{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 1

Issue 131 AUGUST 2015

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

FREE

Welcome

Fr Stephen Lee

Fr Matthew Jolley

Michele McMahon A messenger of hope


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 2

Lourdes by air from Manchester Airport 8 days departing 4th September 2015 4* Hotel Astrid in Lourdes £680 per person sharing £850 per person in single room

JUST 26 PLACE S LEFT

Lourdes, Nevers & Paris 8 days by coach departing 5th September 3* Hotel Agena Lourdes £550 per person sharing £700 per person in single room

Christmas in Lourdes

6 days departing 22nd December 2015 No overnight travel 4* Hotel Astrid Lourdes £365 per person sharing £395 per person in single room

6515

2015 Pilgrimages to Lourdes * Rome * Assisi * The Holy Land * Poland * Fatima CALL NOW FOR A FREE FULL COLOUR BROCHURE 768 Manchester Road | Castleton | Rochdale OL11 3AW

2

Catholic Pictorial

0844 8551844

www.options-travel.co.uk


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 3

contents Welcome The month of August is, for many, a time of rest and relaxation, the opportunity to take a break and recharge batteries; in compiling this month’s ‘Catholic Pic’ I’ve been wondering if July is a time when we cram two months into one so that we can have that break. We welcome our new priests, Father Matthew Jolley and Father Stephen Lee ordained by Archbishop Malcolm. Father Matthew was ordained on 4 July at St Mary’s, Warrington and Father Stephen on 18 July at St Marie’s, Standish. We wish them well as they begin their ministry among us and offer them an assurance of our prayers for their work. Ours is a magnificent heritage that they are ordained into. This month we cover three church anniversaries and there have been more celebrated too, so many that we haven’t been able to get to them all. If you have pictures and some words from your celebrations do please send them in for the next edition. We feature too the 600th anniversary of Windleshaw Chantry which was celebrated with an open air Mass on the Feast of St John Fisher and St Thomas More, a great reminder of that heritage.

Contents 4

Main Feature Archdiocese welcomes its new priests to the fold Ordination of Father Matthew Jolley and Father Stephen Lee

8

News From around the Archdiocese

From the Archbishop’s Desk The Pope’s recent encyclical on the environment made a big splash in the global media and now seems to have disappeared. Of course it is what we may call a foundation document that lays down the principles on which so many of the decisions about the future of the people who live on the planet Earth, so even though it may not be capturing the headlines at present, it will not go away. The encyclical is deeply rooted in the Jewish/Christian understanding of life drawing on our biblical tradition. Being reminded of truths that I have taken for granted has made a deep impression on me. Let me take just one idea that comes out of paragraphs 96 and 98 of Laudato Si: Jesus invited his disciples to recognise the paternal relationship God has with all his creatures and to live in full harmony with creation without despising the body, the material or pleasant things of life. To a greater or lesser degree, we all recognise a bond with other peoples on this earth forming a common humanity, but what about other creatures? How should we relate to animals? Pope Francis suggests that as we are called into being by one Father, all of us are linked by unseen bonds and together form a kind of universal family, a sublime communion which fills us with a sacred, affectionate and humble respect. He goes on to say that a sense of deep communion with the rest of nature cannot be real if our hearts lack tenderness, compassion and concern for our fellow human beings. It makes you think. Doesn’t it?

15 Nugent News Helping people who need us most 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 18 Profile Michele McMahon A messenger of hope for cancer sufferers 19 Animate Youth Ministry Departing Animate team show why community matters 20 Justice and Peace Lessons from the annual Justice and Peace conference 25 Cathedral Record Welcome to the Choir of Christchurch Cathedral

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Editor Peter Heneghan Pictures Cover and main feature Nick Fairhurst: nickfairhurst@aol.com Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life

Copy deadline September issue 12 August 2015 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 28 Pic Life Why silence really is golden 29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey

Catholic Pictorial

3


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 4

Archdiocese welcomes its new priests to the fold July brought two special days for Liverpool Archdiocese with the ordinations of Father Stephen Lee and Father Matthew Jolley By Simon Hart ‘You will be invited into the most personal and private times in the lives of God's people to witness their marriages as two become one in Christ, to anoint them when they are sick, to comfort them when they are dying and to be a presence of Christ to them at all times.’ Archbishop Malcolm McMahon spoke these words during his homily at the ordination Mass of the newest priest in the Archdiocese of Liverpool. They were words that served to sum up the special role that a priest fulfils, a role now waiting to be filled by both Father Stephen Lee, the man whom Archbishop Malcolm was directly addressing on 18 July, and Father Matthew Jolley, the other new priest welcomed into the Archdiocesan fold this summer after the pair had completed their seminary training at Oscott College. Both men will begin their priestly duties in September: Father Matthew will be assistant parish priest at Holy Name, Fazakerley while Father Stephen will 4

Catholic Pictorial

begin as a Metropolitan Cathedral-based hospital chaplain, but for now both are still getting used to their new lives. As the latter said of his classmate’s ordination at St Marie of the Annunciation in Standish on 18 July: ‘I walked in and just to be there concelebrating and on the other side of things was rather surreal.’ The first of the Archdiocese’s two summer ordinations took place on Saturday 4 July at St Mary’s, Warrington with Father Matthew’s admission into the priesthood. For the history graduate from Edge Hill University, after all the anticipation surrounding this special day, the reality of the occasion began to sink in as he lay prostrate on the floor during the Litany of Saints. ‘That is the point where you feel like everything has been handed over to God,’ he reflected. ‘You are about to be ordained so there is nothing else to worry about, there is the contentment of knowing you have reached that point and now it is in God’s hands. You hear everyone around praying for you and asking the saints to pray for you and it is

Right: Father Matthew Jolley with parents Louise and Kevin

time to trust in God really.’ One of the most significant moments of the ordination rite comes when the priest receives his chasuble and stole, and in Father Matthew’s case, he was given his garments by Father Pat Sexton and Father Sean Riley: ‘a big influence and source of support throughout my training’ according to the 28year-old, who also credits the Benedictines, notably Father William Wright, for their support in his vocation. They were not the only ones, of course; his parents Kevin and Louise and brother Patrick were looking on, along with many other welcome faces in the congregation. ‘It was nice to see more than six years’ worth of people coming to give their support and pray for me. It was moving. The highlight of the Mass came after I was ordained when I went and sat up next to the Archbishop and I looked out and saw such a full church. It is testament to people’s appreciation of what priests do.’ Archbishop Malcolm, speaking in his homily, offered his own positive appraisal of a memorable day when he said: ‘What is happening in this church today is truly an extraordinary sign of God’s love and mercy for his people.’ For Father Stephen, meanwhile, ‘the most moving’ moment of his celebration a fortnight later arrived when Father Stephen Maloney, the former Archdiocesan Vocations Director, helped vest him with his chasuble and stole, together with his parents Dennis and Kathleen. It was


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 5

feature ‘It is putting into practice all the years of training I have had at seminary and hopefully bringing Christ to people’s lives.’ (Father Stephen)

Father Maloney whom he had approached when first thinking about his vocation, and here they were together once more, 11 years on, at the end of a long road travelled. ‘I think all four of us, myself, my mum and dad and Father Stephen, were quite emotional at that point,’ Father Stephen explained. ‘You are called forward and your hands are anointed with chrism and then you are clothed in the vestments of the priest. The three people involved had journeyed with me and the challenges I’ve had over past 11 years added to the emotion of finally, after all these years, getting to where I was hoping to get to.’ For the former IT technician at Salford University, the following day brought his first Mass as a priest at St Bernadette’s in Shevington, the twin parish of St Marie’s. It was the first taste of what lies in store in his new life.

