Catholicpic april 2015

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Issue 127 APRIL 2015

A new look for our clergy

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

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Easter Joy

St Bernadette’s at 50


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contents Welcome A very happy and blessed Easter to all as today, Easter Sunday, we celebrate the greatest feast in the Christian calendar. There is an artistic feel to this edition as we take a look at the new archdiocesan vestment commissioned by Archbishop Malcolm and designed by Hayes and Finch which just a few days ago made its debut at the Mass of Chrism. This will become a familiar sight at archdiocesan celebrations over the coming months and years. We also take a look at the creative work of the Metropolitan Cathedral Art Studio where a busy band of volunteers produce banners, altar frontals, vestments and more. There are opportunities for people to join them if they would like to do so. Our main feature concentrates on the letter from our Bishops regarding the General Election. With just a month to go to polling day there is plenty for us to ponder and reflect on before casting our vote. Congratulations go to ‘Pic columnist’ Canon Philip Gillespie as it is announced that he will be taking up a new appointment in September as Rector of the Beda College in Rome. The good news is that he will continue to write our liturgy column each month.

From the Archbishop’s Desk It is very easy for us to forget that we are Easter people. Now that the Easter celebrations both in church and with our families are over it is very easy to go back to the way we were before Lent and Easter. At the beginning of Lent we tried very hard to change our life even if it was only in a little way such as giving something up or resolving to help those less fortunate than ourselves. Those of us who kept our resolution all through Lent should give ourselves a pat on the back. But even if we didn’t quite make it to the end the fact that we tried should have a lasting effect on the way we live our lives. You will remember the phrase ‘Easter People’ because that was the name of the report from the National Pastoral Congress that took place in Liverpool in 1980. Not all the high expectations expressed in that report have been achieved but we are Easter people nonetheless. One way we can show that we are full of the joy of the resurrection of Jesus is to look happy and, to quote Pope Francis, not look as though we are returning from a funeral. So even though it is nearly a year to the next Lent in the meantime let us resolve to be Easter people and messengers of joy. May God bless you and your families throughout the Easter season.

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

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Main Feature Voting for the Common Good

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News From around the Archdiocese

12 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 13 Nugent News Looking for someone who cares 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 18 Profile Siobhan Ackers A family affair at St Teresa’s 19 Animate Youth Ministry A Lenten Season with a difference 20 Justice and Peace Use your vote urge local Church Leaders 25 Cathedral Record Many hands make light work in the studio 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Copy deadline May issue 10 April 2015 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

28 Pic Life How often do we judge a book by its cover? 29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey

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Voting for the common good Bishops’ letter urges Catholics to vote – and vote with care – at General Election By Simon Hart ‘... Remembering the mercies of God... let the renewing of your minds transform you, so that you may discern for yourselves what is the will of God – what is good and acceptable and mature.’ (cf Romans 12:1-2) This quote sits at the top of an open letter from the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales calling on all Catholics in this country to give serious thought to where they cast their votes at the upcoming general election. Over 500,000 copies of the letter have gone out to parishes, asking Catholics to ‘think about the kind of society we want here at home and abroad’. The letter looks at five different areas of life outlining Catholic teaching before offering key questions which voters may consider before 7 May. It is a letter which underlines our responsibility to engage in the democratic process with questions regarding respect for life; marriage and the family; education; our communities; and our relationship with the planet. According to the Bishops, ‘respect, dignity, equality, justice and peace’ must be ‘primary concerns’ and Jesus’s message in the Gospel offers a vital guide by teaching us to value each person: ‘the vulnerable child inside the womb; the parent struggling with the pressures of family life; the person striving to combat poverty; the teacher inspiring students to seek the truth; the stranger fleeing violence and persecution 4

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in their homeland; the prisoner in his cell in search of redemption; the child in a distant land claiming the right to a future; and the frail elderly person needing care and facing the frontier of death.’ These primary concerns are addressed as follows: 1) Respecting life The Bishops write: ‘We support policies that protect the fundamental right to human life. The unborn child is vulnerable and defenceless and, tragically, in our society often the innocent victim of abortion. We oppose calls to introduce assisted suicide or euthanasia. We urge better support for carers and more high-quality palliative care and a robust National Health Service on which we can all rely.’ Question: Where do the candidates in your constituency stand on assisted suicide, euthanasia, abortion and other life issues? 2) Supporting marriage and family life; alleviating poverty ‘The Christian understanding of marriage, founded on a loving and faithful relationship between a man and a woman, is the basic building block of society… A commitment to support the family should be at the heart of social and political life.’ Q: Do your candidates have a commitment to support marriage and family life? ‘There are many families in our communities who are financially vulnerable and struggle to make ends meet; housing and living costs are high.

Many people do not have a living wage to support them and their families. Too many have to turn to the state for additional income and to external voluntary support such as food banks. Government policies should be assessed on the ways in which they impact those most in need… and how they support and strengthen the family and its capacity to flourish.’ Q: Where do your candidates stand on directly helping the poorest and most vulnerable people and also helping them transform their lives?

3) Educating for the good of all ‘We want outstanding schools where success is not just narrowly based on league tables but on how the full potential of every child is developed. Catholic schools and colleges seek to develop to their full potential the God-given gifts of every child. This includes the spiritual dimension… Catholic schools serve over 845,000 children in England and Wales and are generally more ethnically diverse than many other schools. They make a positive contribution to society as they help pupils become good citizens with clear moral principles... Future government policy should ensure the poorest have access to high-quality education and that Catholic parents have true choice for educating their children in Catholic schools.’ Q: How will candidates ensure the best outcomes for the poorest children? Will they support parental choice for faith-based education? 4) Building communities ‘As human beings we share a common humanity and are members of a single human family. We rightly have ties to our own families and communities, but are always called by the Gospel to a wider solidarity with others and to help build a society based on love and justice, where decisions are made at the most appropriate level (whether local, national or international). The principles of solidarity and subsidiarity assist us in how to think about the future of Europe.’ Q: Where do your candidates stand in protecting these values in the debate about European institutions?


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feature ‘Catholic schools and colleges seek to develop to their full potential the Godgiven gifts of every child’

‘For some communities many factors make life more difficult, including rising inequality, increased loneliness for many older people, job insecurity and overstretched community services. Building communities is something that can only be done by active citizens. It cannot only be left just to politicians or government. Q: Where do your candidates stand on the role of the voluntary sector and how its work can be enhanced? ‘The private sector also has a vital role. Business should see itself at the service of society, solving problems and meeting needs. The market economy exists to serve humanity. People are not merely economic units to be exploited. The dignity of work should always be respected.’ Q: Do your candidates support a living wage and a thriving private sector committed to fair pay and the dignity of human work? ‘Violence and conflict have led to the massive displacement of people, many of whom seek asylum or refuge. There are also workers and students from overseas

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feature

Above: Cardinal Nichols at the Press Conference launching the letter

‘The recognition and respect given to religious belief is now a crucial issue in many societies including our own’ 6

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who contribute much to the common good of our country… Immigration is a highly emotive issue and every country needs a policy to control immigration, as well as a positive commitment to policies that facilitate the integration of migrants into the mainstream of society. There is a great danger of blaming immigrants for the ills of society. We support policies which fairly regulate immigration and uphold the human rights of all, recognising the rights, dignity and protection of refugees and migrants.’ Q: Where do your candidates stand on asylum and immigration? ‘In recent years we have witnessed a dramatic increase both in violent extremism and in the persecution of people on the basis of religious beliefs…The recognition and respect given to religious belief is now a crucial issue in many societies including our own. Catholics seek to recognise the signs of God's goodness everywhere, promote mutual understanding, defend the fundamental rights and freedoms of all, including the right to practise their religion, both in private and in public, and the duty to strive to contribute to the common good of all.’

