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Issue 138 MARCH 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

FREE

Celebrating Marriage and Family Life

Inside this issue: Pastoral Letter for Lent

RCIA Celebration

Civic Mass 2016


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contents Welcome The March edition begins on the Fourth Sunday of Lent and ends with the Octave of Easter. On the First Sunday of Lent the Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion was celebrated with Archbishop Malcolm in the Cathedral marking an important step on the journey to full membership of the Roman Catholic Church for those who have been learning about what it means to be a Catholic and who feel ready to receive the Sacraments of Initiation at the great Vigil of Easter. In these last days of Lent we pray with and for them. Our own Lenten journey continues for another two weeks taking us to the drama of Holy Week. In those days we will experience every human emotion: triumph, betrayal, suffering, ridicule, agony, death, love without limit, peace and a joy that knows no end. Holy Week has everything: moments of noise and drama and moments of silence and peace. If we faithfully follow the path laid down for us we can truly celebrate the greatest Christian Feast of Easter: the Resurrection of the Lord. May all the joy of Easter be ours; but first we must prepare and complete our pilgrimage.

From the Archbishop’s Desk

Cover: Eimear Maguire who was married in the Cathedral in January brings forward incense during the Marriage and Family Life Mass at the Cathedral.

Contents

Pope Pius XI gave the name ‘subsidiarity’ to the principle that a higher authority should not interfere with the powers of a lower authority. It first appeared in the encyclical letter ‘Quadragesimo Anno’ in 1931, just forty years after Leo XIII published his social encyclical ‘Rerum Novarum’ in 1891 that proved to be influential in the development of workers’ rights in the 20th century. The European Union adopted the principle of subsidiarity as it enables individual states to retain their sovereignty while belonging to Europe.

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Main Feature ‘A joyful and uplifting celebration’ Mass for Marriage and Family Life

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News From around the Archdiocese

We are going to hear much about Europe in the next few months and the relationship of our country to the European Union, and the principle of subsidiarity will be much quoted. One thing I am sure of is that we will only hear the negative meaning; we don’t hear much about the principle’s positive aspect. The word subsidiarity is derived from the Latin word ‘subsidium’ that we translate as ‘help’. The positive meaning of the principle is that the higher authority has a duty to support other smaller and weaker bodies and organisations even though they have a right to govern themselves.

15 Nugent News Wellbeing Curriculum at Nugent House School

During this month when we remember Christ’s passion, death and resurrection we can reflect on the way in which God our Father has freely offered us the Divine Help while also enabling every person to retain their individuality and free will.

25 Cathedral Record Holy week at the Cathedral

We should give thanks to God for the freedom of mind and body that we enjoy, and pray for the grace to make generous, balanced and wise choices.

16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Victor Anichebe- On faith and football

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 27 Animate Youth Ministry Lauren’s Lenten reflection

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures Cover and main feature; Nick Fairhurst nickfairhurst@aol.com Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life

Copy deadline April issue 9 March 2016 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

28 Pic Life When a teacher’s influence never ends 29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Welcoming Syrian refugees

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‘A joyful and uplifting celebration’ Cathedral Mass for Marriage and Family Life provides opportunity for reflection – and appreciation IT is just a single testimony but it said a great deal about the celebration that took place on Sunday 21 February at the Metropolitan Cathedral. This celebration was the Archdiocese’s Mass for Marriage and Family Life and its positive impact was highlighted by the following words from an unnamed woman who headed home afterwards with a welcome spring in her step. “I left the Cathedral feeling optimistic and energised,” she said. “All will be well; all manner of things will be well.” More than 600 people had come to the Cathedral for this annual event, which comprised a Mass celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon followed by a gathering in the Gibberd Room, and Maureen O’Brien, Marriage and Family Life Co-ordinator for the Archdiocese of Liverpool, echoed the voice above when describing it as “a wonderful experience, joyful and uplifting”. For those struggling with the burdens of family life, it was evidently a worthwhile opportunity to pause and reflect and here we gather a selection of other

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impressions from those present at this significant event in the Archdiocesan calendar. ‘’Thank you so much for the invitation to participate in today’s Celebration of Marriage and Family Mass. My mum and I were delighted that you asked us and we have looked forward to it very much. We didn’t know what to expect but felt very privileged to be included. My husband, Chris, decided to join us, and as we are married 30 years this May, I joked on the journey into Liverpool that this could be our Anniversary Mass. Well, they say many a true word is spoken in jest! When I saw the renewal of the marriage vows in the order of service, I thought I would have been very disappointed if he wasn’t there. He said later that he was thinking the same thing. My mum, Chris and I found it emotional as we have had extraordinary family issues and problems recently. As with all families, we have our ups and downs – trials and tribulations I like to call them – but events have occurred that I wouldn’t have envisaged in a million years within our family. The prayers, readings and intercessions were all about ‘real’

‘Family life can be hard for most of us and because of this it was lovely to see so many people participating’

Right: Kate and Glen Lewis receive their Bible from Marie Waine and family

families and ‘real’ modern-day issues, particularly the prayer that went with the incense bowl my mother and I carried to the altar. ‘For families struggling with the issues of our time – unemployment, money worries, time pressures and addictive behaviours. May they be given strength to endure and come to a renewed appreciation of the power of simplicity when lived in love.’ This prayer alone made me feel that everyone involved in organising the event and planning the service understood what matters to families and couples these days and the challenges that 21st century living presents. It was refreshing to hear some of them out loud – an acknowledgement of the struggles that many of us face. I found time during the service to reflect on my own position. I thought to myself that I don’t just believe in all that we speak of when we worship together but, especially at present, I am trying to live it out too. It is hard, though. And if it’s hard for me, I assume it is hard for most of us, at various times throughout our lives. Because of all this, it was lovely to see so many people like us participating with the offertory, the Family Bibles, the incense bowls, the readings and the intercessions. Just perfect.’ Angela Mollan


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‘’Many thanks to all who had a part in planning this annual Mass in our beautiful Cathedral. How blest we all are to have this inspirational occasion. We all belong to families. Many people are married. Daily life presents challenges as well as joys for us all, but in everything we all need God's guidance and support. As we all are human, perfect marriages and perfect families do not exist yet Jesus invites us to ‘Be perfect as your heavenly Father is

perfect’. This celebration with the renewal of marriage vows and most helpful Bidding Prayers, in which all are included, helps us all to become closer to the person that God wants us to become, so that our marriages and families reflect the Father's 24/7 love, mercy and forgiveness. In the Gospel, God says, ‘This is my Son, the chosen one. Listen to Him.’ And the Gospel acclamations at Mass remind us of the value of God’s word, with St Luke's

Gospel telling us: ‘Mary pondered all these things in her heart.’ It makes you think how much we need to follow her example of listening to – and not just hearing – God's word, so that with His strength we can act on it. It was fitting, therefore, to see that the three family Bibles entrusted to three families at last year’s Mass were passed to three other families for 2016. We all need God's word to nourish us inwardly for life's challenging journey. ‘Your words

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Mike, Michelle, Daniel and Sam Parker who brought forward the gifts at the offertory procession.

are spirit, Lord, and they are life; you have the message of eternal life’ (John 6: 63).’ Peter and Julia Galloway

And finally, the last words must go to 11-year-old twins Lucy and Kate: ‘I really enjoyed the Mass and the cakes were sublime.’

‘Thank you for a wonderful service in respect of marriage and family life. It was a privilege to attend and witness the reaffirming exchange of marriage vows. The words relating to the concept of family beyond marriage were particularly comforting to those of us who are unmarried or no longer married. Thank you so much. How special to be part of a larger family, ie the Church, which has space in it to include all.’ Jacqui Sellek and Maria Tanton

‘The Mass was very interesting and the music was superb. I loved the cakes the most, though only by a small bit. I would like to do this again.’ Twins Kate and Lucy If you missed the celebration this year we hope to see you in 2017. One of the ways you can support marriage and family life in the meantime is by offering a little of your time to truly make a difference.

