a recent ‘Harvest of our Hands’ celebration at Saint Thomas of Canterbury in aid of the Catholic Clothing Guild (which collects new garments and toiletries to make up baby layettes for mothers in difficulties), Father Dominic spoke of strong women in the Church and cited the example of Saint Hilda, whose feast day it was. She was born in the year 614 and was baptised a Christian at 13. When she was 33 she answered the call of Bishop Aidan of Lindisfarne and became a nun. In 657 she became the founding Abbess of Whitby Abbey which was a double monastery, for men and women (who says equality is a modern phenomenon?). The Abbey quickly grew in prestige, so much so that it was chosen to host the synod which established that the Church in England would follow Roman rather than Celtic practice. She was described as a skilled administrator and teacher and by the time of her death in 680, at the age of 66, had gained such a reputation that kings and princes would seek her advice. She was a truly remarkable woman, and a very modern woman, to whom we can well pray today. • The UCM Friends’ Circle of Prayer is for sick or disabled members no longer able to attend normal UCM meetings. It is a way for them to participate from home and express their support for the work of UCM members. It is a prayer for the sick and housebound and for peace in the world and a copy of the prayer is located at the back of UCM diaries. Prayer cards are available also in large print from Sue Bickerstaffe, our ‘stock controller’, to give out to housebound members. Perhaps we could occasionally read it out at our meetings as it is a lovely prayer and would show our love for our fellow members. Madelaine McDonald, media officer

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

KSC delighted to support Embrace Liverpool

The KSC played an important role once again in this year’s Embrace Liverpool youth conference at the Metropolitan Cathedral on 21 November, as Pat Foley, our provincial grand knight, explains. For the second year running we experienced a truly awe-inspiring and successful day in the presence of over 1,500 young people. It is easy in this day and age to underestimate the talents and vitality of these youthful participants and the contribution made by them to the programme of music, drama, comedy, dance and, of course, prayer. My thanks go to the brothers who were able to attend and who set up display boards, banners, photographs and projectors both inside and outside the Columba Chapel in the Cathedral. I am grateful also to Michael Nolan, provincial action convener, and to Danny Grimes who presented at short notice a display of photographs and delivered a workshop on the Knights of St Columba to a very keen and interested audience, after Terry Conneely, our supreme action convenor, had withdrawn on health grounds.

The day concluded with Mass on the vigil of Christ the King and the knights were invited to take part in the procession. For all of the knights present it was a memorable day – and you can see some of our group pictured with our young audience at a workshop in the Columba Chapel. • The Order is approaching the centenary of its foundation in 1919 and a series of major events are being planned nationally and locally. Liverpool has the unique distinction of being the home of the first English council (branch) of the Order, founded in Glasgow on 12 October 1919.The very first meeting of that council took place on 7 November 1920 at St Mary’s Parish School, Highfield Street – the then oldest parish in Liverpool, founded by the Benedictines in 1707. Membership of the Order grew rapidly and very soon further councils were established across the Liverpool area and beyond.

Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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“An Outstanding Catholic School” Liverpool Archdiocese


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PIC Life Steadfast parents give us lesson in true faith By Moira Billinge The story of the baby girl who lived for just 74 minutes quickly became worldwide news. A 13-week antenatal scan had diagnosed anencephaly, a condition which would be incompatible with life, and doctors suggested that her parents should have her aborted. Hope’s parents refused and her mother carried her to full term, along with her healthy twin brother. In the short span of time that followed, they dressed and cuddled their precious daughter, who rewarded them by holding her mother’s finger in her tiny hand. Hope’s story did not end with her death: her kidneys were transplanted into an adult, and her healthy liver cells would be used to treat patients waiting to receive a new liver. Her heartbroken parents stated that in her short life, Hope had done more good than some people do in a lifetime. In making the compassionate choice for their daughter by refusing abortion, the love and selflessness of her parents also enabled others to live.