Q: Where do your candidates stand on religious freedom, mutual respect and the role of faith in God in contemporary Britain, and in defending fundamental human rights and promoting religious freedom overseas? 5) Caring for the world ‘… As members of one human family, the richer nations such as ours have a duty to help the development of the poorer nations.’ Q: What are your candidates’ views on overseas aid and development? ‘We know that caring for the planet involves concern for the environment and protecting the livelihood of the poorest people in the world.’ Q: What are your candidates’ views on tackling climate change and supporting sustainable development? The letter ends by saying: ‘It is important that we vote. It is a duty which springs from the privilege of living in a democratic society. In deciding how we vote the question for each one of us is: How, in the light of the Gospel, can my vote best serve the common good?’


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

A new look The clergy of the archdiocese had a new look at the celebration of the Mass of Chrism this year as they wore vestments created especially for them. Archbishop

Malcolm McMahon commissioned Hayes and Finch to design new chasubles and dalmatics based on the Metropolitan Cathedral to be worn by priests and deacons at major diocesan celebrations. Staff from Hayes and Finch spent a long time at the Cathedral taking pictures on which they could base their design and then it was the task of graphic designer, Jessica Parry to come up with a final version for approval. The front panel of the pale cream chasuble is a view taken through one of the glass panels in front of the Cathedral enhanced by the crown of the Cathedral in the background. Once finalised Hayes and Finch staff set to work to create over 240 sets of vestments to meet the deadline of the Mass of Chrism. Karen Reilly, Marketing and Production Director at Hayes and Finch said, ‘It was a privilege to be given

the opportunity to design and make the vestment for our own archdiocese. Our factory employs 62 local people who all have an array of very specialist skill sets. Large contracts of this nature help to promote our presence and capabilities to a wide audience which potentially supports winning additional specialist projects that will sustain our factory and maintain job security for our staff” The vestments will now be used at all major celebrations throughout the archdiocese.

Leyland’s light shines Leyland St Mary’s Catholic High School was nominated to design the art work that would be displayed during the service of the Rite of Election and the Call to Continuing Conversion in the Metropolitan Cathedral. Four talented students: Rachel Smalley, Jess Hull, Jess Hiles and Grace Derry created the artwork and banners based on Isaiah 43:1-3 featured in the service. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP praised both students and staff that created the work. It was noted that ‘the art work produced by Leyland St Mary’s Catholic High School is exceptional, and these particular pieces are a valued addition to this afternoon’s service’. Rachel said, ‘I was really proud but it was a nerve wracking experience as I had to walk all the way round the cathedral Carrying a banner.’

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Mrs Edwards and Mrs Dickinson from St Mary’s art department donated their own time to support the girls in designing work.

Headteacher Miss Kathy McNicholas said, ‘It is so wonderful to see the pupils inspired and letting their light shine, we are very proud of their talent.’


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news diary Obituary of Rev John Seddon Father John Seddon, a former Port Chaplain, Director of the Archdiocesan Youth Service and National Chaplain to Catholic Scouts died on the morning of Friday 27 February, at Ince Blundell aged 62 years. He had been a priest for 29 years. John Seddon was born in Liverpool on 3 May 1952, the son of John and Mary Seddon. He attended St Peter and St Paul School, Crosby, St William of York School, Thornton, and St Bede’s Secondary School, Crosby. After leaving school he became a clerical assistant at the Inland Revenue, eventually becoming a tax officer, but felt the need to do something else. He joined the Police Force as a Constable for two years, before returning to the Civil Service as an executive officer at the Ministry of Defence. During his time at the Inland Revenue he had become a Royal Naval Reservist and from the age of twenty had become involved as a scout leader. He became involved in the parish at St William of York, Thornton, and was among the founding members of Speakeasy, a discussion and music group for young people. After two of his close friends decided to begin seminary training, it was only a matter of time before the long-standing struggles in discerning his own vocation became more insistent. He eventually applied to begin his seminary training and was sent to Ushaw College in 1980. He was ordained priest by Archbishop Derek Worlock at St William of York, Thornton, on 6 July 1985. Following ordination he was appointed assistant priest at Our Lady of Compassion, Formby, where he remained until August 1989. He then spent a year as Chaplain for the Apostleship of the Sea at Stella Maris, Bootle. Over the years John acted as chaplain on more than 25 cruises, the last on board the Aurora last Easter. In 2012 he gave an interview to the Daily Telegraph about his work as a priest on board cruise ships. He quipped that, ‘We’re actually classified by the cruise lines as an entertainer,’ which in John’s case was probably quite apt, but on a more serious note he also remarked on the various ways in which he could help passengers and crew amidst the joys and sorrows of life.

In August 1990 John was appointed as Director of the Archdiocesan Youth Service living at St Robert Bellarmine, Bootle. He undertook this role for four years before his appointment as parish priest at St Michael’s, Kirkby. In 1997 he returned to a ministry with young people, this time as National Chaplain to Catholic Scouts, a post he held until his death. John was very proactive in this role. He was instrumental in organising camps for Catholic scouts, including the provision of prayers and reflections to be used. He was for a time the religious adviser to the scout movement on Catholic matters, he also chaired an inter-faith committee and he was very involved in the Centenary Jamboree in 2007. On a number of occasions John had the honour to preach at some prestigious venues such as Westminster Abbey and Rochester Cathedral, and for the St George’s Day parade at Windsor, and on one occasion to lead prayers in the US Senate. For ten years John also served as the European Catholic Chaplain for the international scouting movement. In the last few years John served on the Police-Clergy liaison group for Merseyside as well as being the Priest Chaplain to the Port of Liverpool. Throughout his time as National Scout Chaplain John was based in the parish of St Peter and St Paul, Crosby, where he generously assisted when he was not prevented by his many other commitments. His Funeral Mass was be celebrated By Archbishop Malcolm at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Friday 6 March, followed by burial at St Peter and St Paul, Crosby.

Obituary of Rev John Cunningham Father John Cunningham who served the Parish of St Brendan, Old Swan, for over twenty years died at Ince Blundell on the evening of Tuesday 10 March aged 90 having served as a priest of the Archdiocese for over fifty years. John Cunningham was born in Liverpool on 23 December 1924, the son of Michael and Cecilia Cunningham. He was educated at St Anthony’s School and St Elizabeth’s Central School in Liverpool, and later with the Holy Ghost Fathers at St Mary’s Missionary College, Castlehead, Grange-over-Sands. During World War II he saw active service with the Royal Navy and participated in the D-Day landings. Following his return to civilian life he trained as a teacher and taught Classics at St Anselm’s College, Birkenhead. Having applied to Archbishop Heenan to study for the priesthood, he was sent to the Beda College in Rome in the autumn of 1960 and was amongst the first intake to the newly-built seminary on the Viale di San Paolo. He was present for its solemn blessing by Pope John XXIII in October that year. On completion of his ecclesiastical studies he was ordained priest at the Basilica of St Paul-without-the-Walls on 14 March 1964 by Paolo Cardinal Marella, Archpriest of the Basilica of St Peter in the Vatican. In August 1964 he was appointed assistant priest at St Teresa’s, Birkdale, where he remained for nearly four years. His naval experience was put to good use in May 1968 with his appointment to Atlantic House. Unfortunately his work there was short-lived as he was diagnosed with a back problem which meant he had to return to parish duties on medical advice. In November 1968 he was appointed temporarily at Holy Rosary, Old Roan, before a more permanent appointment at Our Lady Immaculate, Liverpool, in February 1969. After five years in Everton he moved to St Aidan’s, Huyton, in June 1974. In April 1978 he became assistant priest at St John’s, Kirkdale, moving two years later for a brief appointment at Holy Family, Halewood, in September 1980. His final parish appointment to St Brendan’s, Liverpool, came in January 1981. Initially he was assistant to Canon Thomas Kennedy, but succeeded as Parish Priest on the latter’s retirement in 1983. For more than twenty years he provided pastoral care at St Brendan’s and continued to live in the area following his retirement in 2002. In the last months of his life he lived at Ince Blundell Hall. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at Holy Family, Ince Blundell on Friday 20 March, prior to burial at Ince Blundell.