Volunteer with us and we’ll train you to make a difference

‘We all need God's word to nourish us inwardly for life's challenging journey ’ 6

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Whether you’ve been blessed in your relationships or have known brokenness, whether married or single, you’ll find a warm welcome from the Archdiocese in partnership with Marriage Care. We are looking for people who can respect and share in our ethos and values, and facilitate or co-ordinate our marriage preparation courses. In return for a little of your time, we will give you the training and development you need, and you will get to enjoy being part of a vibrant, professional community, and benefit by knowing you are contributing to a truly worthwhile, life-enhancing cause from which individuals and ultimately society as a whole benefit. If you or someone you know is interested in volunteering as a Marriage Preparation Facilitator, please contact Maureen O’Brien, Marriage and Family Life Co-ordinator for the Archdiocese of Liverpool: m.obrien@rcaol.co.uk 0151 522 1044.


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

New Resources in Support of Family Catechesis On Ash Wednesday Archbishop Malcolm launched three new resources produced by the Pastoral Formation Team to support Family

Catechesis from Baptism onwards. In the revised edition of ‘Baptism: Everything You Need for Life’ with an Introduction by the Archbishop, it is

Fr John McLoughlin, Veronica Murphy, Archbishop Malcolm and Eleanor Lalley with the new resources

recommended that parents are presented with a family Bible: a gift from the parish community. The new resource ‘God With Us’ has been designed to help parents make use of their gift. A key feature of this resource, produced in partnership with the Bible Society, is a set of laminated bookmarks which can be placed in the appropriate section of the Family Bibles once that section has been used. In an attractive, parent –friendly way it introduces seven Bible characters who impact on family life today. A second resource comes in two parts: available either together or separately. An ‘Alphabet of God’s Amazing Love’ is available as a poster for bedroom/nursery/play rooms and also as a small book suitable for ‘Story time’ cuddles. A feature of both is the use of ‘The Liverpool Angels’, specially commissioned and attached to particular letters. This resource enables parents, grandparents, Godparents, siblings and others to introduce the alphabet from our faith perspective. Suggestions for using the alphabet and the angels are included in the booklet. These two resources were produced by a small working group and were designed by Catherine Roperto with angel illustrations created by artist Mary Rouncefield. All the resources can be purchased athttp://www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/for mation-shop or by telephoning Pastoral Formation 0151 522 1040. God With Us (£3.95); Alphabet Poster (£2.50); Alphabet booklet (£3.50) and the Baptism Pack (sufficient for five catechists and five families) (£40.00). Discounts for ten or more are available.

Obituary of Rev Wilfrid Patrick Flynn Father Bill Flynn, former Parish Priest of St Patrick, Clinkham Wood, St Helens died on Sunday 31 January at the age of 87 and in the sixty-second year of priestly ministry. Wilfrid Patrick Flynn was born on 10 July 1928, the son of Joseph and Winefride Flynn. He attended St John’s School, Wigan, and Thornleigh College, Bolton, followed by studies for the priesthood at St Joseph’s College, Upholland. He was ordained priest by Archbishop William Godfrey in the chapel at Upholland, on 12 June 1954.

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After ordination he served as assistant priest at St Anthony, Liverpool from August 1954 until October 1963 when he moved to St James, Bootle. In January 1969 he became assistant priest at St James, Orrell and in October 1977, following a brief curacy at St Cecilia’s, Liverpool, and chaplaincy to St Ambrose Barlow Secondary School; he received his first appointment as parish priest at Sacred Heart, Kirkby, in succession to Fr Basil Walker. His tenure here was relatively brief and he spent much of 1981 absent from the archdiocese on sick leave.

On his return to the archdiocese in March 1982 he became assistant priest, for a second time, at St James, Bootle, followed by his appointment as assistant priest at Our Lady, Star of the Sea, Seaforth, in May 1987. In November 1992 he was appointed parish priest at St Patrick, St Helens, where he ministered faithfully until his retirement to Formby in September 2000. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Aloysius, Roby on Thursday 11 February followed by burial at Gidlow Cemetery, Wigan.


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news diary Pastoral Letter of the Archbishop of Liverpool read at all Masses celebrated on the First Sunday of Lent, 14 February 2016 Dear friends in Christ, n Ash Wednesday many Catholics began Lent by going to Mass to receive ashes, which is the outward sign of our desire to turn once again towards God. In this season of repentance the individual Christian turns again to Our Lord. It is an opportunity to put our lives in order and resolve through the traditional practices of almsgiving, works of mercy, fasting and prayer to make a difference, not just to ourselves, but to the lives of the community in which we live. We look beyond the cross, on the hill of Calvary, to the resurrection of Jesus, the source of eternal life. Therefore I strongly urge you to make a good start to Lent by making a pilgrimage to the Holy Door at the Cathedral or to one of our designated churches, and to receive the grace of the sacrament of penance.

O

I am often asked what is the value of fasting? Unless we are trying to lose weight it can seem rather pointless. A spiritual answer is that to make ourselves feel weak and hungry can help us realise that, even in this highly technological age, we are ultimately dependent on God. It creates a longing and yearning within us for Christ to come into our lives and satisfy our need for him. But there is also a very practical answer to the question of fasting. Giving up something for Lent enables us to give the money saved to those who are in need. Fasting can also help us understand the plight of the less well-off members of our society by suffering with them. Sadly, it is not uncommon for people in our society to go hungry. That is a very damning indictment of the times in which we live, but it is also an opportunity to be merciful like the Father, the theme of this Jubilee Year of Mercy. So please help the food banks in your area. In the gospel Jesus is tempted to turn a stone into bread. I am sure that many people caught up in the war in Syria or nearer home, those who run out of food for their family as the month ends, would understand that temptation at first hand. But Jesus makes it clear that we do not live on bread alone. This doesn’t seem to make much sense, especially to people who are hungry and literally do not know where the next meal is coming from. When we put this response alongside the next temptation it starts to make sense because food or bread should not be used as instruments of manipulation and power. Furthermore, despite our immediate needs, we retain our God-given dignity if we remember that God creates us all in his own image and likeness.

confessing that we do not live on bread alone, and that the God we worship is found in Jesus Christ. They gathered in cathedrals throughout the world to meet their bishops at the Rite of Election, as they set out on the last stage of their journey: the six weeks of Lent. We can accompany them by our prayers and good works, so that when we celebrate the resurrection of our Lord at the Easter Vigil or on Easter Sunday we will be able renew our commitment not to live on bread alone. What sign will we give to the world that we are members of the risen Body of Christ, the Church, and that we do not live on bread alone? The ashes will have been washed from our foreheads many weeks before. We can take our cue from Pope Francis who in giving us this Year of Mercy wants us to be known by our actions as people of mercy. Sometimes we do not receive the mercies that we were hoping for and we give up, and turn from God. We all know people who have done this. Some Catholics in a second marriage for example will be disappointed that the recent Synod of bishops did not ask the Holy Father to allow such people to receive Holy Communion. But nevertheless a different but very real way of being in communion with Jesus is to become more merciful. This is a very hard test of faith for many couples. Other areas of Church teaching can also challenge our faith. But it is not just Church teaching that tests our faith. We are tested in many other ways too; by unemployment, death of a loved one, abuse or rejection to name a few. But even if, with our rather limited human understanding, we cannot always see a way forward, we should remember that God’s mercy is boundless and we should not lose heart. So this Lent let us all try very hard to do just that – not lose heart by becoming more merciful. Can we be less critical of others and more understanding of them? Is it possible for us to share our food through food banks, even if we do not have that much ourselves? Can we find a few more minutes in the day to speak to and listen to God in prayer? I know that these are ways to become merciful like the Father. With my prayers and every good wish for you and your families for a blessed Lent and a happy Easter,

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

I am sure that like me you have been impressed by the conviction and dignity of the parents from war-torn areas of the world who have taken risky boat journeys across the Mediterranean so that their children can eat and have a safe future. We cannot fail to be deeply moved by the television scenes of parents standing on the beach of a Greek island having risked the lives of their families so that they can find a place of peace. Their journeys are truly an exodus as they crossed the waters in search of new lives. At Easter our catechumens will find freedom from their past and enter into the new life of Christ, as they join the new People of God through the waters of baptism; and those already baptised will be confirmed in their faith alongside them. They are truly

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RCIA Celebration

Bronze awards at the Cathedral Archbishop Malcolm signs the Book of the Elect and greets the candidates The Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion, which always takes place in the Cathedral on the First Sunday in Lent, marks an important step on the journey to full membership of the Roman Catholic Church for those, from across the Archdiocese, who have been learning about what it means to be a Catholic and who feel ready to receive the Sacraments of Initiation at the coming Easter Vigil. For those who have not been baptised, there is the declaration, by the Archbishop, of their election: recognition that they have indeed been chosen and called by God to be baptised, confirmed and share fully in the Eucharist as

members of the Body of Christ, the Church. Once they have been presented to the Archbishop, they sign their name in the Book of the Elect, which remains on display throughout Lent. For those already baptised the Archbishop calls them to continuing conversion during the Lenten season in preparation for their full sharing in the Easter Mysteries. During the service Godparents and Sponsors testify to the readiness of those they are accompanying and all who are present promise to support them in prayer. This year for the first time the number of those seeking Baptism (40 Catechumens) almost equalled the number of those for First Communion (41 Candidates).

