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INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Issue 126 MARCH 2015

Living Joyfully: a wonderful celebration

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

FREE

We find God in family life

Our Lenten Journey


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contents Welcome The season of Lent began on Ash Wednesday, our time of preparation for Holy Week and Easter. In compiling the ‘Whats On’ pages for this edition of the ‘Catholic Pic’ I was struck by the rich variety of events taking place to help us prepare. There are Masses, services, devotions and reflections throughout our Archdiocese, so many that for the first time I can remember we have had to edit the list; had we not done so they would have taken up half the magazine. Full listings of all the events can be found on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk and, later in the month, Holy Week and Easter services will be added. Please do take a look and see if there is anything which will help you to prepare for the great feast. The Gospel on Ash Wednesday says, ‘when you fast do not put on a gloomy look’ and this month we feature the ‘Living Joyfully’ celebration held at the Metropolitan Cathedral as part of the Year of Consecrated Life. There can be no better guide for our Lenten observance than the joy of our faith. Pope Francis writes of ‘The Joy of the Gospel’, let us embrace that joy this Lent.

Contents 4

Main Feature Living Joyfully a wonderful celebration

From the Archbishop’s Desk 6 When I think about how I am going to change a little for the better this Lent, my thoughts inevitably turn to the Eucharist. Frequent Communion during Lent will inevitably help us have a good and joyful season.

Pastoral Letter For Lent 2015

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News From around the Archdiocese

The post-communion prayer from the Liturgy for the feast of St Augustine (August 28th) prays:

15 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life

‘Lord, make us holy by our sharing at the table of Christ. As members of his body, help us to become what we have received’.

16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese

Help us to become what we have received. Literally, may we become Holy Communion to one another and all we meet. In other words, may our lives be a point of contact, a place of encounter with Christ, where his presence and his influence is felt in our practical action for justice; in the helping hand and the shoulder to lean on; in the gesture of forgiveness and the dismantling of barriers, which are the cause of distrust, fear and pain to the human family, both at global and local levels.

18 Profile Sister Catherine Skelton Communicating the Word of God

The Eucharist requires that we make of our lives a living offering of praise and thanks, united with Christ; a life that holds nothing back. A life which proclaims the Lord's cross and resurrection; a life which cries the gospel of death destroyed and life restored. At the Eucharist, we celebrate the Lord's, deliverance of us from fear, self-love, sin and death itself; and in so doing, we relive our salvation.

20 Justice and Peace Oscar Romero: the Saint of the Americas 24 Nugent News Woolie and the Good Shepherd 25 Cathedral Record Lent at the Cathedral

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures Jim Donnelly Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

19 Animate Youth Ministry My unexpected leap of faith

Copy deadline April issue 9 March 2015 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 28 Pic Life The importance of trust 29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey

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‘A window opened on Consecrated Life Living Joyfully at the Cathedral proved a ‘wonderful celebration’ of religious life By Simon Hart ‘IT’S about visibility, it's about saying there are people still living the consecrated life and it's maybe not as you imagine.’ These are the words of Sister Catherine Skelton, a member of the Daughters of St Paul community in Liverpool and one of the organisers of the Living Joyfully event that was held at the Metropolitan Cathedral last month. If visibility was the aim, then it is fair to say nobody went home disappointed. In this Year of Consecrated Life, Living Joyfully served a significant role in opening a window on the work of over 40 different religious orders. It invited Catholics of all ages – albeit with an understandable emphasis on young people – into an important encounter and it ended up becoming, in the words of the Archbishop of Liverpool, Malcolm McMahon, ‘a wonderful celebration’. Running over three days from 6-8 February, the first day – Friday 6th –

brought to the Cathedral over 250 pupils aged 14-18 from 10 different schools from Liverpool Archdiocese and the dioceses of Lancaster and Shrewsbury. Together they were given an introduction to consecrated life. With some 100 religious in attendance, the day’s activities included live worship, moments of prayer and reflection, and discussion; there were workshops looking at prayer, mission and justice, community life, making choices, priesthood, religious vows and the joy of the Gospel. Sr Cathy Jones, an Assumption sister, was present in the Cathedral in her capacity as the Religious Life Promoter for the National Office for Vocation. She said: ‘There were about 250 to 300 young people and it was so good to see them totally engaged and enjoying encountering so many religious. What I’ve been particularly encouraged by is the eagerness of the young people to find out more. ‘The good thing about this event is that there was time for proper engagement, and also for the priests and religious to share the good work that they are doing both here and abroad. For the children to hear about the amazing things that we're doing is a way of counteracting perhaps some negative publicity and instead celebrating the good and faithful work of so many.’ Sr Cathy added: ‘One activity that really worked was the ‘adopt a priest and nun’ game, where we got the children to find

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Right: Archbishop Malcolm at the Liverpool vocations display

a priest and nun, or brother or sister, and to adopt them – to say that they would pray for them. In turn, the priest or nun would pray for that child. The children just loved it. They were going from here knowing that a religious would be praying for them by name.’ After that initial focus on young people of school age, the second day of Living Joyfully, Saturday 7th, was open to all. There was a panel discussion with featured topics including the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience; discernment; community life; faith and justice and prayer. There was also the opportunity to simply meet and speak to different religious about their lives and experiences. Sr Catherine Skelton estimated there were ‘up to 200 religious’ representing ‘about 45 orders’ present on Day 2, along with members of lay orders such as Focolare and Chemin Neuf. There were exhibitions all around the Cathedral displaying their work, and these remained on show until lunchtime on Sunday 8th. Sr Catherine added: ‘On the Saturday there were visitors throughout the day and there were even Everton and Liverpool supporters who came in before the derby match. It was very much about church and about community and sharing our specific vocation. It was about saying to people ‘yes, we’re still alive’. ‘People met up with the sisters that had taught them or they discovered things they had never known before, and there were people who spoke individually to a sister or a priest about their searching for God and searching for what God wanted them to do.’ Archbishop Malcolm McMahon reflected on the success of Living Joyfully in his homily at the 6.30 pm


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feature ‘What I’ve been particularly encouraged by is the eagerness of the young people to find out more’ Mass that concluded Saturday’s programme. ‘Yesterday we had all the teenagers and the place was very lively and full of activity while today there was a lovely atmosphere as people wandered around talking to the various religious orders who have set up their stands and stalls around the cathedral,’ he said. Sr Catherine was grateful for the support given by so many to ensure that Living Joyfully worked out so fruitfully. ‘We couldn’t have done it without the response we got from the Archbishop and the Cathedral and the religious congregations. The feedback has been very positive,’ she said. In light of this positive response, the organisers’ efforts will not end there – they have planned a meeting in Liverpool on Wednesday 18 March for those interested in continuing the discussions begun at Living Joyfully. ‘It will be a follow-up from Living Joyfully for anyone who wants to come for some peace and a chat and a prayer, and to start reflecting on where God is calling them,’ Sr Catherine explained. The event, commencing at 6.00 pm, will take place upstairs at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. • See P18 for Sister Catherine Skelton profile

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pastoral letter Pastoral Letter of the Archbishop of Liverpool appointed to be read at all Masses celebrated on the First Sunday of Lent 2015 Dear friends in Christ, On Ash Wednesday, with the blessing and distribution of ashes in our churches and schools, we began our annual Lenten pilgrimage. Lent is a holy season, a privileged time of renewal for us as individual Christians. It invites us to abandon into God’s hands everything that stops us from following Christ as we ought, so that we can not only see him more clearly ourselves, but be his face and his presence in the communities in which we live. As Christians, we are, as Pope Francis reminds us, ‘messengers of joy’. At the end of each Mass we are all sent out on mission, to ‘announce the Gospel of the Lord’, to glorify the Lord in our daily lives. Lent provides us with an opportunity to reflect upon how we do this, so that, by the grace of God, we might serve the Lord and his people better. In the Gospel on Ash Wednesday, Jesus himself gave us three ways in which we can come closer to him, three ways in which we can see the face of Christ. First, Jesus reminds us that we are to give alms, and there are many ways in which we can do this by giving to charity. But giving alms means more than just putting our hands in our pockets. It means reaching out to those in need, maybe by visiting a lonely neighbour. It means seeing Christ in other people, especially in those whom we find it a real challenge to love and respect. It means going out of our way to be people of reconciliation and peace, building bridges within our families and the local community. Secondly, Jesus reminds us that we are to pray. To be a Christian is to be a person of prayer, a person who places their trust in God in all that they say and do. We can pray in so many different ways, most importantly by gathering on Sundays to celebrate Mass together. But we are asked to live our faith seven days a week, and I hope that, this Lent, we can find space for God on weekdays as well as on Sundays. We can spend some time at the beginning and end of each day. We could read one of the Gospels and so get to know Our Lord a little better. We could make the Stations of the Cross on Fridays this Lent, to reflect upon Christ’s Passion and Death. And I hope that we will not