Catholic Pictorial

5


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 6

feature

Above: Father Stephen Lee with parents Kathleen and Dennis

‘It will be a challenge to settle in and adapt, it is a whole new way of life but that is the fun of it really.’ (Father Matthew) 6

Catholic Pictorial

‘You are now the centre of attention and people are asking you what you want,’ he said. ‘You have changed from being a parishioner they have got to know over the years to a priest who is going to be there, as the Archbishop said in his homily, supporting people at different times in their lives. You will be there in some of the most important times in their life: the good times and the bad times, the happy times, like weddings and baptisms, to being with someone who is sick or dying. In this modern day there is still the sense of trust that people still have for the priest and they want them to come when they are most in need.’ Father Stephen will soon experience this at first hand in his role as a cover chaplain for the Royal Liverpool University and Broadgreen hospitals, working alongside Father Ged Callacher and Father Jonathan Brown, who is the full-time chaplain at the Royal. ‘Hospital Chaplaincy work is something I’ve not got that much experience of and I suppose it can be challenging

ministry to have but I am looking forward to it,’ said the 39-year-old, who will replace Father Liam Collister at Cathedral House. ‘It is putting into practice all the years of training I have had at seminary and hopefully bringing Christ to people’s lives.’ Father Matthew expressed a similar sentiment about his opening assignment, serving as assistant to the parish priest, Father Kevin McLoughlin, at Holy Name in Fazakerley. ‘I am looking forward to just getting stuck in really. You spend six years learning all the theory but it is not until you are out in the real world that you put that theory into practice.’ As with Father Stephen, he is aware that there will be testing moments to come, but he is ready to embrace these challenges. ‘Hopefully I have got my own qualities I can contribute. It will be a challenge to settle in and adapt, it is a whole new way of life but that is the fun of it really. I am excited after six years’ studying and training to finally be able to get out there and do what we’ve been prepared to do.’


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 7


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 8

News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

The Liturgy in Bloom Parishioners from St Oswald’s, Longton celebrated the Golden Jubilee of their church in style with a three day Flower Festival on the theme: ‘The Liturgy in Bloom’. The new church building in Longton was completed in November 1965 and has served the local Catholic

community since that time. Planned and designed by Janet Wilkinson the flower arrangements in the church reflected the liturgical year of the church including the nativity. The institution of the Eucharist at the Last

Supper, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection were represented in individual displays. Other arrangements included a portrayal of the different colours of the liturgical seasons; and Act of Consecration to the Sacred Heart using red and white roses and the sacraments of Reconciliation and Baptism. Displays on the pew ends symbolised the elements of the Eucharist with grain for the bread and grapes for the wine; each display carried a message of dedication from parishioners. Visitors to the church were greeted with a display by the statue of St Oswald alongside a banner made especially for the Jubilee Year by Helen Cross. Pupils from St Oswald’s School had been busy too with every child contributing to a display on the church wall with a rainbow made up of their hand prints with their mission statement within it together with a cross made up of a collage of small crosses made by each child in the school.

Golden celebration for Father Sean Parishioners, friends and family gathered at St Benet’s, Netherton, where Father Sean O’Connor celebrated his 50th anniversary of ordination to the priesthood. Archbishop Malcolm, Bishop Tom Williams and brother priests joined Father Sean in celebrating a Mass of Thanksgiving. Archbishop Malcolm shared a few words about how Father Sean has been a great example of servanthood over the years in his ministry to the people of the Archdiocese but also to the people of Ecuador during his years of service there doing all things for ‘the glory of God’ – ‘Cun Glorie Dé’. After Mass, guests were invited to the parochial centre for a meal to thank Father Sean for all his hard work and dedication over the last 50 years.

8

Catholic Pictorial


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 9

news diary Warm welcome at St Charles

Archbishop Malcolm was welcomed to St Charles Catholic Primary School where he met pupils and staff and to saw how they spread the Good News in the school and local community. The Archbishop, accompanied by Father James Preston, Parish Priest of St Charles’, Mr Steve Roberts, co-chair of governors, Mr Chris Davey, headteacher, and Mary Walker, deputy head and RE coordinator, visited each class and talked to the children and teachers. He Archbishop took with him his Crozier and Mitre, talked with the children about them, and let some lucky pupils try them on for size. The children in Year 2 presented him with a ‘Welcome’ card, and were generous enough to draw an Arsenal badge on the front, in reference to his support of the club. As he left, Archbishop Malcolm commented on the warm welcome he had received and on how wonderful the children at St Charles’ Catholic Primary School are.

Archbishop Malcolm presents Awards for new Faith for Life Course

Twelve participants, who recently completed the new ‘Faith for Life’ Course in Widnes, were delighted to receive their certificates from Archbishop Malcolm at an Awards Evening held at Lace writes Veronica Murphy. They were accompanied at the celebration by friends and family. The new course has been co-produced by members of the Department of Pastoral Formation and members of the Adult Formation team in the Dublin Archdiocese’s

Office for Evangelisation and Ecumenism. The Episcopal Vicar Father Kieran McDermott flew over to receive his certificate as he has participated in full in the course which began in October 2014. ‘Faith for Life’ runs over four week-ends and includes local meetings between the four ‘Movements’. The course is rooted in Ignatian Spirituality and follows the Movement of the Pastoral Cycle, sometimes referred to as See, Judge, Act. It aims to help participants become more

open, confident, trusting and willing to work for change, using their Catholic faith as the basis for action. The next courses will run in Longton for parishioners in Penwortham and Longton starting in September 2015 and then again in Widnes in January 2016. For further details contact: Steve Atherton Tel: 0151 522 1080; or Veronica Murphy Tel: 0151 522 1048; or Jonathan Mercer Tel:0151 522 1040.

Catholic Pictorial

9


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 10

news diary Celebrate the Child

St Richard, Skelmersdale 150th anniversary

Mayor of West Lancashire Nikki Hennessy, Councillor Terry Aldridge, Deacon Des Alger, Rosie Cooper MP, Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP, Deputy Mayor Liz Savage, Fr Mike Thompson, Deacon Anthony Callaghan, Councillor Noel Delaney Mayor’s Consort.

St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens was the venue for the Annual Mass, celebrating the work undertaken with and for children in the archdiocese. Archbishop Malcolm celebrated the Mass with children and their families from parishes throughout the archdiocese. The children and their families helped with preparations before the Mass and the children decorated the Church with colourful artwork and made ‘shakers’ from empty bottles and streamers so they could join in the music provided by St Wilfrid’s parish, Widnes and St Paul of the Cross parish, Burtonwood. Altar Servers came from St Wilfrid’s, Widnes, Our Lady and St Philomena and St Francis Xavier’s parishes, and readers from St Wilfrid’s Widnes, St Paul of the Cross and St Anne’s Ormskirk. Although it rained on the day a picnic was enjoyed after the Mass in the parish hall and Animate Café that is located at Lowe House. Thank you to everyone who made this year’s Celebration lively, enjoyable and special. If you would like to be involved in the preparation for next year’s Mass, or indeed would like to host the Mass in the future then please contact the Safeguarding Department Tel: 0151 522 1043 or email: safeguarding@rcaol.co.uk 10

Catholic Pictorial

Archbishop Malcolm McMahon helped St Richard’s, Skelmersdale kick off its 150th anniversary celebrations with a special Mass on Friday 19 June. Archbishop Malcolm was assisted by Bishop Vincent Malone and a number of returning former priests at the Mass, which was attended by around 250 people – including Rosie Cooper MP and Nikki Hennessey, the Mayor of West Lancashire. To mark the anniversary, two new stained glass windows were unveiled during the Mass. One, in memory of St Richard, had been paid for by a legacy as well as donations and fundraising by parishioners; the other, dedicated to Our Lady Queen of Peace, was paid for by the local engineering college of the same name. In his homily, Archbishop Malcolm looked back at the history of the church and amused the congregation by reading out some of the decrees of previous times: ‘Priests who clipped or slurred their words by rushing were to be suspended. The clergy should wear their proper dress and not imitate what the lay people wore. They were not allowed to wear their hair long or have romantic entanglements.’ Times have changed but as the Archbishop noted: ‘We remain constant in accepting the apostles’ teaching and prayer. Our foundation in

faith always remains the same.’ At the end of the Mass, Archbishop Malcolm sealed a time capsule containing artefacts and documents donated by parishioners and the Catholic schools in the town and asked that it remain closed until 2065, which will be the 200th anniversary of the church. Father Mike Thompson, parish priest for the town, said: ‘This is a fantastic day for the parish. The changes over the last 150 years have been amazing. Following the opening of the church, St Richard’s school soon opened next door. We’ve uncovered some interesting documents, including a punishment book, from those early days as well as some early school photographs which were on display during the celebrations. ‘Now, 150 years later we have three churches in the town, five primary schools and one secondary school and a very vibrant church community – something well worth celebrating.’ The church on Liverpool Road, Skelmersdale was designed by the Pugin family of architects and parishioners enjoyed a full weekend of celebrations. There was a buffet after the evening Mass on Friday 19th, and the next day a music hall-style social event took place for parishioners at the Comrades Club, which was followed by a Sunday afternoon picnic in the parish orchard.