Metropolitan Cathedral servers Chantal Ameh, Alec Petit de Mange and Richard Paringit, were presented with their Guild of St. Stephen Bronze Medals by Fr Ged Callagher during the 10:00 am Family Mass in the Crypt. All have been serving for over a year, and are regular mitre and crozier bearers for the Archbishop at Masses at the high altar of the Cathedral.

Catenians celebrate Ormskirk Catenians hosted their annual Clergy Night at Hurlston Hall with thirty local Priests and thirty-five Ormskirk Circle members. The guest speaker was Bishop John Rawsthorne, Bishop Emeritus of Hallam. For further information regarding the Catenians contact Andy at apltd@hotmail.co.uk

Ormskirk President Tony Charnock, Bishop John Rawsthorne, Father Godric Timney (St Anne’s), Ormskirk Vice President John Gannon, Canon John Gaine (St Teresa’s, Birkdale 10

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news diary Parish Focus Team at St Teresa’s Fr Philip Kehoe FDP, Parish Priest at St Teresa’s Upholland, invited members of the parish Focus Team to declare their commitment to the service of the parish during Sunday Mass. There are nine in the team including Father. Philip and Father Michael Moss. Other members are: John Harthill; Bernard Keyworth; Jenny Maguire; Cecilia Rigby (Headteacher of St Teresa’s School); Ros Roscoe; Andrew Southworth and Jane Simpson (Parish Administrator). The readings that day were especially relevant as we received St. Paul’s teaching on the importance of all the parts of the body for building up the Body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12: 12–30) and in the gospel Luke described the beginning of Jesus’ ministry. (Luke 1: 1–4; 4: 14–21). Members were invited forward after the

homily and asked if they were willing to undertake this ministry. Fr. Philip told them of their service to the parish community by holding the Parish Vision; nurturing its fruitfulness; sharing in the priest’s oversight of parish life and helping the parish to stay focussed on its priorities. They will achieve this through: listening to all ages, all sectors, all partners (schools, ecumenical, local community); through reviewing the priorities set five years ago and, if appropriate, discerning new areas of priority and through encouragement, of individuals, of ministry groups, and of new initiatives. Their acceptance of this role was followed by the blessing: ‘Almighty God, We give you thanks for the many and

varied ways you build up your Church. Bless these members of the Focus Team. Grant that through their vision and direction They may be of service to this parish And bring honour and glory to your name. Grant this through Christ our Lord.’ At the end of Mass a ‘retiring’ member of the team, Libby Wison, was presented with flowers as a token of appreciation of her commitment. Father Philip announced that she would now become the equivalent of a Member of the House of Lords remaining a source of wisdom in the days ahead. For more information about forming a Parish Focus or Discernment Team contact: Veronica Murphy 0151 522 1048

A time of reflection On the first weekend of Lent the Catholic Chaplaincy to the Liverpool Universities, had a retreat at Sandymount Retreat House, Crosby, led by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon writes Bernadette Durcan. The theme was ‘The Parables of St. Luke and the Year of Mercy’, and we reflected on the Christian vocation to be merciful like our heavenly Father (cf. Luke 6:36). We all enjoyed our time there, whether in times of quiet prayer; walking along the beach; or around the dinner table but most of all, we came away refreshed and better prepared to journey through Lent and the challenges the invitation of mercy poses. A big thank you to the Archbishop for sharing your thoughts and helping explore this invitation of mercy.

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Civic Mass at the Cathedral Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated the annual Civic Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral in the presence of the Lord Lieutenant, Dame Lorna Muirhead, the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, Councillor Anthony Concepcion and civic dignitaries from throughout the region. Also present was the Right Reverend Paul Bayes, Bishop of Liverpool. In his homily Archbishop Malcolm thanked those present for their service and said, ‘We give thanks for the progress that has been made in recent years, the harmony and common purpose that exists between communities and different religions, race and creed that make up our people.’ He went on to praise the ‘courage to welcome the refugees and asylum seekers offering them the hand of friendship’. Top right: civic guests at the Cathedral. Bottom right: Archbishop Malcolm and Bishop Paul greet the congregation after Mass

Eucharistic Ministers Weekend for Young People Jack Simpson, 18, from Upholland took part in the Eucharistic Ministers weekend at Animate Youth Ministries, he writes: As soon as I heard about the opportunity to train to become an Extraordinary Minister of the Eucharist I had no hesitation in putting myself forward as I wanted to continue the theme of last year’s Lourdes experience of ‘the Joy of Mission’. My mission is to help to lead the youth group of St. Teresa’s Parish in Upholland and to support the faith journeys of our young people. By becoming a Minister of Holy Communion, it allows me to be a role model showing some of the ways in which young people can develop their faith through different types of service. During the weekend twenty-nine young people from across the Archdiocese came together to train to become Extraordinary Eucharistic Ministers. Led by the Animate Team, the weekend consisted of exciting and interesting activities which helped us to reflect upon our own unique faith journeys

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from Baptism to today. It helped us all to realise that we have been called to serve as members of the body of Christ, and to recognise that responsibility. After some practical training about distributing the Eucharist and leading services, we completed our weekend with a commissioning Mass which we celebrated with our friends, family and other members

of our local parishes and communities. It was a lovely, rewarding way to end the course. I thoroughly enjoyed our weekend as we made lots of new friends and had fun whilst learning about our new roles. I would highly recommend other young people to engage with this opportunity as it is one you will not regret.


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St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School Pilch Lane, Liverpool L14 0JG Tel: 0151 477 8490, Fax: 0151 477 8491 Email: stmargargaret@knowsley.gov.uk Website: www.smmj.co.uk Loving, learning, growing together with Jesus Chair of Governors: Mrs M Rawsthorne DEPUTY HEADTEACHER - ISR L11 – L15 £49,481 – £54,503 per annum The above salary is depending upon experience Required from September 2016 The Governors of St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School would be delighted to appoint a celebrating Catholic to our large Junior school who can demonstrate the highest standards, qualities, attributes, skills and dedication needed to work alongside the Governors and all stakeholders to help move the whole school community forward in the coming years. This will be a non-teaching appointment focused on raising attainment and working in close partnership with the Leadership Team. We are seeking a person who: • Has a strong Catholic Faith. • A clear understanding of leadership within Catholic education. • A strategic leader who can provide leadership of a high quality in the academic, pastoral and management fields and be able to show evidence of the successful implementation of change. • Has the leadership qualities needed to work with the Headteacher in order to inspire, challenge and encourage staff to achieve the best outcomes for pupils. • Is a team player and is able to work in collaboration with the leadership team and has the ability and ambition to raise standards, moving the school to outstanding. • Has excellent interpersonal, intercommunication, organisational and pastoral skills • Will continue to develop collaborative partnerships with Parents, the Parish and the wider community. We are able to offer: • A dedicated and proactive Governing Body who hold the children at the heart of everything they do • A non-teaching Deputy post • Working in partnership with the dynamic Headteacher, Leadership Team and dedicated Governors • A proactive and developing school staff, dedicated to raising standards in all areas and who embrace change • Children who are happy, enjoy learning and embracing new challenges We can offer you the chance to make a huge difference to all our pupils and staff within a friendly and supportive environment where we all strive to live, love, learn and grow together with Jesus. This post would be suitable for either an existing deputy in a smaller school or someone who has extensive leadership and management experience within a leadership team as this post offers significant professional development to Headship. Visits to the school are warmly welcomed by appointment with the Headteacher How to apply: Further information and application packs are available from Mrs Sandra McNulty, School Business Manager, by telephone on 0151 477 8490 or email Sandra.mcnulty@knowsley.gov.uk. Alternatively, they can be downloaded from the school website http://www.smmj.co.uk or http://www.knowsley.gov.uk/jobs/knowsley-council-vacancies.aspx Completed application forms should be sent by e-mail directly to Mrs McNulty at sandra.mcnulty@knowsley.gov.uk or at the address stated above and marked for the attention of Mrs McNulty. St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School is committed to safeguarding, to promoting the welfare of children and adhering to the Equality Act 2010. The successful candidate will be required to undertake an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check and health clearance by the Local Authority Occupational Health provider. To comply with the Asylum and Immigration Act 1996 all prospective employees will be required to supply evidence of eligibility to work in the UK.