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news diary ‘Do you Love me’

Well over a hundred people gathered at Lace for the launch of the Bishops Conference document ‘Do you love me’ writes Father Chris Thomas. This book has been written by the subgroup of the Bishops conference on spirituality and the launch was sponsored by the Department of Pastoral Formation and the Irenaeus project. The atmosphere was wonderful, vibrant and lively as people from all across the diocese took the opportunity to listen, pray and reflect together. Right at the heart of our tradition is the invitation to enter into relationship with Christ and to constantly deepen that relationship in a way that brings life to us and through us to others. This beautifully produced and written book is designed to help us as individuals and groups to enter into that process. We were delighted to have with us Bishop Brian Noble, the chair of the bishops sub group on spirituality, who talked us through this pastoral book with great clarity. Those who came thoroughly appreciated the evening and were enthusiastic about the book and the opportunities it offers. That enthusiasm was shown as within ten minutes the Daughters of St Paul had sold out of their copies of the book. 'Do you love me’ is available from the Daughters of St Paul and is well worth buying. 10

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In the arms of Pope Francis Helen and Mike Langan, owners of Leisure Time Travel, were delighted when their son, Martin together with his wife Pamela and baby son Oliver decided to join their pilgrimage to Rome and Assisi, but never in their wildest dreams could they have guessed what was going to happen next. On the day of the Papal Audience Pope Francis stopped the popemobile and lifted their grandson Oliver from the crowd and kissed him before returning him to his astonished parents. Oliver’s grandfather, Mike, said, ‘In June last year my granddaughter, Jasmine, was privileged to sing for Pope Francis with the Metropolitan Cathedral Choir at the Mass at which Archbishop Malcolm received the

Pallium, and now this. I am on top of the world’.

Pic columnist to be rector of the Beda College Canon Philip Gillespie, Dean of the Isle of Man and ‘Catholic Pic’ columnist, has been appointed as Rector of the Pontifical Beda College in Rome by the Congregation for the Clergy at the request of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales. He succeeds Monsignor Roderick Strange of the Diocese of Shrewsbury who, after nearly 17 years, will return to England to take up a position at Saint Mary’s University, Twickenham, London. Canon Gillespie celebrated his Silver Jubilee of Ordination on 22 June 2014 and has served in the parishes of Holy Family, Southport from 1991 to 1994, Sacred Heart and Saint Alban, Warrington from 1994 to 1996 and Christ the King, Liverpool from 1996 to 2002. In 2002 he went to teach at Saint Cuthbert’s Seminary, Ushaw until 2010 when he was appointed to St Mary of the Isle, Douglas and as Dean of the Isle of Man. Canon Gillespie said: ’I have to confess that I was very surprised by the news of this appointment and while I am truly sorry to be leaving the

Isle of Man, I am immensely grateful for the privilege of being able to share with the students at the Beda my love of the ministerial priesthood and, in conjunction with the other staff of the college, assisting in their discernment and preparation.’ The Most Reverend Malcolm McMahon OP, Archbishop of Liverpool, said: ‘Canon Philip Gillespie goes to his new post at the Beda with the prayers and good wishes of the priests of the Archdiocese of Liverpool. Canon Philip is a very fine pastor who has considerable experience of the formation of future priests and I am sure that he will prove a worthy successor to Monsignor Roderick Strange, and continue his excellent work.’


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news diary St Bernadette’s celebrates 50 years A year of celebrations to mark the 50th anniversary of St Bernadette’s parish in Shevington began in earnest recently with a special series of Masses. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon was the main celebrant at the 9.30am Mass on Sunday 22 February with another Mass following on the anniversary itself, the next evening, attended by a number of former parish priests. Father John Hindley, the parish priest at St Bernadette’s, said: ‘The Masses over that weekend marked the beginning of the year-long celebrations for the 50th anniversary of St Bernadette's parish. We were delighted to welcome Archbishop Malcolm on 22 February and he made a great impression on all the parishioners with his warmth and friendliness. ‘The parishioners also appreciated seeing some of the former priests that have served the parish and also the priests from the pastoral area at the concelebrated Mass on Monday 23rd, the actual anniversary.’ There was also a Mass for pupils from the primary school and a day of activities at the school focused on the anniversary. Fr Hindley added: ‘The celebrations used the past 50 years as inspiration for the future, so that St Bernadette's continues to be a vibrant parish, committed to spreading the Good News.’ St Bernadette’s was originally built as a chapel of ease served by the priests of St Marie’s, Standish, and was blessed and opened in 1961. A contemporary copy of The Catholic Parish Magazine described it as ‘a single storey building constructed of

Canadian red cedar wood, with very attractive vertical timbering. On entering one is surprised at the spaciousness of the building which will seat 300 persons comfortably.’ With the town growing due to the arrival of the M6 motorway, Archbishop George Andrew Beck decided in 1965 that it should become a parish in its own right and Fr Frederick Ness became its first parish priest. His successor, Fr Charles Brady, oversaw the subsequent opening of the primary school in January 1971. St Bernadette’s has been served by nine parish priests, with the present incumbent, Fr Hindley, arriving in 2006. Fr Hindley, writing in a parish history to mark the

anniversary, said: ‘The building was designed with a useful life of 25 years but the modesty of the outside belies what is inside, and the personality of the people who shape the parish, who come to worship God there. The best way to thank those people from 50 years ago is to ensure St Bernadette’s is still thriving, moving forward and building on the work they began.’ The history of St Bernadette’s recalls the early days of parish and school, remembers the contribution of former parish priests and highlights the effort of different parish groups down the years. For a copy, contact author Steve Grimes on 01257 426090. Pictures: www.nickfairhurstphotographer.com

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news diary LACE event raises awareness about young suicide ‘If today saves one young person, it’s been well worth coming.’ These were the words of one of the participants at an event raising awareness about youth suicide at LACE Conference Centre last month. The conference on 6 March shed an important light on the national charity Papyrus, which works for the prevention of young suicide. Hosted and promoted by Familias, the National Association for Catholic Diocesan Marriage and Family Life Ministry, it sought to explore attitudes and beliefs about suicide and consider what is being done to prevent young suicide in particular. Ged Flynn, the chief executive of Papyrus, was hopeful that the day at LACE would serve as a significant step towards promoting dialogue about a serious problem for our society. In 2013 there were over 1,500 suicides by people aged between 15 and 35, three-quarters of

them male. Flynn said: ‘It was really good to have in one room school chaplains, educators, retired professionals, carers, parents, clergy, pastoral ministers, prison chaplains, university staff and chaplaincy leads, to name but a few – all talking about suicide and how to prevent it among young people. ‘Seventy-five per cent of people who take their lives are not known to those providing mental health services. We all want to help and often don’t know what to say or do when faced with suicidal behaviours.

‘I hope that the result of our day in Liverpool is an increased awareness of the scale of young suicide and a determination to share with others that suicide is not inevitable – that we can all help to do something to prevent it. ‘My own hope is that the 100 people who attended will return to their parishes, communities and organisations and start talking about suicide. This, in itself, breaks stigma and promotes open dialogue about one of the last taboos, suicide.’ For more information, visit www.papyrusuk.org.

