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Issue 141 JUNE 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

FREE

The Church of St Rose of Lima A new church for LAMP

Inside this issue: A new way of putting Faith into Action

Celebrations at Bishop Eton

Sharing the light with HCPT


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contents Welcome ‘A dream come true’ were the words used by Archbishop Malcolm to describe the new ‘Faith in Action’ award scheme for young people which was launched last month. The award, which has been described as a ‘Catholic Duke of Edinburgh’, allows the Church to celebrate, recognise and reward all that active young people of faith already give to the Church, and it challenges these young people to deepen their relationship with God and change the world in which they live. Such a scheme is welcome as our young people give so much in the service of others; we only have to look at our Lourdes Youth pilgrimage to see such ‘Faith in Action’. Our main feature this month explores how the scheme will work. The new church of Saint Rose of Lima in Villa El Salvador on the outskirts of Lima, Peru is also a dream come true after ten years of effort and hard work by the parishioners. Parishes in our Archdiocese have helped to bring this dream to fruition through the work of Father Simon Cadwallader who works with the Liverpool Archdiocesan Missionary Project (LAMP). We remember them in prayer as they begin life in their new church.

From the Archbishop’s Desk The Pentecost walk from the Anglican Cathedral to our Metropolitan Cathedral reminded me this year that being a Christian is supposed to be a joyful experience, or at least it should help us find joy in the mundane things of life, and hope when we are sad and feeling low. Christianity is about singing, music, eating and perhaps even dancing, after all John the Baptist leapt in his mother’s womb when he first encountered our Lord. Food, whether secular or sacred, is at the heart of our liturgical and social lives, and St Augustine reminded us that a prayer sung is a prayer twice said. These thoughts went through my mind as I walked side by side with other Church Leaders and a lady pushing her little child in a push-chair. We were certainly the people of God united in faith as we went on our pilgrim way. My prayer is that that this mini pilgrimage is an anticipation of that time in the future when all Christians are visibly united in faith. I am sure that when that time comes there will be dancing, and rejoicing, not just in Hope Street but throughout the world. In the meantime let us continue to reach out to other Christians with the hand of friendship and join in prayer for Christian Unity. Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Cover: Consecration of the Church of St Rose of Lima, Peru

Contents 4

Main Feature A new way of putting Faith into action

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Surviving in difficult times 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Peter Woods A true friend of the Cathedral 21 Animate Youth Ministry The Year of Mercy so far 25 Cathedral Record Be a chorister for a day 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 28 Pic Life What is a proper apology?

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Copy deadline July issue 13 June 2016 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Why Asylum Link Merseyside warrants our support

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A new way of putting faith into action Duke of Edinburgh-style award scheme launched for Liverpool’s young Catholics By Father Simon Gore or the five hundred young people from our diocese preparing to assist the elderly and infirm on the annual Liverpool Archdiocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes next month, there is the perfect remedy for the post-pilgrimage blues afterwards – a new scheme to help make the ‘spirit of Lourdes’ a yearround reality.

F

For our Lourdes youth pilgrims and any other youngster who sees their faith linked with acts of service, the launch on 18 May of the Faith in Action award scheme represents an exciting opportunity – one whose realisation was described by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon as ‘a dream come true’. It was Archbishop Malcolm who welcomed the 80-strong group of representatives from parishes, high schools, primary schools and youth groups to the launch of the scheme at LACE, where they heard how it can be implemented in local communities and across the wider diocese. In broad brushstrokes, the Faith In Action programme will reward active service in schools and parishes and encourage young people to combine faith with service. There are four different levels of award: pin, bronze, silver and gold. For

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this reason it has been described as a ‘Catholic Duke of Edinburgh’, although there are obvious differences that make this a stand-alone award grounded in Catholic theology. The award allows the Church to celebrate, recognise and reward all that active young people of faith already give to the Church, but it also challenges these young people to deepen their relationship with God and change the world in which they live. It is a scheme designed to run on an annual cycle with participants working towards a single diocesan celebration and presentation evening. Why have a Catholic Award Scheme? Work started on this award a couple of years ago – at around the time Pope Francis issued his ‘Joy of the Gospel’ document. Much of the thrust of this document is about taking the joy of faith, the joy of the Gospel, into the world: ‘Being a disciple means being constantly ready to bring the love of Jesus to others, and this can happen unexpectedly and in any place: on the street, in a city square, during work, on a journey’ (Evangelii Gaudium 127) The award encourages the young people in our diocese to do just this: to take the joy of the Gospel into the wider world and – as Pope Francis demanded at World Youth Day 2013 – ‘to make some noise’.

It also responds to a longstanding question of what, as a Church, we can give to teenagers. The award offers a structure that can be in place for four or five years, providing a focus for youngsters in our schools and parishes that both challenges and rewards. The scheme in more detail Who is this for? The scheme is, primarily, for school pupils from years 6-11. It is envisaged that schools and parishes will use the material incrementally with groups based on local demographics. That is to say, even though a participant may wish to aim for the gold award, the local school or parish may encourage them to go for the silver in a given year so that they may then have something to work towards in the years to follow. Baptism is not necessary but some expression of faith and interest in being involved in a faith community is desirable. Additionally, the award should link together home, parish and school. At its best, it will link parish and school as both institutions need to be involved for the young person to achieve the higher awards. Why should we run the award? What are the benefits? The simple answer is that the scheme serves as a tool to evangelise. This is the mission statement of the diocese – ‘To take the good news to all creation’ – and by participating, we are simply following the last command of the Lord. Just imagine how fantastic it would be to have hundreds of young people around the diocese all doing acts of service in the community – and, more than that, doing these acts of service as a visible expression of their faith. Furthermore, as this is a national award offered in other dioceses, we may very well be doing our young people a disservice if we do not offer them the opportunity to be involved. From a school’s point of view the award has the potential to make a significant, positive and valuable contribution by: • Demonstrating the value of, and respect for, the Catholic tradition • Communicating a clear


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feature ‘It also challenges these young people to deepen their relationship with God and change the world in which they live’

understanding of the mission of the Church • Highlighting the vibrancy of the ‘Catholic life of the school’ What do we do? As group leader in a parish or school you would need to identify young people to be involved in the scheme. They would then engage in acts of service in their community and reflect on these acts in the light of the teaching of the Church. Their award level would be based on the type of service performed, and this can be as varied as the community in which the young person lives. Examples could include: • Involvement in school Mass/collective worship • Fundraising – eg for Cafod, Nugent Care • Engagement with school chaplaincy • Reading, serving, ministering at Mass • Assisting at coffee mornings • Children’s Liturgy

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feature

(l to r) Father John McLoughlin, Father Simon Gore, Kate Loftus (Chaplain St Peter and St Paul, Widnes) with students Chelsey Fairclough and Luke Williams and Father Joe Bibby, Ben Simpson and Jane Simpson (St Teresa’s, Upholland) with Archbishop Malcolm at the Launch.

