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Issue 160 January 2018

A Christmas cheer for Nugent’s family of volunteers

FREE

Inside this issue:

Adoremus Eucharistic Congress and Pilgrimage 2018 Synod 2020


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contents Welcome A very happy, peaceful and blessed new year to all. As we begin 2018 we take time to look ahead to what promises to be a busy year in the life of our archdiocese. In September Liverpool will be hosting Adoremus, a Eucharistic Pilgrimage and Congress, called by the Bishops of England and Wales. It is the first Eucharistic Congress to be held in this country since 1908 when London was the venue. On that occasion a Eucharistic procession through the streets was not permitted, thankfully things have changed since then and this year’s celebration will conclude with a Eucharistic procession through Liverpool. 10,000 delegates are expected to attend and experience a warm Liverpool welcome. Preparations have also begun for our own Synod which will take place in 2020, and our main feature outlines the path to that gathering. We have been praying in preparation for both the Eucharistic Congress and the Synod during Advent, let us continue to pray for God’s help in becoming the Church that He is calling us to be: ‘a community that listens, that trusts, that lives with courage and that puts out its nets into new waters’.

Contents 4

Main Feature Adoremus Eucharistic Congress 2018 Synod 2020

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News From around the Archdiocese

From the Archbishop’s Desk One of the hazards of being tall is that I look up more often than I should. Inevitably I trip over things from time to time which brings me down to earth with a bump. Sometimes people think I am being rude because I don’t acknowledge them if they are below my line of sight, and that can get me into trouble too. Of course, there are some advantages to being tall such as being able to see over the heads of a crowd or lifting luggage onto the rack in the train but being able to look over and beyond our past and present experience and see further is something that everyone can do. During the Christmas season, we were encouraged to look up by the shepherds who in seeing the night sky filled with angels glorifying and praising God they were led to someone who was very down to earth, God’s son, Jesus. The wise men also looked up and saw a star which led them to the true King. They prostrated themselves on the ground before him and offered the homage due to a king. So, throughout the year ahead we should keep looking up because by broadening our vision and taking in the magnificence of the creation, even if it is likely that sooner or later we will trip over and find ourselves humbled, because it is there that we will surely encounter the Lord.

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Christmas Cheer for Nugent volunteers 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Bellerive duo's national recognition 21 Animate Resolved to live joyfully in January 25 Cathedral Record Epiphany at the Cathedral 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

28 Pic Life Thank God for his many blessings Editor Peter Heneghan

Copy deadline February 2018 8 January 2018

Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Publisher CPMM 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Pictures Front cover and main feature nickfairhurstphotographer.com Advertising Sales team 0151 709 7567

CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace A thank you and two invitations 30 Letter from Rome Seminary Life

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Synod 2020 – a New Vision hen he became Pope in 2013 Pope Francis issued a challenge to the whole church. It was in the form of an Apostolic Exhortation called ‘The Joy of the Gospel’. He invited us all to have a daily encounter with Christ who changes lives and to have the courage to take up the call of Jesus to be missionary disciples. He said that our parishes were the places where this could happen as long as we were prepared to renew what we do. Pope Francis wrote:

W

‘I dream of a “missionary option”, that is a missionary impulse capable of transforming everything, so that the Church’s customs, ways of doing things, times and schedules, language and structures can be suitably channelled for the evangelisation of today’s world rather than for her self-preservation.’ Pope Francis invites everyone to be part of this adventure: ‘To those who feel far from God and the Church, to all those who are fearful or indifferent, I would like to say this: the Lord, with great respect and love, is also calling you to be a part of his people! The Church must be a place of mercy freely given, where everyone can feel welcomed, loved, forgiven and encouraged to live the good life of the Gospel.’ It is in the light of this and being aware of our changing circumstances that the Archbishop has called for a Diocesan Synod to take place in June 2020. In 1962 there were 264,000 people at Mass each Sunday, last year that number had fallen to 47,000. In 1962 there were over 400 priests serving the Diocese and now there are just 120. This means that we have to be open to change. The work of the Gospel is no less urgent, the call to make disciples has not changed, but we have to find new ways to do this in the light of our changed circumstances. The Second 4

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Vatican Council (1962-65) invited the church to look at the signs of the times, to reflect on what they mean and to take appropriate action. This includes a re-discovering and a re-energising of the vocation of all the baptised.

‘The Church must be a place of mercy freely given, where everyone can feel welcomed, loved, forgiven and encouraged to live the good life of the Gospel.’ Pope Francis

This is the background which is leading us to Synod 2020. 2017 to September 2018: In the first year we are invited to join our prayer with the Church in this country as we prepare for the National Eucharistic Congress and Pilgrimage which will be held in Liverpool in September 2018. A series of prayers will be written as well as three Holy Hours for each parish to use which will lead us to a deeper understanding of the Eucharist. The first prayer was used at the end of Masses in Advent in each of our parishes The three Holy Hours, which will be sent to parishes in January, invite us to reflect on three aspects of the Eucharist. The Eucharist as thanksgiving, the Eucharist as a meeting with Jesus and thirdly the Eucharist which calls us and sends us as missionary disciples. Another prayer will be sent to be used after Easter and the final prayer will form part of a novena of prayer for the days between Ascension and Pentecost. Our schools will also be invited to be part of this time of prayer and preparation. As the Archbishop said, in his October Pastoral Letter, the best way we can begin our preparation for Synod 2020 is in focussing our gaze upon Jesus. In the Spring and summer of 2018 the Archbishop will be visiting each area of the Diocese (15 different venues) and he will lead priests and people together in prayer as we prepare for the Synod. He will share his vision and we will be joined as a Diocese in a great act of prayer. September 2018 – September 2019: In the second year the focus will move

to each parish. Parish discussions will take place which, we hope, will enable us to catch something of the vision that moves us towards missionary discipleship. We are not under-estimating the changing circumstances, but we are trying to address the situation in a way that gives us energy and creativity. Resources will be prepared to enable us all to shape the topics discussed and then we will have an opportunity in our parishes to discuss the topics chosen. A scriptural theme will guide us in our discussion. (The word Synod means journeying together, so there are some obvious ideas). This will lead to Pastoral Area Synods in September 2019 which will bring together the parish discussions on the various topics. September 2019 – June 2020: In this third year the aim is to look at practical ways forward which will be presented to the Diocesan Synod as a series of propositions. From October to February each Pastoral Area will meet in Synod to formulate propositions on the topics discussed in Year 2. The Archbishop or his delegate, will attend a meeting in each Pastoral Area to listen to what is being said and to help shape the direction of our work. (These will probably be on a Saturday morning from October.)


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feature

Exposition at St Marie’s, Standish

World of Atherton My ‘ New Year resolution? I haven’t succe eded in ke eping last years yet!’

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feature ‘The Second Vatican Council invited the church to look at the signs of the times, to reflect on what they mean and to take appropriate action.’

In June 2020 delegates from each parish will gather for the Synod. Propositions will be discussed and voted on which will help us provide concrete ways in which we, as a Diocese, are going to move forward implementing a shared vision and strategy. It has been suggested that the Synod will be held on a Saturday with the final propositions being brought forward in a Diocesan Mass in the Cathedral on the Sunday afternoon. Why a Synod? The last Synod in this Diocese took place in 1955 when it looked mainly at questions regarding the canon law of marriage. So why have another one now? The need for decisive action is such that something of the import of a Synod should happen. It underlines how important is the work that will be done and the future vision and strategy that will emerge. Who will go? Because it is a Synod there are certain people who, by Church law have to be there, but we will ensure that every parish has the opportunity to send two delegates.