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:51 Page 11

news diary Mass marks 600 years of Windleshaw Chantry There was a celebration with a difference in St Helens in June when an open-air Mass was staged to mark not the usual 50, 100 or even 150-year anniversary – but instead the 600th birthday of Windleshaw Chantry. The ruined chantry, located in a small graveyard adjoining St Helens Borough Cemetery, falls under the supervision of Father Tom Gagle, the parish priest of St Thomas of Canterbury, and it was Father Tom who celebrated the Mass on 22 June – the feast of St John Fisher and St Thomas More. It was not the first time Father Tom had said Mass there – he did so for the first time on the Solemnity of All Saints in 2008 and further Masses followed on Easter Monday in 2009, 2010 and 2011 – yet this was the first since new research had confirmed the correct age of the building, one of the oldest in the area. The chantry was built in 1415 – not 1435, as previously thought – by Sir Thomas Gerard, lord of the manors of Bryn and Windle, to have Masses said for himself, his wife and his family. Chantry guide Ted Forsyth discovered the date in a document dated 21 June 1415, which read: ‘I John Catrick, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, give licence to my dear son in Christ, Thomas Gerard Knight and his wife Margaret, for Mass and Divine Office to be celebrated in their Chantry Chapel within their manor of Windle, the same being situated in the said diocese.’

Like the present church at Dentons Green, it was dedicated to the Gerard family patron, St Thomas of Canterbury; indeed, the tower of the present church, opened in 1912 and designed by Pugin and Pugin, is modelled on the chantry tower. When Windleshaw Chantry was visited in 1558 under the Chantry Act of 1547, there were 2,374 such buildings in the country – the majority in the west, with more monasteries and priories in eastern England. According to the St Helens Family History Society’s 1985 history of the building (‘Monumental Inscriptions – Windleshaw Chantry’), the land around the building was used for secret burials at night for Catholics,

owing to the fact they were refused burial in the consecrated ground of now Anglican churchyards following the Reformation. ‘As a place of sepulture for the clergy, Windleshaw remains unique,’ it says. ‘At least 60 priests are buried here, more than in any other place of similar size in England.’ South of the chantry are the remains of the old town cross, which once stood in the market place near the site of the present parish church. The chantry began to decay in 1644 when Parliamentary troops stripped lead from the roof and further vandalism has occurred in more recent times but there are hopes that English Heritage will make a grant to allow for its partial restoration.

St Jude’s celebrates 50 years July was a landmark month for St Jude’s parish in Wigan which marked its 50th anniversary with a weekend of celebrations. The main celebration took place on Sunday 12 July with a special evening Mass led by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon. Three former parish priests joined Archbishop Malcolm and Canon Pat McNally, the current incumbent, in concelebrating the 6.30pm Mass, which was followed by a buffet in the parish centre. The previous day St Jude’s primary school had staged a summer fair, ensuring – as Canon McNally explained – that

‘parents and staff and parishioners were all involved’ in a memorable weekend. Canon McNally, who has been parish priest for 26 years, added that St Jude’s had reached its half-century in fine health, citing its flourishing ‘collaborative ministry’. ‘This has been hugely successful,’ he said, ‘with teams of tutors, catechists, SVP, Legion of Mary and Eucharistic ministers heavily involved. A good barometer of any parish organisation is how it cares for the marginalised, the needy, the lonely, and our volunteers do Trojan work.’ He also pointed to the parish’s active participation in ecumenical events in Wigan. St Jude’s was built in response to post-war housing developments, with Catholic families leaving St Joseph’s parish in the Wallgate area for new council estates to the southwest of the town centre. After the construction of a temporary chapel of ease in 1959, the new church was built at a cost of £100,000 and opened by Archbishop Beck on 13 July 1965 with the presbytery and parish centre following two years later. In 1995 St Joseph’s parish was closed and absorbed into St Jude’s.

Catholic Pictorial

11


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:52 Page 12

news diary Schools explore meaning of British values Just what does it mean to be British? This was the question posed to pupils from 38 Catholic secondary schools and sixth form colleges when they came together in St Helens on 30 June to consider what British values really are. Year 10-12 students from a range of different cultural and religious backgrounds were present at Langtree Park, the home of St Helens Rugby Football Club, on 30 June for an event geared at developing teaching and learning resources based on British values to be implemented in schools across the region.

The Liverpool Archdiocese Secondary Schools’ Partnership (LASSP) had selected students from its eight local authorities to participate in the Student Voice Conference, all aiming to tackle this complex question and to find an answer. Paul Greenall, director of LASSP and organiser of the event, wanted them to explore what being British meant to them. The theme of the day was ‘British Culture and Values in the Catholic Secondary School – Students’ perspective’ and this entailed the student delegates taking part in several activities based on a survey which Christ the King Catholic High School’s head of science, Dave Hemsley, had conducted with thousands of pupils across the region.

Tim Warren, Archdiocesan Director of Education, and James Lancaster, head teacher of Christ the King, were the keynote speakers and they underlined how Catholic values, personal values and British values are all interlinked. As Lord Nash, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Schools, has stated: ‘We want every school to promote the basic British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance for those of different faiths and beliefs.’ For more information on the conference’s aims and mission statement, visit the Liverpool Archdiocese Secondary Schools’ Partnership at www.lassp.co.uk, where you can also learn about upcoming events.

St Vincent’s pupils catch the science bug ‘I love science’ is not something you hear every day in a school classroom but at St Vincent de Paul Primary School in Liverpool, such a reaction is becoming increasingly common. As one ten-year-old declared after the school began using a new ‘hands-on’ method for teaching and learning about

12

Catholic Pictorial

science: ‘I love science – it used to be boring before we started using our own equipment, but now it’s brilliant.’ This newfound enthusiasm is a consequence of the Pitt Street school becoming one of the first in the country to team up with the Empiribox Primary Science Trust, which has been trialling a

system for primary schools which enables regular and varied practical scientific experimentation in the classroom. ‘With Empiribox everything is ready for teachers to use right out of the box,’ explained Phil Stewart, head teacher at St Vincent de Paul. ‘By having sufficient materials and equipment to allow working in pairs every week of the school year to conduct a whole range of exciting experiments, we will be more able to nurture a keen interest in the wonders of science.’ The Empiribox system includes teacher training and lesson planning support and all the necessary Key Stage 2 science teaching components in 12-week cycles, after which the equipment is collected from the school and the next consignment is delivered. ‘The success of our trials clearly demonstrates primary school age children respond much more positively to doing science rather than just being told how to do it,’ said Dan Sullivan, the former secondary school science teacher who founded Empiribox.