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to protect him. In so doing, she gave a more powerful witness to the preciousness of every human life than any amount of pro-life campaigning could ever achieve and conveyed a strident message to anyone who leaned, even remotely, towards abortion as a choice for a child with a disability.

for the Year of Mercy “Jesus Christ is the face of the Fathers Mercy” “The Mercy of God is a gift” “Mercy: The bridge that connects God and man opening our hearts to a hope of being loved forever despite our sinfulness.”

Worth a visit

She made such an impression on the staff that they also became her friends, and when she sensed their unhappiness on her behalf at the inevitable prognosis, she actually did her best to bolster their spirits with her wonderful Scouse humour! When the baby was born, he was named after the priest friend who baptised him. I had the great privilege of being his godmother. He was loved into the world and he was loved back into the arms of God. Afterwards, as my friend and her husband mourned the loss of their ‘beautiful’ son, she celebrated the fact that he had even existed. Her love and trust of her beloved Lord reminded me of Our Lady, whose Magnificat rejoiced in the greatness of God.

A very dear friend of mine faced the same situation. The condition that her baby had was different from that of baby Hope, but it was still a diagnosis deemed to be incompatible with life. She refused the option of an early induction which the baby would have had no hope of surviving but chose instead to allow her child to live until he had made his entry into the world in his – and God’s – own time.

This happened 25 years ago and, despite the death of another son, her faith remains steadfast and the sure knowledge that she will one day be reunited with her beloved children fills her with joy. We are already a month into the Year of Mercy instigated by Pope Francis. It is a vehicle for ‘welcoming sinners back to the Church’, although I prefer to describe it as the imperfect extending a welcome to the imperfect.

Through the ensuing months of her pregnancy, my friend moved the hearts of every member of staff with whom she came into contact by her love for her unborn baby and her fierce determination to do whatever she could

It is the Church embracing, sharing and rejoicing in God’s mercy and His profound love for everyone. My friend and the people like her are the window of this wonderful Church to which the Pope is pointing.

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Quotes from Pope Francis

Take your first steps into the new year by reflecting on the journey of the Magi, writes Lucy Oliver. The feast of the Epiphany, commemorating the visit of the Wise Men to the child Jesus, is an opportunity to consider our own gifts and offerings to Christ and the path we should take to employ them. There is no better place to celebrate the feast than in Spain where Catholics mark the ‘Día de Reyes’ – or Day of the Kings – in spectacular style. On the evening of 5 January, there are processions of the Magi on impressive floats through the streets of every town and city. Sweets are thrown to children, who can enjoy other seasonal treats, notably ‘carbón de azúcar’ (coal candy) and the ‘Roscón de Reyes’, a sponge cake covered in candied fruit. To find a buried toy inside is, like discovering silver in a plum pudding, a symbol of good fortune for the coming year. Visitors to Barcelona for the New Year celebrations will find the Three Kings Fair, which runs until 6 January, and a wonderful crib display at the Plaça Sant Jaume, which can be seen until the feast of Candlemas in February, when we mark the midpoint of winter and look forward in hope to spring.


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search The Liverpool church of St Sebastian is celebrating the centenary of the opening of the church in January 1916. Check our clues to find out more about this saint.

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ARROWS

It’s nice to eat out during January. Try one or more of our listed eateries Red Lion New Street, Mawdesley 01704 822208 Ship Inn Wheat Lane, Lathom 01704 893117

SOLDIER ATHLETICS

MILAN

Ashfield House Ashfield Park Drive, Standish 01257 473500 Hightown Hotel Lower Alt Road, Hightown 0151 929 2650 Wine Cellar Lord Street/Eastbank Street, Southport 01704 530002