Is this just Leaving Safe Harbours with another name? We have been facing the need for change for many years now, and that will not stop. But a Synod will build on what we have done and allow us to have a shared vision and strategy for tackling the circumstances that face us now and in the foreseeable future. The Archbishop ended his October Pastoral Letter, announcing the Synod with this call: ‘We need to regain our missionary spirit so that the call to holiness we heard in our baptism is expressed by a change of direction. Baptism has changed us so that as Christians we live no longer for ourselves but for others.’ ‘Perhaps we can also begin to see the opportunity that Synod 2020, our three-year journey of prayer, reflection and action, might bring us to hear and respond to the call of the Lord with openhearted generosity and creative commitment. It is in this spirit that we can face the future with hope and confidence in Christ who is always close to those who seek to do his will.”

The Synod Logo The logo for Synod 2020 came from an idea of the Archbishop. He reflected that he had often seen pottery images of a group standing round a candle. The candle represents Christ and the group gathers round the light. But he suggested that we should turn this around: in the midst of the group is the light and the group, strengthened by the light, face outwards, ready to offer something to the world. In the logo each figure has a flame in their hands – this is the flame, the spark of faith, that we share with all those we meet. This seems to speak powerfully of the vision of Synod 2020. The logo is the work of Jonathan Mercer, Secretary of the Pastoral Formation Department.

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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Faith in Action Christmas Shoe box appeal for the Homeless As part of the Faith in Action Award scheme, eight young people from the parish of St Benet’s, Netherton, made an appeal over Christmas asking parishioners for donations for the Whitechapel Centre in Liverpool. Thanks to their generous donations, the young people managed to make up 64 shoeboxes containing such items as scarves, hats, gloves and toiletries, to be given to the rough sleepers of the city. In addition, they were also able to put together 23 parcels for their animal companions. The young people were able to live out their faith by helping their neighbour and to love, not only in word, but by deed.

Cathedral Choristers visit to Westminster

On 7 November, the boy choristers of the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral visited London for a once in a lifetime opportunity to sing in Westminster Cathedral as part of the Golden Jubilee celebrations. The boys took part in Mass that was being celebrated in Westminster Cathedral, which marked the first time that the two leading Catholic choirs in England had sung together. The following day, the pupils were given the privilege of celebrating a private Mass in Westminster Abbey at the tomb of St Edward, the patron saint of their school, St Edward's College. That evening the choristers performed Mozart’s Requiem with the

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choir from Westminster. The concert, conducted by Martin Baker, was magnificent and the choir was commended for their singing throughout the concert and during the rehearsals. On the final day of the trip the choristers visited the House of Commons and the House of Lords and were able to take a tour around the Palace of Westminster thanks to parliament being in recess. The following week saw the return leg, with the choristers of Westminster making the journey to Liverpool to again perform Mozart’s Requiem together, this time at the Metropolitan Cathedral.


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news diary Generous help for Zimbabwe In December 2016 Father Peter Hannah, parish priest of St. Vincent de Paul, St Helens, was robbed at gunpoint. All that was taken was £100 collected for the parish charity partner, St Bernard's School in Zimbabwe. The story touched the hearts of many people, both local and across the country and even as far as America. Many people were kind enough to send sums of money to replace that which had been stolen. By January 2017 £9,300 had been received, an amazing expression of love, concern and generosity. Father Peter says, ‘we sent this money to our friends in Zimbabwe. They were able to commission a new school, as pounds sterling go much further in Zimbabwe than they do in England and I received this message from Notre Dame Sister Meltah who is in charge of the project: ‘There is great progress in the school and in 2018 it is definitely opening its doors. The place was fenced. The borehole had solar pumping installed. One of two classroom blocks finished. Administration block completed and now working on the second classroom block at roofing level. Thank you for your support. Life is tough here but through God's grace we are managing.’ The association with St Bernard's school came about through parish Sister, Philomena Doherty SND, who had visited the school and worked there several times.

Christmas tree collections for Jospice St Joseph's Hospice is urging families to spare a thought for their poor Christmas tree once the seasonal festivities are complete by arranging for it to be collected and recycled in the new year. In partnership with UK charity JustHelping as well as the Crosby Lions, a team of volunteers from Merseyside's oldest and largest hospice will be out collecting Christmas trees from selected postcodes across Waterloo, Crosby, Thornton, Hightown, Formby and Maghull on 6/7 January. For a suggested donation of £10, collections are available in postcode areas L22, L23, L31, L37 and L38. Alternatively families can bring their tree to St Joseph's Hospice – situated on Ince Road, Thornton – for a suggested £5 donation. All the trees will be chipped at the hospice and used around the grounds. Julie McAdam, Jospice's senior fundraiser, said: 'We are delighted to be working with JustHelping as they inspire people to contribute to their local community. We are also very grateful for the support received from many local community groups and local businesses who are providing vehicles and volunteers to collect and recycle all the trees.'In particular, we'd like to thank Tony from Heaven on Earth Landscapes, Gary from Big Tree Liverpool, Barry from Adamson Garden and Landscaping, Alan from Yard Work and, of course, the Crosby Lions who support our Christmas tree collections every year.' To arrange a collection, visit www.charityxmastreecollection.com and register your tree by 1 January. For more information, contact the fundraising team on 0151 932 6044 or email julie.mcadam@jospice.org.uk.

Obituary of Monsignor William Dalton Former Rector of St Joseph’s College, Upholland, and long serving Parish Priest of St Thomas of Canterbury, St Helens, Monsignor William Dalton died on Saturday 25 November aged 92 and in the 69th year of his priesthood. He was well known to several generations of seminarians from the Northern Province and beyond in his capacity as professor of dogmatic theology, and later Rector, at Upholland. His period of teaching included the days of the Second Vatican Council and the many changes that followed in the early post-conciliar period. Later as Rector in the mid-1970s he had to oversee the changes at Upholland following the bishops’ decision to alter the seminary provision for the Northern Province. William Dalton was born in Warrington on 30 October 1925, the son of William and Mary Dalton. He was the youngest of four children and was educated at Sacred Heart School, Warrington, before he entered the junior seminary at the English College, Lisbon. He remained at Lisbon for the duration of the Second World War and then transferred to St Joseph’s College, Upholland, for the final three years of his theology course. At the general ordinations held at Upholland on 11 June 1949, he was the only priest ordained by Bishop Joseph Halsall, Auxiliary Bishop of Liverpool. The next day he celebrated his first Mass at Sacred Heart Church, Warrington. Following ordination, he studied dogmatic theology at the University of Louvain in Belgium before returning to Upholland College in 1953 to embark on a nearly thirty years’ continuous service on the college staff. From 1953 to 1973 he served as a theology professor, apart from 1955-1956 when he went to teach undergraduates at Notre Dame University, Indiana, USA. In 1973, following the sudden death of Monsignor Tom Worden, he was appointed Rector of Upholland College and was named as a Prelate of Honour by Pope Paul VI the following year. In February 1977 he was appointed by Archbishop Derek Worlock as Episcopal Vicar for Education, a post he combined with his duties as Rector. Monsignor Dalton finally got his wish to exercise his priestly ministry in a parish in January 1982 with his appointment to the parish of St Thomas of Canterbury in St Helens where he was a much-loved parish priest and it was there that he celebrated his Golden Jubilee in 1999. Following his retirement in 2004, firstly at Aughton and then at Maghull, he often supplied for priests in their parishes when he was able and was an unfailingly cheerful presence at diocesan gatherings. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Thomas of Canterbury, St Helens, on Monday 4 December prior to burial in St Helens Cemetery.