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neglect to make a good confession as Easter draws near so that we can celebrate his Resurrection with joy in our hearts. God’s mercy has no limits for those who seek him with a humble heart, and he is ready to welcome us with open arms when we seek him. Our prayer and our worship of God places him at the very centre of our lives Thirdly, Jesus reminds us that we are to fast. I hope that we have all ‘given up something for Lent’. However, the Lenten fast is not a diet, but is much more profound than that – it expresses our longing for God and helps us to identify with the poor, including those in our midst. Pope Francis reminds us that: There is a lot of poverty in the world, and that’s a scandal when we have so many riches and resources to give to everyone. We all have to think about how we can become a little poorer. So, I would like to suggest, this Lent, that we fast from something else in addition to giving up some food or drink that we like for a few weeks so that ‘we can become a little poorer’, the ‘poor Church for the poor’. Maybe those of us who drive to work could walk for part of the journey; we could fast from a favourite TV programme or the internet, spending the time instead with our families or friends. Our fasting

should be a hunger for justice, a thirst for doing what is right, so that Christ shines through our words, deeds and the example that we set others by our way of living. Being marked with ashes to remind us that we are dust, and to dust we shall return is a humbling moment for all of us. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of our annual pilgrimage of renewal, which will lead us through these next forty days to our annual celebration of Our Lord’s Resurrection on Easter Sunday. This Lent, I pray that Almighty God, who brings us to life by fashioning us from the dust of the earth, and who re-creates us in the waters of Baptism so that we can live not for ourselves but for him, may breathe into us once more the new life of the Risen Lord, so that we may truly be Christ’s face and his presence in the communities in which we live. With my prayers and every good wish for you and your families for a blessed Lent and a happy Easter,

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Experts to shed light on stained glass at SFX The art of stained glass has been fundamental in church building design for many centuries, and new light will be shed on this special art at an event in Liverpool this month. Saint Francis Xavier’s Church on Salisbury Street, is hosting the event on Saturday 7 March (2.00 pm) which will feature a talk from two experts in the field. Professor Raphael Seitz, visiting professor at Hope University, will give a talk titled 'Breaking Light Like Bread – Art in Stained Glass'. He is an internationally renowned painter and glass artist and is well known in Liverpool for his beautiful works at the Metropolitan Cathedral. Dennis Eckersley of Design Lights Ltd, meanwhile, will describe the work he is doing to restore a World War II-damaged stained glass window from SFX Church itself. The event is part of a Heritage Lottery Fund project and all are welcome, with entry free. SFX Church is on Salisbury Street, Liverpool, L3 8DR (next to Hope University Everton campus).

Liverpool knights hold annual dinner Liverpool’s Knights of St Columba held their annual dinner at the Adelphi Hotel last month. The guest of honour for the evening was Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, who in addition to his role as shepherd for Liverpool Archdiocese is also ecclesiastical adviser to the KSC nationally. Other guests included Supreme Knight Charlie McCluskey; John Hamilton, the provincial Grand Knight; Pat Foley, the newly elected Grand Knight for Liverpool; John Church, the provincial Social Secretary; and Father Emelka from Shrewsbury Diocese. They are pictured along with Mrs Patricia Church, Mrs Anne Foley, Mrs Sandra McCluskey and Mrs Rita Hamilton. A highlight of the evening was a presentation of the Order’s prestigious Meritorious Medal to Pat McGann, a former Grand Knight of Liverpool province, for his outstanding and dedicated service over many years.

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news diary Archbishop leads celebration of marriage and family life ‘We find God in the home.’ This was the message from Archbishop Malcolm at the Annual Mass celebrating Marriage and Family Life at the Metropolitan Cathedral. In his homily the Archbishop reflected on the example of Saint Peter’s mother-in-law in the day’s Gospel reading (Mark 1: 29-39), noting that in Peter’s home in Capernaum ‘so much was just centred on the prayer of the home and the holiness of the home’. This, he continued, was an example to all: ‘As we remember and celebrate family life in our diocese this Gospel fits in in a pertinent way because how often do we think of our homes as being the place where God is present? In the little community of our family do we make a place for Christ to dwell? ‘Where do we find Christ?’ added the Archbishop. ‘Well, we find him in the home. We find him in the context of family life.’ One special feature of the Mass was the passing on of the family Bibles that had been entrusted to three families at last year’s celebration. Kenny and Carolyn Lawler, married in 2013, handed on their Bible to Mary Waine and her family. Deacon Paul and Mary Collins, who celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary this year, handed their Bible to Daniel and Dawn Rooke who were married last September. Irene Kennedy, who is a widow, gave her Bible to the family of Ian Pilkington and fiancée Linda Hodson.

On the significance of the Bibles, Archbishop Malcolm added: ‘Perhaps what we can do in our own lives is to get that Bible off the shelf and dust it down and put it in a more prominent place in the house and perhaps once in a while gather our family around it to thank God for the wonderful deeds he has done for us.’ The gifts at the offertory procession were brought forward by Jim and Sheila Moonan who celebrated their golden wedding anniversary last year and Leanna Street and Peter Marsh who are to marry in the Cathedral this year. There were prayers of intercession said for those preparing for marriage and those newly married but also for people experiencing difficulties in their relationships and for the widowed, the divorced, the separated and the bereaved.

Marie Waine

Ian Pilkington and fiancé Linda Hodson

Daniel and Dawn Rooke

Obituary of Rev George Robson SDB

Father George Robson pictured with his brother and two sisters outside Buckingham Palace after receiving his MBE

Former Parish Priest of St Dominic’s, Huyton, Father George Robson, died on Friday 6 February at the age of 80. George Robson was born in Wigan on 15 August 1934, the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. He was educated at Thornleigh Salesian College, Bolton, but subsequently moved in 1948 to the Salesian Missionary College, Shrigley Park, to begin his aspirantate for the Salesians of Don Bosco. He made his first profession on 8 September 1952. During his practical training he taught at Shrigley and Battersea, London and was ordained in the Basilica of Mary Help of Christians on 25 March 1963. After ordination George completed a second BSc degree in London before moving to Bootle to teach Physics. In 1970 he went to Shrigley as a teacher and Vice Rector of the local community. Between 1981 and 1987 he was Rector of the Blaisdon Salesian community. In 1987 George moved into parish work, first in Bollington and then from 1991 at St Dominic’s in Huyton. During his twenty years as parish priest there Father George worked closely with the other churches and the wider community. He also served for a number of years on the Archdiocesan Finance Advisory Committe. In 2009 he was awarded the MBE by the Queen ‘for sevices to the community in Merseyside’. By 2011 Fr George was already suffering from cancer but he never complained and generously moved to Glasgow where he worked as curate for a further two years. He retired to St Joseph’s, Bolton, in January 2014 and died a year later having greatly impressed everyone by his courage and his cheerfulness. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at Thornleigh, Bolton on Saturday 14 February.

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Bellerive welcomes Bishop Tom Bishop Tom Williams visited Bellerive FCJ Catholic College last month and took the time to call into a number of lessons including Maths, History, Geography, English and RE. He shared some of his experiences of these subjects with the students and took part into a question and answer session with Year 10 on aspects of their catholic faith. He was very impressed with the articulate way in which the students expressed themselves throughout the day. After joining the students for lunch, Bishop Tom formally opened the Elmfield extension (completed in 2013). The extension gives an extra six teaching spaces to help house the growing school population. Bishop Tom was joined at the opening ceremony by three Year 7 students who will hopefully make great use of the spaces in their time at the College.