‘Just imagine how fantastic it would be to have hundreds of young people around the diocese all doing acts of service in the community ’ 6

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• Charity fundraiser • Lourdes pilgrimage • Visiting a care home What separates Faith in Action from the Duke of Edinburgh scheme is that, as the year goes on, we would ask the young people involved in acts of service to reflect on why they are acting in this way and what the results of their actions might be through four 90-minute reflection points based on the Pastoral Cycle of see-judge-act. This ensures that the youngsters involved will first act and then reflect on their actions. At the end of the year they will be asked to consider how their thoughts might have changed by completing a final piece of work that shows how they have engaged with their work and service, and how these reflection points have allowed them to grow in their relationship with God and their neighbours. Who is the award run by? The award is run by the diocese but moderated nationally to allow all participating dioceses to have a fair system of assessment. This means any group (school or parish) wishing to be

involved must be registered with the diocese before starting. How long does it take to complete the award? It is recommended that the programme should begin around September, with final pieces and hours to be completed by the following May/June. The awards ceremony will take place after the summer break. More information For more information about the scheme please contact Father Simon Gore on 01744 740467 or s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk. Please note there will be an informal follow-up meeting for those who have expressed interest in the scheme but would like further questions answered on Thursday 7 July from 5.30-6.30pm at Lowe House, St Helens, WA10 2BE. We are also seeking moderators to help assess the final pieces of work. This should not be too time-consuming and would involve looking through a certain number of final pieces of work over the summer. If you would like to be involved, please contact Father Simon.


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

‘Remain in the Truth’

Picture: Liverpool Echo

Legion of Mary ‘Book Barrow’

Members of Our Lady, Queen of all Angels, Legion of Mary from Hindley held a ‘Book Barrow’ in their local Tesco. During the day they gave out Catholic books, magazines, prayer cards and miraculous medals with a statue of Our Lady prominent on the table. Teams of Legionaries took turns to staff the ‘Barrow’ chatting with shoppers and getting something of a mixed reception. One lady said, ‘I don’t believe in God’ while her young daughter said, ‘I do mummy’ and went away with the gift of a miraculous medal. Some atheists visited but many more Christians from all denominations and a total of forty miraculous medals were given out together with numerous books and magazines. Joan Baines from the Legion of Mary said, ‘We were there to give witness, re-kindle the light of faith in the lapsed and “plant seeds” to the doubtful’.

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Archbishop Malcolm took part in the Hillsborough Vigil at St George’s Hall alongside other Church Leaders from the City. Speaking to the thousands in the crowd he spoke of the way in which the defiance of the Hillsborough families has cemented the bonds between communities in the City saying, ‘Our identity has been enhanced by this struggle for justice that has united us as citizens of this city at a very deep level. As people of this city we now share an even deeper bond of friendship and enjoy a greater sense of community’. He went on to speak of the families as an inspiration and of Liverpool’s pride in their battle for justice. Looking to the future he said, ‘Our task now is to remain in the truth. As those who are responsible for causing this terrible tragedy are called to account for their actions, we must not be vengeful but follow the example of dignity that has characterised the families of the victims over the last years...We should be proud of the achievement of the people in calling the justice system of our country to account. This will undoubtedly be of benefit to our people in the future’. Before leading the Vigil in prayer he remembered the 96 saying, ‘may they rest in peace, to be forever remembered in the hearts and minds of the people of Liverpool’.

Be part of the Metropolitan Cathedral Jubilee Flower Festival Next year there will be a Flower Festival to celebrate the Metropolitan Cathedral’s 50th anniversary, opening on Friday 2 June 2017 it will coincide with the main weekend of celebrations on Saturday 3 June and Sunday 4 June. The theme will be celebrating and reflecting on the achievements of the Cathedral and its community over the past 50 years, and honouring the Cathedral’s role as a defining symbol of Catholic worship. Established and experienced groups or individuals who regularly provide arrangements for their churches or places of worship are invited to a meeting to discuss how they can be involved. Please contact Claire Hanlon in Cathedral House on 0151 709 9222 extension 201 or c.hanlon@metcathedral.org.uk for more details.


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news diary A marathon in memory of Vin Vin McMullen’s son, Ben, ran the London Marathon in memory of his father raising over £1,300 for Cafod and finishing in an impressive time of 3 hours and 25 minutes. He said, ‘Cafod has been part of my life since I was 10 and I was a volunteer throughout my teenage years so it was natural to run the London Marathon in memory of my dad; and for a charity we both supported’.

Pentecost Pageant

‘Pentecost Pageant: Celebration of Hope’ was the theme for the Two Cathedrals Service on Sunday 15 May. Following a brief Service in Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral Archbishop Malcolm, Bishop Paul Bayes and Rev Phil Jump led the procession of 2,000 people along Hope Street before an open-air Service on the Piazza of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. This year Liverpool City Council and Visit Hope Street Community Interest Company joined with the Churches to provide music, dance and performance from 12.00 noon. During the Walk itself there were contributions from Samba bands, the Merseyside Welsh Choir, stilt performers and dancers.

Obituary of Vin McMullen Vin McMullen Cafod’s Regional Organiser for over fifteen years and a much loved and respected figure in the Archdiocese, died at his home in Southport on Palm Sunday, 20 March. Originally from Wallsend on Tyneside he grew up during the depressed 1930s, leaving school at thirteen and working at the Swan Hunter shipyard on the Tyne; following National Service he qualified as a teacher and worked in the North East. In 1973 he moved to the Archdiocese when he was appointed as Headteacher at St Edmund’s Junior School in Waterloo. After taking early retirement he was appointed Cafod’s first ever regional organiser, working first at the Curial Offices on Brownlow Hill and later at St Joseph’s, Upholland. It was in Upholland’s grounds that the Cafod Christmas Fun Run was to take place for many years, an immensely successful event established by Vin which attracted entrants from not only the North West but further afield. The run continues to this day, though now elsewhere, and is very much a memorial to Vin. Visits to El Salvador and the Philippines made a deep and lasting impression on him and increased his determination to work for justice for the poorest of the poor. His book ‘Looking at the Philippines through the Eyes of the Poor’ gives a powerful account of his experience there, especially living with those who scavenged for their very existence on the rubbish dump known as ‘Smokey Mountain’. It was for his unstinting pursuit of justice and dignity for the poor in countries like the Philippines that he was awarded a Papal Knighthood of St Gregory. Other books were to follow, notably an autobiographical trilogy which vividly tells his life story with complete candour and with his lifelong sense of humour. His faith and his family were all important to him and he was at his happiest when with Gill, his devoted wife of fifty-six years, and their close family. Many priests and a large congregation attended his Funeral Mass which was celebrated at Holy Family, Southport.

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New Church of St Rose of Lima by Father Simon Cadwallader When I came to the parish of Our Lady of Peace in Villa El Salvador on the outskirts of Lima in 2004, I received some wise advice from missionaries with a great deal of experience: do not construct a church building until you have built up the community and when you begin the construction be prepared for your patience to be tested to its limits. Those guidelines served me well and both turned out to be so true. Forming a community is a process which goes on continuously as in all parishes and, by 2006, with a good spirit developing within the parish family, we began to look at ways of funding the project of constructing the Church of Saint Rose of Lima. The fact that the Bishop of the Diocese of Lurin has recently inaugurated and blessed the church, just prior to Easter of 2016, tells you that it has been a long and winding road and not without trials on route. One thing that Peru does not lack is administrative bureaucracy and it can be very exacting. If I had known in advance the tangled network of regulations and pre-requisites that the local municipality and the College of Architects would insist you abide by and overcome to reach your goal, I might have thought twice about beginning the endeavour. So many forms to fill, so many requirements to be met, and so much money to be handed over in the process of gaining permissions. As we were to build in an area of maximum danger of earthquake activity, there was an insistence that the building have deep-rooted steel foundations to support the edifice in the event of seismic movement. That is understandable and necessary, but to insist that the area outside the front door of the church be no less than the area covered by the interior of the building had us scratching our heads. It was stated that security precautions dictated that the people must be able to evacuate the church to an area of equal proportion within the boundaries of the property. While speculating that it was highly unlikely that the congregation would hang around outside the building should an earthquake strike, it was nevertheless futile to argue the case. This stringent requirement dictated that the church would now have to be much smaller than originally envisaged, but 10