Closing date: Wednesday 9th March 2016, at noon Shortlisting : Wednesday 9th March 2016 Observations: Thursday 10th, Friday 11th, Monday 14th or Tuesday 15th March 2016 Interviews : Wednesday 16th March 2016

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0151 287 8000 The North West’s Leading Pilgrimage Company Catholic Pictorial

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note A very early Easter means that by the time we share these thoughts we are well into the Lenten journey. Here at the Beda College, we have the custom on mid-Lent Sunday of having a ‘Lenten Oasis’ at which we invite the staff and students of some of our Englishspeaking sister colleges in Rome to join us for Mass and then lunch. It is held on Laetare Sunday, the day on which, in some of our churches, the purple of the Lenten season gives way to a slightly less austere rose colour – a reminder to us that there needs to be a lightness in our fidelity to the Gospel which always makes space for the joy (Gaudium) of the Gospel, a joy to which Pope Francis is constantly re-calling us. Mid-Lent Sunday, which falls on 6 March this year, takes its name ‘Laetare’ from the entrance antiphon at Mass that day; Rejoice O Jerusalem. An exception to the Lenten norms is made so that we can have flowers at the altar and play the organ (and by extension

Sunday thoughts Father James English was a legendary parish priest. He served at Christ the King in Childwall, my home parish, for many years. He was a holy man but faced criticism from some parishioners for this reason: they didn’t see enough of him. They saw him at Sunday Mass but the rest of the time he spent looking after the lost sheep. A familiar figure at all hours on the corridors of Broadgreen Hospital, he formed a bond with those out of touch with the Church. His parish visiting consisted of ‘seeking out and saving the lost’ rather than in socialising with regular attenders. He visited the sick but had little time for the hale and hearty. And some of them resented it. It must be said, however, that in the days Father English was parish priest, much of the routine duties were undertaken by energetic and enthusiastic curates such as Father Kevin Finn and Father John Smith. Eternal rest to all of them. On the fourth Sunday of Lent we

Canon Philip Gillespie

other instruments) as a ‘voluntary’ – that is, not only to support the singing. This is just a slight lifting of what can appear as the heaviness of Lent, a reminder that there is such a thing as a joyful Lent. Lent is not an end in itself, but a means by which the grace of God brings about the preparation and purification needed in our lives so that we can fully and lovingly celebrate the Resurrection of the Lord at Easter. ‘There are Christians whose lives seem like Lent without Easter. I realise of course that joy is not expressed the same way at all times in life, especially at moments of great difficulty. Joy adapts and changes, but it always endures, even as a flicker of light born of our personal certainty that, when everything is said and done, we are infinitely loved.’ Pope Francis, The Joy of the Gospel #6

Mgr John Devine OBE

hear the story of the Prodigal Son. The key lies in the introductory verse: ‘The tax collectors and sinners were all seeking the company of Jesus to hear what he had to say, and the Pharisees and the scribes complained.’ The story describes the resentment of a loyal and dependable older brother at the leniency of his father towards his feckless and irresponsible younger brother. The Year of Mercy challenges us to reach out to those who have fallen away from the Church. Do we rejoice with the Father when they make an effort? Or do we sneer at funerals when they fail to join in the responses? Or resent them seeking baptism for their children? Do we too readily condemn them when they disappear the day after their children make their first Holy Communion?

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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Ashes for mourning I know they symbolise the beginning of Lent. I know they are the beginning of 40 days of penitential reflection. Throughout my time as a priest I have been aware of the strange cultic power that they have, even over people who hardly ever go to Church. Ashes are part of the cultural understanding of Catholicism. This year for the first time, probably because of something I have been reading by Ronald Rolheiser, they have come to symbolise for me so much of my own life that has been burned and reduced to ashes. Like us all I have crushed dreams. There are times I have felt as though I have power over my own life and that I am strong and invincible. As I get older, the realisation that this is not true has left me feeling vulnerable at times. I have had a sense of my own goodness only to see it swept away by the stupid action or the harsh word. Everything reduced to ashes. Mourning for the losses. Rolheiser says: ‘The ashes speak loudly of what demons I was meant to meet in each particular Lent.’ Jesus went into the desert to face his demons. For the ancient peoples, the desert was a place of trial, where there was no security. It was a place where people would find themselves by entering into brokenness and pain that is within, mourning it and then finding life. In the early Church the desert was seen as anything that moulded and shaped the heart. This Lent, your desert could be the Stations of the Cross, the extra 10 minutes of prayer, the reading of the scriptures, the reaching out to help those you find difficult. They become the desert if you reflect on what they are teaching you about yourself and when you learn to mourn for the brokenness within you that makes you hardhearted selfish, insular. It is from that place that the spirit can lead you into life. Don’t let what you do for Lent simply be external observance. Let these things challenge you within, by your reflection on them. God will reach into your heart and do things within you and your ashes will be turned into a garland of joy. Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Wellbeing Curriculum at Nugent House School

Catholic Social Action Network (CSAN) charities have a long history of providing support and accompanying disadvantaged migrants, asylum seekers and refugees on their journey to resettlement in the United Kingdom. Nugent Care, as the social welfare arm of the Liverpool Archdiocese provides Caritas services. Recently key members of Nugent Care Caritas Services met up with Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace Worker at the Archdiocese, to look at ways we can further help those in need now and in the future. Clearly this is a coordinated effort between many different organisations, but it is an important and humane task.

Gill Hughes, Principal at Nugent House School, and Dr Nash Popovic, Senior lecturer in the School of Psychology at University of East London Working with Dr Nash Popovic and the University of East London, Nugent House School in Billinge, which caters for boys between the ages of 7 and 19 who are subject to a Statement of Special Educational Needs, are introducing an innovative approach to improving outcomes for our young people, the Wellbeing Curriculum. This is in response to Government concerns that mental health issues and emotional issues are not being correctly addressed in education for many pupils and leaving them unable to improve their own lives. The Department for Education and Public Health England have recommended that schools address these real issues and as our young people have more than their fair share of blocks to their progress we are keen to respond to their needs. Dr Nash Popovic is a Senior lecturer in the School of Psychology at University of East London, who are leading the field in research in wellbeing in education, and we are really lucky that they are working with us in this programme. Besides being a lecturer, Nash is also an educational consultant and a counsellor in private practice, receiving his PhD from the Institute of Education, London.

He has developed the Personal Synthesis Programme, a systematic and comprehensive approach to psychological education and personal development. It has been implemented in a number of educational institutions in the UK and abroad. Nash is also a co-founder of Personal Well-being Centre, a not-for-profit social enterprise dedicated to promoting the wellbeing and growth of individuals, organisations and communities. The Well-Being Curriculum is applicable for primary and secondary school pupils and for students in post-compulsory education. It can also be used in adult groups and for recreational, in addition to educational, purposes. The curriculum can be delivered through a variety of methods, including direct teaching, group discussions, individual and pairs-based work. Teachers and facilitators will become familiar with a battery of self-assessment measures, that allow them and/or students to evaluate their happiness levels, discover their signature strengths and evaluate other characteristics. The programme is delivered as part of PSHE (Personal, Social and Health Education) and is compatible with SEAL (Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning) requirements.