Join in the Obituary of former Walk for editor John Short Life Right To Life supporters are invited to don their walking shoes on Monday 25 May and help raise funds by taking part in the annual Jim Dobbin Memorial Walk in Clitheroe. The Bank Holiday Monday walk has been renamed after the late Labour MP for Heywood and Middleton and tireless pro-life campaigner, who died last September. Walkers will take an eight-mile circular route which will both begin and end at St Michael and St John Church, Lowergate, Clitheroe, BB7 1AG. Those taking part in the walk, which starts at 1pm, will include Bishop John Arnold, the Bishop of Salford, Lord David Alton of Liverpool and Fiona Bruce, Conservative MP for Congleton and chair of the All Party Parliamentary Pro-Life Group. For booking and sponsor forms and any further details, contact Moira Billinge on telephone 07545118743 or 01732 460911, or email moira.billinge@btinternet.com

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THE original news editor of the Catholic Pic, John Short was a wonderfully gifted communicator who used his talents as a journalist to gain lasting admiration and respect from colleagues and readers alike. Short, who died in February aged 83, was recruited by Norman Cresswell, the founder of the Pic, to help launch the paper in 1962 as a rival to The Universe and the Catholic Herald. He was determined that the Pic should be fiercely independent and enjoy complete journalistic integrity and his driving presence helped the then weekly tabloid achieve a peak circulation of 43,000. Born in Liverpool in 1931, he was the son of a GPO technician and one of five children raised in a devout Catholic family. He was accepted to train for Holy Orders at the Valladolid seminary in Spain but decided that the priesthood was not his true calling and returned to Merseyside in the mid1950s where, after completing his national service, he landed his first job in journalism at the Birkenhead Advertiser. He then had three years as a news reporter on the St Helens Reporter before moving to the Daily Post for a year prior to his arrival at the Pic. Short was renowned at the Pic for

mentoring young reporters like Colin Myler, now editor of the New York Daily News. Myler recalled: ‘John gave me my first job in journalism. He was an extremely talented journalist and brilliant story-teller. He was a born rebel who loved to go against the tide, and a mentor like no other for instilling into young journalists the most simple and long-lasting values, not just for being a good reporter but how to treat people with respect and dignity.’ When Cresswell decided to sell the Pic, Short opted for a career change. He earned a social studies degree from Liverpool University and an MA from Leicester University and became a media lecturer at Trinity and All Saints College in Horsforth near Leeds. He later worked at Ulster University in Coleraine and for the government's Central Office of Information. During this time he was invited to Australia as visiting professor in the School of Journalism at the University of Queensland. He later settled in Yorkshire before moving to Ely in order to be close to family. Short, who had been suffering from cancer, is survived by his wife Hilda and their daughter Emma and son David.


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sunday reflections On a liturgical note Christ is risen – He is risen indeed! The joy and delight with which we as Christians celebrate the Resurrection of the Lord and the great feasts of the Easter season seem to revolve around one word – fidelity. The fidelity of Jesus in the face of his impending suffering is summed up in the phrase ‘Not my will, but your will be done’; moreover, the fidelity of Christ to his promise ‘I am with you always’ is the bedrock upon which we build firmly all our personal love and devotion and the pastoral works within the family, within the Church and within our mission and ministry to the wider society around us. During the Easter season of 50 days we read extensively from the Acts of the Apostles, the New Testament book which could almost be given the sub-title ‘What happened next’. It is the unfolding of how – in joys and persecutions, debates and conversions of heart –

Sunday thoughts I grew up in the seminary from the age of 12. I took it for granted that passages in the Gospels about the call of the disciples were about vocations to the priesthood or religious life. Adult conversion for the cradle Catholic normally led to the seminary or novitiate. Settling for anything less meant taking your hand from the plough, adopting the ‘lay state’ and returning to life in the pews. Even the term ‘the married state’ felt like a putdown. This was not the case with sister and brother Christians from other denominations. Pre-Vatican II at least, non-Catholic Christians were more at ease with lay Christian commitment than Catholics. In the Gospel reading from John for the Second Sunday of Easter the disciples have locked themselves in the upper room ‘for fear of the Jews’. Jesus appears to them. After his usual greeting of ‘Peace be with you’, he pours out the Holy Spirit on them and says: ‘For those whose

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Canon Philip Gillespie

the early followers of Jesus were guided by the working of the Holy Spirit to deepen their fidelity to Christ. This fidelity led some to travel great distances to proclaim the Good News; equally it inspired others to remain in their families and close-knit communities and to be a leaven and an inspiration for goodness of living – having hearts open not only to God but also to the demands of their communities and those in any kind of need. All this was done ‘faithful to example and command of Christ’. What is different for us today? Not a great deal! The means of transport and communication may have changed, but the fundamental call to fidelity of life and of love remains constant. Christ yesterday and today, the beginning and the end, the Alpha and the Omega. (Blessing of the Easter Candle, Roman Rite)

Mgr John Devine OBE

sins you forgive they are forgiven; for those whose sins you retain they are retained.’ Wearing my priest hat, I interpret these words as the moment when Jesus institutes the Sacrament of Penance. He confers on the ordained the power to give sacramental absolution. He also grants the discretion to refuse absolution to those, who in his judgement, lack remorse or resolve; the power to ‘fast and loose’. Over the years I have come to reread this text through the eyes of a baptised person. The Lord commands us all to forgive. The words of Jesus suggest that a refusal to forgive our brothers and sisters freezes the animosity between us forever. This is a challenge easier said than done. It is the work of the Holy Spirit.

Christ has died, Christ is risen… Just recently I was having a conversation with a friend of mine. We were reflecting on the present moment and came to the conclusion that while for us everything is chronological, God is other and for God everything is the present moment. There is no time in God. That means the opportunity to experience what is at the very core of our Christian tradition – the reality of the Passion, death and resurrection of Christ for us – and to let it be real. We are caught up in something that is eternal. The Christ we have been given is far more than we can ever imagine. How do we live with the paradox of death and resurrection? I guess all we can do is ponder the mystery and let it bear fruit within us because it is happening within us. Richard Rohr, the American Franciscan, says: ‘God is dying in all things, but God is risen in all things too. And both at the same time! Only wisdom can hold both together. Part of the great mystery of life is that it’s just as hard to see the ecstasy and beauty of things as it is to accept the crucifixion of things. Both together are the paschal mystery—Christ is dying; Christ is rising all the time, everywhere – no exceptions.’ In the very stuff of our lives, in the very creation that we live in now and for all time, Christ is dying and rising, present in all things, good or bad now and forever. The events of the week that we call holy culminate in the Easter Triduum where we spend time reflecting on Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. After that we spend the next 50 days reminding ourselves that ‘we are an Easter people and alleluia is our song’. Easter goes on and on and the Church wants us to recognise that truth. So what is the challenge? I think it lies in questions like: Do we recognise the Paschal mystery in our own lives? Are our lives filled with hope and the joy of Easter? Would others know through our lives that we are an Easter people? This weekend gather and celebrate the story of Jesus’s death and resurrection but also your own story too and then live it out for the world to see and make it real. Let others know that Christ has died and Christ is risen. Fr Chris Thomas


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nugent news New Lives Fostering Service: we are looking for someone who cares

This year at least 8,600 foster families are needed across the United Kingdom and every year thousands of children need a safe, caring foster home, but there are not enough foster carers. New Lives Fostering Service is a new service based in Liverpool and part of Nugent Care. New Lives Fostering will strive to be the best, consistently finding ways to improve services and inspiring confidence in the support offered to individuals, families and the children in their care. New Lives Fostering Service is looking for carers who want a career that is emotionally and financially rewarding and that offers opportunities to train and develop within the role; learning new skills and therapeutic parenting, that will aid them to care for and offer children in need a positive fostering experience. We approach everything we do with positivity, and this will be passed on to our carers too. We have high expectations of ourselves and our foster carers, and this in turn leads to the children we look after having high expectations of themselves, with the intention of them achieving higher than national average results in school compared to their looked after peers. New Lives Fostering places a great deal of importance on learning and development, as we believe it can make a significant difference to the

effectiveness of foster carers. It gives both the tools and skills to meet the needs of children looked after, whilst building the knowledge that underpins practice. We aim for our carers to be some of the most satisfied in the United Kingdom, and we will work hard to improve, constantly learning and listening to our carers, our children and local authorities, aiming for 100% satisfaction with the service and support we provide. ‘We are committed to providing high quality foster care to ensure positive outcomes for children and young people, and want to continue to recruit new foster carers to help us to fulfil this aim. New Lives Fostering is different, and we believe that the things that make us different are the things that make us stand out. ‘We will provide carers with 24 hour support every day of the year, excellent training and generous fostering allowances’ says Corral Amusa, Nugent Care New Lives Fostering Manager. If you have the time and space to make a difference in a child’s life? If you can care for a child, contact us today for an informal chat and learn more about what makes us one of the United Kingdom’s top independent fostering agencies. Call 01744 613 041, email fosteringservice@nugentcare.org or visit our website www.nugentcare.org for more information.