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nevertheless the show must go on. Once plans had been accepted and construction began, a realisation sunk in fast that the parish priest might need to don a foreman's hat more than he had expected. It has been a giant learning curve in terms of geometry, climate considerations, contracts not being completed on time, and so many fine details to be chewed over. It has also been a wonderful community and friendship building experience. To help meet our financial targets, parishioners prepared and sold breakfast after every Sunday Mass for the past couple of years. People shared ideas, gave what they could and prayed that God would do the rest. We are hugely thankful to have been blessed with financial contributions from many people, especially those of the Archdiocese of Liverpool through the generosity of the LAMP collections, from parishioners of St Luke´s Church in Whiston and St. Peter and St Paul in Crosby. Now that we are up and running,

so to speak, the challenge is to make the church site into a missionary centre for the evangelisation of the local area. The plaque that hangs outside the recently opened Church of St Rose of Lima, one of three chapels in the parish, says that this building has been blessed for the greater glory of God. May that always be so. The joy on the faces of the parishioners on the day of inauguration of their church was wonderful to see and though a ten year journey of construction has come to an end, many challenges lie ahead. Just as in diocesan life in England, there are many baptised here who do not develop their faith journey. Poverty and the fight for survival play a role in this; many of our people work such long hours that they are exhausted at the end of the week. Yet there is also the issue of indifference and family disunity which exercise the minds and hearts of all pastoral planners in the Diocese of Lurin in Lima. The questions which face parishes here are not so very different than the challenges at home. Missionary life is everywhere.


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news diary 150 Years of the Icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Succour by Timothy J. Buckley, CSsR (Parish Priest of Bishop Eton and St Mary’s Woolton) ‘Make her known’ was Pope Pius IX’s command to the Redemptorists when he entrusted the icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Succour into their care on 26 April, 1866. The story of the icon is a long and colourful one, much of it embellished with dramatic legends associated with how this typically beautiful eastern icon of the Madonna and Child left the island of Crete and eventually ended up being venerated in the Augustinian church in Rome. Part of the tradition is that Mary had made it clear that she wished her image to be situated between the great basilicas of St John Lateran (the Pope’s Cathedral) and St Mary Major, her own basilica. For the best part of 300 years from the year 1500, it was famous for the many miracles and graces granted to those who made the pilgrimage to the church of St Matthew on the Via Merulana, but when the church became the victim of the Napoleonic forces in 1798 and the Augustinians fled, the icon disappeared from the scene. When interest in the icon was renewed in the middle of the 19th century, a young Redemptorist who, as a boy, had been an altar server for the Augustinians and who knew all about the history of the icon now in their private chapel, was able to guide his confrères to it and quickly everything would fall into place. The Redemptorists now had a new church on the site of the old church of St Matthew and it was agreed that Mary’s wishes should be honoured and the icon restored to the place where she wished it to be venerated.

Over the past 150 years the Redemptorists have been faithful to the edict of Blessed Pius IX and now it is almost certainly the most widely known and reproduced image of Mary across the world. The Redemptorists at Bishop Eton in Liverpool are proud to possess the first copy to leave Rome after the icon was entrusted to them in 1866 and while they have another copy in the Lady chapel of the church, this treasured copy is on display on special occasions and this year will be enshrined in the church for the Novena prior to the feast on Monday, 27 June. All over the world the Redemptorists are making a special effort to mark this Jubilee Year. On 26 April, pilgrims attended the celebrations in the church of Saint Alphonsus on the Via Merulana, including a party of over sixty from the Redemptorist parishes in London, Birmingham and Liverpool. There in the

evening we were able to join in a procession from Saint Mary Major to the shrine with Cardinal Vincent Nichols, who by a happy coincidence was given the Redemptorist church as his titular church in Rome. A son of Liverpool, he has acknowledged that there is something providential about all this, since the icon had an honoured place in his family home in Crosby as it does now in his office in Westminster. The Redemptorists in Ireland are taking the icon around all their cathedrals and in our country there are celebrations planned, including a Mass in our mother church, St Mary’s Clapham in London, where again Cardinal Nichols will be in attendance. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon will bring the Novena in Bishop Eton to a close on the evening of Monday 27 June and the Redemptorist Bishop of Hallam, Ralph Heskett, will open the Novena in St Mary’s Woolton at the 5.30 pm Mass on Saturday 18 June. Our Emeritus Archbishop, Patrick Kelly, has also promised to take part in the event and we hope everyone across the city of Liverpool and beyond will know they are invited and welcome. From the arrival of the Redemptorists in the city in 1851, Bishop Eton has long been a centre of pilgrimage and devotion and we are delighted that in this Holy Year of Mercy, all our Redemptorist churches have received a special indult from the Holy See and become places of pilgrimage because of the icon of Our Mother of Perpetual Succour. Throughout the nine days there will be a full programme of Masses and services, including special opportunities for the children.

Brother James's Reconciliation Cycle Brother James Hayes from St Francis Xavier’s College, has just begun a nine day sponsored bike ride from Berlin, to Arromanches in Northern France, a distance of approximately 1,500 kilometres, to raise money for the Royal British Legion. Brother James has been a member of Birkenhead North End Cycling Club, since 1992 and has so far completed thirteen sponsored cycle rides. Following a presentation by members of the Royal British Legion at St Francis Xavier before Remembrance Day last year Brother James decided to do his next sponsored cycle for the Legion. He says, ‘with Pope Francis having announced a Year of Mercy I see this ride as also being a symbolic gesture of reconciliation, mercy and solidarity between our peoples, as well as an opportunity to raise funds; en route I will be taking a detour via Dresden and will also be going through the somme region in Northern France’. Anyone wishing to sponsor Brother James can contact him at St Francis Xavier’s College, Woolton Hill Road, Woolton, Liverpool, L25 6EG or visit: https://www.justgiving.com/James-Hayes29

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new diary Honour for Sharing the Light Father Godric

On Sunday, 24 April, Father Godric Timney OSB, Parish Priest of St Anne’s, Ormskirk, was installed as an Honorary Ecumenical Canon of Worcester Cathedral by the Right Reverend John Inge, Bishop of Worcester. Three years ago Father Godric was appointed Cathedral Prior of Worcester. Nine of the ancient English Cathedrals were also Benedictine Monasteries and after Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries the Holy See enacted that the titles of the priors should be perpetuated.

On Monday 2 May five HCPT regions came together at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King to celebrate a Mass to mark the Diamond Jubilee of the Trust. Jubilee Masses were celebrated on the same day in Southwark, Swansea and at the Carfin shrine in Scotland. The intention was that past and present Easter and Summer Group pilgrims, together with their families and friends and all those who support HCPT, should be able to share the joy of this very special year. In Liverpool pilgrims from Manchester, Merseyside, the Midlands, North West and Yorkshire regions took an active part in a lively, happy liturgy, acting out the Gospel, reading the Bidding Prayers, and leading the Offertory

50 Years of St Julie’s Catholic Primary School In September 2016 we will be celebrating our Golden Jubilee at St Julie’s writes Acting Headteacher, Anne Hodgson. On 12 September 1966 the bell rang as the school opened the doors for the first pupils. The school was then known as Blessed Julie’s, as Julie Billiart was not canonised until 1969. We would love to hear from anyone who has a connection with the school and can share their memories, photographs or keepsakes. Archbishop Malcolm will be celebrating Mass for our school and parish community on Wednesday 21 September and we hope to display the memorabilia that we collect so that all can share in our celebration. As a lasting memorial of our Golden Jubilee we intend to create a Prayer Garden within the grounds of the school. If you have any suggestions as to how we can mark our Golden Jubilee, or would like to be involved directly in our preparations please get in touch via e mail at stjulies.jubilee2016@sthelens.org.uk or via our school website.