ROMAN St Sebastian’s church is situated on Lockerby Road, Liverpool 7

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy

The Victoria Victoria Road, Liverpool 17 0151 727 1046

Greetings Cards from Carmel

Following a visit to Chester Zoo, the young curate had become very interested in wildlife and had his head stuck in a David Attenborough book as the auld fella dipped his chocolate biscuit into a cup of tea. ‘Every page of this book is full of amazing facts about animals,’ said the YC. ‘Is that so?’ responded Father Mullarkey. ‘I can’t believe how much David Attenborough knows about animals.’ ‘So he should,’ said the auld fella, ‘he’s been studying them for about 50 years.’ The young curate pressed on. ‘The turkey is a remarkable bird.’ ‘Especially with cranberry sauce and roast potatoes!’ Father Mullarkey quipped. Undeterred, the young curate tried again. ‘The turkey can run at 30 miles an hour.’ ‘So would I with Bernard Matthews behind me!’ said the auld fella, enjoying the last word.

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Helen Molyneux, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Kevin Lonergan Tel: 01772 744148 or 01772 655433 (home).

If you have relatives or friends with something to celebrate you might consider buying your cards from the Carmalie Monastery. There is a great selection and excellent prices. Visit the Monastery at: Carmelite Monastery, Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Email: marytoncards@outlook.com Phone: 0151 724 7102

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justice & peace

Nothing just in Syrian war By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker Maybe I don’t get out enough but I have still not met anyone who was not dismayed by the decision taken in the House of Commons to join in the bombing of Syria. The principles of Just War theory have a presumption against the use of force, ie there are a rigorous set of conditions to be met before war should be launched. The principles of Just War theory state that for military action to be justifiable there must be: 1. Just Cause ... ISIL/IS/Daesh is certainly an aggressor and the cause of much misery in the Middle East and also in Europe. Conclusion: There is great cause for concern but other arguments are needed before the move into war is taken. 2. Competent Authority ... Has the Syrian government, or any other body in the country, asked for military intervention? The House of Parliament is the supreme law-making body in the United Kingdom but is there clear authorisation for military action under UN resolution 2249? Conclusion: UN authorisation is needed when no communication is received from the country to be atacked. 3. Comparative Justice ... In the West we are horrified by the atrocities committed by ISIL and must avoid being drawn into committing atrocities of our own. Do the rights and values

invoked justify killing? Conclusion: Find another way to contest the moral ground.

Conclusion: Recent experience suggests that a bombing campaign has little probability of success.

4. Right Intention ... There is no suggestion that those who voted for military action had bad intentions but have parliamentarians deluded themselves and become victims of their own outrage? Conclusion: Repeat the argument that military response is not a long-term solution.

7. Proportionality ... It is hard to avoid the conclusion that European lives are worth more than other lives. Conclusion: The attacks in Paris were the spur that outraged our civilised values and drew us into a destructive bombardment that promises to be as bad as any destruction that any of the factions in Syria have inflicted on each other.

5. Last Resort ... Can we say that all peaceful alternatives have been exhausted? The Middle Eastern groups that oppose ISIL need to be brought together to agree a common set of objectives for stability. It is also important that those countries buying the exported oil must stop so that ISIL’s funds are limited. Conclusion: Political and economic pressure are key to defeating ISIL. 6. Probability of Success ... It is difficult to achieve successful military action when there is no clear target and even worse when the target is mixed in with the civilian community. ISIL does not work out of offices with large signs outside advertising their presence so how will bombing be targeted to avoid innocent civilians?

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Catholic Pictorial

8. Discrimination ... It must be directed against unjust aggressors, not against innocent people caught up in a war not of their making. Conclusion: This criterion is almost impossible to fulfil. Even if oil fields and the distribution system are the only targets, the environmental damage will be immense. It is worth noting too the following declaration from Vatican II: ‘Any act of war aimed indiscriminately at the destruction of entire cities or of extensive areas along with their population is a crime against God and man himself. It merits unequivocal and unhesitating condemnation.’ Gaudium et Spes


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Profile for Educate Magazine

Catholic Pic January 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic Pic January 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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