Obituaries Father Brian Coakley, former parish priest of St Agnes, Eccleston, died on Thursday 22 January at the age of 86. He served in the Archdiocese for over sixty years celebrating his Diamond Jubilee of Ordination last May. Brian Philip Dermot Coakley was born in Liverpool on 26 May 1928, the son of Joseph and Josephine Coakley. He attended Hardy Street Convent School and St Francis Xavier’s College, Liverpool, before going on to Ushaw College to study for the priesthood. He was ordained by Archbishop William Godfrey at St Clare’s, Liverpool, on 9 May 1954. Following ordination he was appointed assistant priest at St Elizabeth’s, Litherland, before transferring to Our Lady’s, Formby, in January 1962. He then held a number of short-term appointments through the 1960s and 1970s: with the Catholic Missionary Society in September 1965; as army chaplain in December 1965; at St Philomena’s, Liverpool in April 1966; St John’s, Wigan in August 1967; St Vincent’s, St Helens in January 1971, and Our Lady’s, Eldon Street in September 1973. In July 1976 he took a period of sick leave before returning as assistant priest at St Joseph’s, Leigh in February 1977 and later at St Anne’s, Liverpool in October 1978. In December 1982 he was appointed parish priest of St Agnes, Eccleston, where he remained until September 1993. He 10

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then had two more appointments as assistant priest: in Skelmersdale in September 1993 and at English Martyrs’, Litherland in June 1994. Following his retirement in September 1999 he lived firstly at Woolton and then at Ince Blundell Hall. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Mary’s, Woolton, on Tuesday 3 February, followed by burial in Allerton Cemetery. Rev Frederick Matthews SMM a former Episcopal Vicar for Religious in the archdiocese and Montfort Missionary priest, died on Thursday 22 January at the age of 88. John Frederick Matthews was born on 25 September 1926 in Blackpool, after attending primary school in the town he studied at Montfort College in Romsey, and entered the novitiate of the Montfort Missionaries in Ashurst, Hampshire in 1944, where he made his first religious profession on 27 September 1945 before studying philosophy and theology. He made his perpetual profession in Church Stretton on 27 September 1950, and a short time later was ordained deacon. He was ordained to the priesthood in St Cuthbert’s, Blackpool on 7 October 1950. In 1951, he went to Montfort College to teach Latin and French; then in 1955 began studies at Southampton University which led to a BA in Philosophy, Latin, French and

Spanish. He returned to teach at Montfort College in 1958. In 1965 he was sent to Barrhead in Scotland to be director of the new provincial seminary, and also to act as Vocations Director for Scotland. The following year he returned to Montfort College to be Superior and headmaster of the school. In 1970, Father Fred became Provincial Superior of the Province of Great Britain and Ireland and was re-elected in 1976, serving as Provincial for a total of twelve years based in London. In 1975 he became President of the Conference of Major Religious Superiors for England and Wales, an appointment that was renewed in 1981. In 1982, Father Fred moved to Liverpool, where he was appointed by Archbishop Derek Worlock to be Episcopal Vicar for Religious for the Archdiocese and a member of the Archbishop’s Council. He also took on the responsibility of the parish of Our Lady of the Assumption in Gateacre for several years. In retirement he continued to serve some of the local convents until ill health made it necessary for him to enter Nazareth House, in Crosby. As his health deteriorated, he was taken into St Joseph’s Hospice, Thornton, where he died. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Peter and St Paul church, Crosby, on Thursday 28 January prior to burial in the churchyard there.


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news diary Archbishop’s call for unity at Civic Mass Archbishop Malcolm McMahon highlighted the importance of reaching out and helping others at the annual Civic Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral. This was Archbishop Malcolm’s first Civic Mass in Liverpool and in his sermon he spoke of the city’s tradition of volunteering. ‘In the city of Liverpool there is a great emphasis on volunteering, there are lots of people who say spontaneously “Of course I want to”,’ he said. ‘This may have been forced on us by necessity, because of the economic and political situation, but volunteering puts new heart into people, it gets them out of their own concerns as they discover that loving and compassionate heart which God has placed in every one of us.’ The Archbishop quoted Pope Francis’s ‘Evangelii gaudium’ (The Joy of the Gospel) when he cited the dangers of a consumerist society where ‘interior life becomes caught up in its own interests [and] there is no longer room for others’. Reflecting on the absence of a shared moral foundation in modern, multi-cultural Britain, he went on to underline the significance of our Christian faith: ‘we always find a welcome for the stranger, we find tolerance and a willingness to help our neighbour’, while stressing that it was not possible to live in isolation and that we must instead follow the example, seen in the day’s Gospel, of Jesus helping the leper. ‘Nowadays there is no future in remaining in the confines of our own Church or section of society; we have to reach out, not only to build a future for ourselves and future generations but to

discover who we really are and to discover what unites us.’ Paul Bayes, Bishop of Liverpool, attended the Mass and Judge Clement Goldstone QC, Honorary Recorder of Liverpool and the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, Councillor Erica Kemp CBE, read the lessons. Prayers were said for all in public office and the judiciary; for volunteers; for those working in industry, commerce, education and culture; and for the deprived and disadvantaged.

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The Chalon Challenge The annual public speaking competition sponsored by St Helens Catenian Circle for students at Carmel College took place at the Chalon Court Hotel in St Helens. The winner was Ryan Ellison who spoke animatedly and passionately on the controversial topic ‘Mission to Mars: is it worth the money?’ Second place went to Chelsea Geary, whose

speech was entitled ‘Read the book or wait for the film?’ and third place jointly to Lydia Ashurst who chose ‘If I ruled the world’ and Erick Musembi who spoke to the question ‘Technology – slave or master?’ The event was chaired by Brother Vice President Jim Byrne, who also presented the prizes. Brother Bernard Fyles acted as Master of Ceremonies, while Brother Frank Firth was the chairman of the panel of judges. However, it was a real team effort to run this competition and invaluable roles were played by: George Baldry, George Jones, Peter Mc Bride, Paul Mather, Brian Parr, Peter Ritson, John Robinson and Margaret Turner. Carmel College were represented by Mr Rob Peacock (Principal), and Mr Phil Kearsley who is responsible for the organisation of the event at Carmel. Ryan Ellison is now eligible to represent Carmel College and the St Helens Circle in the provincial competition which will be held in March.

Nightfever comes to Liverpool On Saturday 7 February, Liverpool celebrated its first Nightfever at the Blessed Sacrament Shrine in the city centre. Nightfever is an evening where volunteers head out onto the streets and invite people to enter the church and say a prayer and light a candle. Whilst they are there, they then have the opportunity to stay for a while in front of the Blessed Sacrament, write a prayer that would be later offered by the Carmelite Sisters, or take part in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. It was a bold move for volunteers from Animate, Hope CathSoc and other willing helpers to go out onto the streets of Liverpool, but this did not put anyone off as they eagerly went out in pairs to offer the invitation into the church. Paul Murphy, the Redemptorist youth coordinator, said 'My first experience of Nightfever in Liverpool was a truly beautiful and powerful one and I was met with a real sense of peace and prayerfulness. The constant flow of people coming to spend time in the presence of the Lord during the course of the night was deeply moving.’ Father Simon Gore, Director of Youth Ministry, said, 'We were not sure what to expect but we had an impressive number of people accept the invitation into the church. We thought Nightfever answered the call of Pope Francis to leave behind the safety of buildings and literally go onto the streets. We hope this first evening will be the start of a new evangelisation in the city centre.' For further information about Nightfever, or to volunteer for the next event, please contact Father Simon Gore on 01744 740467 or s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk

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news diary Support for those in healthcare Bishop Tom Williams celebrated Mass with and for those who work in healthcare on Sunday 15 February. The celebration at Christ the King and Our Lady in Liverpool followed the message published by Pope Francis for the World Day of Prayer for the Sick which is kept on the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes, 11 February. Bishop Tom, who chairs the Healthcare Reference Group of the Bishops’ Conference, took the opportunity to thank those who work in any capacity in healthcare and to offer them both support and prayer.