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Procession. Before the Mass began a recorded message from the Founder and inspiration, Brother Michael Strode was played. Bishop Tom Williams, the Episcopal Liaison between HCPT and the Bishops' Conference, was the Principal Celebrant at the Mass, and Bishops Vincent Malone and John Rawsthorne, both former Group Chaplains, concelebrated along with several current Group Chaplains. The theme of the Jubilee Mass was ‘Thanks be to God’, and during the Bidding Prayers this message was displayed by a group of young pilgrims while six helpers carried candles, one for each decade of the Trust. We do indeed give thanks for sixty years of countless blessings, of sharing and caring, and we hope and pray that HCPT will continue to Rise and Shine for many more years to come.


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sunday reflections On a liturgical note On the 15th of this month, the Beda College will temporarily move across the road to the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls and we will be joined for Mass there by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon who will ordain to the diaconate nine men from the College, including Michael Barrett who will be ordained for our own Archdiocese. In so many ways, the ordination of deacons – and then the ordination of priests back in their respective countries – is the high point, the culmination and indeed the purpose of all our work throughout the year. The seminary is exactly what the word suggests; it is where the seeds – semina – of faith and vocation are nurtured and strengthened, but the seminary is not an end in itself. The ordained ministry which our students will exercise in their dioceses and religious orders (at present we have students from 12 countries, ranging from England to Australia, via Malaysia and Tanzania) is the on-going living out of the call of our baptism, the call of baptism which you and I have received and

Sunday thoughts The Isle of Man TT races are under way. A motorcyclist myself, I am looking forward to experiencing the TT for the first time. I have been around the mountain course and it is great fun. My speed is nowhere near the terrifying pace of the competitors but the course is an interesting one. Spectacular scenery is coupled with challenging bends and long straights. Up in the mountains you can easily forget you are on a small island. Riding a bike around bends is counter-intuitive: you move the handlebars ever so slightly in the opposite direction. Almost miraculously, if your eyes stay focused on the ‘vanishing point’ of the furthest bend ahead, rather than directly in front of you, the bike rides itself. Look directly at the front wheel, or worse still, at the kerb and that is where you will end up. In a heap. Wherever you look, the bike will follow. Apparently ploughing is similar to

Canon Philip Gillespie

which we try to make visible and real in whatever our calling in life; mother or father, son or daughter, married or single, consecrated or ordained. As we heard a few weeks ago in the Solemnity of Pentecost, all our lives go to make up a unity of faith – a unity which is God’s gift to us as individuals but also a gift to the society and the world in which we are called to live. The need for the good news to be preached to all aspects of our world and our society today is as pressing and as necessary as ever. May the liturgy which forms and nourishes us also be the liturgy which impels us forward in mission: ‘Go in peace glorifying the Lord by your life.’ Please remember in your prayers all our students in seminary at this time and those considering and discerning the Lord’s call to priesthood, diaconate and religious life. Saint Junipero Serra, pray for them.

Mgr John Devine OBE

riding a motorcycle, especially with an oxen or horse-drawn plough. The ploughman who takes his eye off the line of the furrow ahead ends up destroying the furrows he has already dug or careering off in the other direction. Looking back spells disaster. Jesus employs this image in the passage from St Luke’s Gospel for Sunday 26 June. At first sight, his response to the enthusiastic commitment of a new disciple sounds severe. ‘I will follow you, Sir, but first let me go and say goodbye to my people at home,’ said the disciple. Jesus replied to him: ‘Once the hand is laid on the plough, no one who looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.’ Yet this is advice that Jesus gives, not condemnation. To use another metaphor: don’t take your eye off the ball.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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Live in the power of Pentecost Back in 1943 my aunty May, who was two years older than my mum, contracted TB. Apparently May was a vivacious young woman whose love of life was contagious. When it became apparent that she was ill my mum said it was really hard to watch the life ebbing out of her till it seemed hardly like May at all. Mum was hardly able to mention May’s name without breaking down but she always said, ‘I don’t know why I’m crying. I know that May’s alive, I just can't physically see her’. I think to see with the eyes of faith is the gift of the spirit. There are two words in Greek that mean ‘to see’. The first is theorein which means to see with your physical eyes and the second is horan which means to perceive. Disciples are invited to be willing to look beyond physical matter and trust that Jesus is with them, to perceive his presence. This is what Pentecost is all about. Are we able to look at the devastation that death and disaster bring and say all will be well? Are we able to look at our illnesses and see God at work? Are we able to look at a brother or sister and see beyond the bad temper, poor behaviour or rudeness and see the presence of God? Are we able to look at the paedophile or the murderer and sense the presence of God? Can we look at the asylum-seeker and the refugee and see his or her fear and know that God is there? Dare we open our eyes and perceive the presence of God in everything? It means we have to change and the gift of the spirit is all about change. To see beyond means our hearts have to become compassionate, our lives have to be broken. To see beyond means we have to give up our judgemental attitudes and the way we condemn our brothers and sisters. It means we have to think of others before ourselves. Dare we take the risk to do that, inviting the spirit to change our hearts and minds? When we do, Jesus tells us we will be filled with a joy that no one can take away. It is not the sort of frothy, feel-good joy that is here today and gone tomorrow but a joy that is gift and comes from deep within. Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Surviving in difficult times

Why the Colour Change? We recently launched our Strategic Plan 2016 -2020. A portion of this plan is about increasing our profile so that we may be better able to serve the vulnerable people in our communities. As part of this our brand identity is evolving.

Normandie Wragg addressing Nugent Care’s Leadership Conference At Nugent Care we are in a process of change. With our ambitious plans for the next four years it is our ideal that everyone is able to live comfortably and in dignity. Unfortunately, for many people this is not the case in their lives, or for some part of their life, and Nugent Care aspires to be there for them. We are working in an unprecedented environment both politically and economically and trust within the Third Sector is currently being tested. Local Authorities have been forced to cut budgets for social care. In Liverpool more than 5,000 adults are set to lose their social care packages during the coming year and spending on services like home carers, meals on wheels, and day care has dropped by more than £1 billion in the last five years. The Foundation for Social Improvement's quarterly Small Charity Index says 60 per cent of small charities reported an increase in demand for their services in the period from December to February 2016. This is having a huge knock-on effect on the NHS, where each year more and more older people are finding themselves trapped in hospital for days or even weeks, despite being well enough to leave, simply because there

isn’t support available for them in their community. The National Living Wage, which came into effect in May, means our front line care staff will see an increase in pay, rewarding people for their hard work and dedication. However, this combined with reduced budgets for health and social care funding means that we continue to work in an environment that has higher expectations for less money. The Care Act 2014 has significantly shifted the way that services are provided within the social care sector. There have also been significant changes to children’s legislation. The regulators have revised the way that they inspect the services, expecting a higher level of quality and accountability than ever before. Working in this environment is a challenge, but it also driving us to do better work, to help more people, to provide more robust support and ensure our services are working at the heart of our hardest hit communities. Nugent Care has big ambitions, we will continuously develop and will tackle these issues head on, to remain a provider of choice, a large and fair employer, a voice for the voiceless, and most importantly, to ensure that we do right by the end users of our services.