A very Happy Easter from all at Nugent Care. Easter is the greatest feast of the year and the message which it brings is one of hope. At Nugent Care we aim to bring hope to peoples lives so that they can see the way forward, no matter how difficult their situation. Hope is vital for the children that we work with. Children enter the care system for a variety of reasons. This could be due to family breakdown, parental illness, neglect, abuse or a whole variety of other reasons. Generally they return home to their parents and resume their normal family life. However, for some children it is not possible to return home. At Nugent Care we offer facilities for children who are not able to live with their families either for a short time period of time or for the longer term. Nugent Care has schools for children who live away from home during the week term time, or also for weekends and the holiday periods, we also have children’s homes, a secure unit, and a fostering service. In addition some children require an alternative ‘forever family’ and we offer an adoption service too. The Nugent Care article in this edition concentrates on our fostering service. Fostering can be suitable for children who need a period of respite, or who require a period of longer term care. Many people wonder whether they could be a foster carer but feel reticent about what they may have to offer to a child or children going through a troubled time in their lives. Have no doubt that being a foster carer can be a challenge, but the task also brings many rewards. To see a troubled child settle, develop, flourish, and grow in confidence is one of the greatest rewards you can experience. Foster carers themselves have a variety of life experience; they may be married, single or divorced. They may or may not have children, or may or not be in paid employment. What is important is that they care about children and can offer a happy family home for the time a child or children are with them. So if you feel that you have what it takes please do contact our team today and talk it through. The team will take you through a comprehensive assessment and, if you become a Carer, will offer you support before, during and after placements. Why don’t you find out if you can offer a child a home?

Kathleen Pitt Chief Executive Nugent Care

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what’s on Saturday 4 April ‘Responding to the Call.’ A Day of Recollection to support those exploring vocations to the Priesthood. Discover more about diocesan priesthood; talk with and hear from priests of the archdiocese and spend time in prayer and discussion. 10.00 am at St Charles’ Presbytery, 224 Aigburth Road, Liverpool, L17 9PG. Further information from Father James Preston Tel: 0151 727 2493 or email: frjamespreston@gmail.com. Also on Facebook at /liverpoolvocations and on Twitter @LVocations

Celebrating the 500th anniversary of the birth of St Teresa of Avila. ‘Holy madness – who is Teresa of Avila?’ Day Retreat led by Gillian Coxhead at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk

Saturday 11 April Car Boot Sale 8.00 am onwards in the Cathedral Car Park. Pitches £10. Details from Claire Hanlon 0151 709 9222.

Wigan and St Helens Gospel Choir Concert in aid of Christies(Wigan) and Macmillan Cancer Support 7.30 pm in St Anne’s Anglican Parish Church, Church Lane, Shevington, Wigan. Organised by the fund raising team from St Bernadette’s, Shevington. Tickets £5 from St Marie's Church, Standish Tel: 01257 423291 or St Bernadette's fund raising team

UCM Annual General Meeting 12.00 noon in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King.

Sunday 19 April Short Evening Prayer Followed by Johann Sebastian Bach’s Cantata 158: ‘Der Friede sei mit dir.’ ‘May peace be among you’ sung by the Liverpool Bach Collective. 5.30 pm in St Helen’s Church, Alexandra Road, Crosby, L23 7TQ.

Saturday 18 April

Tuesday 14 April Ministry Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. A day for anyone involved in ministry or the service of others, with time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sr Winnie Morley. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Thursday 16 April ‘Life as an Army Chaplain.’ Speaker: Father Martin Caddell. 7.00 pm Mass followed by the talk in St Helen’s Parish Centre, Crosby, L23 7TQ. Saturday 18 April ‘Their joy was so great that they still could not believe it.’ A day led by Dr Marian Tolley for all proclaimers and hearers of the Word. 9.30 am to 4.30 pm at the Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation. Cost £15 including lunch. Bookings www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/CoursesEvents or Pastoral Formation Department, LACE, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool, L17 1AA. Tel: 0151 522 1040. Email: formation@rcaol.co.uk

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Saturday 25 April Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winnie Morley. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Consecrated life: the Joy of the Gospel: how do we respond with joy in this world of anxiety? A day for consecrated people organised by the Religious Life Institute and the Archdiocese of Liverpool Vicariate for Religious at Bellerive FCJ Catholic College from 10.30 am to 4.00 pm. £6 per person payable to St Anne’s Church. Tea and Coffee will be provided but please bring some food for a shared lunch. The day will be led by Sister Gemma Simmonds CJ, Director of the Religious Life Institute.

Looking ahead: May 2015 Saturday 2 May ‘Responding to the Call.’ A Day of Recollection to support those exploring vocations to the Priesthood. Discover more about diocesan priesthood; talk with and hear from priests of the

Saturday 9 May

archdiocese and spend time in prayer and discussion. 10.00 am at St Charles’ Presbytery, 224 Aigburth Road, Liverpool, L17 9PG. Further information from Father James Preston Tel: 0151 727 2493 or email: frjamespreston@gmail.com. Also on Facebook at /liverpoolvocations and on Twitter @LVocations Wednesday 6 May UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St. Edmund of Canterbury, Oxford Road, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Thursday 7 May to Sunday 10 May Cursillo Catholic three day course in Christianity At St Joseph's Prayer Centre, Formby, L37 1PH. For further details visit www.liverpoolcursillo.co.uk or Tel: 07542 642327. Friday 8 May to Sunday 10 May ‘See what great love the Father has lavished on us’ Discovering the Letters of John. Scripture Weekend led by Father Chris Thomas at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 9 May Mass of Thanksgiving for Elizabeth Prout 2.30 pm at St Anne and Blessed Dominic, Sutton, St Helens, WA9 3ZD. Speaker: Sister Marie McNiece CP. Tuesday 12 May Ministry Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. A day for anyone involved in ministry or the service of others, with time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sr Winnie Morley. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com


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april Thursday 14 May ‘Into the belly of the whale’ Discovering the Book of Jonah. Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Thursday 21 May ‘Into the belly of the whale’ Discovering the Book of Jonah. Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 23 May ‘Etty Hillesum - A pathway to freedom and hope’ with Donna Worthington Day Retreat at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Sunday 24 May to Sunday 31 May Preached Retreat Led by Father Ian Kelly at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Thursday 28 May ‘Into the belly of the whale’ Discovering the Book of Jonah. Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 30 May Annual May procession Led by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. Starts at 2.00 pm at St Peters Square (off Seel Street). Those who will have made their First Holy Communion are invited to join the procession. Details from Jim Ross. Tel: 07766 706766. Email jimmy.ross7@gmail.com

Annual Mass for Healing The 16th Annual ‘Mass for Healing’ will be celebrated in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King on Friday 1 May at 7.00 pm with confession available from 6:30 pm. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon will be the Celebrant and all are welcome to attend. This special service attracts people from all over the country. Originally it was led by Father Jimmy Collins who died three years ago at the age of 94. It was Father Jimmy’s sincere wish that the celebration would continue and Friday 1 May is the anniversary of his Funeral Mass and the feast of St Joseph the Worker the patron of the parish which he served in Kirkby for thirty years. Before Mass the music ministry will lead hymns of praise and worship and at the end of Mass there will be Exposition during the healing part of the service. During this time priests, deacons and members of the prayer teams will be available for prayer and a blessing. Priests will also be available for confessions. Healing takes many forms: spiritual, mental, physical, reconciliation, awareness and acceptance; everyone is affected in different ways and all receive some form of gift from the Holy Spirit. The Mass and Service of Healing can offer peace and renewal to those present.