CSAN wrote recently, ‘based on the life and teachings of Jesus we call for people who migrate to be treated humanely and with dignity. At the same time, we consistently maintain that the root causes of forced migration: poverty, injustice, religious intolerance armed conflicts, must be addressed so that migrants can remain in their homeland and support their families.’ It was interesting to hear of the work that CSAN was conducting in Calais with our French Caritas Partner, Secours Catholique, facilitating financial donations and other assistance. We heard first hand accounts of the issues faced in the refugee camp. Our partners in CSAN, other charities that we work closely with are working diligently to help those in need. The Cardinal Hume Centre in Birmingham operates a high quality Immigration Advice Service (IAS), including legal representation in complex cases, for disadvantaged migrants, asylum seekers and refugees in London. The Brushstrokes Community Project, based across Sandwell and West Birmingham, supports those seeking asylum through the difficult pathway of adapting to life in the United Kingdom. Many asylum seekers face living in isolation from their home, culture and extended family. Their experiences of trauma, of war or torture is never far from their thoughts. It is important to us to support these efforts and to continue to contribute to the efforts of local charities and Nugent Care will continue to do so. Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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what’s on Tuesday 8 March Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Stations of the Cross 6.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘Mercy flows like a river.’ Lenten evening of reflection. 7.30 pm at Most Holy Redeemer and St Kentigern, Waddicar Lane, Melling, L31 1BS. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Wednesday 9 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. 12.00 noon Mass followed by Stations of the Cross St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Lenten Hour of prayer and reflection 6.00 pm at St Joseph’s, Brindle, PR5 0DE. ‘Luke: A Gospel of the Poor.’ Lenten Reflection. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool ‘Are you thirsty for God?’ New Life in the Spirit reflection. 7.00 pm at St James, Orrell, WN5 7AA. ‘Discovering Jesus in the Old Testament.’ Lenten Reflection by Deacon James Mawdsley. 7.00 pm at St Mary’s, Buttermarket Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at Blessed Sacrament, Park Vale Road, Aintree, L9 2DG. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY.

Liverpool L25 5JF. Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Richard’s, Liverpool Road, Skelmersdale, WN8 8BX. Stations of the Cross 11.30 am at Our Lady Immaculate and St Joseph, Vicarage Place, Prescot, L34 1LE. Stations of the Cross 11.30 am at St Mary’s, Buttermarket Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. Mass followed by Stations of the Cross 12.15 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral Crypt, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool, L3 5TQ. Lenten Poverty Lunch 12.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lives of the Saints film 2.00 pm at St Mary’s Presbytery, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR Exposition followed by Stations of the Cross and Benediction 5.30 pm at St Joseph’s, Brindle, PR5 0DE. Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St John the Evangelist, Chapel Lane, Lathom, Ormskirk, L40 7RA. Stations of the Cross followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 7.00 pm at St Bernadette, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP. Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St John Fisher, Moorfield Road, WA8 3JA. Stations of the Cross and Exposition 7.00 pm at St Joseph’s, Withnell, Chorley, PR6 8SD. Evening Prayer (7.10 pm) and Stations of the Cross followed by Benediction (7.30 pm) at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. Night Prayer led by the Choir 8.45 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF.

Thursday 10 March ‘Jesus the Compassionate God’ Reflections on the Gospel of Luke. Scripture Morning. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk 12.00 noon Mass Followed by ‘The Passion of Christ’ Lenten Reflection led by Monsignor Richard Atherton at St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. (Reflection in the Marian Centre.) Stations of the Cross (St Alphonsus) 7.00 pm at St Catherine Laboure, Stanifield Lane, Farington, PR25 4QG. ‘The pain of life’s reality.’ Lenten Meditation on the Way of the Cross. 7.00 pm at St Julie, Howards Lane, Eccleston, St Helens, WA10 5HJ. Service of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Oswald’s, Padgate Lane, Warrington, WA1 3LB.

Saturday 12 March Holy Hour with Sacrament of Reconciliation 9.00 am at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. Day of prayer and awareness of dementia 10.00 am to 4.30 pm at Cardinal Heenan House, School Lane, Roby Mill, Up Holland, Skelmersdale, WN8 0QR. Details: Father Stephen Beale, email: sbeale@orionecare.org Tel: 01695 622885. Followed by Mass at 6.00 pm in St Teresa’s church, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. Celebrant: Bishop Tom Williams. Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. 12.00 noon Mass followed by Stations of the Cross St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. St Mark Passion: Bach with the Cathedral Orchestra Conductor: Stephen Pratt, and the Cathedral Cantata Choir, Director: Richard Lea. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk

Friday 11 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton,

Sunday 13 March Fifth Sunday of Lent Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King

Masses at 8.30 am (Blessed Sacrament Chapel), 10.00 am (Family Mass: Crypt), 11.00 am (Solemn), 7.00 pm (Crypt) 36th Annual Romero Mass 10.30 am at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. Marie Curie Remembrance Service 3.00 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Lenten Holy Hour and Evening Prayer 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Liverpool Bach Collective Johann Sebastian Bach Cantata 152: ‘Tritt auf die Glaubensbahn’ (‘Walk in the Way of Faith’) 6.30 pm at St Agnes and St Pancras, Ullet Road, Liverpool, L17 3BL. Singers and Players directed by Philip Duffy. Ecumenical ‘Singing in one Spirit.’ 6.30 pm at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. ‘Born for this’ by CJM Stations of the Cross in words, music and drama. 7.30 pm at Catholic Chaplaincies to the Liverpool Universities, St Philip Neri, Catharine Street, Liverpool, L8 7NL. Monday 14 March to Friday 18 March A Lenten Retreat Led by Father Daniel O’Leary at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Suggested offering: £280. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Monday 14 March Mass followed by Holy Hour 9.15 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Tuesday 15 March Stations of the Cross 6.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘Mercy flows like a river.’ Lenten evening of reflection. 7.30 pm at Most Holy Redeemer and St Kentigern, Waddicar Lane, Melling, L31 1BS. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Wednesday 16 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. 12.00 noon Mass followed by Stations of the Cross St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Lenten Hour of prayer and reflection 6.00 pm at St Joseph’s, Brindle, PR5 0DE. ‘Luke: On Mary and Discipleship.’ Lenten Reflection. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool ‘Are you thirsty for God?’ New Life in the Spirit reflection. 7.00 pm at St James, Orrell, WN5 7AA. Service of Reconciliation for the Parish of St Wilfrid, Widnes

Full listings, of times for Holy Week and Easter Services, can be found on the Archdiocesan 16

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march 7.00 pm at St Bede’s, Appleton Village, Widnes, WA8 6EL. Service of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at St Teresa, Devon Street, St Helens, WA10 4HX. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Thursday 17 March 12.00 noon Mass followed by ‘The Passion of Christ’ Lenten Reflection led by Monsignor Richard Atherton at St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. (Reflection in the Marian Centre.) Stations of the Cross (St Alphonsus) 7.00 pm at St Catherine Laboure, Stanifield Lane, Farington, PR25 4QG. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Oswald’s, Padgate Lane, Warrington, WA1 3LB. Friday 18 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Richard’s, Liverpool Road, Skelmersdale, WN8 8BX. Stations of the Cross 11.30 am at Our Lady Immaculate and St Joseph, Vicarage Place, Prescot, L34 1LE. Stations of the Cross 11.30 am at St Mary’s, Buttermarket Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. Mass followed by Stations of the Cross 12.15 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral Crypt, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool, L3 5TQ. Lenten Poverty Lunch 12.30 pm at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lives of the Saints film 2.00 pm at St Mary’s Presbytery, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR Exposition followed by Stations of the Cross and Benediction 5.30 pm at St Joseph’s, Brindle, PR5 0DE. Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St John the Evangelist, Chapel Lane, Lathom, Ormskirk, L40 7RA. Stations of the Cross followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 7.00 pm at St Bernadette, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP. Stations of the Cross and Exposition 7.00 pm at St Joseph’s, Withnell, Chorley, PR6 8SD.