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news diary Sensory Garden at Carmel College In May of this year, Carmel College’s Foundation Learning department in St Helens, were awarded an £8,000 grant by Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority in partnership with Veolia. Foundation Learning is a discrete provision within Carmel College for students with Moderate Learning Difficulties. The department, which caters for around 40 students and delivers qualifications which develop their personal, social and employability skills, is using the grant to help construct a large sensory garden. The garden will incorporate a substantial amount of traditional household waste that has been repurposed in order to create an environment that students and staff can engage with. The overall aims of the project are not only to raise awareness of the benefits of recycling and the impact that household waste can have on the environment but to also provide a ‘safe space’ for students who feel they need a brief escape from the stresses of everyday life. Many of the students have been carrying out a variety of tasks in the garden, which has already allowed them to reap therapeutic benefits and provided an opportunity to develop

their employability skills, preparing them for working life. The project is looking to recruit volunteers, particularly towards the latter stages (January to March), when the majority of the work will take place. Community groups in particular are invited to get in touch if they are keen to support the cause. As well as volunteers, there will also be a series of free workshops, held at

Carmel College, delivered by various organisations with a focus on horticultural skills, recycling and even upcycling. If you would be interested in volunteering or attending any of the free workshops, please contact foundationlearning@carmel.ac.uk and follow the project via their Facebook or Instagram by searching for ‘Carmel College Sensory Garden.’

Clarence Community Food Share project launched Clarence High School in Formby welcomed guests from the local community as well as dignitaries from Tesco and FareShare to help launch the Clarence Community Food Share project. The launch event promoted a service that Clarence High School had been delivering for several weeks already, after receiving surplus food from the Ainsdale branch of Tesco and laying on meals for the local community. The hope was that even more members of the community could benefit. Guests at the event included Nugent CEO Normandie Wragg, Mark Jamieson from Community Food Connection Tesco, former Bootle MP Joe Benton, and representatives of FareShare Merseyside which fights hunger by saving good food from going to waste and redistributing it. Joe Benton, who had an integral role in initiating the Clarence Community Food Share, said: ‘The event was highly successful. It was very positive to see so many responses to help the project from the different organisations that attended. There is great potential at Clarence High School to improve social welfare for the 10

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elderly.’ Clarence High School in Freshfield is a specialist education service run by Nugent, and among the early beneficiaries of its food share scheme were residents from another Nugent establishment, Margaret Roper House care home in Birkdale. According to Maria Bailey, a senior pastoral worker at Clarence, the aim is to 'help put an end to loneliness by giving people in the local community an

opportunity for a chat and to make new friends while enjoying afternoon tea.' The project will continue to serve up weekly lunches and to share food collected from across the local community to assist older people and families. Clarence High School provides educational day placements in a therapeutic setting for girls and boys aged 7–19 with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties.


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news diary Southport school celebrates being first in country to win eco award

A Southport primary school has celebrated being the first school in the country to receive the Cafod livesimply award by holding a day of ecofriendly events. Staff and pupils at Our Lady of Lourdes Primary in Birkdale invited MPs, governors and local clergy to come and see their new accolade – awarded for the school's efforts in living simply, sustainably and in solidarity with people in poverty – during a special open day. livesimply is an opportunity for Catholic communities to respond to Pope Francis's invitation in his encyclical Laudato Si' to 'work with generosity and tenderness in protecting this world God has entrusted to us'. Pupils and attendees enjoyed a Fairtrade tuckshop as well as an assembly led by the children. One student from each class across the school who had shown outstanding commitment to the project received their own certificate. Our Lady of Lourdes Primary's eco-friendly exploits began when it won a £50,000 grant to spend on installing solar panels and a panel clearly registering energy usage. When the school, a long-term Cafod supporter, heard about livesimply it seemed a natural progression. Pupils attend a gardening club, growing their own fruit and vegetables, which they make soup out of and share. Annie Swainson, the school's RE subject leader, said: 'It was great so many governors, community members and clergy could come to celebrate our being the first school to receive the award. This isn't a one-off, it's a commitment.' Headteacher Maureen Hillsdon added: 'To be the first nationally to gain this prestigious award is amazing. We will continue our commitment and put our faith into action going forward.' Every year the children fundraise for Cafod and learn about global issues, including the refugee crisis. Cafod volunteer Paul Kelly, who assessed Our Lady's, said: 'It's been brilliant seeing the enthusiasm and how committed everyone is to respecting one another, respecting people in need at home or abroad, and respecting the environment. They have really embraced living simply.' To find out more, visit: cafod.org.uk/livesimply.

Oh what a circus! By Neil Sayer, Archdiocesan Archivist How popular is your priest? Popular enough to have a circus in his honour? Well, that's what happened to a certain Father Byrne of St Helens in 1887, as a document in the Archdiocesan archives reveals. The church of St Joseph in Peasley Cross, St Helens was barely two years old when Father Patrick Byrne arrived as rector in 1880. Born in Ireland, Father Byrne was still a relatively young man when he moved from Everton to the developing industrial district of Peasley Cross. Whatever impact he had on the local miners and glassworkers and their families must have been positive, because when he was transferred back to Liverpool in 1887, the community wanted to thank him for his service. Not for them a box of chocolates or bake sale. Rather they put on a variety show, intending as a 'mark of esteem and appreciation' that a 'clear half of the proceeds' would help Fr Byrne in his new parish of All Souls. The surviving poster in the Archdiocesan archives shows that a troupe of variety acts was assembled by Wallace Revill to perform at the town's Grand Circus variety theatre. The list of performers represents a parade of variety, including the well-known Lupino family fresh from an engagement in Liverpool, and clog dancing from sisters Nelly and Rose Coleman. Frederick Kelmar's ventriloquism act would probably be readily recognised today, likewise Miss Maude who seems to have been some kind of spirit medium. Oscar Dubourg, 'The celebrated Man-Fish', presumably performed with a tank of water; meanwhile, Lisburn and O'Marr may well have been comedians in the 'Negro element' but were most likely blacked-up white men doing extracts from the minstrelsy shows popular at the time. As for Professor R Wezner, according to the poster his was a 'Goblinual séance act' that made 'pigs laugh'. He may have been a magician in the Tommy Cooper mould. In fact, the whole thing sounds a bit like 1970s Saturday-night TV! Fr Byrne, incidentally, died aged 68 in 1918. It isn't known how far the proceeds of the Grand Circus helped in his ministry.

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news diary St John Rigby stages school chaplains day The chaplaincy team at St John Rigby College in Wigan hosted chaplains from neighbouring Catholic high schools for a day dedicated to missionary discipleship, Christian commitment and engagement which was led by Mill Hill priest Father Kevin Hughes. The day began with a morning workshop before Father Kevin celebrated Mass along with a visiting priest from Africa, Father Emanuel. With St John Rigby boasting strong links to its partner Catholic high schools, there were invitations for the chaplains from Our Lady Queen of Peace, Skelmersdale; St Edmund

Arrowsmith, St Peter’s and St John Fisher, all Wigan; St Mary’s, Astley; Holy Cross, Chorley; and St Bede’s, Ormskirk. Together these schools form the Wigan Catholic Education Partnership whose head teachers, teachers and pupils work closely to support the continuation of strong Catholic education from Years 7–13. Crucially, there was the opportunity for current St John Rigby sixth-formers to meet the chaplains from their former high schools. St John Rigby chaplain Martin Malone explained: ‘We wanted to ensure students from our Catholic partners were settling

well into sixth-form life. The time with the chaplains was thoughtful and Fr Kevin led the event exceptionally well. I would like to thank him for his reflections.’ St John Rigby College recently

became the first Catholic sixthform college judged ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted under a new inspection framework and thus has become the firstchoice college for pupils from a wide range of schools.