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note On Wednesday 25 March we celebrate the Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord. Unusually for a day in the Lenten season, we use the Gloria at Mass, although not the Alleluia which is now reserved for the Easter Vigil and Masses of the Easter season. The Annunciation celebrates that moment when Saint Gabriel the Archangel communicates to Mary that she was to be the mother of the Son of God. Mary, also a daughter of God, gave her ‘Fiat’ (Be it done) by which she conceived the Saviour by the working of the Holy Spirit. We can always find great significance in the dialogue recounted in the Gospel of this solemn feast – Mary is humble yet, through the work and will of the Father, she is also great. Through her consent to God’s plans, she took part in the whole redemptive work of her Son; we, therefore, venerate her as Mother of Christ and our mother. It is a feast which puts us in mind of the thinking and writing of one of England’s great saints, Julian of Norwich, with her emphasis on two attributes of God’s working in our lives which perhaps we lose sight of a little today – God’s ‘courtesy’ and his ‘homeliness’. In using these two images Julian does not seek to

Sunday thoughts After a 10-year journey the European Rosetta spacecraft has landed on a comet. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has travelled three billion miles in nearly nine years to photograph the surface of Pluto. The Kepler telescope has revealed the existence of ‘goldilocks’ planets – not too hot and not too cold – 117 light-years away. More fascinating for me is not the potential for intelligent life elsewhere but the vast scale of the Universe. The known Universe may be one of billions of parallel universes. Some of these may have already ceased to exist. Others may still be born. The words of Sacred Scripture were written and read by those who believed that the earth was the centre of the Universe. For them the sun was hardly more than a satellite. But the Lord God Creator of the compact medieval universe also reigns over the multiple galaxies revealed by contemporary space

Canon Philip Gillespie

lessen God’s majesty and greatness – far from it. Rather, she sees that it is in courteous love and everyday kindnesses that God is fully revealed to us. However, there is also a challenge; if this is our theology (our ‘words about God’, expressing our understanding of God), then we should mirror and exemplify these attributes in our own lives. So it is that Julian’s understanding of God’s love is not something so ‘mystical' or far removed from human experience as to be beyond us; no, in the ‘courtesy’ of the Annunciation, in the homeliness of his dealing with men and women who sought his presence and company, and above all in his suffering for our sake, Jesus gives us truly an example that we should imitate. ‘And given all this, I thought it impossible that all manner of things should be well, as our Lord revealed at this time. And I received no other answer in showing from our Lord God but this: “What is impossible to you is not impossible to me. I shall keep my word in all things and I shall make all things well.”’

Mgr John Devine OBE

exploration. My faith is strengthened by these discoveries. Human life on planet Earth may be 200,000 years old, a blip in the life of the Universe. The light of stars detected by the Kepler telescope was already on its way towards us in the lifetime of Jesus. The Incarnation makes as much sense in our backwater of the Milky Way as it does in Galilee, the backwater of the Roman Empire. Billions of years passed before my own birth. Billions may pass after my death. Yet Christ’s death and resurrection give my life significance. The words of Jesus remain as hardhitting today as they were 2,000 years ago: ‘Unless a wheat grain falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single grain; but if it dies it reveals a rich harvest.’

Looking within I was recently in Israel staying with a Palestinian friend and as I was leaving his house for the airport I gave him a hug and got into the taxi which happened to be driven by a Jewish man. The car started and we drove up the road and then the driver stopped the car, looked at me and said, ‘You hugged an Arab’. My response was ‘He’s my friend’. ‘You don’t like Jews then?’ he replied. I said, ‘Yes, I have Jewish friends’. He kept repeating ‘you hugged an Arab’ as we drove to the airport virtually in silence. It was an uncomfortable journey and one I would not want to repeat but I hope that I made him think. There are those far more qualified than me to speak about the complex Middle Eastern situation and that is not what I am writing about. What the experience did was to illustrate to me the prejudices that lie just under the surface within all of us and the need we have to be honest with ourselves and face these prejudices. It is what the Gospel stories tell us over and over again. The danger with all religious people is that we can become blind within, in the name of religion judging and blaming those who do not see things as we do. We can have our neat little package but not be open to the presence of God. We can go to Mass every day and know everything the Church teaches and be unaware of the presence of God in our brothers and sisters. We can be so caught up in our own self-righteousness and limited vision that we close ourselves off from the God who is in people of all faiths and no faith. Lent is a time when we are invited to look within. The things that we give up and the extra things we do are not so that we can feel proud of ourselves for fulfilling our Lenten observance. Fasting and prayer and works of charity are to enable us to see where our lack of love is, where we judge and blame and separate, where our prejudices lie. We are invited to die to ourselves so that we can rise to new life with Christ. So in what is left of this Lenten time can we take up the challenge and dare to look within? Can we face our prejudices and our blindness? Can we open ourselves to God’s abiding presence all around us and bring life to others? Fr Chris Thomas

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what’s on Sunday 1 March Rosary and Benediction 3.00 pm at St Albert’s, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Holy Hour with Evening Prayer 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Monday 2 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lenten Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Tuesday 3 March Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘The Gift’ Spirituality Course 7.30 pm at St Albert’s Centre, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. ‘Lent: A Time for Change and Renewal.’ Prayer and Reflection led by members of the Irenaeus Team. 7.30 pm at Saint Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ. Details from Father Paul Seddon Tel: 01942 883395. Wednesday 4 March Lenten Mass 7.30 am at St Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ Lenten Prayer and Reflection 10.30 am-12.00 noon at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk ‘Meditation.’ Lenten Reflection 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Thursday 5 March ‘From death to life’ Reflections on Mark’s Gospel Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Lenten Talk by the Most Reverend Malcolm McMahon OP, Archbishop of Liverpool 6.00 pm at Liverpool Parish Church, Old Churchyard, Chapel Street, Liverpool, L2 8TZ ‘Gift in today’s world – Sacrament of Reconciliation’ Lenten talk by Father Richard Reid CsSR. 6.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Lenten Discussion Group 8.00 pm at Our Lady and All Saints, Lancaster Lane, Parbold, WN8 7HS. Friday 6 March Women’s World Day of Prayer Lenten Mass. 6.30 am at Holy Family, Chaddock Lane, Boothstown, M28 1DN. Lenten Mass 6.30 am (followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament until 8.30 am) at St Joseph’s, Harper Lane, Chorley, PR6 0HR Marriage and Family Life Ministry PAPYRUS: Prevention of Young Suicide Conference Suicide is a leading cause of death among our young people. PAPYRUS seeks to work with communities across the UK to tackle the stigma that surrounds suicide and to promote mental health and wellbeing among young people and those who care for and work with young people. Speaker: Ged Flynn, Chief Executive of PAPYRUS. 10.00 am-3.30 pm (light lunch provided) at

LACE, Croxteth Drive, Sefton Park, L17 1AA. Online booking at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/Courses-Events or Tel: 0151 522 1040. Cost £10 per person. For more details contact: Maureen O’Brien Tel: 0151 522 1044 Email: m.obrien@rcaol.co.uk Embroidery for Pleasure Crewel work for Beginners. 1.00 pm in the Studio of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tutor David Peglar. Cost £5 including refreshments and free parking in the Cathedral Car Park. For further information Tel: 0151 709 9222 or email enquiries@metcathedral.org.uk Film about the Saints 2.00 pm at St Mary’s Presbytery, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Saturday 7 March ‘Responding to the Call.’ A Day of Recollection to support those exploring vocations to the Priesthood. Discover more about diocesan priesthood; talk with and hear from priests of the archdiocese and spend time in prayer and discussion. 10.00 am at St Charles’ Presbytery, 224 Aigburth Road, Liverpool, L17 9PG. Further information from Father James Preston Tel: 0151 727 2493 or email: frjamespreston@gmail.com. Also on Facebook at /liverpoolvocations and on Twitter @LVocations Eucharistic Adoration 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. A talk on stained glass By Professor Raphael Seitz, visiting Professor at Liverpool Hope University, and creator of stained glass at the University and the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. 2.00 pm at St Francis Xavier's Church, Salisbury Street, L3 8DR. Sunday 8 March Aid to the Church in Need Prayer Vigil for Religious Freedom. 3.00 pm in St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Holy Hour with Evening Prayer 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Monday 9 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lenten Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. ‘The Gift’ Spirituality Course 6.30 pm at St Albert’s Centre, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Tuesday 10 March Ministry Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. A day for anyone involved in ministry or the service of others, with time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sr Winnie Morley. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com ‘Planning tools for prayer and worship.’ A skills workshop. 6.30 pm at 7.30 pm at St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE. Booking email: formation@rcaol.co.uk ‘Lent: A Time for Change and Renewal.’ Prayer and Reflection led by members of the Irenaeus Team. 7.30 pm at Saint Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ. Details from Father Paul Seddon Tel: 01942 883395.