Consecrated Life: the Joy of the Gospel Consecrated life: the Joy of the Gospel: how do we respond with joy in this world of anxiety? This is the theme for a day for consecrated people organised by the Religious Life Institute and the Archdiocese of Liverpool Vicariate for Religious. Bellerive FCJ Catholic College will be the venue on Saturday 25 April, from 10.30 am to 4.00 pm. The cost will be £6 per person payable to St Anne’s Church. Tea and Coffee will be provided but please bring some food for a shared lunch. The day will be led by Sister Gemma Simmonds CJ, Director of the Religious Life Institute and will offer opportunities for sharing and reflection.

World of Atherton

Various dates in May

Archdiocesan website www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Catholic Pictorial

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profile A family affair at St Teresa’s by Simon Hart

Siobhan Ackers

THE Easter Vigil at St Teresa’s in Upholland promises to be quite an occasion for Siobhan Ackers and her family. Not only will she be standing at the front of the church for her baptism and first communion, but she will also be accompanied by her three daughters – Lottie, Ruby and Georgia – who will be received into the Church. Becoming a Catholic is something that Siobhan, 45, would never have dreamed of when she was the age of Lottie, nine, her eldest daughter who will also be making her first communion. Back in her days at Christ Church C of E primary school in Bootle, it was ‘them and us’ when it came to mixing with Catholics, Siobhan recalls, but today she could not feel more at home in the community of St Teresa’s parish, where her daughters attend the local primary school and where she embarked on the course of learning that will lead to her Easter initiation. ‘My Irish grandad was a Catholic but I was brought up in a non-religious house,’ says Siobhan, one of 38 catechumens to be baptised this Easter across the archdiocese. ‘With the girls going to the Catholic school I started thinking I should do something but it is a very big step when you are older and not christened. It has taken me a lot of years to think I really do want to do this and I need to do it.’ Reflecting on the path taken towards the Church, Siobhan cites a period of soulsearching prompted by several miscarriages – ‘You question faith and God’ – and the subsequent, unexpected arrival of Georgia, now three. Yet it was not until Lottie’s classmates began preparing for their first communion last year that Siobhan decided to act. The fact that Lottie, baptised a Methodist like her sisters, could only receive a blessing led her to a significant conversation with Father Tony Sligo, the parish priest. ‘Initially I had my head down thinking, ‘We’re not Catholic, I’m not really sure what we’re allowed to do’. But when I eventually approached Fr Tony, he came to the house and talked me through things and was very welcoming. There were no barriers – it was just, ‘Come along and see what we do’.

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‘It’s like stepping into the unknown if you’re not from the Catholic Church but I started going to the ASK (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) classes just to find out more. Before I would go to church services and see everyone doing things but I didn’t know why they were doing them. I have really enjoyed it because it has opened my eyes and made me think this is the right thing I am doing. I feel it has woken something up in me.’ And Siobhan, formerly a teacher at Farnborough Road primary school in Southport but now a full-time mother,

cannot speak more highly of the welcome she has received in the Church. ‘I thought there were rules and it was all very mystical and mysterious but I have found it so welcoming. You can ask questions and you don’t feel silly. It has not been like I’d imagined it at all. It has been so welcoming and so lovely.’ Easter weekend, with that special family outing to the Vigil, should be lovelier still.

‘The word of God doesn’t change, what changes is how we communicate it’


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youth ministry

My Lent with Animate Animate Youth Ministries team member Charlotte Walmsley looks back a Lenten season with a difference. It would be wrong to say I have not put a foot wrong during my year with the Animate team – after all, on our first Mission Week together in Wales I managed to break my ankle, a mishap that earned me the nickname ‘Limpy’. But every week, even with an attractive blue plaster cast on, I have enjoyed the chance to walk with and guide other young people as they learn more about their faith and about themselves, and at the same time I have grown too. Community prayer, for instance, is something I never thought I would be able to enjoy or embrace but I feel, for the first time, that I really can communicate with God, and similarly this year I really have been able to approach Lent differently. The key focus on Lent for me was always ‘to give something up’. The Catholic faith of my family is something I grew up taking for granted and while I knew that Lent was a special time, as with many cradle Catholics, I had never really given much thought to it. I just did it – giving up crisps, cake and chocolate and even (during one

particularly testing Lent) McDonald’s. This Lent, however, has been rather different for in addition to sacrificing my treats, I have embarked on a journey of discovery, developing my knowledge of what Lent really means to me as a Catholic. In February we ran a series of day retreats for Year 8 pupils from Saints Peter and Paul Catholic College in Widnes. We focused on the three pillars of Lent: Almsgiving, Fasting and Prayer. Over the course of the day we wanted the pupils to come to a realisation that almsgiving (‘Do I really have to give someone my arm?’ is an actual question we get asked!) does not have to be a solemn activity, but can be something which is small but done with great love. Likewise, fasting does not have to be the hardest thing in the world; it is possible. And prayer does not mean saying the Our Father or Hail Mary 20 times a day, but may mean spending just five minutes thinking about the things which we are thankful for or sorry about and offering these things to God. As a consequence, I have actually quite enjoyed Lent. Now, if you had told me as a child (or even last year), that this was possible – a time when we have to go without our treats and spend half our days on our knees! –

I would not have believed it. But this Lent has been different. It has felt like it has had a purpose and I have understood more what it is all about. As a community we have done small things – Stations of the Cross for our morning prayer, giving up the change from our supermarket trips, open night prayer and even extra Masses during the week – but it is these small things which have helped me come to realise the importance of Lent. I have tried to follow Jesus’s teaching that ‘When you fast, don’t pull a long face… when you go without food, wash your face and comb your hair’. I do always comb my hair, but I have not moaned (as much) about going without my favourite foods because I have come to know Jesus just that little bit better. I am still getting to know Him, but this Lent I feel I have moved a small step closer. Now, where are those chocolate biscuits and crisps?!

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justice & peace

Use your vote, urge local Church leaders produced by the Joint Public Issues Team of the Baptist, Methodist, United Reformed Churches and the Church of Scotland. As Christian citizens we are called not simply to act in our own interests, but those of society as a whole. This is enshrined in the words of Jesus that those who love God should also love their neighbour, and that we should treat everyone in our society as a neighbour.

By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker Archbishop Malcolm McMahon has joined his fellow Merseyside Church leaders in calling on Christians across the region to make their voices heard in the forthcoming general election.

In voting we encourage you to reflect on what our Christian faith urges us to do for the betterment of our society. Further resources to assist your reflections produced by church leaders and Christian organisations can be accessed from the website of Churches Together in the Merseyside Region (www.ctmr.org.uk)

Archbishop McMahon was one of six signatories of an open letter from the presidents of the Churches Together group which underlined the importance of public participation in the 7 May election. “This is an expression of liberty and democracy that we should not take for granted, and we urge all citizens to participate,” said the letter, which added: “In voting we encourage you to reflect on what our Christian faith urges us to do for the betterment of our society.” The letter in full reads: Dear friends The General Election takes place on Thursday 7th May. This is an expression of liberty and democracy that we should not take for granted, and we urge all citizens to participate. Previous generations lobbied and died for the right to vote and we can thank God that we live in a nation where

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Yours sincerely

political disagreement and transition can occur without bloodshed and violence. It is important that everyone ensures that they are registered and we offer the reminder that the closing date for this is 20th April. Church communities can take a lead in encouraging friends and family members to make sure they are registered. The process takes five minutes online (https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote). We endorse and commend the core message that has been the foundation of the Church of England bishops’ recent pastoral letter, the letter from the Catholic bishops and the resources

The Most Rev’d Malcolm McMahon, Archbishop of Liverpool The Rt Rev’d Paul Bayes, Bishop of Liverpool The Rev’d Dr Sheryl Anderson, Chair of the Liverpool Methodist District The Rev’d Jacky Embrey, Moderator of the Mersey Synod of the United Reformed Church The Rev’d Phil Jump, Regional Minister, Northwest Baptist Association Major Drew McCombe, NorthWestern Divisional Commander, Salvation Army