Obituary of Rev Thomas Leigh Father Tom Leigh, who has died aged 75, and in the 48th year of his priesthood, was particularly associated with Speakeasy, a group he founded for young people in the parish of St William of York, Thornton, in 1976. Originally it was intended as a discussion group, but very quickly it transformed and grew into a 40-strong music group that sang regularly at Mass in the parish. Father Tom explained that the name Speakeasy came from the fact that in origin the members of the group were given the freedom to ask anything, and an attempt was always made to give an honest and positive answer. Over the years the group sang regularly during the archdiocesan pilgrimages to Lourdes, they sang to greet Pope John Paul II on his arrival at Speke Airport in May 1982, and they sang at various ordinations and celebrations at the Cathedral. Earlier this year Father Tom reflected on his association with this group following their 40th anniversary celebrations last November, ‘My own reaction was - a lump in my throat, fighting back tears, sheer pride 12

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Fr Tom Leigh and the Speakeasy Group

and delight, and above all wonder. God had inspired a group of people, who had been given the chance and opportunity to bring joy to their faith.’ To a generation of seminarians in the 1980s Father Tom Leigh was a significant figure in his capacity as Vocations’ Director, guiding them with grace and good humour through the various stages of the selection process, as well as providing invaluable assistance at various points along the journey through seminary, not least in arranging the various pastoral placements in the archdiocese. During his period as director (1980-1987) there was something of an upturn in the

number of ordinations and candidates entering the seminary. Tom Leigh was born in Liverpool, on 22 August 1942, the son of Thomas and Mary Leigh. He attended St Elizabeth’s School, Litherland, and St Wilfrid’s Secondary School, Litherland, before studying for the priesthood at St Joseph’s College, Upholland. He was one of three priests ordained by Archbishop George Andrew Beck at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool, on 31 May 1969. Following ordination he served in three parishes as assistant priest: St Ambrose, Speke from August 1969; St Hugh of

Lincoln, Liverpool from September 1971 and St William of York, Thornton from May 1976. In September 1980, he was asked by Archbishop Derek Worlock to take up the post of Vocations’ Director and moved to St Mary’s, Lowe House, St Helens, where he formed part of the first community of diocesan priests to care for that parish following the departure of the Jesuits. In May 1987 he relinquished his post as Vocations’ Director and moved to Holy Name, Fazakerley, to take up his first appointment as parish priest, moving to St Patrick’s, Churchtown, Southport in September 1995. Following his retirement in November 2012, he moved back to his native Litherland. His health, which had never been robust, deteriorated particularly in the last twelve months and he had many periods of hospitalisation. He died peacefully on the evening of Friday 8 December surrounded by members of his family. His Funeral Mass was celebrated at St Patrick’s, Southport, on Thursday 21 December prior to burial at Ford Cemetery.


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sunday reflections On a liturgical note We begin the calendar year with great Christmastide Feasts – Mary, Mother of God, the Epiphany (which this year is kept on the Sunday, 7 January) and then the Baptism of the Lord. These Feasts remind us that the Christmas Season is exactly that – a period of time, not just a one-day wonder! Just as the weeks of Advent helped prepare us for the Coming of the Lord at the end of Time – which was the theme of the first three weeks of Advent, and is also called the Parousia – and then to celebrate the coming of the Lord in the history of the People of Israel and of the world (from 17 December until Christmas Day itself ), so these weeks after Christmas Day enable us to reflect upon the wonder of the star which we have seen, the song of ‘Glory to God in the highest’ which we have heard, and the child whom we too have embraced and in whose birth we are made glad. It is also a moment when we can respond to that most fundamental of all questions, ‘And what difference does it make?’ Fundamentally, we can with surety reply, ‘All the difference in the world’ – this is also what we sing on the night of the Easter Vigil in the Exultet: ‘What good would life have been to us, had Christ not come as our Redeemer?’ The birth of Jesus, his life and teaching, his death and resurrection – all these

Sunday thoughts On an individually directed retreat over 20 years ago I was encouraged to use my imagination to meditate on the nativity scene; to imagine that I was really there; and then to imagine what I might have to say to Mary and Joseph and what they might say to me. It took me back to my childhood when I loved to visit the crib in church. It always looked really cosy. Unlike the small crib at home, I could easily have climbed into it and snuggled down in the straw with Mary, Joseph and the baby. As I entered into the meditation I found myself knocking at the stable door. After a while Joseph answered. I didn’t need to introduce myself. Amazingly Joseph knew me. ‘Who's that?’ a woman’s voice called from the back. ‘It’s John,’ said Joseph. ‘He’s come to see the baby.’ And so I was beckoned in. And there was Mary holding the child. She looked up and smiled at me.

Canon Philip Gillespie

events are caught up in this one wondrous proclamation. And as John 3:16 reminds us: ‘God so loved the world that he gave his only Son so that whoever believes in Him may not perish but have eternal life.’ The gift who is the Word made Flesh transforms our lives into lives that look towards God to find their ultimate purpose and dignity, and towards the world to find that place where the proclamation of the love of God must be translated into acts and works of charity and kindness. What, we may ask, is the reason for this hope and purpose for our daily living, faithful to the example and command of the Lord Jesus? It is because we acknowledge in the words of Pope Leo the Great that we read on Christmas Night in the Office of Readings a fundamental truth which makes each of us a bearer of God’s goodness and God’s Word to others: ‘O Christian, be aware of your nobility! It is God’s own life that you share.' Advent and Christmastide have invited us to be a people of hope and of vision. These attitudes for life are closely linked to the Feasts we have celebrated over these last days; may we bear the fruit of these virtues in our daily living in the weeks and months ahead in this new Year of the Lord, 2018.

Mgr John Devine OBE

I was lost for words. And then she said, ‘Would you like to hold him?’ And so I did. After the retreat the group spent a few days reflecting on our experience and how it had helped us. To my surprise I discovered that all those who had done that particular meditation on the Nativity had had a similar experience. Each of us had been invited by Mary to hold the baby. One feature of the Gospel accounts of the birth and childhood of Jesus is that in Matthew’s Gospel Joseph dreams, and in Luke’s Gospel Mary ponders. It has been suggested that Luke’s source for the events surrounding Jesus’ birth comes from Mary herself. She pondered these sacred moments throughout her life. And Joseph dreamt. At Christmas time we too are invited to relive these events at the crib; to dream and to ponder.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection

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Called to be a people of hope Just recently I was talking to a Big Issue seller who told me he had no hope for the future. His life, he said, was so broken and messed up that it took him all his time to get up in the morning. I felt extraordinarily sad as I listened to him but his reflection led me to ask myself ‘do I live in hope’ and ‘what is hope’? Sometimes it’s easier to say what hope isn’t. Hope isn’t dependent on the circumstances of our lives or whether people like us or don't like us. Hope is not wishful thinking. You know I hope I win the lottery or I hope my football team win the league. For those of us of the Christian faith hope is a person who was longed for and waited for. If you go to the Scriptures you'll find woven into the fabric of Jewish belief a growing awareness and hope that God was coming to save them. Hoping was a way of life. The sadness is that they weren’t open enough to see their hopes fulfilled. They didn’t expect their hope to be fulfilled in a tiny baby born in a hovel, who grow up to be a radical preacher who made himself unclean and died a criminal’s death on a rubbish heap called Golgotha. Pope Francis has recently said, ‘Hope is something else. Hope has a name. Hope is Christ. Jesus the hope renews everything. It’s a constant miracle.’ If we are baptised into Christ then we are baptised into hope, and I think at the beginning of a new year the greatest gift we can ask for is an increase in hope as we face the future. The American Franciscan Richard Rohr says, ‘Hope is not occasioned by things working out as we expected. If our hope rises or falls according to circumstances, we do not have hope.’ The challenge for all of us is to trust God in the darkest moments, to trust God in the moments of questioning and wondering and doubting. To trust God when it looks as though our world is falling apart and sometimes to trust that God's ways are not our ways. Our hope in God has nothing to do with life’s circumstances but everything to do with the bigger picture. God can still be our hope when the world is falling apart because God is God. So this year pray that you be filled with hope because of the presence of the risen Christ in your life and share that hope with the world. It’s the greatest gift we can give. Father Chris Thomas