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:52 Page 13

Catholic Pictorial

13


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:52 Page 14

sunday reflections On a liturgical note If all goes well, and the weather plays ball, August should be a slightly more relaxed and temperate month – but there are a lot of ifs in that sentence! We never know exactly what is around the corner, either as regards the weather or, more importantly, the calls that will be made on us as part of that daily fidelity to the Gospel which we call ‘just getting on with things’. As we have often said, the fact that we call this the ‘Ordinary Time’ of the year does not mean that there is nothing of interest or of particular note going on; the Lord nourishes his people with Word and Sacrament and this in itself is pretty extraordinary and worthy of daily thanksgiving. This year August will be a month of musings. Do I need to pack this for the journey? Is it about time to lay this particular object, book, or even videotape or cassette (!) to one side? Will I ever use that again? It is only when you come to move from one parish to another – or, in my case, from one parish to a seminary in another country – that you realise how, without ever

Sunday thoughts ‘The Road Less Travelled’ was written by the American psychiatrist M Scott Peck. Its title is taken from a poem by another American, Robert Frost, which ends: I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I – I took the one less travelled by. And that has made all the difference. In captivity in Egypt the people of Israel cried out for deliverance. There had to be an alternative to slavery. The Lord heard their cries. He took pity on them. He sent Moses to lead the people of Israel out of captivity. They exchanged the certainties of slavery for the insecurities of the wilderness; confinement in a concentration camp for getting lost in the open desert; the predictability of regular meals for the novelty of fending for themselves. On the day they left Egypt, Moses the liberator, was their hero. Once abandoned and hungry in the desert they came

14

Catholic Pictorial

Canon Philip Gillespie

intending it, you have ended up surrounded by so many objects, many of which carry precious memories. However the one memory which is vital that we carry with us on all our journeying, wherever it may lead us, is the memory laid before us each day in the celebration of the Liturgy – the memory of an event and a self-giving love so present to us today that it shapes and moulds and transforms our daily living; the command of the Lord Jesus to ‘do this in memory of me’. My dad had a record of Josef Locke singing ‘Count your blessings’ and I can almost hear it playing in the background as I make the separate piles of ‘Needed’, ‘Share with others’ and ‘Not sure yet’. I trust the Good Lord that I will make the right choices for what goes into which pile! • Canon Philip will be taking up a new appointment as Rector of the Pontifical Beda College in Rome in September.

Mgr John Devine OBE

to blame him for their misfortune. Why did we not die at the Lord’s hand in the land of Egypt when we were able to sit down to pans of meat and could eat bread to our heart’s content? Slavery was safe and secure and familiar and predictable. They regretted taking the road less travelled. The Lord intervened with manna from heaven. He bought them off with bread. But bread can only keep us going until lunchtime. ‘Do not work for food that cannot last,’ Jesus tells us. Bread can never be fuel for the soul; nor can alcohol or shopping or any other substitute. The road less travelled leaves us hungry and empty because there is something better round the next corner. He who comes to me can never be hungry.

Let go and live In the prefabs behind the doctor’s surgery where we lived there was a woman called Violet. Life had not been easy for her. Struck down with polio when she was 21, she lived the rest of her long life walking on two sticks, her legs encased in callipers. Yet she allowed her suffering and pain to teach her about compassion, love, acceptance and understanding. This taught her what real humanity was about. There was within her an ability to accept, to love and to cherish and those who met her discovered that. She was 87 when she died and just the day before she died, I took my six-year-old niece to see her. Cathy scrambled on to her lap and said: ‘Stebby, tell me a story.’ Violet began to tell the story of the toy rabbit who wanted to know what it meant to be real. As she told the story I realised that I was looking at someone very real, very human and very holy. I think for too long our pursuit of what we see as holiness has, for many, stopped us becoming fully rounded human beings. Holiness has been misunderstood as an invitation to be pious and prudish and often miserable rather than a gateway into life. I don’t want to be holy if holiness means condescension and condemnation towards and of others. I don’t want to be holy if it means looking over my shoulder for a God who is waiting to trip me up. I don’t want the sort of holiness that sees life as an endurance test to go through in order to experience heaven. The Gospel for me is primarily God’s way of enabling me to understand what it means to be alive. We are to live in the present moment understanding what it means to be intimately involved with God and with our brothers and sisters, living lives of love and service. What is it that you have to let go of in order to live life? What is it you need to bring to the Lord to understand a little more fully what it means to be human and alive? What is your security? What is your bondage? What is your pain? In a sense the Lord is saying to each of us ‘Let it go’ – and begin to live. Father Chris Thomas


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:52 Page 15

nugent news

Helping people who need us most

‘Working 9 ‘til 5’ so the famous song goes but for many employees at Nugent Care, their work is round the clock in providing the best care and service for our users. Whether it’s in one of our many care homes looking after older people, providing the best education for children and young people in our schools or giving a vulnerable adult the skills to enter employment in a volunteer role, it’s often easy to overlook or take for granted how our work affects real people and real lives. Receiving recognition for the work we do, whether it’s by a colleague on the monthly newsletter for doing a great job or by being noticed outside of Nugent Care, it’s wonderful to know our work is not only making a difference but being rewarded. St Catherine’s Secure Unit for children was recently awarded with the Josephine Butler Award, which recognises education work of people of the Christian faith. As a result, the team at the school were presented with a £5,000 prize to continue

the fantastic work they do for the young people. Additionally, one of our care homes Geel and Hitchen Court has been awarded the Gold Standards Framework for End of Life Care. The award reflects the dignity of care given to our residents and Geel and Hitchen are the only service in Liverpool to receive this prestigious acknowledgement. But it’s not only outside of the organisation that the hard work and commitment are rewarded. We recently held our third Dignity In Care Awards to recognise those who go above and beyond to provide the best possible care and service. Awards included Adult Services Care Award, Volunteer Award and the Champion of Champions. It’s fantastic to receive appreciation for the work that goes on 24/7 within our services, and never stops nor wanes because the needs of our users is what drives everyone at Nugent Care. And we won’t stop in our mission to keep helping people who need us most, whenever in life they may call on us.

At Nugent Care we always strive to offer the best possible service. Indeed one of our principles is that we will offer services that we would ourselves be happy to use if we stood in need of them. We would all want that for members of our families and our friends too. Each of us is touched in some way by older people in need, people with learning difficulties, physical or sensory difficulties or mental health problems. Or we may know families in poverty, children who are struggling in their educational setting, or who cannot for a period of time live within their family homes. Any of these issues can be within our own families, amongst our friends and in our local communities. Therefore it is right that agencies such as Nugent Care exist and provide an excellent standard of service for anyone in need. There is of course always the issue of how do we know that the service we offer is of a high standard. Sometimes we get that accreditation from outside agencies and our article in this edition is highlighting some of the awards and accreditations we have recently received. It is thanks to our staff and volunteers, and to you, our supporters, that we receive these accreditations. Please do read the article to find out more. Importantly though it is the feedback that we get from people who use our services, and from their families and friends, that really let us know if we are delivering services that we would ourselves be happy to receive. We welcome all comments that help us to get it right whether that be a complaint we need to learn from, or a positive affirmation of something we are doing. To hear a young person at one of our schools say that he would be in trouble by now if he had not come here but now he has a future helps us to know that we have got it right for him. To see written down that attendance at our Deaf Arts Group on a Tuesday means their silent world is not silent on that day is brilliant to know. And the craft work of that group is fantastic. We strive for continuous improvement in all that we do. An agency such as Nugent Care can never stand still and we always need to keep up with changing needs and wishes. Thank you for your support in making that possible. Kathleen Pitt Chief Executive - Nugent Care

Catholic Pictorial

15


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:52 Page 16

august

what’s on Saturday 1 August ‘Responding to the Call.’ A Day of Recollection to support those exploring vocations to the Priesthood. Discover more about diocesan priesthood; talk with and hear from priests of the archdiocese and spend time in prayer and discussion. 10.00 am at St Charles’ Presbytery, 224 Aigburth Road, Liverpool, L17 9PG. Further information from Father James Preston Tel: 0151 727 2493 or email: frjamespreston@gmail.com. Also on Facebook at /liverpoolvocations and on Twitter @LVocations Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Peter Litman (Peel Cathedral, Isle of Man) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Monday 3 August to Monday 10 August ‘Seeing God in all things’ retreat Led by Father Michael Beattie SJ at St Joseph' Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, L37 1PH. Details: www.stjosephsprayercentre.com. Tel: 01704 875850. Saturday 8 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Hannah Gibson (Birmingham Conservatoire) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Saturday 15 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Jack Spencer (Queen’s College, Cambridge) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Sunday 16 August Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Wednesday 19 August Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher : Father John Cullen.