Wednesday 11 March Lenten Mass 7.30 am at St Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ Lenten Prayer and Reflection 10.30 am-12.00 noon at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk ‘Praying the Scriptures.’ Lenten Reflection. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Penitential Service for the St Edmund Arrowsmith Pastoral Area 7.00 pm at St Edmund Arrowsmith High School, Rookery Avenue, Ashton-in-Makerfield, WN4 9PF. UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St Jerome's, Greenloons Drive, Formby, L37 2LX. Thursday 12 March ‘From death to life’ Reflections on Mark’s Gospel Scripture Morning led by Father Chris Thomas. 10.30 am at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Lenten Media Evening with Phil Redmond, Alastair Machray and Roger Phillips 6.00 pm at Liverpool Parish Church, Old Churchyard, Chapel Street, Liverpool, L2 8TZ ‘Paying the Price of Faith.’ A lecture by Lord Alton organised by the Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets £8 available from Cathedral House Tel: 0151 709 9222. Service of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at St Richard of Chichester, Mayfield Street, Atherton, M46 0AQ. Friday 13 March Lenten Mass 6.30 am at Holy Family, Chaddock Lane, Boothstown, M28 1DN. Lenten Mass 6.30 am (followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament until 8.30 am) at St Joseph’s, Harper Lane, Chorley, PR6 0HR Embroidery for Pleasure Crewel work for Beginners. 1.00 pm in the Studio of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tutor David Peglar. Cost £5 including refreshments and free parking in the Cathedral Car Park. For further information Tel: 0151 709 9222 or email enquiries@metcathedral.org.uk Film about the Saints 2.00 pm at St Mary’s Presbytery, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Aid to the Church in Need Prayer Vigil for Religious Freedom 7.30 pm in St John’s, Standishgate, Wigan, WN1 1DX. Saturday 14 March Preparing for Easter with Father Daniel O’Leary 10.00 am – 4.00pm pm at Sandymount Retreat Centre, 16 Burbo Bank Road, Blundellsands, Liverpool, L23 6TH. Cost £15. Details at www.sandymountretreats.org.uk Tel: 0151 924 4850 Email: info@sandymountretreats.org.uk Eucharistic Adoration 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Goldwork: Intermediate Purl and Sequins in the Studio of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tutor David Peglar. This is the second course in

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march Goldwork, and follows on from the beginners course last year to using the specialised purl thread and sequins. For further information Tel: 0151 709 9222 or email enquiries@metcathedral.org.uk Sunday 15 March Holy Hour with Evening Prayer 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Monday 16 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lenten Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Penitential Service for the St Edmund Arrowsmith Pastoral Area 7.00 pm at All Saints, High Street, Golborne, WA3 3BG. ‘The Gift’ Spirituality Course 7.30 pm at St Albert’s Centre, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Tuesday 17 March ‘Lent: A Time for Change and Renewal.’ Prayer and Reflection led by members of the Irenaeus Team. 7.30 pm at Saint Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ. Details from Father Paul Seddon Tel: 01942 883395. Wednesday 18 March Lenten Mass 7.30 am at St Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ Lenten Prayer and Reflection 10.30 am-12.00 noon at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk ‘Praying through the liturgy.’ Lenten Reflection. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Thursday 19 March Lenten Talk by Sally Vickers 6.00 pm at Liverpool Parish Church, Old Churchyard, Chapel Street, Liverpool, L2 8TZ Penitential Service for the St Edmund Arrowsmith Pastoral Area 7.00 pm at Our Lady Immaculate, Downall Green Road, Bryn, WN4 0LZ. ‘The Jewish Celebration of Passover.’ Lenten talk by Arnold Lewis. 7.00 pm Mass followed by the talk in St Helen’s Parish Centre, Crosby, L23 7TQ. ‘White Rabbit.’ Animate Youth Ministries welcome RISE Theatre, who will be performing their brand new original play. 7.30 pm at St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE. Booking and tickets (£5 for 16+, £3 for under 16) contact Father Simon Gore on 01744 740460/467. Email: s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk Lenten Discussion Group 8.00 pm at Our Lady and All Saints, Lancaster Lane, Parbold, WN8 7HS. Friday 20 March Lenten Mass 6.30 am at Holy Family, Chaddock Lane, Boothstown, M28 1DN. Lenten Mass 6.30 am (followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament until 8.30 am) at St Joseph’s, Harper Lane, Chorley, PR6 0HR Mass with reconciliation for the St Gregory the Great Pastoral Area 12.00 noon at St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ.

Embroidery for Pleasure: Crewel work for Beginners. 1.00 pm in the Studio of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tutor David Peglar. Cost £5 including refreshments and free parking in the Cathedral Car Park. For further information Tel: 0151 709 9222 or email enquiries@metcathedral.org.uk Film about the Saints 2.00 pm at St Mary’s Presbytery, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Service of Reconciliation (with individual confessions) 7.30 pm at St Albert’s, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Saturday 21 March Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winnie Morley. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Eucharistic Adoration 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Mozart Requiem Concert with the Cathedral Orchestra Conductor: Stephen Pratt, and the Cathedral Cantata Choir, Director: Richard Lea. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 22 March Annual Romero Mass 11.00 am 7.30 pm at St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE. Holy Hour with Evening Prayer 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. ‘Membra Jesu Nostri’ Concert 7.30 pm at St Mary’s, Buttermarket Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. Warrington Choral Society and Orchestra. Conductor: Michael Wynne. Tickets £10. Concessions: £7, £5, under 16 free. Details from St Mary’s Parish Office on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays or www.WarrChoral.com Monday 23 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lenten Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Tuesday 24 March ‘Lent: A Time for Change and Renewal.’ Prayer and Reflection led by members of the Irenaeus Team. 7.30 pm at Saint Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ. Details from Father Paul Seddon Tel: 01942 883395. Wednesday 25 March Lenten Mass 7.30 am at St Ambrose Barlow, Astley, M29 7DZ ‘Devotional prayer.’ Lenten Reflection. 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Thursday 26 March ‘Gift in today’s world – Sacrament of Reconciliation’ Lenten talk by Father Chris Thomas. 6.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. ‘The Gift’ Spirituality Course 7.30 pm at St Albert’s Centre, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA.

Friday 27 March to Sunday 29 March ‘Faith, hope, love and the greatest of these…’ Quiet weekend of prayer led by Father Brendan Rice at Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Friday 27 March Lenten Mass 6.30 am at Holy Family, Chaddock Lane, Boothstown, M28 1DN. Embroidery for Pleasure: Crewel work for Beginners 1.00 pm in the Studio of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tutor David Peglar. Cost £5 including refreshments and free parking in the Cathedral Car Park. For further information Tel: 0151 709 9222 or email enquiries@metcathedral.org.uk Film about the Saints 2.00 pm at St Mary’s Presbytery, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Saturday 28 March Day of Reconciliation for the St Thomas of Canterbury Pastoral Area 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at St Helen’s, Alexandra Road, Crosby, L23 7TQ. Archbishop’s Retreat Day for catechumens, candidates and catechists 10.30 am at the Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation. Booking essential. Email: formation@rcaol.co.uk Eucharistic Adoration 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, 82 Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Open air Stations of the Cross 2.00 pm from the corner of Church Street/Lord Street in Liverpool City Centre. The walk will go through Church Street along Bold Street finishing at St Luke’s (bombed out church) with a short service. Participants should arrive at 1.45 pm. Details from Jim Ross. Tel: 07766 706766. Email jimmy.ross7@gmail.com Sunday 29 March Walk for Jospice on the new Thornton relief road Access to the road will be from 11.00 am on the morning and last entrance at 2.30 pm. A donation towards the work of Jospice is asked from each participant who will receive a special certificate. Refreshment vans will be available on the day and toilet facilities at the starting point. Registration: www.jospice.org.uk Penitential Way of the Cross with Exposition 3.00 pm at Holy Family, Lily Lane, Platt Bridge, WN2 5LL. Holy Hour with Evening Prayer 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Mount Pleasant, Chorley, PR7 2SR. Monday 30 March Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lenten Holy Hour 11.00 am at St Bartholomew’s, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NY. Lenten Service of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at Our Lady and All Saints, Lancaster Lane, Parbold, WN8 7HS. ‘The Gift’ Spirituality Course 7.30 pm at St Albert’s Centre, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Tuesday 31 March Lenten Mass of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at St Luke the Evangelist, Shaw Lane, Whiston, L35 5AT.

n services and events can be found on the Archdiocesan website www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Catholic Pictorial