Brand identity, generally, is a group of resources relating to marketing and communication approaches that assist in distinguishing an organisation from other providers. Brand Identity also creates a positive impression in the minds of the people who use our services, our staff, and supporters of Nugent Care and of course the wider community. Our refreshed visual identity seeks to satisfy all of the existing expectations of what our current work represents whilst at the same time having an appearance that even further reflects our direction as a charitable organisation and the diverse service provision of Nugent Care. This refresh will be seen on our website and across social media and in campaigns going forward. Mike James, our Marketing and Communications Manager, further explains this journey, ‘The next phase for strategy development is to process the research findings into aims and objectives that will sit alongside the strategic plan.’ We can then develop campaigns building upon our existing profile. Of course our primary mission is to care, protect, educate and inspire those in need and this initiative will provide us with a platform with which to share that good news. To ensure that we are going in the right direction, our brand development is based on research (including an insight into the visibility, profile, and the perceptions of Nugent Care), staff and service user consultation, and how other organisations are illustrating their profile. If you have thoughts, comments or suggestions regarding increasing our profile, please contact our Marketing and Communications Manager, Mike James, by email at michael.james@nugentcare.org. Look out for this refresh in Summer 2016.

Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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what’s on Thursday 2 June Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Friday 3 June Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Golden Jubilee Concert 7.00 pm at St Albert’s, Hollow Croft, Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA, given by the Choir of St Bartholomew’s, Rainhill. Sunday 5 June Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Wednesday 8 June ‘Songs we Remember.’ Are you living with dementia or caring for someone who is? Come and join our Dementia Community Choir. The aim is to learn some songs we can sing at an Ecumenical Dementia Friendly Carol Service in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King in December and to have some fun along the way. 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, followed by lunch at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. We meet on the second Wednesday of every month. Details: The Irenaeus Project Tel: 0151 949 1199.

UCM Annual Mass 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. Saturday 11 June Car Boot Sale 8.00 am onwards in the Cathedral Car Park. Pitches £10. Details from Claire Hanlon 0151 709 9222, Ext. 201 or c.hanlon@metcatherdal.org.uk ‘Heavenly Voices’ Concert With the Girl Choristers of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King and St Mary’s Pro-Cathedral, Dublin directed by James Luxton and Christopher McElroy. 7.0 pm at Our Lady of the Annunciation, Bishop Eton, Woolton Road, L16 8NQ. Excerpts from Stabat Mater, Pergolesi, and music by Rutter, Franck and others. Admission free, retiring collection. ‘Vivaldi Gloria’ Concert with the Cathedral Orchestra Conductor: Stephen Pratt, and the Cathedral Cantata Choir, Director: Richard Lea. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 12 June La Sagesse pupils and staff reunion From 12.00 noon at Liverpool Cricket Club, Aigburth Road, L19 3QF. All welcome.

Saturday 18 June to Monday 27 June Novena in Honour of Our Mother of Perpetual Succour An Icon of Love providing a fountain of grace for the Holy Year of Mercy Our Lady of the Annunciation, Bishop Eton, Woolton Road, L16 8NQ St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF Saturday 18 June 5.30 pm (St Mary’s) Opening Mass with Bishop Ralph Heskett Sunday 19 June Sunday timetable in both parishes Monday 20 to Friday 24 June Masses at Bishop Eton at 7.00 am, 12.00 noon and 7.30 pm 10.00 am (St Mary’s) Service with children of Much Woolton each day 3.45 pm (Bishop Eton) Service for children without Mass Saturday 25 June 10.00 am (St Mary’s) Children’s session with Mass Masses at 12.00 noon (Bishop Eton) and 5.30 pm (St Mary’s) Sunday 26 June Sunday timetable in both parishes Monday 27 June As above for weekdays, ending with concelebrated Mass with Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP.

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2016 16

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Monday 13 June to Monday 20 June Individually Guided retreat Led by Sr Margaret O’Shea SMG at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, Formby, L37 1PH. Tel: 01704 875850 Email: theprayercentre.stj@gmail.com Tuesday 14 June Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

Friday 17 - Sunday 19 June

Friday 17 June to Sunday 19 June Northern Catholic Conference at Liverpool Hope University With the theme ‘Blessed are the merciful; they shall have mercy shown them’ (Matthew 5:7). Speakers will include Father Denis McBride, Father Pat Deegan, Tony Hickey and Sister Seraphim. The weekend will include reconciliation and healing services, the Rosary and Divine Mercy Devotions. Separate Childrens and Youth Ministries will take place on Saturday. Further information: www.northerncatholic.co.uk Tel: 07543 800812 or write to: ‘Regina Coeli’, 6 Warner Drive, Liverpool L4 8US. Saturday 18 June Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com UCM Business Meeting 1.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Sunday 19 June Day for Life


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june Saturday 25 June to Monday 27 June ‘The Work of your Hands.’ Floral displays inspired by the work of Aid to the Church in Need. 9.00 am to 6.00 pm daily at St Peter’s Cathedral, Balmoral Road, Lancaster, LA1 3BT. Entrance free, donations to ACN’s work in the Middle East. Details Tel: 01524 388739 Email: nw.office@acnuk.org Saturday 25 June ‘Welcoming the Stranger’ Organised by the Liverpool Justice and Peace Commission. 10.00 am to 4.30 pm at the LACE Conference Centre. The day will use stories, analysis and conversations to help participants understand the asylum seeker and refugee situation, and offer workshops on practical ways to become involved in the response. Details Email: s.atherton@rcaol.co.uk Tel: 0151 522 1080. Sunday 26 June Liverpool Bach Collective Johann Sebastian Bach Cantata 122: ‘Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen’ (‘Weeping, wailing, sorrowing, fearing’) 6.30 pm at St Clare’s Church, Arundel Avenue, Liverpool, L17 2AU. Singers and Players directed by Philip Duffy. Wednesday 29 June Solemnity of St Peter and St Paul (Holyday of Obligation)

Celebrate the Child 2016 This year the Celebrate the Child Mass will begin its journey around the archdiocese and will be celebrated on Sunday 3 July at St Pascal Baylon Primary School, Chelwood Avenue, Liverpool, L16 2LN at 2.30 pm. Many people come together to prepare this celebration of our faith with children, families and the church family. The theme of this year’s Mass is ‘Spread the Good News' and the day will begin at 1.00 pm when children will be able to join in activities to help prepare for the Mass which will be celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm, priests are invited to concelebrate. Pastoral Area 3 are hosting the Mass, if you would like to be the ‘hosts’ in 2017 please contact the Safeguarding Department as soon as possible. After Mass there will be time to enjoy a picnic in the school grounds and join in the many games that are planned. Please help to make this a joyful celebration of our faith and encourage families, catechists and the wider parish to join in. Please bring along a parish banner if you have one. It would be helpful to have confirmation of numbers when available. For further information or offers of help contact the Safeguarding Department Tel: 0151 522 1043 or email: safeguarding@rcaol.co.uk

Looking ahead: July 2016 Sunday 3 July ‘Celebrate the Child’ Mass 2.30 pm at St Pascal Baylon Primary School, Chelwood Ave Liverpool, L16 2LN. Details Tel: 0151-522-1043 or email: safeguarding@rcaol.co.uk Prayer Meeting led by Emmaus Prayer Community 7.30 pm at St Patrick’s church, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Thursday 7 July Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286.

personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Wednesday 13 July UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at St George, Station Road, Maghull, L31 3DF.

World of Atherton The wife generally tells me how we’re going to vote!