The Marriage and Family Life Department offers support meetings for Divorced and Separated Catholics. These will begin again in mid-September. We welcome Catholics and other Christians who are divorced or separated (recently or in the past) or who are experiencing the breakdown of a marriage or a long term relationship. The small groups are informative, affirming, free and confidential. For information or to book a place please contact Frances Trotman Tel: 0151 727 2195. General enquiries can be directed to Maureen O’Brien Tel: 0151 522 1044 Email: m.obrien@rcaol.co.uk

Saturday 29 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: James Luxton (Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Monday 31August to Sunday 6 September ‘For me to live is Christ’ Retreat led by Monsignor Jeremy Fairhead at St Joseph' Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, L37 1PH. Details: www.stjosephsprayercentre.com. Tel: 01704 875850.

Monday 31 August to Monday 7 September Preached Retreat Led by Father Jim McManus CSSR at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Monday 31 August Mass of Thanksgiving for Blessed Dominic of the Mother of God 12.00 noon at St Anne and Blessed Dominic, Monastery Road, Sutton, St Helens, WA9 3ZD.

Looking ahead September 2015 Thursday 3 September ‘Love others as you love yourself’ Exploring the Letters to all Christians. Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 5 September ‘Responding to the Call.’ A Day of Recollection to support those exploring vocations to the Priesthood. Discover more about diocesan priesthood; talk with and hear from priests of the archdiocese and spend time in prayer and discussion. 10.00 am at St Charles’ Presbytery, 224 Aigburth Road, Liverpool, L17 9PG. Further information from Father James Preston Tel: 0151 727 2493 or email: frjamespreston@gmail.com. Also on Facebook at /liverpoolvocations and on Twitter @LVocations Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Peter Morrison (St Mary’s Church, Chorley) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Tuesday 8 September Ministry Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. A day for anyone involved in ministry or the service of others, with time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winnie Morley. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Wednesday 9 September UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St Benet, Copy Lane, Netherton, L30 7PE.

Various dates Saturday 22 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Norman Harper (St George’s Cathedral, Southwark) Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Wednesday 26 August Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father Tom Leigh.

Thursday 10 September to Sunday 13 September Heritage Open Days at St Matthew, Clubmoor, Liverpool, L13 9DL. Thursday 10 September ‘Love others as you love yourself’ Exploring the Letters to all Christians. Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Friday 11 September to Sunday 13 September ‘No ordinary God.’ Weekend Retreat led by Dave Hopewood at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk

Archdiocesan website www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk 16

Catholic Pictorial


p01-17:covers 24/07/2015 14:52 Page 17

news diary Nugent Care’s 45th celebration

Archbishop Malcolm will be the Celebrant at Nugent Care’s 45th annual celebration of their Mass for people with disabilities. The Mass which is at 3.00 pm on Sunday 27 September in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King will welcome people from all walks of life, faith and abilities for a celebration which will provide the congregation with a sense of belonging. The theme of this year’s Mass is ‘Life Giving Water to All’ and will

include a presentation from Electric Apple, a group of drama enthusiasts with learning difficulties. Nugent Care`s Faith and Community worker Rose Taker, who has organised the event, says: ‘The Mass is sure to be a fantastic occasion and we would encourage everyone to attend, whatever your beliefs or background. The annual Mass for people with disabilities is always a great way to meet new people from your local area.

Receiving Vatican II University, Rev Dr Peter McGrail will speak on the theme of ‘Active participation: unpacking a disputed concept’ on 20 October and the series draws to a close on 27 October with Dr Alana Harris, Teaching Fellow in History, King’s College, London on the subject of ‘Interrogating the Council from Merseyside: the Mariology and eschatology of Dr Anne Biezanek’.

2015 marks the 50th Anniversary of the closing of one of the most significant religious events of the twentieth century: the Second Vatican Council. To mark this, and to keep the conciliar spirit alive, the Archdiocese of Liverpool will be hosting a series of six talks given by experts on aspects of the reception of Vatican II. With the theme ‘Receiving Vatican II’ the talks will take place in September and October 2015 in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. No booking is required.

On the weekend of 14 – 15 November the Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation will be the venue for 'Vatican II and the Church Today’ a conference featuring internationally renowned speakers exploring the continuing impact of the teaching of the Second Vatican Council in the life and mission of both the local and global Church.

On 15 September Archbishop Malcolm McMahon will speak on ‘Nostra aetate: 50 years on’ and the following week on 22 September Dr Christopher McElroy, Director of Music at the Cathedral will address the issue of ‘Catholic Imagination: unlocking the arts in worship today’. On 29 September Rev Dr Nicholas Sagovsky, visiting professor at Liverpool Hope University delivers the talk on ‘From “Gaudium et Spes” to “Together for the Common Good: Catholic social teaching as public theology.’

The series then takes a break for a week resuming with Rev Mgr John Devine, former Churches’ Officer for the North West, speaking on ‘Faith in the public square’ on 13 October. Associate Professor of Theology at Liverpool Hope

Featured speakers will include authority on Vatican II, Dr Massimo Faggioli, Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor and Father Timothy Radcliffe OP. Places must be booked in advance, on a first come first served basis and early booking is strongly recommend. Details can be found at http://liverpoolvaticanii.org/

Catholic Pictorial

17


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:17 Page 18

profile hen Michele McMahon stands up to speak at this year’s Pause for Hope service at the Metropolitan Cathedral on 13 September, it will be only her second attempt at public speaking – yet the impact of her first attempt suggests her audience will be kept spellbound from start to finish.

W

The 46-year-old’s smiling eyes gain an extra gleam as she recalls what happened when she addressed a similar audience in Manchester in May. ‘Some people were coming up me to crying,” she tells the Catholic Pic. ‘It touched them and inspired them and I think that my role in life now is to give people hope. I didn’t realise the impact it would have.’ The purpose of Pause for Hope is to provide a positive message for cancer sufferers and it is not hard to see why Professor Ray Donnelly, who established this initiative having previously set up the Roy Castle Foundation, sees Michele as the ideal representative. After all, when the former nurse from Knotty Ash was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2007 she was told by doctors that the cancer in her right lung was inoperable. ‘I asked the doctor, ‘Will I be OK?’ and he said, ‘I don’t know’. I thought, ‘What do you mean? I am 39 and my kids are 12 and 14 – I’ve got to be OK’. That was nearly eight years ago and my prognosis was two and a half years.’ Those children – daughter Sarah Louise and son David – are now in their twenties, and Michele adds: ‘I used to pray that I would see my kids grow up – that is all I wanted, I said I’d never ask for anything again and now I am going to be a nan in December.’ Reflecting on the ups and downs of the past eight years, Michele explains how she was the beneficiary of a trial treatment – ‘the Soccar trial’ – run by Dr Joe Maguire at Clatterbridge Hospital, which combined chemotherapy with radiotherapy over a five-month period. ‘I was 39 and used to working 60-70 hours a week and it was really hard going. It nearly killed me. But it has worked so far – I am stable.’ Previously employed at the Royal Liverpool Hospital, she had pushed doctors for a correct diagnosis when she first fell ill. ‘The scans were alright but I was not alright and I told them I wasn’t moving from the room until they listened to me and made a plan – and they did