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profile

Sister Catherine Skelton

Communicating the word of God by Simon Hart AS a teenager growing up in Greenock on the west coast of Scotland, Catherine Skelton felt a strong calling to enter the religious life. Yet the traditional ministries of teaching and nursing held no interest; instead, a book about Blessed James Alberione, founder of the Daughters of St Paul, persuaded her that her future lay in spreading the Good News through communication. ‘I was very impressed by his vision of ministry in the Church,’ she remembers. ‘I set out to find the Sisters in Glasgow and I did and I liked what I saw. At a young, tender age, I asked to join them. I was 18, naïve and enthusiastic.’ Today, more than 30 years on, Sister Catherine is living out this ministry at the ‘Holy Shop’, aka Pauline Books and Media on Bold Street in Liverpool. The Pauline Sisters have been there since 1967 and as the publishing industry has changed, so too the work they do, as Sr Catherine explains. ‘The digital world has affected us but also the whole climate of the Church has affected us and also the fact the Catholic population of Liverpool has decreased considerably,’ she says. ‘Yet there will always be needs to be met – the

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word of God doesn’t change, what changes is how we communicate it. ‘Our founder’s great vision was that the Bible, the word of God, be available to everyone in whichever form they can access it and we have a very pastoral ministry here,’ she adds, noting how troubled souls will often drop into the shop seeking a quiet word. ‘That is one of the most rewarding things – seeing people turn their lives around in adverse situations, and seeing it change through their faith and connectedness with the word of God. The power of the word does transform people’s lives still today and we are in very privileged position.’ The changing function of St Paul’s bookshop is underlined by the fact the second floor is now free of books. ‘We try to provide alternatives – talks and catechist days,’ she says and on 18 March, it will host a follow-up gathering for those people whose interest in consecrated life was piqued by February’s Living Joyfully event. Sr Catherine, a member of the Archdiocese’s organising committee for the Year of Consecrated Life, recalls growing up in ‘a Church culture where feeling called to have a vocation was more

common than uncommon’. Yet she sees the value in the Samuel groups – promoted by the National Office for Vocation – which give young people considering their calling the opportunity for discussion and reflection; after all, she experienced the original version during two ‘exciting years’ as a novice in Milan in the early 80s. ‘I was fortunate to be in the diocese of Cardinal Martini when he first initiated the Samuel groups in the cathedral.’ From Milan, she moved on to the Pauline Sisters’ ‘international’ communities in Glasgow, London and Slough prior to her arrival in Liverpool in 2012. A keen walker she is enjoying discovering the city’s parks, but her main passion is unchanged: communicating the word of God. ‘Our resources help develop the sacramental life,’ she says. ‘We produce our own material and you see the energy and creativity that goes into creating something that is going to help multitudes of people understand better the sacraments.’

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youth ministry

My unexpected leap of faith By Caroline Rigby ‘And do you think your degree has helped you in your current line of work?’ ‘Erm, no. Not really.’ This is just a snippet from a recent telephone conversation I had with a woman completing a survey for St Andrews University. When she asked what I had been doing since graduating last June, I do not think my reply of ‘working as a Catholic youth worker’ was what she was expecting. If I am honest, it is not the answer I would have expected from myself either had someone asked me the question a year earlier. I have always been a ‘planner’. I want to know what I am doing with my life and where I am going next, so my decision to join the Animate team was as big a shock for me as it was for anyone else and, sure enough, in the months before I moved into Lowe House, I got cold feet. Shouldn’t I have applied for a regular office job? Shouldn’t I have applied for one of those graduate schemes? Shouldn’t I have applied for something to do with my degree?

The decision to work in youth ministry did not happen overnight – in fact, I think God was slowly leading me to this over my four years at university. I was brought up a Catholic and considered myself committed to my faith but I think, like many students, I became easily distracted by all the other things going on at university. With the freedom of living away from home, parties to enjoy and new people to meet, somehow God became much less important to me. I stopped going to Church and on the odd occasion I did get to Mass I never told my ‘friends’ about it for fear that they would consider me ‘weird’. The novelty of my first year at university started to wear, though, and I began to realise something was missing. Putting other things before my faith was not making me happy. It was only when I met some wonderful people in St Andrews that I was able to put God at the forefront of my life again. I saw how much joy their faith brought them and I wanted what they had. It is true what Pope Francis says: ‘The Church grows by attraction, not proselytising.’ I wanted to be to others what these true friends had been to me.

And so here I am – halfway through my year with Animate and I have not looked back. I work with young people on a daily basis, hoping to share with them the joy of faith. I do not set out to ‘teach’ anyone anything, or to ‘persuade’ others to think as I do, or to ‘convert’ anyone. I simply want to share my experiences and give others the chance to share theirs. There was no greater example than Animate’s recent weekend course for Eucharistic ministers. The focus was on how we each felt that God had called us to this role and it gave us the chance to share our experiences of faith. I was able to see not only how I can help young people grow in their faith but how they help each other and how they help me. Those who say young people do not have a faith need only spend some time working in youth ministry to see that this simply is not true. More often than not, all that is needed is something or someone to awaken what is simply lying dormant. • ‘White Rabbit’ – Lowe House Church, Thursday 19 March at 7.30pm The Christian theatre company RISE Theatre will perform the new play ‘White Rabbit’, a story about two people and their journey to faith. The performance is suitable for adults and ages 12+. To book, contact 01744 740460/467 or s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk. Tickets are £3 (ages 16 and under); £5 (16+). the next few months and beyond.

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justice & peace

Oscar Romero, the Saint of the Americas By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker This month I was intending to write about the importance of voting in the forthcoming General Election but then something amazing happened that made me change subject. Oscar Romero, the Archbishop of San Salvador from 1977-80, has been officially declared a martyr and he will be beatified very soon. The ceremony will probably take place in the square outside the cathedral in San Salvador, capital of El Salvador and the same place where his funeral was interrupted by military gunfire. Archbishop Romero’s mission was one of hope, of Good News. He was appointed as Archbishop because he was ‘a safe pair of hands’, known as a friend of the rich and powerful, including the country’s military rulers. But they were wrong about him. He was quiet so they thought he was unthinking; he was gentle so they thought he was weak; he was traditional so they thought he was conservative; he was a friend of the rich so they thought he was an enemy of the poor; he was old so they thought he could not change. They did not reckon on the power of the Gospel. Romero had always been a deeply spiritual man who spent long hours in prayer. There is a story of a man being

sent to the chapel to meet him. At the chapel there was no sign of the archbishop, just an old priest saying his prayers. The visitor waited impatiently for nearly an hour, looking at his watch and wondering when Romero would turn up. Then the priest got up from his knees and came to the door. It was Romero. Soon after his appointment, one of his priests was murdered (Rutillo Grande who is now being considered for beatification). At that point, Romero brought the reality of life in El Salvador into his prayer and the man of prayer became also a man of action. We rightly talk about seeing the crucified Christ in human suffering, in ‘sites of suffering’. El Salvador was truly such a place. During the three years that Romero was archbishop, the country was building up to a civil war that exploded into its full horror soon after his death. Experience of the ordinary lives of ordinary people had a huge effect on Romero. He was evangelised by the people he visited in impoverished and brutally violated communities; the people of God

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changed him. Two months before his death Romero said: ‘The Word of God is not a reading of the past but a living Word, a Spirit that is being accomplished here and now.’ Romero teaches us that faith is an active thing; that God is alive in our lives; that we are called to act justly; that reconciliation is not only possible but essential. This is why he is about to be beatified – he links to the here and now of how we should live and of how we should conduct our own politics in 2015 wherever we are, be it El Salvador or the UK. Did you know that there are only two places in the world that have commemorated his assassination every year since he was murdered in 1980? One is El Salvador and the other is here in our archdiocese of Liverpool. From now on, we will not be mourning an assassination but celebrating a joyful life and a faithful ministry that led to martyrdom. This year we will meet on Sunday 22 March in St Helens at the 11am Mass at St Mary’s, Lowe House. Archbishop Malcolm is the celebrant and we hope you can join us.


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0151 287 8000 The North West’s Leading Pilgrimage Company Catholic Pictorial

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College celebrate feast day The celebration of Notre Dame Catholic College’s Feast Day is a very important day in the school calendar and on this day staff and students remember St Julie, foundress, and Francoise, co-foundress of the Notre Dame De Namur order. In particular the college remembers the work of the community and how in their lifetimes they have established so many foundations for the education for young women both here and abroad. The celebration on Monday 2 February started with a liturgy for the staff at 8.40am. During this short service staff received a medal, bought when the 1804 society visited the sister house in Namur, Belgium in November 2014. The whole school then gathered together on the ‘Spanish Steps’ and in the drama box for a Feast Day Mass concelebrated by Fathers Graeme and Michael. Father Graeme gave the sermon which focused on allowing the Light of Jesus to

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shine through us in our school community and the wider community. Every student wore a special Feast Day

tee shirt and enjoyed free drinks at break. Entertainment after break was provided by Becky Lane.


