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20p from each sale goes to your parish Issue 101 FEBRUARY 2013

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ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

Prayers for the Holy Land

World Day of Prayer for the Sick

‘With Jesus to Calvary’


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contents 20p from each sale goes to your parish Issue 101 FEBRUARY 2013

Welcome In a few days time we celebrate the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes, the World Day of Prayer for the Sick. The message of Pope Benedict XVI has the theme ‘Go and do likewise’ taken from the Parable of the Good Samaritan. The Holy Father says: ‘On this occasion, I feel especially close to you, dear friends, who in health care centres or at home, are undergoing a time of trial due to illness and suffering. May all of you be sustained by the comforting words of the Fathers of the Second Vatican Council: “You are not alone, separated, abandoned or useless. You have been called by Christ and are his living and transparent image”.’ This month our main feature pays tribute to healthcare workers and volunteers in our archdiocese. We also report on the meeting of the Holy Land Coordination which this year visited Jordan as well as Bethlehem and Jerusalem. Archbishop Patrick had planned to travel to the Holy Land again this year but the slight stroke he suffered before Christmas prevented this. The Archbishop has now returned to Liverpool and continues to make good progress in his convalescence; he has also announced his intention to retire. Please remember him in prayer at this time.

From theBishop’s desk “The Church must be forever building, for it is forever decaying within and attacked from without” (T S Elliot: ‘The Rock’). When I stood in for the Archbishop at the Midnight Mass in our Cathedral, I was reminded many times by those around me that I would be OK with the live broadcast, as long as I concentrated on speaking to one person, and forgot that millions would be listening. All those people listening in their own environment, and hopefully, being moved by the same words, but still, for the vast majority of them being on their own. I was happy with doing my very best, because the words were not mine. In the readings, they were the words of Sacred Scripture, the Good News of the Gospel; in the Liturgy, they were the words of the Church: the words of the Creed, the words of Consecration; and even the Sermon was the words of Archbishop Patrick. My delivery of the Words was the important thing. The whole experience was profoundly moving.

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ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

Prayers for the Holy Land

World Day of Prayer for the Sick

‘With Jesus to Calvary’

Cover: Snow in Bethlehem during the meeting of the Holy Land Coordination

Contents 4

Main Feature ‘Go and do likewise’ World Day of Prayer for the Sick’

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Spotlight News from the Ecumenism Commission 15 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 18 Animate Youth Ministry A new approach for Youth Alive

My weaknesses, and they are many, were irrelevant, it is the listeners, the Church, that must hear the Good News of Our Lord and Saviour who are important.

19 Profile Frank Cogley Retiring Director of Schools

What is amazing, is that, with modern technology, more people heard me speak in one hour than Jesus could have spoken to in a thousand years, but they were His Words, His Message of Salvation: ‘Go and preach the Word of the Lord to people of all Nations’. It is up to all of us to preach it as best we can (I wonder how many were really listening?).

20 Justice and Peace Together for the common good

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures Cover: Mazur/catholicnecos.org.uk Main Feature and Profile: Tom Murphy Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Copy deadline March issue 11 February 2013 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

25 Cathedral Record February at the Metropolitan Cathedral 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 28 Pic Life The things we miss in the daily whirl 29 Join In Family Fun More Mullarkey

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‘Go and do likewise’ World Day of Prayer for the Sick by Father David Potter On Monday 11 February we keep the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes. One place where this will be celebrated with great solemnity is the medieval shrine of Altöetting in Bavaria. Altöetting is set to host the 21st World Day of the Sick, which coincides with Our Lady's feast. This year's theme is ‘Go and do likewise’, Jesus' words at the end of the parable of the Good Samaritan. The Good Samaritan was moved by the sight of a wounded traveller, to the extent that he placed himself and his resources at the sufferer's disposal. Some see the Good Samaritan as an ancestor of today's paramedics, who also come to the rescue of gravely endangered people. By highlighting the Good Samaritan at World Day of the Sick, the Church is presenting him as the model of a Catholic approach to healthcare. One of love of neighbour and mercy towards those in need, matched by the will to turn compassionate feelings into action. It is an inspiring vision which recalls why Pope John Paul instituted World Day of the Sick in 1993. He wanted to awaken an intense spirit of prayer for those who are sick, inviting Christians to reflect on and respond to human suffering. At the same time he wanted to recognise and honour all who work in healthcare : doctors, nurses, Chaplains, managers, ancillary staff. John Paul II's wish to give greater support to Catholic healthcare workers has met with a generous response, not least in England and Wales. When I became a Hospital Chaplain in 1999, I was something of a one-man band, well-supported generally as a priest but less so specifically as a Chaplain. By 4