Friday 8 July (evening) to Sunday 10 July LOYOLA-metro Living Theology 2016 At St Francis Xavier Church and Hope University, Everton. Cost : £65. Details Tel: 0151 298 1911 or email d.reynolds@sfxchurchliverpool.com Tuesday 12 July Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and

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Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, religious books, relics etc.

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profile

Peter Woods eter Woods is describing the details of a recent visit to London for a garden party at Buckingham Palace. ‘It was wonderful to see so many people being recognised for their work in the voluntary sector. It’s a forty-acre garden with lots of places to sit and people-watch –and there was a delicious afternoon tea!’ Peter was invited to the Palace in his capacity as Merseyside Chair of the Art Fund, a national fundraising charity for art, though it is his similar role with another association – the Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral – that he wishes to discuss with the Catholic Pic. This is a group, he explains, which combines raising funds for the Cathedral with a range of fascinating talks and cultural activities for its 400 members. ‘Our aim is to keep interested people aware of what’s going on at the Cathedral and how they may be able to help the Cathedral in a practical way,’ says Peter, who has held the post of chair since 2006. ‘We do that by arranging a lot of events – trips to other places of interest, such as cathedrals or buildings with some religious significance, and lectures and talks which we sponsor.

P

A true friend of the Cathedral by Simon Hart ‘In January we had Father Geoffrey Wheaton, who made a presentation on art and Scripture. We’ve also had Lord Alton of Liverpool talking about his work overseas.’ The Friends’ fundraising efforts are visible around the Cathedral, according to Peter, who proffers some notable examples: ‘We’ve sponsored medals for members of the choir and for altar servers, and we’ve paid for some of the glass altar pieces in the Blessed Sacrament chapel by German artist Raphael Seitz. We’ve bought crib figures and sponsored the Easter Garden this year. Another thing we donated was the Hillsborough memorial tribute with the names of all the people who died.’ Peter, born and raised in Ireland, has vast experience of fundraising work with other charitable causes in his adopted city. Appointed a Deputy Lieutenant of Merseyside in 2010, he is also a board member of the Merseyside Building Preservation Trust and was previously Chair of the Friends of the Tate and also the Homebaked Community Land Trust in Anfield, a community bakery project originally set up by Liverpool Biennial. The son of Liverpool-born parents, Peter

grew up in County Louth but, he explains, ‘had grandparents here so it was very much like coming home when I came here in 1969’. With his partner Francis Ryan, he developed a successful antiques business in Liverpool, working as a director of Ryan Wood Antiques from 1972-2005, and he retains an involvement today. ‘We help people with acquiring or disposing of antiques and collectables and with valuations,’ he says, though much of his attention is now focused elsewhere. Retirement evidently has a different meaning for this engaging Irishman, who proceeds to explain his fondness for his local parish church of St Vincent de Paul’s on St James Street. ‘It’s a beautiful Pugin church,’ he says. ‘I’d love to see it restored to the way it should be and already the parishioners are working toward that goal.’ It is the Cathedral, though, that we come back to as he outlines his wish to attract new members to the Friends group. ‘We’d like to have more representation from the parishes throughout the diocese,’ he says, and for more information, call 0151 709 9222 or email friends@metcathedral.org.uk

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youth ministry

The Year of Mercy so far… Sarah Beatty reflects on the Animate team’s May pilgrimage to Rome We had the good fortune last month to spend a few days on pilgrimage in Rome. We took part in the pilgrim walk from Castel Sant’Angelo through to the Door of Mercy at Saint Peter’s Basilica and once inside, were allowed through the barrier to pray around the altar above the tomb of St Peter. We were also lucky enough to pass through the Holy Doors at the basilicas of Saints John Lateran and Maria Maggiore. Passing through these Holy Doors and taking part in this pilgrimage made me think of what we, as a team, have been doing so far in this Jubilee Year of Mercy. Focusing on the Year of Mercy has been a popular choice for our retreat days and mission days at the high schools we visit. Through these days, we have been able to consider with the young participants how best to lead merciful lives as well as exploring the mercy shown to us by God. In particular, we have focused on the

‘It has been a busy six months so far, but it is far from over … ’ Liverpool; St Mary’s, Crosby; St Edmund Arrowsmith, Ashton-in-Makerfield; and Holy Cross, Chorley. At each school we offered Reconciliation services for different year groups, giving the pupils a chance to receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation. During the services the team spoke about the mercy that God shows to us and offered testimonies about mercy being shown to them in their lives. More than 1,200 confessions were heard in this time – who said no one wanted the Sacrament of Reconciliation anymore?

Corporal Acts of Mercy: to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless, visit the sick, visit the imprisoned, and bury the dead. We have given examples of ordinary people who have carried out acts of mercy, perhaps without even realising it, in order to inspire the young people to do all they can to be merciful to others. We have also asked them to think who would be their face of mercy. This could be someone who acts as an inspiration to them or someone who shows mercy to them personally. Throughout Lent, the team travelled to St John Fisher, Wigan; St Mary’s, Brownedge; St Gregory’s, Warrington; St Bede’s, Ormskirk; St Julie’s,

Alongside our work with schools, we have been focusing on what this year means to us as a team. In January, we took time out to join Hope CathSoc on retreat in Freshfield. It was an opportunity to think more deeply about mercy: where it appears in the scriptures and where we can see it in works of art. In our community prayer times, meanwhile, we have challenged ourselves to be ‘merciful like the Father’. As well as our Roman pilgrimage, we joined the rest of the St Helens Pastoral Area on a pilgrimage to our own Metropolitan Cathedral in Liverpool, passing through the Holy Door there and taking part in the Sacrament of Reconciliation and Mass. It has been a busy six months so far, but it is far from over … Upcoming events Nightfever – Adoration, praise & worship and confession from 7pm-9.30pm on 2 July at the Blessed Sacrament Shrine, Dawson Street, Liverpool Life & Soul – Monthly prayer and praise gathering at 7pm on Thursday 9 June and Thursday 7 July at St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens Youth Alive – Lourdes and World Youth Day departure Mass at 6.30pm on 10 July at St Mary’s, Lowe House Keep in touch via social media: Facebook – Animate Youth Ministries Twitter – @animateyouth Instagram – @animate_youth

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cathedral

‘Be a chorister for a day’ Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean June at the Cathedral is the main month for the various annual Diocesan celebrations and gatherings of Diocesan associations. On 8 June at 7.30 pm the Union of Catholic Mothers from across the Diocese assemble for their annual Mass – Archbishop McMahon will preside at the Mass this year.

by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral June opens with the visit of Brentwood Cathedral Choir to join our own Cathedral choir to sing at the Solemn Mass and Evening Prayer on Sunday 5 June. We will also be joined that weekend by a very special guest in the form of Mr Colin Mawby. A former Master of the Music at Westminster Cathedral, he celebrates his 80th birthday this year. On the afternoon of 5 June the Cathedral Choir will officially release a new CD of Mawby’s music as part of his birthday celebrations: watch this space for further details on how to get a copy. Our recruitment focus in the Summer term switches from boy choristers to girl choristers. We are very fortunate in Liverpool to have the only full time, choir school based, Catholic Cathedral girl choristers in the country. This means that our Cathedral is able to offer the same musical opportunities to both girls and boys in our liturgy. On Sunday 26 June we are holding a ‘Be a chorister for a day’ event for girls currently in year 5. On this day girls will have the opportunity to meet our current choristers, sing with the choir, tour the

building and generally experience what it is like to be a cathedral chorister. Places are limited and filling up fast: if you know anyone who is interested please visit the Cathedral website for further information. Music at the Good Shepherd Mass this year will be led jointly by the cathedral boy and girl choristers and around 300 children from 11 schools across the Archdiocese. Music staff from the Cathedral have been visiting these schools over the last month to prepare them for this Mass and there is a great sense of anticipation. Many of these children have never visited the Cathedral before so it promises to be a very special Mass. On 11 June the girl choristers will give a joint concert along with the girl choristers of the Pro Cathedral, Dublin. The concert takes place in Bishop Eton Church in Childwall and begins at 7.00 pm. All are very welcome: admission is free with a retiring collection. Links between Dublin and Liverpool are many, but this is the first time that the girl choristers of the Pro Cathedral have performed in Liverpool so is an occasion not to be missed. The following morning both sets of girl choristers will sing at the Solemn Mass in the Metropolitan Cathedral.