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A Christmas cheer for Nugent’s family of volunteers More than 70 Nugent volunteers and community group members assembled at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Parish Social Club in Croxteth for their annual Christmas get-together. At the event on 1 December, the Nugent ‘family’ members were treated to prize bingo and a raffle – with the star prize a £150 Christmas wreath made and donated by volunteer Madeline Compton – as well as a visit from Santa and a disco. The Christmas gathering not only acted as a thank you for the volunteers’ dedication and hard work, but also constituted a chance to meet old friends or make new ones, to share experiences and to better understand what other team members do. Often associates are inspired by their peers to sign up for new volunteer opportunities within Nugent. The event was run by Nugent’s volunteer support team and the volunteers themselves, with volunteer Gerrard Williams providing the disco for free; meanwhile, Nugent’s very own Brian Davies assumed the role of Father

Christmas, helping with bingo calling and the raffle. Nugent has almost 200 volunteers who give their time free. The dedication and commitment they offer to so many vulnerable people is invaluable in supporting the Liverpool-based charity’s services and in its communities. Volunteers have gone on to gain employment both within Nugent and externally – with the volunteering experience having boosted their confidence and facilitated the learning of new skills. Volunteering roles are varied, including working at the Nugent shop in Allerton, driving a collections van, driving service users on trips, running and supporting community groups, lending support in the charity's homes and schools, and working with Nugent's Opening Doors project in Knowsley. Anybody interested in volunteering with Nugent please contact Colin Pryor, volunteer coordinator: Tel: 0151 261 2041 / 07909 925594 Email: Colin.Pryor@nugentcare.org

Christians living with HIV Normandie Wragg Chief Executive Nugent This month I am sharing with you a resource for parishes and Christians that are living with HIV. This information was provided by CSAN and can be found on their website www.csan.org.uk Catholics for AIDS Prevention and Support (CAPS – CSAN member) has launched a new website to support Christians living with HIV. The resource includes three video series featuring a range of people living with HIV and Christian leaders, and a library of additional resources. The material aims to: • Encourage and support Christians struggling with their HIV diagnosis • Improve awareness of why faith is important to many people with HIV • Motivate and train parishes to engage with HIV: starting conversations about HIV, providing welcome and including people living with HIV • Signpost professionals in the health and HIV / sexual health sectors addressing these issues in their work. Jim McManus, Director of Hertfordshire Public Health, and project sponsor, said, ‘If Churches are sometimes uncomfortable about HIV, health services still feel uncomfortable about faith. This resource seeks to bridge that gap. I encourage anyone to spend a little time listening to what people with HIV are telling us about needs and priorities, including faith.’ Duncan Selbie, Director of Public Health England which funded the project, said, ‘Faith plays a critical part for many in keeping well and in helping others. Catholics for AIDS Prevention and Support has taken a lead on AIDS prevention. Positive Faith is a fabulous, pragmatic expression of faith being about life and in this case people living with HIV.’

Pictured: (left to right) Emily Nolan, volunteer coordinator; Colin Pryor, volunteer coordinator; Brian Davies (aka Santa); Madeline Compton

Resources can be found at www.positivefaith.net

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what’s on Monday 1 January Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. Sunday 7 January Solemnity of the Epiphany of the Lord. Epiphany Carol Service 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Liverpool Bach Collective Johann Sebastian Bach Cantata 7: ‘Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam.’ (‘Christ our Lord came to the Jordan.’) 6.00 pm at the Church of Our Lady and St Nicholas (Liverpool Parish Church), Old Churchyard, Liverpool L2 8TZ. Singers and Players directed by Philip Duffy. Tuesday 9 January Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. An opportunity for quiet time, away from the daily rush of life. Offering £10 per person (bring your own lunch). For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Wednesday 10 January UCM bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at Blessed Sacrament, Walton vale, Liverpool, L9 2DG. Friday 12 January Epiphany Service for Schools 2.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral

january of Christ the King. Details and bookings: Claire Hanlon, Cathedral House, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool, L3 5TQ. Tel: 0151 709 9222 Ext. 201 Email: c.hanlon@metcathedral.org.uk Sunday 14 January World Day of Prayer for Peace Thursday 18 January to Thursday 25 January Octave of Prayer for Christian Unity Sunday 21 January Justice and Peace Annual Memorial Lecture ‘Towards social and solidarity economies.’ Speaker: Dr Pete North, University of Liverpool, Department of Geography and Planning. 2.00 pm at the Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Sefton Park, Liverpool L17 1AA. Details: Steve Atherton Tel: 0151 522 1080 Email: s.atherton@rcaol.co.uk Saturday 27 January Quiet Day 10.30 am to 4.00 pm at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person (bring your own lunch). No booking required. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Sunday 28 January Racial Justice Day

Sunday 7 January

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk 16

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Adoremus: Eucharistic Pilgrimage and Congress Liverpool 2018 The Bishops of England and Wales have called a Eucharistic Pilgrimage and Congress from 7 to 9 September 2018 to take place in Liverpool. Adoremus (let us adore), will involve delegates from every diocese of England and Wales. Archbishop Malcolm McMahon stresses the importance of Adoremus for our Archdiocese. The events in and around Liverpool city centre will focus on Christ in the Eucharist, the bread of life. Through adoration, talks, workshops, keynote speakers, Masses and other activities we will be given the chance to reflect on how the Eucharist nourishes our lives as disciples. In addition, Cardinal Vincent Nichols has written ‘We seek to rejuvenate Eucharistic adoration


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in our parishes as the source of strength for our lives and for our mission, that of making present the love and compassion of Jesus in our society.’ Delegates from the Archdiocese of Liverpool will be invited by the Dean of their area to this historic event which will be a gathering of clergy, religious and laity to promote an awareness of the central place of the Eucharist in the life and mission of the Church. The last Eucharistic Congress occurred in London in 1908, when permission for a public procession of the Blessed Sacrament was refused.

public that support the Eucharistic Congress on Friday and Saturday. These events will be hosted by city centre parishes. After Adoremus delegates will return to their parishes with practical resources to develop prayer, contemplation and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. by Eleanor Lalley

10,000 pilgrims are expected to come from across England and Wales. On Friday, the first day of the Congress, there will be talks and workshops for parish catechists, (especially for those involved in First Holy Communion programs), RE teachers, Hospital and Prison Chaplains, musicians, Seminarians and Extraordinary Ministers. Sessions will focus on: Scripture, Ecclesiology, Eucharistic Language and Catechesis, and Rites and Music for Eucharistic Adoration On Saturday, the Echo Arena in Liverpool will be the home to a six-hour stage programme including a speech from Bishop Robert Barron and other speakers, music, drama and conclude with Adoration. On Sunday, the final day of the Pilgrimage and Congress, there will be two pilgrimage Masses (9:30 and 11.00 am which will be ticketed because of numbers of delegates) and a street procession - open to all. The Archdiocese of Liverpool will offer free ‘fringe’ events open to delegates and the

Thanksgiving In preparation for Adoremus, the National Eucharistic Congress and Pilgrimage, Father Joe Kendall will offer a series of reflections on Eucharistic themes. On attending my friend’s wedding some years ago I learnt that there is no tradition of speechmaking at a wedding reception in Spain. Not being a fan myself of such things, I was delighted; it left more time in the proceedings for eating and drinking. Some of my fellow Liverpool guests were left a little disconcerted by this, however. ‘I just think someone should say, “thank you,”’ said one. Such feelings, prompted by polite upbringing and English sensibilities, may be understandable but I did think that that day we had all said, ‘thank you.’ Bride and bridegroom had celebrated the Sacrament of Matrimony in Mass. We had all participated that day in the Eucharist, the great thanksgiving, giving thanks that love triumphs over all.