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the time I left Chaplaincy in August 2012, things had changed both nationally and locally, and substantial thought had been given to what it means to be Catholic in the NHS today. Nationally, a Healthcare Reference Group was established in 2005 under the chairmanship of Bishop Tom Williams. Members come from clinical, pastoral, legal and managerial backgrounds, constituting a coalition of Catholics involved in varied aspects of healthcare. The HRG has issued guidance to hospital Trusts on the nature of Catholic Healthcare Chaplaincy and the religious needs of Catholic patients and staff. It has also produced a prayer book for use in hospitals, and has even contributed to the work of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. This has all been done in the interests of influencing policymakers and promoting Catholic contributions to healthcare, giving people the chance both to share their views and to be advocates for Catholic moral and social teaching. While much of the HRG's work can be done only by a national body, members have always encouraged the development of local support structures in the dioceses of England and Wales. In our Archdiocese, Hospital Chaplains have been meeting regularly for a number of years to reflect on how best to be a presence of Christ and His Church in the healthcare setting. And the importance of bringing Catholics together to pool their experiences of healthcare work, and think about how it relates to their faith, has begun to filter through. A case in point was a seminar held at Aintree Hospital last November on the subject ‘Inequalities in Healthcare : Catholic Social Teaching

and the Requirements of Justice’. It sought to ask whether there are any contemporary issues in healthcare which challenge our values as Catholics, and what support Catholics in healthcare expect from the Church. This seminar was attended by Chaplains, clinicians, managers and volunteers, and throughout there was an emphasis on caring for the whole person. Not just the diagnosed illness, but also the spiritual welfare of the patient. Archbishop Kelly, who chaired the seminar, quoted Tolstoy's character Ivan Illyich as saying ‘It's me who is sick, not my kidney’. There was also a perception that paperwork can predominate over care in the NHS, to the point where some elderly patients are treated with indifference if not inhumanely. It was pointed out that it can be hard for Catholics to take a moral stance in the NHS, because (for example) the ‘conscience clause’ allowing healthcare workers not to take part in abortions is interpreted more restrictively now than it used to be. On a more positive note, we discussed evidence that holding a religious faith can have a positive effect on physical and mental health, and assist recovery from illness. The opportunity to air these shared concerns creates a sense of being supported, of not being alone. As a former Chaplain, hearing Catholic doctors speak at such conferences shows me that they are alert to the moral underpinning of their professional work. Perhaps clinicians may likewise see that Chaplains are committed to the same endeavour as they are, and are not pursuing an autonomous, esoteric agenda? From a Chaplaincy perspective, there are also other reasons why the work of the Healthcare Reference Group and its diocesan offshoots is a welcome development. I remember the first patient I visited in 1999 as clearly as the last patient I saw six months ago. The essence of ministry to the sick remained constant in that time. It is as true now as it was then that the seriously ill need God's help to


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feature ‘holding a religious faith can have a positive effect on physical and mental health, and assist recovery from illness’ avoid being crushed in spirit or weakened in faith. Encounters between Chaplains and patients, which are the means by which Christ strengthens the faithful afflicted by illness, are as redemptive and beneficial as they ever were. But the context in which this ministry is exercised has changed considerably, and the challenges facing it have become more acute. Increasing secularisation, the Equality and Diversity agenda, budgetary pressures which have caused a downsizing of Chaplaincy in some areas: all make the task of Catholic Chaplains a complex and delicate one. Against this background, it was always reassuring to know that difficult issues were being addressed by bodies such as the Healthcare Reference Group, and an appropriate Catholic response was being worked out. This enabled us to focus on the heart of ministering to the sick with more confidence and less anxiety than would have been possible otherwise. It freed us to keep our gaze fixed on Christ, to hear Him asking us to do as the Good Samaritan did. ‘Go and do likewise.’ World Day of the Sick is a ‘big-picture’ event. Its universal scope means that it is partly removed from the detailed circumstances of any individual Catholic healthcare worker. Paradoxically, that is