Evening Prayer (7.10 pm) and Stations of the Cross followed by Benediction (7.30 pm) at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Benedict’s, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA2 7QE. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. Night Prayer led by the Choir 8.45 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Saturday 19 March ‘Pots, Pans and the Enkindling of Love.’ A Journey with St Teresa of Avila led by Father Matt Blake OCD and Gillian Coxhead. 10.00 am at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Suggested offering: £20. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. 12.00 noon Mass followed by Stations of the Cross St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Annual carrying of the Cross 2.00 pm at the junction of Church St and Whitechapel, stopping for the Stations of the Cross while walking through Liverpool City Centre to St Luke’s church at the top of Bold Street. Details: Jim Ross, Missionaries of Charity Seel Street. Tel: 07766 706766. Monday 21 March Mass followed by Holy Hour 9.15 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Quiet Day with Gillian Coxhead 10.30am at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB.

Penance Service 7.00 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Tuesday 22 March Stations of the Cross 6.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘The Passion according to Luke.’ Lenten Reflection. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Wednesday 23 March Holy Hour with Sacrament of Reconciliation 11.00 am at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY. 12.00 noon Mass followed by Stations of the Cross St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Good Friday 25 March Faure Requiem 8.00 pm at St Peter and St Paul church, Liverpool Road, Crosby, L23 5TE. Tickets £8 all proceeds to Jospice. Wednesday 30 March Holy Hour with Sacrament of Reconciliation. 11.00 am at St Teresa, College Road, Upholland, WN8 0PY.

World of Atherton

Holy Week and Easter at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King: Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord 20 March Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King 8.30 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 10.00 am Family Mass (Crypt) 11.00 am Procession of Palms and Solemn Mass Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP 7.00 pm Mass (Crypt) 7.30 pm Tenebrae (Cathedral)

Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion 25 March 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Cathedral Choir) (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 11.30 am Stations of the Cross led by Bishop Tom Williams (Cathedral) 3.00 pm Commemoration of the Lord’s Passion Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP presides

Wednesday of Holy Week 23 March 7.30 pm Mass of Chrism Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP

Holy Saturday 26 March 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Youth Choir) (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 pm The Easter Vigil and First Mass of Easter Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP

THE EASTER TRIDUUM Maundy Thursday of the Lord’s Supper 24 March 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Girls’ Choir) (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 7.30 pm Mass of the Lord’s Supper Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP

Easter Sunday of the Lord’s Resurrection 27 March 8.30 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 10.00 am Family Mass (Crypt) 11.00 am Solemn Mass of Easter Day 3.00 pm Solemn Baptismal Choral Evening Prayer 7.00 pm Mass (Crypt)

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2016 Catholic Pictorial

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“An Outstanding Catholic School” Liverpool Archdiocese


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“People worship footballers but I find it strange sometimes, I really do.” It is not a surprise to read such words in a publication like the Catholic Pic, but what may surprise you is the fact it is actually a footballer saying them. For Victor Anichebe, though, there is a good reason he feels this way and his Christian faith has rather a lot to do with it, as he explains as we sit talking in the media room at West Bromwich Albion’s training ground. “Some people are football, football, football but I am not like that and I wasn’t raised like that,” says Victor who attended Ursuline Primary School and Sacred Heart Catholic College in Crosby. “People from the outside think football is the best thing in the world and we are very blessed. I do feel blessed – I have been given this opportunity to go and do something I love – but at the same time, it is really not the be all and end all. “Sometimes people get me mixed up and think I don’t care," he adds. "It is not that I don’t care. I see a bigger picture sometimes and don’t think football is the only thing. I put God and all these things like helping others before this.” For the 27-year-old former Everton forward, his faith certainly gives him a focus away from football, and its significance was brought home to him by an episode that occurred one night on a country road as he was driving home from the Midlands. It is an episode that Victor – a boyhood parishioner at St Joseph’s, Crosby – related in a recent testimony at a church he now attends in Manchester. “I must have dozed off,” he recalls. “I don’t know how long it was but I closed my eyes and all I could hear in my head was the clearest voice I have ever heard in my life. I heard ‘Chinedu’ – my Nigerian name. ‘Get up, Chinedu.’ As I woke up, I was in the other lane and there was a lorry and I was going right for it. I don’t know who it was, if it was my guardian angel or my grandmother, but they were shouting. I swerved into the other lane and that is how I was saved.” This is not your usual training-ground conversation. At West Brom, he says, it is “the foreign players more than the English players” who are willing to offer outward expressions of faith. For the Nigerian international, however, it is a different story when he plays in Africa. “In Nigeria, it is a big thing. We have to go to a group prayer if we are in camp, and the whole group will come together in the changing room before and after the games, win lose or draw, and will say some kind of prayer.” Victor’s life in football began at 11 when he signed as a schoolboy for Everton.

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Victor Anichebe On faith and football By Simon Hart There have been precious opportunities to “play in big stadiums” and “travel the world” in the years that have followed. “At Everton I scored loads of goals in the Europa League, and played in the Premier League at such a young age. I have represented my country too and won an Olympic silver medal. We get to do things that people could only dream of.” That said, there is a downside. “We get criticism all the time and that is probably the worst part of football – the criticism, the scrutiny, the pressure.” If that covers some of the good and bad,

he is particularly grateful for the platform football has given him to help others. He is currently looking to develop a relationship with an unnamed charity, and also supports communities in the village in eastern Nigeria where his parents originate from. “I go back and am able to give something to people who have nothing,” he says. “I went back last summer and walked around with my brother and had an event for the whole village with food and drinks for the people in the community. These are the best things about football.”

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youth ministry

The three pillars of Lent Animate Youth Ministries team member Lauren Lynch offers a Lenten reflection. I am writing this article during a busy week – it is Ash Wednesday and we are on our Mission Week at Saints Peter and Paul Catholic College in Widnes. I had been told that this half-term, starting in the grey days at the beginning of January, would be the hardest period of the Animate year, a time when people’s focus might blur. Some of you reading this might agree with that suggestion yet I see it differently: we are given such a big opportunity do so something purposeful within the Animate team. Perhaps this is why we feel challenged right now as we try to focus our minds on a new year, with its new ambitions. We offer all these hopes up to God … and wait not so patiently for his reply. We want an answer, and sometimes we lose patience. Losing this patience causes us to lose our way and when we do not know the way anymore, we can forget the path we are called to follow. Today, while celebrating the first day of Lent, the following question popped into my head: am I forgetting the real reason I am here? I suppose answering this question honestly, I am. Yet I have been given a great opportunity to remember my

real mission in this world, and there is no better time to acknowledge this than in Lent. What is Lent all about? Jesus requests us to live out three things that will help us focus less on ourselves and more on others. These three things are called the pillars of Lent. The first pillar is almsgiving, whereby we are asked to give to others. It might sound like a simple task at first glance, but it is not about loving those who are close to us; rather, it means doing the complete opposite and looking at the vulnerable, the lonely and the ones we have turned our backs on in the past. This pillar focuses on the decisions we make: are we making these choices for our own selfishness or for the love of others? The second pillar is the giving of self – that is, to not only accept and love others around us, but to be of service to them. I have realised the only way we can truly live out this pillar is to focus first on our love for God, who will then provide the skills and gifts needed to help us show humility towards others. In other words, we must realise the need to place our Lord in the centre of our hearts, allowing him to work through us in everything we say and do. The final pillar is prayer. How can we

give to our God? This Lenten journey leads to the Lord providing us with the greatest gift of salvation. He asks us to form a closer relationship with Him, yet a relationship requires two people working together, communicating and trusting, and so we are asked to work alongside Our Lord. In this six-week period of Lent, therefore, we should look deep within our hearts and accept God as He reaches out to us. We have all been given the greatest opportunity. No matter who we are or what we do, there is one thing that remains true of us all. We can never be on the wrong journey if we allow the Lord to walk with us. Dates for the diary • 20 March – Palm Sunday Youth Alive Mass at Saint Basil’s Church, Hough Green Road, Widnes, WA8 4SZ. Starts at 6.30pm. • 25 March – Good Friday retreat at Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE from 10am2pm. For Years 7-9. A chance to think about what Easter is all about! For future dates for Life & Soul, Nightfever and other events taking place, check: Twitter – @AnimateYouth and Facebook – Ani Mate