18

Catholic Pictorial

Michele McMahon A messenger of hope for cancer sufferers by Simon Hart and found out it was cancer,’ recalls Michele, who since her course of treatment has been sustained by ‘a herbal tea called Essiac’ and the power of prayer. ‘Apart from Dr Maguire the only thing I had was my faith,’ she explains. ‘At least once a week I take myself off to the cathedral. It is a place that makes me feel calm and gives me comfort.’ She is particularly grateful for the support of Father Peter Morgan at St Anne’s, Overbery Street who ‘helped make my faith as strong as it is’. Though she misses her work as a nurse – an attempted return to her old job proved too arduous – Michele was able to care for her parents, Roy and Ronnie, before their deaths from lung cancer in the past two years. Today she helps the fight against the disease in her role as patient representative on the Roy Castle Foundation’s Clinical Reference Group. ‘There is a stigma with lung cancer as people think, ‘She must smoke’. You’d

never say, ‘Skin cancer, oh you must have sunbathed’. It is not right.’ She will be speaking again at a fundraising night for the 25-year-old foundation at Liverpool’s Crowne Plaza Hotel in October, offering the insight of somebody with more experience of lung cancer than most. ‘You can’t change it so you have to learn to live with it,’ she adds. ‘I try to be positive and have a sense of humour. It’s no use being miserable, people would just switch off.’ There is no chance of that when she stands up to deliver her message of hope at the Cathedral next month. • The Pause for Hope service takes place at 3pm on Sunday 13 September www.pauseforhope.org.uk

‘I thought, What do you mean? I am 39 and my kids are 12 and 14 – I’ve got to be OK’


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 19

youth ministry

Departing Animate team show why community matters By Father Simon Gore I write this with the words of Frank Sinatra running through my mind: ‘And now the end is near’. Not because this is a final curtain (I hope!) but because it is the final week for the Animate team of 201415. Of course, at the time of writing, our work was due to continue with the Lourdes pilgrimage, but the team who have shared their lives as part of the community here at Lowe House are preparing to leave and take the next steps on their life’s journey. I hope it has been a fruitful year for them. It cannot be easy to join a community such as we have at Lowe House. I often think of my own experiences on joining the seminary community; but even as the numbers declined at Ushaw we were still a large group of people. Furthermore, we also had classes and pastoral work that took us away from the house. For the team here at Animate there is no such parallel. It is expected that they will meet for a time of prayer in the morning before the work of the day starts. We will

then either prepare in the house for a group of young people to arrive for a day retreat, or get on the bus and make our way to another venue and work with young people closer to their homes. The team then cook for each other and eat together and have evening prayer at the end of the work day. It can be difficult to acclimatise to such an unusual way of living. To come from a family home and have certain freedoms (along with certain responsibilities) and all of a sudden be expected to cook for nine people and be in the chapel at 6am for morning prayer and have the responsibility of making sure certain parts of a very large house are kept clean and tidy can be a daunting prospect. Yet there is a reason for all of this. Again, I think of my own seminary experiences and realise that living in a community allows for the deepening of a relationship with God. It is through the regimen of prayer times together that we can become accustomed to offering to God our day. In the same way, it is through

sharing a life with others that we come to realise that our needs might not be as important as we might have thought and so begin to see the world in a different way. It is easy to fall into the belief that the work we do with young people is the main function of Animate. Yet I increasingly see this work as a byproduct of the community life of the team. It is only through having a vibrant team of young people who live together as a community and share their joys and sorrows with each other that any work done with young people has any credibility and authenticity. Without the community, any ministry with young people will be as shallow as ‘a gong booming or a cymbal clashing’ (1 Cor 13). And so I hope that this year’s living as part of a community has been fruitful for the 2014-15 team. At its best a community can profoundly affect those who are a part of it for the rest of their lives. My hope and prayer is that this year at Lowe House will have deepened and strengthened the faith of the team and given extra impetus to their mission to live the life the Lord is calling them to. As they take their next steps, either moving on or preparing to re-join the community here next year, please pray for them. Animate team of 2014-15: Sarah Beatty James Lawry Chris Jones Tom Hallsworth Sean Evans Dominic Cain Caroline Rigby Charlotte Walmsley

Catholic Pictorial

19


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 20

justice & peace Lessons from the annual J&P conference Steve Atherton reflects on the central messages of the 2015 National Justice and Peace Network conference which took place in Swanwick, Derbyshire on 17-19 July. There were over 300 Justice and Peace activists at this year’s conference and one common question was how to build peace in communities and across the planet. Professor Paul Rogers from the Department of Peace Studies at Bradford University claimed that governments often adopt a military solution to try to control problems rather than deal with the underlying causes. He argued that the world economy was organised so that more and more people get very poor while a tiny minority get enormously rich. ‘The neoliberal economic system is not delivering justice,’ he said, noting how this division of wealth is made worse by the effects of climate change, citing how typhoon Hyan left over 6,000 people dead in the Philippines last year. Yet Professor Rogers was not despondent, noting that it is big shocks that often cause world governments to act. He recalled how the Great Smog of 1952, which killed 4,000 people in London, ‘affected the power elites and brought the Clean Air Act forward a decade’. Similarly, in the 1980s, the threat posed to the ozone layer by the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in our fridges and freezers drew quick action from governments to halt the danger. Professor Rogers believes that similar action is needed now to address the threats posed by climate change to peace and the living environment. ‘The period between now and 2030 is crucial

– we have to work to get the changes. We can have a peaceful, sustainable and just world in the 2070s if we make the right moves now up to 2045.’ I was left wondering whether our politicians base their policies on reality or wishful thinking. We heard also from Father Edu Gariguez, a former Goldman environmental prize winner (2012), who spoke of the threat posed to the people of the Philippines and their environment by large mining companies. He said that there were 92 large-scale mining applications for the island of Mindaro, where he lives. The Filipino government sees mining as a way to earn money but the island’s inhabitants experience it as destruction. ‘The neo-liberal system sees natural resources as something to be exploited rather than something for the sustainable life of all,’ said Father Gariguez, who has been targeted by death squads for campaigning against exploitative mining practices. ‘If we are pro-life, we must be pro-environment,’ he added, calling for ‘concerted collaborative action, working together in building the common home’. There were also talks from women having a big influence on their local communities, notably Lorraine Dinnegan, who spoke about the establishing of a ‘Safe Havens’ scheme in north London after her son Martin was stabbed to death in 2007. The Dinnegans learned about this scheme from the Mizen family, who lost their son Jimmy in similarly tragic

20

Catholic Pictorial

The photo from the convention shows: Jenny Vaughan, campaigns officer at Progressio; Lorraine Dinnegan, Safe Havens organiser; Professor Paul Rogers, Department of Peace Studies, Bradford University; Pat Gaffney, director of Pax Christi and conference chair; Ann Peacey, chair of NJPN; Rev Dr Martin Poulson SDB, Theology Department, Heythrop; Father Edu Gariguez. circumstances in south London. Lorraine has worked with people from her church and her local police force to set up havens in 45 shops and explained: ‘The police were grateful that people in the community were standing up for something good.’ I wonder whether we could copy this idea in Liverpool. Sister Maire Hayes from the Congregation of the Holy Spirit in Luton, meanwhile, explained how faith groups were working together to promote harmony in a town which is the birthplace of the English Defence League (EDL), and a place often associated with racial hate. She told of an annual peace walk and sporting events where people of different faiths come together. Sister Maire noted that despite the tensions, often stoked by people coming in from outside, there was no trouble in Luton at the time of the riots across the country in 2011. Another example of work that began in a church J&P group and ended up making a big impact came in a report from the Lancaster Diocese, whose environmental subgroup ended up advising Lancashire County Council. It was good to learn that a J&P group had influenced the rejection of applications for fracking on the Fylde!