When we give thanks at Mass, the past is renewed, the present is transformed, and the future is made already present. In this thanksgiving, hope is generated by recalling past mercies. What we know from the past of the power and love of God gives us confidence in the continued mercy of God despite whatever may be going on in our lives to try us. The pages of our Scriptures are alive with the stories of men and women who did not always enjoy success and wealth as the world understands those things and yet were women and men who hoped in the promise of God that all would be fulfilled in God’s kingdom. They could then give thanks. They proved themselves to be the truly happy ones and so it can be for us as we give

thanks for the daily blessings we receive from God. In the Eucharist, we unite our thanks not only with the thanks of all those faithful men and women of the past but we are caught up and included in the prayer of Jesus giving everything to the Father as he hung on the cross. In the Eucharist, past and present are gathered into one as together we look with anticipation for the dawn of the promised fulfilment of the Kingdom of God. In this banquet and sacrifice, we can already thank God for the final and complete victory of God at the end of time. That is assured; we are given even now a foretaste of this victory in the sacramental meal. After-dinner speeches of thanks just will not do. The thanks we give are the meal itself.

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profile

Kelsea Curran receives her award from Rt Hon Ruth Kelly (Pro Vice Chancellor of St Mary’s University) and Nina Mattiello Azadeh (previous CYPA awardee).

Caitolin Ali runner up St Josephine Bakhita Award

Bellerive duo’s ‘extraordinarily’ good example earns national recognition By Patrick Hart The Celebrating Young People Awards may have been presented in central London, but there was a strong Liverpool interest in the glittering proceedings which saluted young people in England and Wales who put Catholic social teaching into practice.

It helped, of course, that the familiar figure of the Archbishop of Liverpool, Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP, was present to hand over the prestigious 2017 Pope Francis Award (selected from all the various nominations) at the ceremony at the Prince Charles Cinema on Leicester Square before Christmas. Yet also in attendance were two students from Liverpool's Bellerive FCJ Catholic College – Kelsea Curran and Caitolin Ali – as Archbishop Malcolm congratulated the assembly of more than 60 nominees, saying: ‘You are not the Church of tomorrow but the Church of today.’ Kelsea, 15, and Caitolin, two years her senior at 17, were just two of hundreds of young people who had been nominated by friends, family, teachers and clergy for six categories of award, each celebrating a different aspect of

Catholic social teaching lived out in action. While the recipient of the overall youth prize given out by the Archbishop was Aaron Omotosho from Manchester's Loreto College, His Grace’s spirits would have soared even higher on an uplifting evening when Kelsea was named one of three winners of the Dorothy Day Award for ‘fostering community and participation’. As well as being a carer to her mum and younger sister, GCSE student Kelsea spends much of her spare time helping others by volunteering in the community – working every day at a local youth centre with both people her own age and the wider community. According to Bellerive’s school chaplaincy, Kelsea 'would feel humbled to receive the award as it would also recognise all the people she works with and what they do in the community. Kelsea herself probably doesn’t recognise how influential her role is, because helping others and being involved come very naturally to her.’ The Bellerive success story continued when Caitolin, who is studying for her A Levels, was announced as a runner-up in the St Josephine Bakhita Award category ‘celebrating human dignity’.

Caitolin, as the main carer for her father, has dealt with many difficult circumstances yet according to her school, ‘carries herself with gentleness and dignity, and is always smiling, willing to help in any way and eager to do well’. The Celebrating Young People Awards are run by Catholic youth charity Million Minutes – an organisation that gives voice and support to young people (aged up to 25) to transform their lives and their world – in partnership with St Mary’s University, Twickenham. While there were three winners in each category, the judging panel declared themselves impressed by all the nominees as examples of ordinary young people doing the most extraordinary things. The last words, though, went to Caitolin, one of two remarkable local teenagers who help make our communities and world a better place: ‘I am glad there is something out there that recognises the work that young people and I do on a daily basis.’

‘You are not the Church of tomorrow but the Church of today ’ Catholic Pictorial

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youth ministry

Resolved to live joyfully in January By Jacob, Animate Youth Ministries First I would like to introduce myself to the Archdiocese of Liverpool. My name is Jacob and I am a member of the gap year team at Animate Youth Ministries. As I tell all the young people, I am your token southerner for the year, born and bred in Woking, the Surrey town famous for rock band The Jam as well as the setting of HG Wells' novel The War of the Worlds. For me, January is always a joyful month in the calendar. Happy memories of Christmas are still fresh in my heart and mind – because being able to return south for the holidays and spend time with family and friends is something I really treasure. January is also exciting because back home I can wear my Woking FC shirt and scarf and cheer on the team in the National League, albeit with a mix of dread and excitement whenever we play local rivals Aldershot Town.

direction, is pretty normal. Anyone who attended the Embrace Liverpool conference for young people at the Metropolitan Cathedral in late November may also want to carry something of the old into the New Year. Too often we hear how young people have become disillusioned with the Church, so the importance of an event like Embrace is that it emphasises that the faith is well and truly alive. Anyway, I digress. In this month's Gospel readings I can also perceive some excitement building. First we read about the Magi presenting their

gifts to the Holy Family; then a few days later we celebrate the Baptism of the Lord. The following two Sundays we see Jesus' invitation to his disciples to 'come and follow me', first to Andrew and Simon Peter, later to James and John. Then finally, after Jesus heals an unclean man in Capernaum, people start to recognise the power of his message and ministry. All five Gospel readings have a thread of excitement running through them. Maybe it is the movement of the Holy Spirit, but from Jesus' birth to his death and resurrection, we are called continuously to follow Jesus in our own lives. So as we enter 2018, I ask you to keep the young people of our Archdiocese as well as the Animate team in your prayers. It has been a fantastic experience to live in this community of friends, to have my own faith grow accordingly – and most important of all, to try to spread the message of the Gospel in an exciting and joyful way. Long may it continue!

Of course, January is also that time when we think about beginning something new. Many people make New Year's resolutions, ready to inspire that 'new me'. I am similar: as a keen long-distance runner, every January I set different targets which hopefully, by the end of the year, will have made me a better runner, be it in times or technique. Wanting to consolidate your achievements of the past 12 months, or to take things in a different but decidedly beneficial

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cathedral Epiphany at the Cathedral by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

After the excitement of Christmas, January can feel a bit flat. However, the liturgical season of Christmas continues up to the Solemnity of the Epiphany (and in fact technically all the way up the Presentation of the Lord on February 2nd.) To mark the Epiphany this year, for the second year running we are holding a special Epiphany Carol Service in the Cathedral on Sunday 7th January. The service will open at the Crib, before proceeding with a mixture of carols, readings and motets, all of which will reflect on the later parts of the Christmas Story and the early parts of Jesus's ministry. The Carol Service will begin at 3.00 pm and all are very welcome. Every two years the Cathedral hosts an Epiphany Service for schools across the

Schools’ Epiphany Service 2016

archdiocese. At this year’s service, which takes place on Friday 12th January, we are also joined by a delegation from our twin city, Cologne, in Germany. Our visitors play a prominent role in the service, and before they leave they inscribe onto the wall of the Cathedral the initials: CMB 2018. CMB stands for ‘Christus mansionem benedicat’ which translates to ‘Christ bless this house.’ But, of course CMB also stands for the names of the three Kings, Caspar, Melchior and Balthasar. Since before the middle ages, Catholics would bless their houses by inscribing with blessed chalk the initials of the three kings above their doorways, a tradition which is still alive and well in Germany and brought to Liverpool by our friends from Cologne. Liverpool is a unique city in many ways, but none more so than the close relationship between its two Cathedrals. To mark the beginning of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, the choir and congregation of both Cathedrals will gather at Liverpool Cathedral for Choral Evensong on Sunday 21st January. The joint choirs will sing music by Tallis, Howells and Vaughan-Williams, surely three of the greatest ever English composers.