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the great strength of this international gathering. It is not principally about my problems and my challenges, or even my joys and my achievements. It concerns our common faith in the Lord whom we meet so tangibly in the needs and vulnerabilities of sick people. It is about realising that when we minister to the sick, we are doing the Lord's

‘when we minister to the sick, we are doing the Lord's work’ 6

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work. Last year, Pope Benedict sent a message to World Day of the Sick saying that ‘God, in his Son, does not abandon us to our anguish and sufferings, but helps us to bear them, and wishes to heal us in the depths of our hearts’. Those who gather in Altöetting on 11 February will be hoping to hear words similarly charged with grace, light and hope.


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Our Sixth Form has many outstanding features Some are simply monumental

New School Building - Opening September 2013

Sixth Form Open Evening Wednesday 27 February 2013 from 6pm

ES

T

A H QU'IL

BON

LE BON DIE U

Everton Valley L4 4EZ Telephone: 0151 263 3104 ao@notredame.liverpool.sch.uk www.notredameliverpool.com Headteacher: Mrs F Harrison BSc (Hons) NPQH


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: post@merseymirror.com

Relics of St John Bosco visit Liverpool The pilgrimage of the relics of St John Bosco came to Liverpool’s Metropolitan Cathedral on the Feast of the Epiphany, Sunday 6 January. The pilgrimage is part of a world-wide tour building up to the 200th anniversary of Don Bosco’s birth in 2015. It began on 31 January 2009 since when it has been raising awareness of Don Bosco’s spirituality and the importance of young people in the Church throughout the world. Bishop Tom Williams celebrated Mass as the relics arrived on the Sunday afternoon and again on Monday evening before their departure. During the pilgrimage thousands visited the Cathedral including groups from Salesian Schools across the north-west. Bishop Terence Drainey, Bishop of Middlesbrough, preached at the Monday Mass on the life and example of Don Bosco. Father Gerry Briody SDB, Headteacher of Savio High School in Bootle said: ‘I am delighted that our young people from Savio High School, Bootle can be involved in such an historic moment. Don Bosco promised to come to England over a hundred and fifty years ago and today he has kept his promise.’

Book Launch for Professor Donnelly Professor Raymund Donnelly, the Founder and President of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation, expressed surprise at the fact that he came to write his reflections, in verse, on the Way of the Cross called, ‘With Jesus to Calvary’. Speaking at the launch of the book at St Paul’s Bookshop in Bold Street, Liverpool, he said that having written for many medical publications over the years the reflections, with a foreword by Archbishop Patrick Kelly, represented something of a change. The evening was introduced by Canon Tony O’Brien, Dean of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, who highlighted some of the meditations. The reflections, available from St Paul’s Bookshop, are on sale at £4.95 and are published by Garth Publications, 1 Lower Park Road, Manchester, M14 5RS. Further details can be obtained from raymunddonnelly@gmail.com

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news diary

Archbishop Patrick announces his intention to retire In a letter to the priests of the Archdiocese Archbishop Patrick Kelly has announced his intention to retire and, in accordance with the Canon Law of the Roman Catholic Church, has offered his resignation to Pope Benedict XVI. Archbishop Kelly continues to make good progress following the slight stroke he suffered in December and begins his letter by thanking people for their prayers and good wishes. He says: ‘Thank you for all the prayers and messages I have received in the past few weeks; they have been deeply moving and much appreciated’. He has now returned to Liverpool to continue his convalescence but there

is no question of his resuming pastoral engagements. Archbishop Kelly concludes by saying: ‘Indeed, although the recovery has gone well, I have decided that I must offer to the Holy Father my resignation as Archbishop of Liverpool. It rests with the Holy Father to respond to the request I have put before him. Until he does so pastoral responsibility for the Archdiocese remains with me’. Under the Code of Canon Law of the Roman Catholic Church a Bishop has to submit his resignation to the Holy Father at the age of 75. Archbishop Kelly will be 75 on 23 November this year.