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 21

StCatholic Vincent de Paul Primary School Pitt Street Liverpool L1 5BY “Serving With Love … Striving For Excellence”

❤ ❤ ❤ ❤

OFSTED May 2013 - ‘St Vincent de Paul Catholic Primary School is an outstanding school.’ Convenient City Centre Location Nursery Places Available Breakfast Club: open from 7.30am Range of After-School Extra-Curricular Activities

❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤

ICT Suite PC/Mac/iPads Educational Visits in our Private Minibuses Healthy Schools Award Activemark Gold Basic Skills Quality Mark Liverpool Hope University Articled School Status Archdiocesan Religious Education Inspection “an outstanding school”

For further details, contact the Headteacher: Mr P Stewart on

0151 709 2572

Fax 0151 707 8942 email: vincent-ao@st-vincentdepaul.liverpool.sch.uk

Leisure Time Travel Liverpool’s Own Pilgrimage Specialists

ROME EXTRAORDINARY JUBILEE HOLY YEAR Opens 8th December in Rome. The Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception 7th - 10th December Half Board By Air Manchester - Rome Only £499 (twin/double)

Groups for Rome Holy Year 2016 Book early to confirm accommodation in Rome during the 2016 Holy Year 5/6 and 8 day Pilgrimages Hotel accommodation available for GROUPS on the following dates 15th February • 14th March 30th May • 27th June 19th September • 24th October

LOURDES by Air from Manchester Departs 14 September Manchester – Toulouse A 5 day Pilgrimage Full Board in Lourdes Only £549 per person

SHRINES OF NORTHERN FRANCE

Caravan for hire on Lleyn Peninsula, North Wales Situated between Abersoch and Pwllheli Sleeps up to 9 £300 - £350 per week Phone/text

07985 553413 for details and availability

To advertise in the next issue please call the Advertising Department on

0151 709 7567

By Executive Coach Departs 2 October Visit Paris (Rue du Bac) Nevers and Lisieux 5 day only £399

LOURDES by Air from Liverpool Departs 5 December Liverpool – Carcassonne A 4 day Pilgrimage Full Board in Lourdes Only £399 Only a few seats remaining at this price

CHRISTMAS IN LOURDES By Executive Coach No Overnight Driving Departs 23 December Full Board in Lourdes A 6 day Pilgrimage Only £415

GROUPS and INDIVIDUALS contact us for LOURDES ROME FATIMA HOLY LAND MALTA POLAND MEDJUGORJE KNOCK SHRINES

For a copy of our 2015 brochure email: info@lourdes-pilgrim.com Facebook: leisure time travel pilgrimages www.lourdes-pilgrim.com

0151 287 8000 The North West’s Leading Pilgrimage Company Catholic Pictorial

21


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 22

MADE YOUR WILL? Your Will(s) prepared in the comfort of your own home for:

£75 per Will* *Guaranteed fixed fee. Absolutely NO HIDDEN CHARGES!

Other Fixed price services:

Lasting Power of Attorney (£195 per LPA) • Property Trust (£195 Severance of Joint Tenancy) • Document Storage (£15 per Will per year) •

For more information or to make an appointment for this Professional, Guaranteed Fixed Fee, Home Visit service call:

0151 420 5391 NORTHERN WILLWRITERS Celebrating 14 Years of Low Cost Home Visit Will Writing Member Society of Willwriters

22

Catholic Pictorial


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 23

Peter Coyne Independent Funeral Services Ltd We provide a range of Funeral Services for the discerning family, with help from our fully qualified and caring staff, we endeavour to provide a quality service at an affordable cost

Head Office: The Grosvenor 134-140 Stanley Road, Kirkdale, Liverpool L5 7QQ Tel: (0151) 207 0222

Millennium House: 475 Queens Drive, Liverpool L4 8TY Tel: (0151) 226 7999 - (0151) 525 7999 634 Longmoor Lane Fazakerley L10 9LA Tel: (0151) 521 7999 St Chad’s Drive Kirkby Town Centre L32 8RB Tel: (0151) 548 7999

Local agents for Golden Charter Pre-Paid Funerals

Catholic Pictorial

23


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 24

“An Outstanding Catholic School” Liverpool Archdiocese


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 25

cathedral Welcome to the Choir of Christchurch Cathedral Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean The quiet month of August gives us an opportunity at the Cathedral to get on with repair work that can’t be carried out when there are regular large events in the building as well as a chance to do some forward planning for the following year.

The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King played host last month to the Choir of the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Christchurch, New Zealand. The Choir currently sing at St Mary’s ProCathedral in Christchurch pending decisions on the Blessed Sacrament Cathedral which sustained serious damage in the earthquake of February 2011. Liverpool was the penultimate stop for the Choir of 40 men and women on a tour of

England, Scotland and Ireland which included concerts and recitals in the Cathedrals at Westminster, Chelmsford, Dublin, Kilkenny, Killarney, Galway, Belfast, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leeds, and Birmingham under their Director of Music, Don Whelan. The Choir were last in Europe in 2010 and have since toured Asia in 2012 and sang in Melbourne in 2013. During their visit to Liverpool they sang at the 12.15 pm Mass in the Cathedral Crypt before giving a short concert in the main Cathedral.

Cathedral Car Boot Sale If you are ever at a loose end on the second Saturday of the month then why not think about coming along to our popular Car Boot Sales which are held in the Cathedral Car Park. They are always on the second Saturday (except August and January when we have a break and do a stock-take.) If you would like to have a pitch and sell your own valuables you need to book in advance and pay £10 on arrival from 7.00 am. If you fancy browsing around you are most welcome from 8.00 am, and why not stop at the Dean’s Cafe for one his famous bacon butties and a cup of tea. However, we are always on the lookout for good quality furniture which we can sell and all money raised goes directly to the Cathedral. So please have a good look through your spare bedrooms, garages and under the bed, and if you have redundant items that you don’t want it is most likely that we can sell them. If you can’t get to the Cathedral with your delivery we can arrange for collection. Bookcases, tables, chairs, settees: you name it we take it. The only things that we don’t take are books and clothes. But furniture is what we are looking for so please help us if you can. For further information and collection request please contact Claire Hanlon in Cathedral House on 0151 709 9222, extension 201 or c.hanlon@metcatherdal.org.uk

One significant item of repair which has considerable consequences for forward planning for next year are the repairs to the East and West Doors. Although these doors look as though they are made of bronze they are actually bronze faced fibreglass and resin on a metal frame which is filled in with concrete. They are not quite as beautiful or expensive as solid bronze but are certainly as heavy: each of the main doors weighs about two tons with the side doors being about half that weight. As the years have gone by the hinges, supporting mechanisms and side porch areas have been in desperate need of refurbishment. This work now needs to be carried out as soon as possible in time for the Holy Year of Mercy which begins on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. Quite what pilgrims can do once they enter through the Holy Door is still being considered. There will be opportunities for parish and deanery groups to come and use the chapels for mass and services of reconciliation during this year and various stations for prayer etc for pilgrims to journey around either alone or in groups. Beyond that I’m not entirely sure but the hope is that the fruits of this year will be a greater compassion and concern for those in need, a warmer welcome for the stranger and better ways in which we communicate and deal with one another within the church.

Catholic Pictorial

25


p18-26:covers 24/07/2015 14:18 Page 26

Pic extras Mums the Word At our bi-monthly Mass on 1 July at St Richard’s, Skelmersdale, Father Mike Thompson was presented with a Papal Blessing organised for him by the local Union of Catholic Mothers foundation to celebrate the silver jubilee of his ordination. Cath Lydon, president of the Skelmersdale foundation, made the presentation to Father Thompson (pictured) and there was also a bouquet of flowers for Angela Moore, our Archdiocesan president, as a thank you for agreeing to stay in office for another year. The evening, which concluded with refreshments served in a marquee erected in the parish orchard, marked another celebration for St Richard’s which in June celebrated its 150th anniversary.