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FEAST OF DIVINE MERCY Sunday 12th April 2015 Our Lord asked Saint Faustina to promote the devotion to His mercy saying “The soul that will go to Confession (within the octave of the feast) and receive Holy Communion on the Feast day, shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment” St Faustina confirms Our Lord’s command to her “If I cannot show mercy, by deeds or words, I can always do so, by prayer. My prayer reaches out even there, where I cannot reach out physically.” Archdiocese venues celebrating the Feast of Divine Mercy - start time Our Lady Star of the Sea, Seaforth 1.30pm Devotions, Confession Mass 4.00pm (Peter Divine Mercy shop bus 53 from Liverpool) St Clares, Arundel Avenue, Liverpool 3.00pm Devotions, Exposition, Confessions Our Lady of the Annunciation Bishop Eaton Liverpool 2.00pm Rosary, Devotions, Bless Image (refreshments after Mass) Mass 3.00pm St Francis of Assisi, Garston, Liverpool 2.30pm Devotions, Confession, St Aloysius, Huyton, Liverpool 2.00pm Devotions, Confession Mass 5.00pm St Monica’s, Fernhill Road Bootle 2.00pm Confessions, 3.00pm Devotions, Mass 3.15pm Holy Spirit, Ford 3.00pm Devotions St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo 2.00pm Confessions, Veneration of Image, Devotions and Mass St Peter & Paul, Haresfinch, St Helens 2.15pm Confession, 3.00pm Devotions St Mary’s Broadfield Drive, Leyland 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions, Healing Service Mass 5.00pm Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley 3.00pm Exposition, Confessions Devotions, Mass 4.00pm St Mary’s, Standishgate, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions, Mass 4.30pm Holy Family, New Springs, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Our Lady Star of the Sea, Ramsey, Isle of Man 2.30pm Devotions

DIVINE MERCY SHOP for leaflets, Divine Mercy pictures etc. Unit 2, 37 London Road, Liverpool (Four cabins behind a bus shelter - opposite ‘Cash Converters shop’, near to Lime Street) Open: Mon– Fri 10.30-4.30 except Wed – closed Sat 10.30-3.30

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cathedral Many hand make light work in the Cathedral Studio Many hands make light work for the embroiderers in the Metropolitan Cathedral Art Studio, but more hands are always welcome to help create banners, vestments, altar frontals and much more. In recent months the latest group of eleven volunteers have produced a silk painted altar frontal for Remembrance Day to commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War; another altar frontal and vestments for Advent; banners for the Cathedral Crypt Chapel based on the seven Sacraments and they are currently busy working on a set of cottas for the Cathedral servers. In addition they also accept commissions from parishes and are willing to provide the same service producing banners, altar frontals and vestments. David Peglar from the studio says, ‘we have an enthusiastic band of volunteers working every Monday but we are always looking for more people who can sew to join us. If there is anybody who is interested and who can machine sew

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

and embroider please get in touch’. Enthusiasm is high among the current volunteers who describe their work as ‘interesting, enjoyable, stimulating and therapeutic’. In addition to the creativity of the studio there is also an opportunity to make new friends who share a common interest. Anyone wishing to learn more can go to a Macmillan Coffee Morning being held from 10.00 am to 12.00 noon in the Studio on Friday 10 April. The morning is being held in memory of Gill Hutchinson who did a great deal of work in the Children’s Chapel of the Cathedral. Anyone wishing to learn more can contact Claire Hanlon at the Cathedral by email at c.hanlon@metcathedral.org.uk or Tel: 0151 709 9222.

The Mass of Chrism was celebrated last Thursday. It was be the first year that Archbishop Malcolm presided at this Diocesan Service, incorporating the Blessing of the Sacramental Oils and the Renewal of Priestly Service, and very many priests, religious and lay people joined him for the occasion. There was also an added splash of colour and fashion with the clergy robed in the new Diocesan Vestments. The sacristy corridor was busier than normal that evening. I wonder what will happen to any priests who turned up without a wedding garment? For the three mornings of the Triduum the Office of Readings and Morning Prayer were sung each day at 10.00 am in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel. The psalms and readings can really help us to deepen our appreciation of what we celebrate on these days and prepare us for the afternoon or evening liturgies. Following this on Good Friday Bishop Tom Williams led a Way of the Cross at 11.30 am. On Maundy Thursday Archbishop Malcolm presided at the Commemoration of the Lord’s Supper at 7.30 pm and followed by watching in the Cathedral until 10.30 pm. The Celebration of the Lord’s Passion on Good Friday was at 3.00 pm with the singing of St John’s Passion and Veneration of the Cross. During our Easter Vigil Archbishop Malcolm baptised three adults and received a number of others into full communion with the church. Finally today’s Easter Sunday Masses are at the normal times with Mozart’s Coronation Mass as the setting for the 11.00 am Solemn Mass. There is a special Easter afternoon Sung Evening Prayer at 3.00 pm. I wish you all a Joyful and Blessed Easter

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Pic extras

Mums the Word Dear Mums, Another Lent has passed and given way to the Easter Triduum, which started at our Cathedral with the Mass of Chrism, then Mass of the Last Supper, followed on Good Friday with the Passion, all of which were solemn and moving services, leading to the great Easter Vigil where once again ‘Thine be the Glory’ was sung to our risen Lord. Looking ahead, Archbishop Malcolm McMahon has invited us to join in our groups and parishes to partake in the questionnaire for the Family Synod. Archbishop Malcolm has also appointed Father David Potter as the successor as our Archdiocesan chaplain to Father Mark Madden. Our prayers, congratulations and a warm welcome go to Father David. It was wonderful to see so many of you at St Jerome’s in March, where we said thank you and goodbye to Father Mark, who had been our chaplain since 2004. The Mass was one of gratitude (and sadness) to Father Mark who had served us with his spiritual guidance, dedication and commitment over the past 11 years. Our prayers go with Father Mark in his future commitments. Pope Francis has declared 2015 the ‘Year of Consecrated Life’. The ‘Living Joyfully’ event at the Cathedral showed how many different religious congregations dedicate their lives to the service of God and His Church in our Archdiocese. Don’t forget, Mums, to book your seats for our national president Maureen Mayer’s Triennial Mass at Salford Cathedral on Saturday 25 April (2pm). A coach will leave at 12 noon from Christ the King, returning at 5pm. I hope you all enjoyed with your families a lovely Mothering Sunday. Finally, I look forward to seeing you all at the AGM on 18 April, where Father David has kindly offered to close the meeting with a Celebration of Holy Mass. A Happy and Holy Easter season to you and your families. Angela Moore, Archdiocesan president

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Meritorious medal for Liverpool knight He has been a member of the Knights of St Columba in Liverpool for more than 30 years and Pat McGann’s outstanding service to the Order has now been recognised with a special award. McGann was the proud recipient of the prestigious Meritorious Medal at the recent KSC annual dinner at the Adelphi Hotel, where the former Liverpool provincial grand knight collected his award from supreme knight Charlie McCluskey (see photo). His active involvement with the KSC began when he became a member at St Thomas More parish in 1981. McGann went on to fill a number of roles at both council and provincial level, starting in 1982 with his election as Council 9 warden. The following year he became council chancellor until 1986, while in 1985 he was appointed council social secretary – a position he held continuously until 2014. McGann was grand knight of Council 9 from 1986 until 1989, the

year of his election as chancellor of Liverpool province (1989-94). He was later deputy grand knight of the province from 1994-97 and provincial grand knight from 19972000. More recently he has served as provincial social secretary (2000-03), provincial warden (2009-10) and provincial chancellor (2012-14). This forms a unique record of service, and all these offices he undertook with distinction and dedication in addition to running his own business in the construction industry until his retirement. • As reported in the February issue of the Catholic Pic, the KSC started a journey of prayer last December to conclude in October 2015, with a different theme for each month. Full details should be available on local church notice boards and the theme for March is ‘When did we see you thirsty?’. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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“An Outstanding Catholic School” Liverpool Archdiocese