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cathedral

Holy Week at the Cathedral by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Consecration of the Oil of Chrism during the Mass of Chrism

An early Easter this year means that the focus in March turns to Holy Week, the busiest, but yet most fulfilling week of the Cathedral’s liturgical life each year. On Mothering Sunday at Evening Prayer the girl choristers sing the ‘Stabat mater dolorosa’ of the eighteenth century composer Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. The music is both beautiful and sorrowful, reflecting the text which speaks of the many emotions of Mary, the Mother of Christ, sat at the foot of the cross watching her Son die. Holy week is very much a journey. A liturgical journey through the final days of Jesus’s life. A physical journey for the Cathedral community with the grand entrance on Palm Sunday, the transfer of the Blessed Sacrament on Holy Thursday and the entrance of the Easter candle symbolising the light of Christ on Holy Saturday. It would be hard to imagine celebrating Holy Week without these processional journeys. Equally it would be hard to imagine Holy Week without certain pieces of music. The Cathedral has a long standing tradition of singing the passion on Palm Sunday and Good Friday. Whilst this does make the reading slightly longer, it is a very engaging experience for the congregation, and brings to life a story with great consequences for us all. The musical settings were

written specially for the Cathedral by Philip Duffy, Master of the Music at the Cathedral from 1966 to 1996. For this Year of Mercy, Father John McLoughlin (Head of the Department of Pastoral Formation) his written a special hymn for use throughout the Archdiocese during this special year of grace. The hymn, ‘World redeemed by Christ’ draws on texts by Pope Francis, Pope John XXIII and the Bible for inspiration. It will be sung at the Chrism Mass in Wednesday of Holy Week by a full Cathedral. On Good Friday the Missal prescribes the singing of the Reproaches during the veneration of the cross. This powerful text will be sung this year to the equally powerful musical composition of Colin Mawby. A former Master of the Music at Westminster Cathedral, Mawby this year celebrates his 80th birthday. This summer the Cathedral choir will release a new CD of Mawby’s music as part of his birthday celebrations; watch this space for further details.

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean The Jubilee Year of Mercy and the Celebration of Holy Week are the major preoccupations for us all at the Cathedral throughout the month of March. At the time of writing we have still not had the first of the Saturday Pastoral Area Pilgrimages to the Cathedral and I’m still slightly concerned that the proposed schedule for the day will work with such large groups attending. Anyway this will become clearer after this first visit which has the potential for being the largest Pilgrim group. On Saturday 5 March the parishes of South Liverpool, Woolton, Halewood, Speke and Liverpool city centre will come on Pilgrimage. Following this on Saturday 12 March it is the turn of the parishes of Kirkby, Knowsley, Huyton, Prescot and Whiston. We have had a number of people ringing the Cathedral with their dietary requirements for lunch on these days and we have had to inform everyone that it would be impossible for us to cater each week for such numbers: if parish groups wish to share lunch together at the end of the morning pilgrimage they should bring packed lunches. We begin Holy Week with the Blessing of Palms, procession and the Sung Passion at the 11.00 am Mass on Palm Sunday. The Mass of Chrism takes place at 7.30 pm on 23 March this incorporates the Blessing of the Sacramental Oils and the Renewal of Priestly Service, and Archbishop Malcolm, who will be presiding at all the major services during Holy Week, encourages priests, religious and lay people to join him on this occasion. For the three mornings of the Triduum the Office of Readings and Morning Prayer is sung each day at 10.00 am in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel. The psalms and readings can really help us to deepen our appreciation of what we celebrate on these days and prepare us for the afternoon or evening liturgies. All are welcome to attend. Following this on Good Friday Bishop Williams will lead a Way of the Cross at 11.30 am. On Maundy Thursday Archbishop Malcolm will preside at the Commemoration of the Lord’s Supper at 7.30 pm and following this there will be watching in the Cathedral until 10.00 pm. The Celebration of the Lords Passion on Good Friday is at 3.00 pm with the singing of St John’s Passion and Veneration of the Cross. Our Easter Vigil will begin at 8.00 pm on Holy Saturday. Finally on Easter Sunday Masses are at the normal times with Mozart’s Coronation Mass as the setting for the 11.00 am Solemn Mass. There is a special Easter afternoon Sung Evening Prayer at 3.00 pm. I wish you all a Joyful and Blessed Easter.

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Pic extras

Mums the Word A blessed and happy Easter to you and your families This is my final column for the UCM and I must confess it has not been easy for me, but I hope my personal thoughts on the wonderful feasts of Christmas and Easter have been enjoyable. I thank our media officer, Madelaine McDonald, and her predecessor, Ann Hogg, for their monthly articles. I would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere gratitude to the UCM chaplains I have served with over the past four years. A special word of thanks is due from me to Father Mark Madden for our pilgrimage to Holywell in the Year of Faith and also for our Mass at Canterbury Cathedral during the pilgrimage to Aylesford Priory in 2014. Thanks to Father David Potter, meanwhile, for your guidance and commitment to the UCM in your first year! To the Archdiocesan Committee, I have been well blessed in having such experienced members to guide and advise me; you have made my time as president so special. Thank you to Kathy Davies, our minutes secretary for all she does and also to Kath Hunt, her predecessor. And congratulations to Cathy Lydon, from St Richard’s foundation, who was elected archdiocesan secretary in February. My most treasured memory of my time as president will always be the love, kindness and friendship that has been shown and given to me by all our members – may I pass on my love, prayers and gratitude in return. Our Year of Mercy celebration started after the February business meeting when we processed through the Holy Door of Mercy for our penitential service, celebrated by Father David. Hopefully after our October business meeting we will be able to end our Year of Mercy devotions by passing through that same door and reciting the Holy Rosary. Finally, may I offer my warmest wishes for a happy presidency to Maria Bruns. God Bless. Angela Moore, Archdiocesan President

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Sense of brotherhood does Knights proud Brother Bernard McGuigan from Council 413 relates a small act of kindness which illustrates the strength of the KSC’s nationwide ties. Sister Marie Clare was Parish Sister at St John the Evangelist, New Ferry for many years. This is my home parish and it meant she was there to give me tremendous support after the death of my dear wife, Eleanor, in February 2012 followed six weeks later by the death of my daughter, Aileen, aged 47, after a long battle against brain cancer. Many parishioners found it difficult to talk but Sister Marie would just throw her arms around me on every opportunity and gave me tremendous support. Sadly, Sister Marie's health deteriorated subsequently and she went to live in St Joseph’s Convent in Hackney. I was able to call on her when visiting London and we kept in touch by phone as she enjoyed text messaging. Last year she told me that she had cancer and was receiving her final chemotherapy treatment. I considered sending Sister Marie some flowers through Interflora but

then thought of the Knights and found that Brother Bill Tomlinson from Council 392 lived near the convent. He called in to see Sister Marie with a beautiful bouquet and refused any recompense. I received a text from Sister expressing her gratitude saying, ‘You are truly amazing’. I think it is the KSC that is truly amazing, though. Sadly, Sister Marie died some weeks later. Brother Bill represented me at the Requiem Mass and sent me a copy of the order of service. This was placed on the altar at St John’s when her Memorial Mass was held and circulated afterwards to other Sisters of Charity and parishioners. I know that the good deeds of Brother Bill are replicated throughout the United Kingdom. Here in Liverpool province, for instance, brothers and their families from the Isle of Man are visited when they are receiving treatment at the various specialist hospitals in our area. Long may the good works of our great Order continue. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com

KSC honour for Archbishop Malcolm Archbishop Malcolm McMahon has been made a Member of Honour of the Knights of St Columba – an honour conferred on him at the Liverpool province’s annual dinner at the Adelphi Hotel. The Archbishop, who is the national spiritual adviser of the KSC, received a certificate of installation from Supreme Knight Charlie McCluskey at the dinner on 12 February – and the pair are pictured here with the Provincial Grand Knight, Pat Foley. There were also Silver Jubilee certificates and medals issued to two longserving members of the Order, Brothers Peter Cherry and Albert Smart.