• Many of the UCM members present at St Richard’s on 1 July will have gone home with patterns for ‘Twiddlemuffs’. These are knitted hand muffs with ribbons, buttons, zips and other bits and pieces attached, and they help dementia sufferers sooth their anxieties by keeping their hands busy. I assume that our expert knitters will have no problem following the patterns distributed and if anyone has made one already, I would like to ask that they send a photograph to me, by post or email, so that others can see what they should look like. • On a serious note, Rob Marris, MP for Wolverhampton South West, will be presenting his Assisted Dying Bill to Parliament on 11 September 2015. Members are asked to write to their own MPs urging them to be in the Commons on that date and to vote against the bill. We cannot let this pass into law as how many elderly or disabled people will feel pressurised into ‘not wishing to be a burden to their families’? The Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) in their 2014 survey found that 77% of their members did not want a change in the law. Please write a short letter to your MP (a letter is better than an email), addressing the envelope to (name of MP), House of Commons, London, SW1A 0AA. By doing this we could have a real impact. • Best wishes for a safe downward journey to Archdiocesan treasurer Margaret Kerbey who is to abseil from the top of the Anglican Cathedral to raise money for the UCM and Parkinson’s disease charities. This is not the first time that she has done this. Good luck, Margaret. Madelaine McDonald, media officer 26

Catholic Pictorial

News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Long-serving members rewarded in Isle of Man and Liverpool

Two centuries of combined service to the KSC’s Isle of Man council was recognised in a special presentation at the parish church of St Columba in Port Erin this summer. Brendan Caley, George Hodson, John Johnson and Robert Lees all received golden jubilee medals and certificates at the celebration on 14 June as the quartet marked their 50 years’ membership of the Order. The presentation was made during an 11am Mass concelebrated for the feast of St Columba by Father Brian Dougherty, Father Leo Cooper, and Canon Philip Gillespie, chaplain of the Isle of Man council who is soon to take up the position of rector of the Beda College, Rome. The Isle of Man council has also welcomed a new member, meanwhile, with Neil Mellon’s admission ceremony taking place during a recent Mass at St Mary of the Isle church in Douglas. Over in Liverpool,

James Kay received his own richly deserved golden jubilee medal and certificate during the Mass celebrated by Father Chris McCoy for the feast day of our patron at St Columba’s parish in Huyton on 9 June. They are pictured alongside Brother James’ wife Kathleen Kay and provincial grand knight Pat Foley. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Email: dpokeane@aol.com


p27-32:covers 24/07/2015 14:20 Page 27


p27-32:covers 24/07/2015 14:20 Page 28

PIC Life Why silence really is golden By Moira Billinge The few very hot summer days we have experienced on our UK shores so far this year will probably have done nothing to change the minds of the global warming sceptics. Despite the message of Pope Francis’s recent encyclical ‘Laudato Si’ (Praise be to you), which called for us to respect and value all aspects of human existence and included concerns for the environment, the debate about the effects or otherwise of the pollution of our planet by carbon gases will remain deeply polarised. Noise is one of the more immediate and obvious forms of pollution in our modern times. While sound is essential to our daily lives, noise is not and though it probably causes less harm to humans than water, air or land pollution, it is an increasing problem. Mobile phones, household gadgets, radios, road vehicles, car and house alarms, industrial noise, and the mindnumbing piped music played in shops (together with the commands bellowed out to staff over increasingly loud PA systems in supermarkets) all combine to create a clanging cacophony of sounds which continually assail our senses. ‘I can’t hear myself think’ will be a familiar adage to many of us and it says something about our constant immersion in noise that some advertising gurus have even responded by cleverly producing silent television adverts that grab our attention immediately. Silence is very important to the welfare of human beings and a lack of it can deprive us of the many opportunities to

28

Catholic Pictorial

appreciate and reflect upon the beauty of the world around us. Mother Teresa of Calcutta wrote: ‘We need to find God, and He cannot be found in noise and restlessness. God is the friend of silence. See how nature – trees, flowers, grass – grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun, how they move in silence. We need silence to be able to touch souls.’ Referring to Good Friday at the beginning of August is rather out of sync with the liturgical calendar, but this year, before leaving the altar after the 3pm celebration of the Lord's Passion, the parish priest at my local church turned to the extremely packed congregation and said: ‘As you leave this church today, please do so in silence, reflecting upon all we have seen and heard during our Good Friday service, as we accompanied Jesus during His Passion and death on the cross. ‘Carry that silence and peace with you, out of church, into the streets and into your homes. If, as you leave, you are tempted to speak to the person next to you, please don’t. Have some respect for that person and their desire for silence.’ The effect was profound. Hundreds of people processed from the church and made their way home, through to the car parks and along the pavements of the busy main road nearby, in total silence. There were so many people, but no-one spoke. Little did the priest know, as he made his appeal for silence, just how generously his parishioners would honour that request; indeed, what followed was a beautiful, prayerful public witness to the sacredness of the day. On that rare occasion, the silence spoke volumes.

Prayer for August Dear God Please during this holiday time keep us all safe and free from all harm and accident as we travel to visit new places. Watch over us on our journey Thank you Dear Lord Please send your favourite prayer to: Barbara, Catholic Pictorial, 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS When sending your favourite prayer please let us have your name and which parish you attend, also your home telephone number which will not be published, without the details we are unable to publish.

Worth a visit by Simon Hart

The Santuario de Chimayo may not be a name to resonate with Catholic Pic readers but as the ‘Lourdes of America’, it is a place dear to many Catholics in the United States. It is located on the high road between Santa Fe and Taos in New Mexico and draws 30,000 pilgrims each Good Friday. As I discovered on a visit in July it is on a smaller scale than Lourdes but with its adobe architecture and bucolic setting – a stream runs through grounds dotted with cottonwood and catalpa trees – Chimayo has undeniable charm and a pleasing peacefulness. Like Lourdes, it is known as a place of healing owing, in its case, to its sacred dirt which pilgrims rub on to themselves On the altar of the main chapel – the Chapel of the Christ of Esquipulas – you find the crucifix at the heart of the Chimayo story. This green cross was found by Don Bernardo Abeyta on Good Friday 1810, after a light had drawn him down from a nearby hill. Tradition says he tried to take it to a church in nearby Espanola only for the cross to reappear in Chimayo. In a sideroom off the main chapel is the pit of dirt (‘tierra sagrada’) marking the spot where the cross was found. http://www.elsantuariodechimayo.us/


p27-32:covers 24/07/2015 14:20 Page 29

join in Eating Out

Children’s word search The Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord is celebrated on August 6. Look at our clues for the feast and learn more about it.

JESUS

R

B

C

M M

H

O

L

Y

J

G

R

MESSIAH

D

E

P

F

A

E

O

G

E

U

N

R

B

N W

O

M

K

S

S

I

R

I

A

S

M D

O

G

Z

U

S

E

W

K

D

N

R

G

X

P

S

J

H

I

N

T

I

N

L

W

H

D

B

T

X

O

A

O

E

SON OF GOD

I

X

S

O

N

O

F

G

O

D

H

N

OUR BROTHER

Q

K

Y

U

R

V M

A

S

T

R

T

LIGHT

R

P

Y

B

T

H

G

I

L

A

U

V

N

Y

R

L

D

Y

W

J

E

P

L

E

G

U

S

Y

M

J

Q

F

O

R

Z

K

O

N

L

F

J

E

T

E

A

S

V

G

KING POWER FEAR

RADIENT HOLY

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy The young curate loves watching golf on the telly and was in his element watching the recent Open. Father Mullarkey is not so impressed. ‘It’s so exciting,’ said the YC. ‘Exciting?’ responded Father Mullarkey. ‘Every time I look they’re just walking across the grass.’ ‘You don’t understand it,’ said the YC. ‘There are three of them in first place and the last four holes have been all square.’ ‘If the last four holes have been all square,’ said the auld fella, ‘wouldn’t they be better off playing with sugar lumps?!’

Relax during August and eat out at some of our listed restaurants Windmill Mill Lane, Parbold 01257 462935 Wheatsheaf Town Row, Croston 01772 600370 Blue Mallard Burscough Wharf, Liverpool Road North, Burscough 01704 893954 The Ship Wheat Lane, Lathom 01704 893117 Rigbye Arms Whittle Lane, Wrightington 01257 462354 New Seasons St thomas Road, Chorley 01257 241040

Cards from the Carmelite Monastery …I prayed specially for you and all your intentions May the Lord bless you now and always

World of Atherton

There is a lovely selection of cards at the Carmelite Monastery Shop, Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, Liverpool L25 3NU. Cards for all occasions of high quality and very well priced are on sale, phone the card shop 0151 724 7102 or email: marytoncards@outlook.com or visit the shop personally if you prefer.

Catholic Pictorial

29


p27-32:covers 24/07/2015 14:21 Page 30


p27-32:covers 24/07/2015 14:21 Page 31


p27-32:covers 24/07/2015 14:21 Page 32

Profile for Educate Magazine

Cathpic august2015  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Cathpic august2015  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Advertisement