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PIC Life How often do we judge a book by its cover? By Moira Billinge I had prepared more efficiently than usual for my recent train journey to London and was looking forward to the sandwiches that I had made earlier. A lady climbed aboard and sat in the seat opposite to me; she was impeccably dressed and bejewelled, and her hair was immaculate. Settling herself down, she began to rummage through her voluminous designer handbag, while I located my food from the depths of my haversack. I was about to start eating when the same woman produced an emery board and began to file her nails! I loathe the sound of the constant scrape-scrapescrape and it was worse because, in the confines of my seat on a crowded train, I was a captive audience. My appetite disappeared immediately and knowing that I could not combine eating with the sight of flying nail-dust particles, I dumped my sandwiches unceremoniously back in my bag. The filing continued, interrupted occasionally with a pause while she inspected her handiwork, but, eventually, my torture came to an end – almost. Peering with satisfaction at the finished product, she then proceeded to waft the nail deposits off the table with the side of her hand. I wish that I had asked her to stop before she got into full swing but I didn’t, and besides, no-one else seemed to mind. I was angry with myself, not just for being too timid to confront her, but also because of my initial surprise. Such behaviour is unacceptable from anyone, regardless of how expensively or otherwise they are attired, and I was furious that I had made the subconscious judgement that her appearance would indicate a different

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type of behaviour from the one that she actually displayed. By contrast, a good friend of mine, up to her eyes decorating her kitchen, decided to take a short break and go into the city centre to buy a free-standing heater. Not feeling inclined to dress up for the occasion – and why should she? – she donned an overcoat to hide the worst of her paint-spattered clothing and rushed to the shops. It was in the days when you handed the credit card to the assistant who would place it in a machine which made carbon copies of the transaction. On this occasion the assistant excused himself. After some considerable time, he returned and gave her the newly purchased heater. She was puzzled by his long absence but did not query it. As soon as she arrived home, though, the phone was ringing; it was her credit-card company who wanted to know whether she had just been in a certain shop and if she had bought anything from it – all of which she confirmed. The assistant, suspicious of her scruffy attire, had delayed while making the various checks with the company. Richelle E Goodrich, author of ‘Smile Anyway’, writes: ‘While you judge me by my outward appearance I am silently doing the same to you, even though there's a 99 per cent chance that in both cases our assumptions are wrong.’ Of course, not all judgements are bad, hurtful or wrong – but most of them are. The more we judge, the more we create the stereotypes which foster all sorts of negativism, against race, age, gender, religious beliefs, disability and so much more. I am reminded of the words of Mother Teresa of Calcutta. It was a frequent exhortation of hers and it went: ‘If you judge people, you have no time to love them.’

Our Easter Vigil Prayer Most Blessed of all nights Chosen by God to see Christ rising from the dead The night will be as clear as day It will become our light, our joy Our salvation, our hope. Catholic Pic wishes all our readers a Holy and happy Easter. May God bless you all Please send your favourite prayer to: Barbara, Catholic Pictorial, 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS When sending your favourite prayer please let us have your name and which parish you attend, also your home telephone number which will not be published, without the details we are unable to publish.

Worth a visit

With the daffodils still radiant, now is as good a time as any to visit Snowdonia – and those who do head down to north Wales should call in at a special cottage, writes Lucy Oliver. Situated on the A5 at Capel Curig, Tŷ Hyll – or ‘The Ugly House’ – is a welcome resting point on a springtime walk, an old dry-stone-wall residence whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Legend says it was built in a single night in the middle ages when, according to the law, anyone who could construct a house and have smoke rising from its chimney by sunrise, would be granted freehold. Some even say it was built by two outlaw brothers, with its rapid construction the reason for its crude appearance. Others, however, point to the burgeoning tourist trade of the 17th century which created a demand for picturesque cottages. The property was bought by the Snowdonia Society in 1988 and restored, and today it is home to an exhibition about its history along with a welcoming tearoom offering homemade food and a beefriendly garden. The Pot Mêl tearoom is open from 10.30am to 5pm from Easter until late October. Go to www.tyhyll.co.uk/ for more information.


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search Our Easter Vigil is such a wonderful part of our Easter devotions try to find our clues to its importance.

DARKNESS

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LIGHT CANDLE RENEWAL

PASSOVER REJOICE

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy The young curate and Father Mullarkey were sitting at the kitchen table reading their newspapers.

Try one of our listed restaurants for an Easter celebration - don’t forget to book your table. Dolce Vita Station Road, Ainsdale 01704 575535 Deli Fonseca Brunswick Dockside, Liverpool 0151 255 0808 Bistro Jaques Button Street, Liverpool 0151 227 2577 Sultans Palace Vicotria Street, Liverpool 0151 227 9020 Othellos Gateacre Park Drive, Liverpool 0151 280 7700 The Ship Wheat Lane, Lathom 01704 893117

Greeting Cards from the Carmelite Monastery

‘Here’s a remarkable story,’ said the YC. ‘A Catholic priest in Japan was run over by a careless car driver and forgave him on the condition he read the Bible every day for the next 12 months.’ The auld fella was not impressed. ‘If it had been me,’ he said, ‘I’d have rather he read the Highway Code.’

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Helen Molyneux, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham

You may know of someone who is about to make their First Holy Communion and Confirmation, if so the Carmelite

Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Kevin Lonergan Tel: 01772 744148 or 01772 655433 (home).

Monastery, Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, Liverpool L18 3NU has a very good selection. Go along to the monastery shop or email: marytoncards@outlook.com There are cards for all occasions on sale you will be delighted.

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Leisure Time Travel Liverpool’s Own Pilgrimage Specialists CONGRATULATIONS to Canon Philip Gillespie on his appointment to the Beda College ROME EXTRAORDINARY JUBILEE HOLY YEAR Opens 8th December in Rome. Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, Seats booked. Half Board 7-10 December by Air. Manchester- Rome, limited places register now

LOURDES by air Direct flight Liverpool direct into Lourdes 24-31 July 4 star hotel Helgon 8 days only £749

LOURDES by Executive Coach 25 May - 6 days £415 24 July - 8 days £549 No overnight driving. Full board in Lourdes

LOURDES - PARIS - NEVERS A 7 day Coach Pilgrimage Departures 24 May - 26 July - 6 September No overnight driving. Only £529

FATIMA by air From Liverpool 18-22 May. Only £529 Wonderful 4 star hotel. Half board

MALTA by Air In the footsteps of St Paul with Fr John Gilbert Superb Hotel and Half Board Throughout Departs Manchester 26-30 October £799

KRAKOW by air From Liverpool and Manchester Departures 10 August - 21 September - 26 October Visit Divine Mercy • Czestochowa • Auschwitz Same price as last year £599

HOLY LAND by Air From Manchester for 8 days 14 September £1149 12 October £1149 Christian Guides and drivers Half Board Would you like to train as a Tour Guide on our Pilgrimages? Also a Part Time office person required for the Summer season. Applications in writing to: Mr M Langan 275 County Road, Liverpool L4 5PQ

For a copy of our 2015 brochure email: info@lourdes-pilgrim.com Facebook: leisure time travel pilgrimages www.lourdes-pilgrim.com

0151 287 8000 The North West’s Leading Pilgrimage Company 30

Catholic Pictorial

HEY GUYS Do you enjoy music? Do you like singing in the bath? Do you like good humoured company? If so, come along to an OPEN NIGHT of THE LIVERPOOL HARMONY CLUB held on the FIRST THURSDAY OF EACH MONTH at 8.15 pm. We perform under the banner of THE GRAND NATIONAL CHORUS Our venue is THE LEE PARK GOLF CLUB, Childwall Valley Road, Liverpool L27 3YA FREE TUITION - NO PRESSURE Secure parking and bar facilities. Also, our chorus has been singing since 1974 and can offer its services for your next function at a very attractive rate. For more details check us out at www.liverpoolinharmony.co.uk


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