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nugent news Woolie leads the way for Good Shepherd Appeal The 113th Good shepherd appeal was launched on Ash Wednesday. The appeal started in 1902 and invites all catholic primary and secondary schools within the Archdiocese of Liverpool to support the work of Nugent Care through the annual Lent appeal. It is a wonderful tradition that young people in schools raise money to help people in need. It reminds us that Jesus is still our Good Shepherd and that one of the ways in which he cares for people in need is through us. Nugent Care has excellent links with Headteachers and School Chaplains which have led to continuing strong support for the appeal. Last year, 2014, 49.9% of schools took up the challenge, pupils and staff, and parents, took part in lots of different fundraising activities ranging from a teacher who shaved his head, children who baked and sold cakes, and many other different sponsored events including the teacher’s favourite: a sponsored silence. One school gathered a team made up of the Headteacher, staff, parents and governors to take part in the Liverpool 10k race. During 2014 schools raised £66, 399 for the Good Shepherd appeal. This year during Lent staff and volunteers from Nugent Care will be visiting schools to meet pupils and listen to their fundraising ideas. During assemblies pupils will hear how their fundraising is helping to address the effects of poverty within the Archdiocese. ‘Woolie’ one of the Good Shepherd’s sheep often makes an appearance at assemblies, he helps the pupils understand the Good Shepherd story. At the end of the appeal schools have the opportunity to come and present their donations at the Good Shepherd Masses, the first Mass takes place on Wednesday 6 May at 1.15 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral and will be celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm. The second Mass will be at St Mary’s, Leyland on Wednesday 17 June, again at 1.15 pm, and will be celebrated by Bishop Tom. If you would like to donate to the Good Shepherd appeal please send donations to Marie Reynolds at Nugent Care, 99Edge Lane, Liverpool, L7 2PE or you can donate on line via www.localgiving.com/charity/nugentcare

On Ash Wednesday the annual Good Shepherd appeal began in the Archdiocese. This annual Lent appeal in our schools and colleges offers invaluable help to the work of Nugent Care. It is not as it used to be just a matter of taking a collection each week but rather a time when parents, teachers, governors and pupils join together in a variety of fundraising efforts to help others. The Good Shepherd appeal dates back to 1902 and was an initiative of Bishop Thomas Whiteside who was Bishop of Liverpool from 1894 to 1911 and then, after the creation of Liverpool as a Metropolitan See on 28 October 1911, he became the first Archbishop of Liverpool until his death on 28 January 1921. Archbishop Whiteside was renowned for his love of, and his work with, the poor. When he first became Bishop he set himself the task of dealing with what he saw as the ‘three great evils’ of ‘loss of faith, pauperism, and drink’. After his death his obituary recalled the origins of the Good Shepherd appeal: ‘His next effort was to enlist for the homeless little ones of his diocese the sympathies not alone of the grown-up people but even of the little children, both those of the well-to-do and those of the poor, but self-supporting, working people. Year by year, at the beginning of Lent, he wrote a special letter addressed to the children of his diocese pointing out the needs of the waifs and strays and asking them to sanctify their Lent by denying themselves little luxuries and to practise charity by devoting the money thus saved to the needs of those still poorer than themselves. To this appeal the children generously responded, the united offerings of the schools sometimes reaching a total of over £2,000.’ The language of Archbishop Whiteside’s obituary belongs to a different age, but the generosity associated with the Good Shepherd appeal has remained constant and, over a century later, continues to grow. Such generosity offers so very much to others through Nugent Care. I don’t know what Archbishop Whiteside would make of ‘Woolie’ but I hope he would approve of this 21st century continuation of the work which he started. Archbishop Whiteside is now buried in the Cathedral Crypt but was originally buried in Ford Cemetery, close to where Monsignor James Nugent lies; it is significant that the reports of his funeral made a point of mentioning this fact. Two great pioneers of the work which Nugent Care continues today. Today the Good Shepherd appeal is our main fundraising event and activity and supports our community services. All of us at Nugent Care are delighted at the ways in which it gets our schools involved with our work. Thank you for your generous giving which helps us to help others. Kathleen Pitt Chief Executive Nugent Care

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cathedral Bronze for Cathedral Servers Five young servers from the Cathedral Parish received their Guild of St Stephen bronze medals, after completing their first year of serving. Aoife McDonnell, Shaneiah Ramos and Grace Kerwin received their medals at the 10:00 am Family Mass in the Cathedral Crypt, joining Laura Williams and Erin McKenna, who received theirs at

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean Laura and Erin, with Julian Daley and Father Ged Callacher, Chaplain to the Servers

the Saturday evening Mass at St Vincent’s. Meanwhile, a surprised and delighted Rose Curry came back from pilgrimage to Lourdes with a Medal of

Merit, presented to her in recognition of her long service both on the altar and as Archdiocesan Secretary of the Guild of St Stephen.

Searching for New look for Stewards Bishop Eton shrine The Metropolitan Cathedral is currently looking for volunteers to join their team of Cathedral Stewards. The main purpose of the role of Cathedral Steward is to welcome regular members of the congregation and visitors to services and Mass at the Cathedral. They assist also by taking the collection, with communion arrangements and giving out service sheets and answering all manner of questions and queries. On bigger occasions they are invaluable showing people to their seats, and looking after VIP guests. No experience is needed as full training will be given. All you need is to be able to give the time: mostly on Sundays including some Sunday afternoon services and weekday services when a presence will be required, as well as all the major Feasts such as Easter and Christmas. Volunteers will also need to be warm and welcoming with a big smile; patient and enthusiastic with a sense of humour. For further details contact Claire Hanlon at c.hanlon@metcathedral.org.uk or tel: 0151 709 9222, extension 201. A very warm welcome awaits.

Parishioners at Bishop Eton, Childwall will find a touch of Italy has been added to their church in the form of the newly renovated shrine to Saint Gerard Majella. St Gerard’s hometown of Caposele in Tuscany is depicted in a new hanging textile that provides a colourful backdrop to the shrine to the Redemptorist saint. The hanging, designed and painted by Gill Roberts, and embroidered by David Peglar and Gill Roberts of the Metropolitan Cathedral Art Studio, evokes the Tuscan countryside where the saint lived and worked. Gerard Majella, a lay brother in the Redemptorist Order in the 18th century, was canonised in 1904 and is today the patron saint of mothers and babies. On one famous occasion he gave his handkerchief to a young girl and told her to keep it as one day it could be of use to her. Years later, the same young woman was facing lifethreatening complications during a pregnancy and sought out the handkerchief and asked Gerard to intercede for her. She was cured and gave birth to a healthy child and as a result, devotion to Gerard among pregnant mothers spread. As the Church prepares for the second session of the Synod on the Family this year, the Redemptorists at Bishop Eton have asked parishioners to deepen their devotion to St Gerard.

With Lent well underway the Canons meet for their Mass and Chapter Meeting on Tuesday 3 March. One of the members of the Chapter passed away since we last met, Canon Bill Redmond, and we will especially want to remember him in our prayers when we gather for Mass that day. Throughout March we have a series of four talks on prayer, led by Fathers Ged Callacher and Liam Collister, on Wednesday evenings beginning on 4 March at 7.00 pm in the Gibberd Room. The four themes are ‘Meditation’, ‘Praying the Scriptures’, ‘Praying through the liturgy’ and ‘Devotional prayer’. As well as this the Cathedral Friends have organised an evening with Lord Alton who will talk on the plight of Christian communities in parts of the world where they are not free to practise their faith. This is on Thursday 12 March at 7.00 pm. BBC Radio 3 will be with us for the Feast of the Annunciation on 25 March for live transmission of Choral Vespers at 3.30 pm. The following Saturday there will be a Reconciliation Service at 11.00 am in preparation for the start of Holy Week. Archbishop Malcolm will preside at the Cathedral for all the major services of the following week beginning with Solemn Mass and the Blessing of Palms on Sunday 29 March. We re-enact Christ’s entry into Jerusalem beginning in the Cathedral Garden and processing through the crowds up to Cathedral for the Solemn sung Passion from St Marks Gospel. Instead of Choral Evening Prayer this Sunday there will be sung Tenebrae at the later time of 7.30 pm. The Mass of Chrism on the Wednesday of Holy Week is at 7.30 pm on 1 April.