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean On the first weekend in the new year we celebrate the Feast of the Epiphany, recalling the mysterious journey made by the wise men from the east who followed the star to worship the Christ child. Instead of evening prayer at 3.00 pm we will be having an Epiphany Carol Service to mark the conclusion of the Feasts of the Christmas season. The Ecumenical Schools Epiphany service on Friday 12th January will take place at our Cathedral this year. The wise men were not the only ones making processional journeys and I have two meetings early in January regarding processions to be arranged for occasions later in the year. The first is the biannual Pentecost service and procession. This has a clearly defined route between the two Cathedrals and has built up a strong tradition over the years, the focus this year will be on involving young people and youth choirs, so this just needs planning and coordinating who takes responsibility for the various elements. The second processional meeting is in relation to the forthcoming Eucharistic Congress in Liverpool in September. The Bishops Conference of England and Wales want the Conference to end with a Eucharistic Street Procession from the Cathedral following the later morning Mass on Sunday 9th September. I estimate that there could be a few thousand people in procession and the original simple route for the procession agreed with the Conference coordinator was not considered to have enough of a street witness element, so we are back to the drawing board. I’m tempted to suggest that we should emulate the magi’s journey and just follow the star and see where it leads. The organisers will be travelling up this month to look at alternative routes. If you spot me walking around the vicinity of the Cathedral with a stopwatch you will know what I’m up to.

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Pic extras Mums the Word By Madelaine McDonald, media officer Ladies, I wish you a blessed, happy and productive 2018. Let us raise our voices to enlist Our Lady’s support; raise our spirits; and raise our membership numbers. And this year may more of us be inspired to take up the reins of office, nationally and at our own foundation level, in the Union of Catholic Mothers. • The first bi-monthly Mass of 2018 will be celebrated at Blessed Sacrament parish, Aintree on Wednesday 10 January. On this occasion we will have the annual presentation of cheques to the charities chosen by our members from across the Archdiocese. This year’s recipients will be: the Priests’ Training fund (which we support every year); the Swan Women’s Centre, a counselling service based in Litherland; the West Lancashire Women’s Refuge in Skelmersdale, which offers support following domestic abuse; and the Missionaries of Charity in Seel Street, who provide food and shelter to those in need. Thank you all for your unfailing generosity, in addition to backing so many charities in your own foundations. • Looking through some quarterly minutes from – wait for it – 1961, I thought you might be interested in this item, considering we have just celebrated the 50th anniversary of our Cathedral. Mrs Abraham, then diocesan president, announced that ‘the UCM will raise money to buy something for the Lady Chapel of the new Cathedral. For four years from January 1961 each foundation should contribute 2/6d (2 shillings and sixpence, i.e. 12½p) per member per year for four years towards this object. On the present membership of 2,000 this would mean that after four years the UCM would be able to present to His Grace the sum of £1,000.’ Mrs Abraham felt that 2/6d was not very much and we could raise it in any way we thought fit; and she felt that if each member was asked to give the actual 2/6d, they would readily agree. The intriguing question is: did we raise the £1,000? What did we donate? Our research goes on, and Neil Sayer, the Cathedral archivist, is being particularly helpful. Of course, some of our senior ladies may also remember …

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Knights end Fatima centenary with nationwide Masses

The Knights of St Columba marked both the end of the centenary celebrations of the apparitions of Our Lady of Fatima and the 50th anniversary of the Abortion Act with specially intentioned Masses on Friday 8 December, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. Tea-lights were commissioned for this occasion and were lit at the beginning of the Masses while the Rosary was recited afterwards. In Liverpool Province the Mass was held at St Francis of Assisi, Garston at 9.30am and was presided over by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, national spiritual adviser to the order. Members who were unable to attend were requested to recite the Rosary personally. • On 25 November the Embrace Liverpool youth conference was staged in the Metropolitan Cathedral, bringing together many young Catholics to take part in another inspiring faith and networking event. As with the first two editions of Embrace, in 2014 and 2015, this one was supported by the order and judging by the numbers present and their great enthusiasm, the conference is going from strength to strength. It was a real fillip that both

Archbishop Malcolm and Bishop Tom Williams were able to attend. The Knights had their own display stand and offered an excellent presentation to an audience of young men and women in the Columba Chapel, courtesy of Brother Danny Grimes, action and youth officer from Council 9 (seen addressing the assembled group in the photo). • We congratulate our new Supreme Knight, Brother Bertie M Grogan, who was elected to the order’s highest office at the Annual Supreme Council Conference in Glasgow on 27 October. He previously held the office of supreme director of membership and development, and succeeds Brother Charlie McCluskey who served as Supreme Knight for the past three years. Brother Charlie was also made a Knight of St Gregory last year, and his official investiture will take place during midday Mass at St Andrew’s Cathedral, Glasgow on 14 January under the auspices of Archbishop Philip Tartaglia. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk and www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life As we usher in this new year we thank God for his many blessings By Moira Billinge It is almost impossible to be blasé about New Year's Eve. However, I am sure that very few 31 Decembers were approached with quite the same trepidation and uncertainty as that of 1999, when we awaited the possible repercussions of the muchspeculated 'Millennium Bug' which was predicted to wreak such havoc on society. The so-called 'Y2K bug' related to the variances of the clocks inside computers; it was feared that as their cogs careered towards the new millennium, the date might be misinterpreted, thus setting all technology back to 1900 rather than forward to 2000. The world steeled itself for impending doom – for the chaos of global computer and network failure, catastrophic electricity and communications breakdowns, and the end of civilisation as we knew it. With the dreaded day imminent, food and water were stockpiled as we were fed a daily diet of public safety warnings. The myriad instructions included how to deal with defunct televisions, video recorders and fax machines. Companies were advised how best to protect their businesses and equipment as lives and livelihoods were catapulted towards the possible ravages of a technological Armageddon. I doubt many people were wiping the sweat from their brows in relief at reading in government-backed information material that 'lawn mowers, hedge trimmers and swimming-pool equipment etc.' would be safe. No doubt survival tactics rather than 28

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leisure or aesthetic considerations were uppermost in people's minds and took priority at such a crucial time. Billions of pounds were spent in an attempt to avert potential disaster, even though no one could be certain the precautions would be effective – or even precisely what we would be facing when waking up on 1 January. That's if we had been brave enough to sleep through what might have been our last taste of earthly normality! Yet when New Year's Day arrived, nothing untoward happened and everyone breathed a sigh of relief. Those who had facilitated the spending of billions to safeguard our precious systems prided themselves on their success; others – with the luxury of hindsight – bewailed the resulting depletion of the public purse. Whatever the reason, being perched on the cusp of a new year has, for many of us, a different feel from any other day, bringing with it a wide variety of mixed emotions, memories and sentiments. We may have had a happy twelve months which we are reluctant to see draw to a close, though this regret can be tempered by the anticipation of looking forward to the prospect of more of the same. Conversely, if we have had a particularly painful year, we may be relieved to see the back of it – hoping and praying that the dawning year will bring better. As we usher in this new year we thank God for his many blessings, and when the midnight hour strikes let's think about all those people entering 2018 with a heavy heart and entrust them to God's care, asking him to bring them the comfort, healing and peace that only he can.