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PIC Life When a teacher’s influence never ends By Moira Billinge It was a blisteringly hot day and, as a ten-year-old prefect on lunchtime duty, I noticed with a heavy heart that the drinking fountain, just inside the school foyer, had a long queue of children patiently waiting for their turn. In those days we didn’t walk around with containers of water in our bags but had to be content with the little bottles of milk taken from the classroom crate in the morning and a glass of water on the dining-room tables at lunchtime. If there was any milk left over in the afternoon break and you had a sufficiently robust constitution to withstand consuming the – by then – smelly, curdling liquid, then life was fine. On this particular occasion I was feeling very thirsty and it was obvious that the school bell heralding the end of playtime would be sounded long before many of the children would get their turn at the fountain, and far more importantly for that matter, before I’d had mine! There was only one solution. I turfed everyone in the queue unceremoniously into the playground and had the fountain all to myself. It so happened, however, that neither the satisfaction that I had gleaned from assuaging my thirst, nor the smugness of the power that I had been able to exert in jumping the queue in such an appalling way, was to last. I hadn’t noticed that the headmaster was nearby and had witnessed the whole sorry episode. I glanced up – mid-gulp – to see him standing there, watching my every move in utter silence which in itself was unusual for him. I knew that this meant only one thing – this wasn’t going to end well for me. Eventually, he broke his silence just long enough to utter one short

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sentence, before turning on his heels. I can still quote it verbatim: “Moira, that was a complete misuse and abuse of authority!” The wise way that the headmaster had dealt with the situation eliminated the need for further punishment because the shame that I felt taught me an invaluable lesson. To have been given lines or detention – common in those times – may well have triggered my resentment or frustration rather than prompt the personal remorse and awareness of the selfishness of my behaviour which ensued. Naturally, the horror of having been caught out was in itself enough to guarantee that such behaviour would never be repeated. It was also the first time that I was to become aware of the fact that every wrongdoing has consequences and, whether or not we realise it at the time, does affect other people, in one way or another. The responsibilities facing teachers are onerous, and extend way beyond academic considerations. Teaching is a vocation which isn’t entered into with either the (inadequate) salary or the proverbial long holidays in mind – not least because most teachers use their breaks to prepare for the next term. One word out of place or the unintentional mishandling of a situation by a tired and increasingly overworked teacher having an ‘off day’ has the potential to last forever in the heart of a pupil, just as a word of encouragement or the intelligent, measured and thoughtful response to a problem will also leave its indelible and positive footprint. As the American historian Henry Brooks Adams wrote: “A teacher can affect eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.” Or she too for that matter.

Quotes from Pope Francis for the Year of Mercy “Nothing is impossible for God’s mercy” “Cloaked in the mercy and love of God” “Mercy: The ultimate and supreme act by which God comes to meet us”

Worth a visit

Plan a trip to a city which has welcomed migrants for generation and pay a special visit to a cathedral named after a man who followed God’s call wherever it took him, writes Lucy Oliver. New York City is famous for many reasons, and from the skyline to the theatre district, its lure to those seeking fame, fortune or just a good time is evident. Yet in the heart of Fifth Avenue, nestled between multi-billion dollar businesses, one building stands to welcome all. Today, it is difficult to believe that the cathedral was once criticised for being too far outside the city. St Patrick’s is a monument which would meet the approval of a man who dedicated himself, among other missionary works, to building churches across Ireland. Completed in 1879 and named after its Dublin counterpart, it was funded by contributions from New York’s poor immigrant population and pledges from more affluent citizens. During your trip to the Big Apple, explore also the life of New York’s early immigrants by visiting Ellis Island whose wonderful museum documents life for those arriving in the 19th century. From the basic facilities to the isolation, it is a story of struggle as much as of hope for a new life.


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join in Children’s word search

Eating Out

There are so many special feast days during March. We mention some of them. Try to find which.

Book early for your family Easter Sunday lunch at one of our listed restaurants.

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“The Lord will come with mighty power and give light to the eyes of all who serve Him. Alleluia

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy Father Mullarkey and the young curate had been invited to an ecumenical social evening in Bootle. They had a nice meal and were relaxing with a cup of coffee when a young woman in a baseball cap came over and said to the young curate: ‘I’m from the Good Tidings Gospel Hall and I’ve got my tickets booked for the Promised Land. Have you got yours?’ The YC was slightly taken aback and stammered: ‘Er... I don't know really. I'm a Roman Catholic.’ ‘And what about you?’ she said to Father Mullarkey. ‘Are you a Catholic too?’ ‘Sure am,’ said the auld fella, ‘but me and the lad will be OK. We’re members of the MCC.’ ‘What use is that?’ said the baseball cap. ‘It guarantees us entry to the Lord’s Enclosure!’

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

Town Green Brasserie Town Green Lane, Aughton 01695 420883 Ship Inn Rosemary Lane, Haskayne 01704 840077 Farmers Arms Halsall Square, Great Eccleston 01995 672018 The Ship Wheat Lane, Lathom 01704 893117 Deli Fonseca Brunswick Quay, Liverpool 0151 225 0808 Saracens Head Summerwood Lane, Halsall 01704 840204

Easter Cards from Carmel

In just a few very short weeks now we will be celebrating the joy of the resurrection at Easter. If you are sending Easter cards to your family and friends do take a look at what the Carmelite Sisters at Maryton Grange have. The cards are really lovely and you will be delighted with them. Call up to the Monastery at: Carmelite Monastery, Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com

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justice & peace

Welcoming Syrian refugees to the northwest By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker During 2015 over one million people sought refuge in Europe in the biggest movement of displaced people since the Second World War. We were told that the influx would stop with the onset of winter but it continues. Seeing the horrific pictures of Syrian refugees trying to escape into Europe, it is natural to want to help. The compassionate response is to ask when these people are going to arrive in the United Kingdom and how will we help when some of them reach the northwest. The shocking fact is that they are arriving but they are not being welcomed. The reason for this is that the UK government’s ‘20,000 over five years’ Syrian Resettlement Scheme (SRP) is only available to people in the refugee camps on the borders of Syria. Any of those who have fled the conflict and reached Europe are not eligible for consideration. The government has refused to discuss taking responsibility for any part of a quota system that would share the humanitarian response across the countries of Europe. According to our government, anyone who has fled the war in Syria and got as far as Europe is not a refugee but an asylum seeker. It seems inhumane to penalise people for being in the wrong place and showing too much initiative. Are we really saying that they should have stayed in the camps in Jordan and Lebanon along with four million others? Are we really saying we have no moral responsibility to help suffering humanity? Are we already saying we are not part of Europe? There is no safe way to enter the UK: just think of the Jungle at Calais and the armed guards at the Channel tunnel. Desperate people try to bribe drivers. They try to hide on and under trucks. They walk into the tunnel. They even cling to the top of trains. And the

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government does everything in its power to stop them. If people are able to get into the UK, they have to take their chances in the hostile asylum application process. Fifty per cent of applications are refused, many because of inconsistencies in the stories told at interview – often the result of panic and the desire to make a good impression.

given preference. The government’s working assumption is that the churches are one entity.

On a positive note, 20,000 on the SRP scheme is better than none and the first thousand arrived before Christmas. It is likely that a few families will arrive in the northwest by the summer. The government has negotiated with 18 out of the 19 local authorities here to become dispersal areas for asylum seekers. (There were previously only three involved.) So the already large number of asylum seekers in our region will increase and towns with no prior experience of asylum seekers will welcome fresh faces.

The proposed activities will include: • Welcoming people on arrival and offering help with integration (eg with doctors, schools)

So what are we doing? We have to recognise the place of the Church in the national response to the refugee situation. The line of communication is: national government, local government, voluntary sector. The Church is included in the voluntary sector and no particular denomination is

With this in mind, we are looking to help set up a network of ecumenical groups based around local authority boundaries and with a strong presence in RC parishes.

• Organising local projects. • Raising money • Helping with learning English, for example by setting up conversation groups • Explaining UK culture and arranging days out (to parks, the seaside, etc) Initial contact with asylum seekers may be best arranged via a welcome event. To get involved, email s.atherton@rcaol.co.uk or ring 0151 522 1080.


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