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Pic extras

Mums the Word The Union of Catholic Mothers or, as we are known, the UCM, seems to be different from when I first joined some 30 odd years ago. But if you look further it is not. The world in 2015 is different from 1975 but a lot of the problems we had in the 70’s are the same now. UCM was an organisation that mums joined, we chatted on different things whether how to deal with minor health problems or how to make perfect gravy or rice pudding. However it was a lot more than just a chatty group. UCM was and still is an integral part of the parish helping with all sorts of parish activities from raising funds to doing the flowers and church cleaning. The most popular stall at fund raising events was the UCM homemade cake stall, it still is in many parishes. There was and still is a lot more to UCM than the above. We have a strong spiritual side. We pray for Vocations to the Priesthood and peace in the world. We have meetings in our foundations and across the Archdiocese to learn about and discuss different subjects. These can be as diverse as the History of the Mass to Foodbanks, historic women of Liverpool and women of other faiths. We offer love, sympathy and practical help when needed. We raise money for charities in this country and the third world. Last year Liverpool UCM raised over £10.000 over and above the report in last months column. New members are very welcome. If you do not have a foundation in your parish please approach your Parish Priest and then contact us. Our next bi-monthly Mass is at St. Jerome’s Formby on Wednesday 11 March at 7.30 pm I look forward to seeing you. God bless, Ann Hogg, media officer

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

A new grand knight for Liverpool province Liverpool’s Knights of St Columba will welcome a new grand knight next month after the election of Pat Foley to succeed John Hamilton. Bro Pat was elected at the provincial meeting at St Austin’s parish centre, Chaloner Hall, on 14 December last year and will assume the office of provincial grand knight for province 2 Liverpool – to use his full title – from 1 April. A retired head teacher and magistrate in both the adult and youth courts in Liverpool, Bro Pat has been a KSC member for over 40 years and has served as grand knight of his own council (9) on three separate occasions as well as holding various provincial posts including chancellor, membership and development officer, and deputy grand knight. We thank Bro John for his service during the past three years and wish Bro Pat every success and all our support for the next three years.

• The Annual Steve Dooley Memorial Walk raised over £4,000 for the Handicapped Children’s Pilgrimage Trust (HCPT), the chosen beneficiary for 2014. Mark Jones from HCPT received the cheque from Bro Danny Grimes (pictured along with Mrs Barbara Dooley, who established the annual walk, and council 9 treasurer Phil Murray). Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life The importance of trust

order to protect the vulnerable then so be it.

By Moira Billinge ‘The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.’ (Ernest Hemingway) We have become a very distrusting society. Closed-circuit TV cameras follow our every move: from out on the streets into waiting rooms and shops and then back on to public transport, our day-today activities are watched and recorded. The only place outside our own homes where a camera lens is not allowed to follow us is the public toilets – for now! The contents of most stores are protected by tags and burly security guards. When the alarms go off at the door, the profuse apologies and sheepish smiles of staff do little to ease the embarrassment of the unsuspecting customer whose tag has been left on inadvertently at the checkout. The indignity of a bag search amid the ear-piercing shriek of a shop alarm does nothing to enhance the shopping experience. Anti-viral hardware protecting the precious data on our computers is increasingly sophisticated as we attempt to thwart malicious hackers and scammers who would steal the bread out of a baby’s mouth without a moment’s regret. An increasing number of churches now have sections of the Confessional doors replaced with glass. Now the penitent can be observed – and sometimes heard – by those waiting outside in nearby pews. Every aspect of our lives is open to scrutiny and some of the safeguarding measures may, at times, seem excessive, but they are the result of wisdom gained from hindsight. There is no going back and if a criminal records check is required for the most innocuous of public roles in

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The sad thing is that, for the most part, we now half-expect to be mistrusted until our legitimacy is guaranteed by appropriate official documentation. Two really lovely things happened recently which made me savour people’s expressions of trust. My computer needed some urgent problems resolved and, after phoning around a few places, I took it to a shop that attempted to guarantee same day repairs. That evening, just as the shop was due to close, I arrived to collect my misbehaving technology. It was then that I discovered that they only accepted cash payments. I do not normally carry £80 worth of spare change in my pockets but fortunately, the engineer, who had my Christian name and mobile number, told me he not need my address and that I could take the computer and pay him the following day. The other moment came on a weekend visit to a local church that is not my parish. I purchased a Sunday Missal from the repository and then, admiring their lovely display of Easter cards, said that I would buy some the following week when I had more cash with me. The lady there said to me: ‘You can take them now if you wish and pay us for them another time. We know you aren’t going to cheat us!’ Both these incidents were about trust and it occurred to me what a special thing it is to trust and to be trusted. Conversely, when a society is unable to co-exist with this beautiful virtue, it is much the poorer for it. Pope Francis wrote: ‘Although the life of a person is in a land full of thorns and weeds, there is always a space in which the good seed can grow. You have to trust God.’ As difficult as it can be at times, we have to learn to trust each other more too and help these good seeds to grow.

My Favourite Prayer If there’s any joy that you wish for God grant it may gladden your way if there’s any blessing you long for May that be your gift for today If there’s any help you are needing for betterment, comfort or cheer God grant it be sent to you these days To stay with you year after year. From Patrick and Maureen Murphy St Anne & St Bernard’s Church Overbury Street, Liverpool Please send your favourite prayer to: Barbara, Catholic Pictorial, 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS When sending your favourite prayer please let us have your name and which parish you attend, also your home telephone number which will not be published, without the details we are unable to publish.

Worth a visit

Those who enjoyed the BBC’s ‘Wolf Hall’ adaptation should consider a spring-time visit to Hever Castle, writes Lucy Oliver. Known to many as the childhood home of Anne Boleyn, second wife of Henry VIII and mother of Elizabeth I, this double-moated castle dates back to the 13th century. The medieval council chamber in the gatehouse is the oldest part of the estate, though it also contains some Tudor timber frames. Thanks to the castle’s wealthy American benefactor, William Waldorf Astor, it was restored in the early part of the last century using the same tools and materials employed by Tudor and Elizabethan craftsmen while the 125 acres of grounds were embellished by a lake and gardens. There is much to explore connected with a tumultuous period in the nation’s history – including the Book of Hours room where beautifully illuminated manuscripts dedicated to Our Lady are housed, and which once belonged to Anne Boleyn. Visitors can venture through a 100-year-old yew maze – one of the castle’s three mazes – and stop off for afternoon tea at the Moat Restaurant. Kent is a long drive from Liverpool, and an overnight stay is recommended to enjoy Hever Castle to the full. For more information, go to www.hevercastle.co.uk


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search Mid-March gives us the very special feasts of St Patrick, March 17 and St Joseph, March 19. Two wonderful men who are saints so we share our word search this month.

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ST PATRICK

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ST JOSEPH

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More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy Father Mullarkey and the young curate were watching Liverpool play Tottenham Hotspur on the telly. It was an exciting game with both teams attacking furiously. Fr Mullarkey was delighted when Liverpool scored but down in the dumps when Tottenham equalised. Then Liverpool scored again to bring a smile back to the auld fella's face. ‘I think the Reds will win now,’ he said to the YC. ‘I’m not so sure,’ replied the YC. ‘I think Tottenham will score.’ And they did. ‘I told you,’ he declared. ‘I knew they would score. I’ve got a sixth sense.’ Quick as a flash, the auld fella responded: ‘It’s a pity you haven’t got the other five.’

Surround Mum with gifts on her special day this month, maybe book a table at one of our listed restaurants The Windmill Mill Lane, Parbold 01257 462935 Eton Place Woolton Road, Liverpool 16 0151 738 1368 The Pheasant Moss Lane, Hightown 0151 929 2106 Armadillo Bebington Road, Wirral 0151 645 5878 Royal Oak Liverpool Road, Aughton 01695 422121 Sapporo Teppanyaki Duke Street, Liverpool 0151 705 3005

Greeting Cards from the Carmelite Monastery

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Helen Molyneux, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Kevin Lonergan Tel: 01772 744148 or 01772 655433 (home).

A wonderful selection of Easter cards are on sale at the Carmelite Monastery, Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, Liverpool or please call the sisters on 0151 724 7102 or email: marytoncards@outlook.com

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Profile for Educate Magazine

Catholic pic march 2015  

Catholic news from the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic pic march 2015  

Catholic news from the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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