Quote from Pope Francis “A free heart is a luminous heart, which lights up others, which shows the way to Gods door. It is a luminous heart which is a heart that goes forth and even ages well, because it ages like fine wine, fine wine gets better with age”

Worth a visit Lift the winter gloom with a trip to Amsterdam, writes Lucy Oliver. Never mind floating houseboats, man-made canals and Golden Age painters, January's Amsterdam Light Festival offers a new way to explore this historical Dutch city. Positioned alongside the canals and the river Amstel, the light art installations created by Dutch artists can be visited by either cruise boat or walking tour. Stop off at both the Van Gogh Museum, displaying some of the master's most famous works, and Anne Frank House, where visitors can see how life was for the teenaged Jewish girl and her family as they hid from Nazi persecution. Elsewhere, the Begijnhof Chapel – or Church of the Beguines – is the designated place for commemorating the Eucharistic Miracle of Amsterdam in 1345. When a seriously ill man received Communion in a house on Kalver Street but was unable to consume it and vomited, the rejected host was thrown into the fire. Next day, the host was discovered intact and floating above the rekindled flames; it was duly returned to the parish church, only to miraculously return to the dying man's house on two separate occasions. News of the miracle spread, and pilgrims began journeying from the parish church to the Begijnhof (or Beguinage), doing so silently and clandestinely during the Reformation. The next Silent Walk takes place on 17 March, while the Light Festival runs until 21 January. Enjoy your visit, and as you take in the sights and illuminations, reflect on the love that leads us out of darkness and into light.


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search The celebration of the Feast of the Epiphnay is January 6. Look at our clues to learn more.

EPIPHANY

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WISE MEN HEROD EAST

HOMAGE MYRRH

More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy

Some warm pubs to enjoy a meal during January. Bear & Staff Gateacre Brow, Liverpool 25 0151 428 2525 Royal Oak Liverpool Road, Aughton 01695 422121 White Horse Acrefield Road, Liverpool 25 0151 428 1862 Hen & Chicken Prescot Road, Maghull 0151 520 1121 Morris Dancers Southport Road, Scarisbrick 01704 880201 Red Lion Inn New Street, Mawdsley 01704 822208

Greeting Cards from Carmel

The young curate and Father Mullarkey were having breakfast in the kitchen. The YC was tucking into bacon, two eggs and a couple of rashers of bacon, while the ould fella was enjoying his cheese on toast. ‘Why don’t you have a full English breakfast for a change?’ asked the YC. ‘Because I’d rather have cheese on toast,’ said Father Mullarkey. ‘The TV cookery programme said too much cheese is not good for you.’ ‘Oh did it?’ said the ould fella. ‘Well my cookery book doesn’t say that.’ ‘I didn't know you had a cookery book.’ ‘Well I have. It’s called the Bible.’ ‘And what does the Bible say about cookery?’ asked the YC. Father Mullarkey looked up with a grin … ‘Blessed are the cheesemakers.’

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

There is a lovely sellection of greeting cards for all occasions on sale at Maryton Carmel, call to the shop or contact the Sisters at Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com

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justice & peace Letter from Rome By Joshua Dixon Every seminary has its own programme and produces its own kind of seminarian. Here in Rome, the community has its own peculiarities. We pray together most mornings of the week in the College Church at 6:45 am, followed by Mass at 7:00 am and then breakfast. Afterwards the seminarians go off to their lectures at the several pontifical universities here in Rome. I am currently in my third year studying philosophy at the Angelicum. Others are studying Theology, which follows philosophy, at the Angelicum and Gregorian universities; the former is Dominican-run, whereas the latter Jesuit-run. The year is split into two semesters, at the end of which we are examined on our comprehension of the term’s lectures. The nice thing about this semester (winter) is that the exams come in January, lending a more relaxed feeling to the house. The steady routine of prayer, reflection, community life – the stuff of discernment – sees rays of colour flash across at various points. This last week, we welcomed Jubilarians from across England and Wales. Priests celebrating their 40th, 50th or 60th anniversary of ordination come to Rome for one week, lunching at the Beda seminary one day and then celebrating Mass and dining with us on the Wednesday. This year some 35 priests came with a combined priesthood of almost 2000 years among them. It is a joy to see their energy, on-going enthusiasm and to celebrate together, as well as to learn from their wisdom and, oftentimes humorous tales of priestly life. Congratulations to those from our own archdiocese who have their jubilees this year. The other highlight of December is the College’s Feast day, known as ‘Martyrs’ Day’, named after the 44 martyr-priests who died whilst ministering to the Catholics in England and Wales after the Reformation. St Ralph Sherwin, the first martyr, famously took an oath to return to England before his martyrdom in 1583 - in which he stated, ‘rather today than tomorrow’. Archbishop Di Noia OP, who works at the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, presided and preached this year. The day concludes with veneration of the martyrs’ relics in the evening, a ceremony much appreciated by many, especially our American friends here. The history of the College and the mission to home is both an inspiration and a challenge, but one worth accepting. Please continue to pray for all priests serving in England and Wales, and all those in formation.

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New Year: A thank you and two invitations By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker Firstly, a big thank you to everyone who responded to our Advent appeal by sending Christmas cards to the victims of torture or to the parishes and schools in the Holy Land that were named on the lists that we circulated. A selection of the addresses appeared in this column last month. The Justice and Peace office estimates that nearly 1,000 cards were sent from parishes across the Archdiocese. Each one of those cards will have made a difference to someone's life. Secondly, an invitation to the Annual Memorial Lecture at the LACE diocesan centre – Croxteth Drive, Sefton Park, Liverpool L17 1AA – on the afternoon of Sunday 21 January, from 2–3.30pm (doors open 1.30). These lectures always provide an interesting opportunity to stretch our thinking about issues central to social justice. This year we have invited Dr Peter North from the Liverpool University Geography department to speak about a way of organising society that puts people above profit. Under the title ‘Solidarity Economics’, he will explore how we support each other as neighbours and communities in ways that don't involve big government, big business or big sums of money. Solidarity is a key concept in Catholic social teaching (CST), and Pete is particularly interested in the role of churches in this sort of community support. This will not be a dry, ‘academic’ lecture but will involve conversations with other participants as Pete tries to discover how we in

our parishes live up to the ideals of CST. It promises to be a challenging and thought-provoking afternoon. It would be lovely to see you there. Thirdly, I’m just back from a Romero Trust pilgrimage to El Salvador and would welcome invitations to come and speak to parish groups about Blessed Óscar Romero. I can offer an illustrated talk with information about his life story, the places associated with him and the relevance of his example to our lives here in this diocese. While on pilgrimage, we learned that the miracle for canonisation has been approved by relevant authorities in the Vatican, which means that we can expect a canonisation soon. This would be a good time, then, to introduce your parish to the life and example of the soon-to-be-canonised Blessed Óscar. To find out more or to make a booking for the Memorial Lecture or a Romero talk, ring the J&P office on 0151 522 1080/1081 or email s.atherton@rcaol.co.uk


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Catholic Pic January 2018  

Catholic news from in and around Liverpool

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Catholic news from in and around Liverpool

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