There are two men who are due to be ordained to the permanent diaconate on Sunday 12 June at 3.00 pm. It has been forty years since the first permanent deacons were ordained for this Diocese and Monsignor Austin Hunt has been the director of the permanent Diaconate for almost all of that time. This year the ordination service will also be a thanksgiving celebration for this 40th anniversary and Monsignor Hunt’s leadership. The ‘Good Shepherd Mass’ for our schoolchildren in support of the work of Nugent Care is at 1.15 pm on Tuesday 14 June celebrated by Bishop Williams. The Knights of St Columba from across the country are here for their annual Mass on Saturday 18 June at 3.00 pm. The Knights have always had a close link with our Cathedral through their sponsorship of the Columba Chapel but through Archbishop Malcolm, who has been their Episcopal Chaplain for many years, that link is now even stronger. The Mass in celebration of the Priestly Jubilarians is at 7.00 pm on 24 June. This year there are two diamond jubilees (Frs Mayne and Strowbridge), one golden (Mgr Butchard), three ruby (Frs Furnival, Sloan and Southworth) and three silver (Frs Abbs, Henry and McLoughlin). As well as this Fr Tom Kennedy, who is parish priest of English Martyrs in Haydock reaches the grand old age of 100 years next month. Ad Multos Annos.

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Pic extras Mums the Word

During the UCM’s Bi-Monthly Mass at Holy Rosary on Wednesday 4 May, Maria Bruns was commissioned as the new Archdiocesan president by Father David Potter, our spiritual adviser. Maria has been a member of the St Paul’s, West Derby branch for 28 years, serving as president and secretary, and has served on the Archdiocesan committee as a vicepresident and study officer. We also have a new Archdiocesan secretary – Cath Lydon from St Richard’s, Skelmersdale – who has been a UCM member for three years. We thank them for volunteering and wish them well in their new roles. At the same Mass, four new members were enrolled. • Fidelia Chime and the UCM members at St Clare’s, Liverpool wish to thank everyone for their prayers and support during the worrying experience of the kidnapping of her husband Edwin in Nigeria, where they had gone to visit family. Thankfully he was released unharmed, so the members of St Clare’s held a thanksgiving service in church, conducted by Father David Potter. • A Study Day is to he held at St George’s Parish Centre in Maghull on Monday 20 June. The Speaker will be Tony Banks from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Maria Bruns has asked that as many members as possible attend to support this Archdiocesan event. • I hope to see you all at the Annual Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Wednesday 8 June at 7.30 pm with all banners flying. God bless Madelaine McDonald, Media Officer 26

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

New provincial council installed The installation of the Liverpool Knights’ new council members took place during the 11am Mass at St Gregory’s, Lydiate on Sunday 10 April. According to the rules of the order, although members can hold office for a period of three years they must be re-elected annually during this period and installed into their positions publicly each time. Our picture shows the provincial grand knight, Pat Foley, with fellow officers and members, and also Father Tom Wood, our provincial chaplain and the parish priest of Our Lady’s and St Gregory’s, to whom we are grateful for arranging the Mass and providing refreshments afterwards. During the Mass, members of the local KSC council – 64 Ormskirk – took the opportunity to distribute recruitment leaflets, and further information on the work of the order can be obtained through the contact details below. • The National Biennial Mass for the

Knights of St Columba will take place at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Saturday 18 June at 3pm. This Mass takes place every two years for members and their wives and families to remember the deceased who gave service to the order and the Church. The celebrant will be Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP, ecclesiastical adviser to the KSC. • This month also features the feast of our patron St Columba and we are very grateful as always to accept the kind invitation of Father Chris McCoy, parish priest of St Columba’s, Huyton, to celebrate the occasion at his church on Sunday 12 June at 11am. • Members of the order have again been invited to act as stewards at the Northern Catholic Conference at Hope University on 17-19 June. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life What is a proper apology? By Moira Billinge I am often bemused by the subjects commissioned for research, usually at enormous expense to the public purse, when the answers could be given by any ordinary member of the general public with a modicum of common sense. The science editor of a daily newspaper reported that recent research at Ohio State University had come up with a recipe for the ‘perfect apology’. The results of the research published in the journal ‘Negotiation and Conflict Management Research’ examined how 755 people reacted to apologies containing between one and all six of the main components from an ‘apology checklist’ which included the following: acknowledgement of responsibility; making amends; expressing regret; explaining what went wrong; declaring repentance; and asking for forgiveness. The study found that if the wrongdoer wants to get their apology over with quickly, the most efficient way is to use what were considered the two most effective measures: taking responsibility and making amends, because you are committing yourself to ‘undoing the damage’. For those who decide to take the longer route – perhaps merited by a more serious misdemeanour – then expressing regret and declaring repentance were deemed the best way of delivering the apology. Asking for forgiveness came last on the list of priorities which surprised me because forgiveness is such an important part in the healing process for all concerned. It could be, however, that for most of us, the very act of approaching someone to say sorry presumes that we seek forgiveness but most human beings need to have some sort of affirmation that they have been forgiven and a line drawn under the incident; no one wants to carry

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around with them the unnecessary burden of unresolved issues. It is highly unlikely that anyone would deliberately seek to offer a false apology, although there are times when a vulnerable individual can be cowed or bullied into doing so – despite the other party being in the wrong. In such situations it can seem an easier option to go through the motions of apologising rather than to endure the real or perceived consequences of not doing so. In the Sacrament of Reconciliation we already have the perfect formula if we ‘want to say sorry properly’, which includes every item on the professor’s checklist and, most importantly of all, gives us the assurance that we are forgiven by God, no matter what wrong we have committed, providing that we are indeed truly sorry. This is not, however, akin to a Monopoly ‘Get out of jail free’ card; there are conditions to be met. I read a very helpful Redemptorist Publication leaflet last week, ‘The Sacrament of Reconciliation’. One of the concluding paragraphs states: ‘God has forgiven you, but your celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation does not end when you come out of the confessional or leave the church. At the heart of the celebration is your undertaking, not only that with God’s help you will try not to sin again, but also that you will show by the way you live that you are conscious of having been forgiven and reconciled with others, the Church and God.’ This wonderful Sacrament is not about grovelling in the shame of our sin before God; it is about acknowledging our weakness and allowing His love to lift us up above our failures. No one is beyond the forgiveness, love and mercy of God and it is never too late to say sorry to Him who, even when dying in agony on the Cross, told the repentant thief: ‘This day, you will be with me in Paradise.’

Quote from Pope Francis for the Year of Mercy “Do you speak with Jesus? Do you tell him - Jesus I believe you are alive, that you are risen, that you are close to me, that you will not abandon me. Jesus is always with us, He is always with our problems, our struggles and our good works”

Worth a visit

The border city of Carlisle in Cumbria is a wonderful, history-laden destination for June, writes Lucy Oliver. It was the Romans who chose to establish a settlement here while the medieval fortress of Carlisle Castle has looked over the city now for over 900 years. Carlisle has much to explore including a cathedral perhaps most famed for its Tudor painted ceiling in the 16th century Prior’s Tower. The Guildhall Museum on nearby Fisher Street dates back to 1407 AD – the only surviving medieval house in the city. Each room is dedicated to a different trade, from butchers to merchants, to tanners and tailors. Carlisle’s other sights include the Border Regiment Museum, while rail enthusiasts will enjoy visiting the railway station for its steam trains. Carlisle is also a stop-off for pilgrims on the journey to see St Andrew’s relics across the border at the eponymous Scottish seaside town. For more information on walking ‘The Way of St Andrews’, visit www.thewayofstandrews.com. From Carlisle, Hadrian’s Wall is 16 miles away, and along the route is the beautiful 13th century church at Lanercost Priory, which hosts a festival of music and drama from 19-26 June, including a production of King Lear. For more information, visit www.lanercostfestival.co.uk


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join in Children’s word search

Eating Out

Saint John XXIII our Pope from 1958 - June 3 1963 was approved for canonisation by Pope Francis on June 3 2013 which was the 50th anniversary of Saint John XXIII death. His actual feast day is October 11 as opposed to the day of his death and intended as a commemoration of the opening of the Second Vatican Council on October 11 1962.

Make a fuss of your special Dad on Fathers Day - June 19. A gift would be lovely and maybe a meal at one of our listed restaurants. (Do book for this busy day).

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POPE PRESIDENT SPF NEW LITURGY

MERCIFUL VATICAN II

The Sparrowhawk Southport Old Road, Formby 01704 882350 Istanbul Allerton Road, Woolton Village 0151 428 6842 Saracens Head Summerwood Lane, Halsall 01704 840204 Sapporo Teppanyaki Duke Street, Liverpool 0151 668 3005 Stanleys at The Titantic Hotel Stanley Dock, Regent Road, Liverpool 0151 559 1444 The Windmill Mill Lane, Parbold 01257 462935

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy Father Mullarkey and the young curate were watching the

Greeting Cards from Carmel

football on the telly. Liverpool were playing Manchester United and, much to the auld fella’s delight, they were winning 1-0. ‘One-nil is not much of a lead,’ said the young curate, ‘and Manchester United are playing well. It wouldn’t surprise me if they scored a goal.’ And a few moments later they did just that. ‘What did I tell you?’ said the YC. ‘I knew United would score. I must have a sixth sense.’ ‘It’s a pity you haven’t got the other five,’ said Fr Mullarkey.

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

The selection of cards on sale at Maryton Carmel are truly lovely. If you haven’t seen them do try and check them out. From first Holy Communion, Confirmation, Ordination, Priestly Jubilee, Birthday, Get Well, Thinking of you, they are all at Carmel for you to see. Visit the Monastery at: Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com You will be delighted

Catholic Pictorial

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justice & peace

Why Asylum Link Merseyside warrants our support By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker The impact of the biggest recorded movement of people is reaching all across the world. Pope Francis’s recent visit to Lesbos ended with three Muslim families being given new homes in the Vatican. The families were chosen in advance by the inspirational Sant’Egidio community in Rome, a group which has worked for social justice since 1968. Here in the northwest of England we are blessed to have several active groups working for the welfare of asylum-seekers and refugees. The largest of these, Asylum Link Merseyside (ALM) on Overbury Street in Liverpool, is an example to all – and a model worthy of our support and admiration. ALM started in the 1990s as ‘Kensington Welcome’ – an informal response by people moved to show compassion to the sudden arrival of lots of strangers in Liverpool. By 2001 it had become clear that generalised good will was not enough and that the organisation needed a more professional structure. Now, in 2016, the situation is more troubling than ever owing to the number of armed conflicts that Pope Francis has called a ‘world war in instalments’. Ewan Roberts, manager of the ALM centre, says they operate on cups of tea and biscuits. According to the

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ALM’s website, ‘most services are accessed on a drop-in basis and the centre is open from Monday to Thursday, providing tea, coffee and a place to meet.’ Yet it is so much more than that. ALM offers specialised services such as access to case workers and legal advice, a general casework service for housing problems, access to GPs, and specialist advice on asylum law at OISC 3. (This is the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner and entails a detailed knowledge of immigration, asylum and nationality law.) More than 3,500 people used ALM’s services last year. At the moment, up to 250 hot meals are served daily – which is a near-miracle given their tiny kitchen. For asylum-seekers, learning the English language is a priority once basic needs for accommodation and food have been met and there is an enthusiastic take-up for language classes, through either conversation groups or more formal ESOL classes. ALM provides a series of ‘wellbeing’ programmes too, with subjects including healthy eating and cooking, allotments and gardening, and bike repair and cycle club.

Currently, about 75 per cent of asylum claims are rejected and people are expected to return to their country of origin. Those whose claim has failed but who are unable to return to their own countries due to war or lack of government, etc, are forced to live for many months in destitution. For these people, ALM keeps a store of basic toiletries to allow them to live with some level of dignity. ALM’s vision is to challenge discrimination and injustice

in the treatment of asylumseekers and refugees through befriending, advocacy, direct assistance and education. It aims to help asylum-seekers and refugees live in dignity, to feel at home and to take a full part in the life of their local communities. Asylum Link Merseyside can be contacted at: St Anne’s Centre, 7 Overbury Street, Liverpool, L7 3HJ Tel: 0151 709 1713 info@asylumlink.org.uk www.asylumlink.org.uk

There a re man y ways • V o lu n we can te e r in g h e lp : at ALM per wee fo r a fe k w hour • T a k in s g a par is h g r o ALM up on a v is it to • I n v it in g a sy lu m - se e v is it o r s k e r s/ r e fu g to a p a ees as r is h , o r days ou o r g a n is • O r d e r t fo r th e m in g in g fo o d o n li n d e li v e r e to b e e d to S t A n n e 's ALM ne e d s: C e n tr e • Fund r a is c a sh c o in g a c ti v it ie s • D o n a ll e c ti o n ti n s in a n d p e r io d ic ti o n church es fo r w o m s o f c lo th e s a n d to il e n , c h il e tr ie s dren a e q u ip m nd bab e n t fo r ie s; c a r in g a n d to fo r b a b y s fo r b ie s, a b ie s • Food a n d to il e tr ie s to a sy lu a r e o n ly m - se e k e g iv rs who b e c a u se a r e d e st e n th e y r e it u te , c e iv e n b e n e fi ts o st a te and ar e not a work. P ll o w e d ar to fo ll o w in ti c u la r ly im p o r ta n t g b a si c Food: r a r e th e fo o d s a ic e , p a st n d to il a , ti n n e tr ie s: ti n n e d ed vege to ta b le s, c o o k in g m a to e s, b r e a k fa st c e r o il , te a e a l, peanut , c o ff e e , su g a r b u tt e r , , lo n g li c h o c o la fe /U H T te sp r e a m il k , d , ti n n ( c h ic k e ed mea n /b e e f) ts , ( tu n a /s ti n n e d fi sh T o il e tr ie a lm o n ) s: so a p , sh to o th b r u sh e s, to a m p o o , o th p a st e , sh o w er gel


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Profile for Educate Magazine

Catholic pic june 2016  

News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic pic june 2016  

News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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