Church Embroidery Taster Sessions

UCM Presentation At the UCM January bi-monthly Mass at St Elizabeth of Hungary in Litherland, we welcomed three new members from St Joseph’s, Penketh writes Ann Hogg. Monica Zeverona, Margaret Kelly and Debra Sawerbridge are pictured with our Chaplain, Father Mark Madden, and UCM President, Mrs Angela Moore, after their enrolment. It is customary at the January Mass to present cheques from our charity fund. The charities are chosen by our members and three are voted on at our June business meeting. Members take part in numerous activities to raise money throughout the year. The Priests Training Fund is always number one as part of our aims and objectives are to foster and pray for vocations to the Priesthood. The other charities were Halton Cancer Support Group, PSS Sefton Young Carers and Emmaus Liverpool. The representatives of the charities are pictured with representatives of the foundations who nominated them.

The Art Studio at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King is looking to recruit members to join its embroidery group. The studio is holding taster sessions this month for people who are interested to sample techniques used in church embroidery. These sessions are free and all material will be provided. The sessions will take place at the Art Studio at the Cathedral on Monday mornings between 10.00 am and 12.00 noon. Places for the sessions must be booked in advance; if you are interested please either email enquiries@metcathedral.org.uk or telephone 0151 709 9222.

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Obituary of Robin McGhie Artist, designer, calligrapher and steward at the Metropolitan Cathedral, Robin McGhie, has died at the age of 91. His many works include the Paschal candlestick and the large embroidered panel behind the altar in the Chapel of the Holy Oils in the Cathedral. He was born on 15 May 1921. After the outbreak of war in 1939, he joined the RAF and served as an aircraft technician in Libya where, it amused him to recall, he was seconded to the Royal Australian Air Force. He was subsequently posted to the Middle East: Palestine and Egypt. On being demobbed from the RAF, he attended Liverpool School of Art eventually specialising in illustration. While still at Art School, he received his first major commission to design and paint murals in the Church of St Philip Neri in Liverpool. This took him three and half years to complete and for it, he researched and made up his own pigments based on the historic traditions of the art, such was his approach to the essence of craftsmanship. It was while working on the murals that he came to embrace the Roman Catholic faith though he still held dear to his heart the Anglican church of his upbringing. His work is to be found widely, not only within the Archdiocese, but throughout the country including Nottingham Cathedral and Buckfast Abbey. Many of his works can be found in his home of Prescot Parish Church: his refurbishment of the High Altar, the candle sticks upon it which he dedicated to his mother, the Paschal candle stick, the Aumbry for the Reserved Sacrament, his redesign of the entrance vestibule fittings and the Book of Remembrance, lovingly maintained for many years in the beautiful italic calligraphy of which he was such a perfectionist. In 2004, he was given the honour of being chosen to receive the Royal Maundy Money from Her Majesty the Queen in Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral. His last commission was carried out in 2012 at the age of 91. The commission was for a moveable font for St Christopher’s Church, Norris Green, Liverpool. The font complemented two earlier commissions: a moveable lectern and a moveable altar

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Mass of Thanksgiving at St Brendan’s Shrine

Bishop Tom Williams, Auxiliary Bishop of Liverpool, was the Celebrant at a Mass of Thanksgiving in St Brendan’s Shrine, Old Swan. The closing Mass gave thanks for the fifty years of parish life at the church. Some of the artefacts from the Shrine will be taken to nearby St Oswald’s church. ‘We give thanks for all the blessings that have been received through the parish and church of St Brendan’s,’ said Parish Priest, Father Mark Beattie. ‘So many people have been touched by God through the ministry of both priests and parishioners.’

Working with faith and purpose The Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation was the setting venue for the 25th Annual Justice and Peace Memorial Lecture. This year’s keyspeaker was Doctor Pauline Petrie, Director of the Craighead Institute in Glasgow. She spoke on the subject of how faith changes from childhood to adulthood. ‘She asked whether it is possible to be a Christian as an adult,’ said Justice and Peace Commission Fieldworker, Steve Atherton. ‘She concluded that the answer is “yes”; but with a greater call for social justice.’ The Craighead Institute was founded in 1987, and is based on Ignatian principles: recognising God in the

everyday and concerns for justice and human dignity. They provide courses, events, research and consultancy for individuals, congregations, faith communities and organisations working in education, health and social services.


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news diary The Bard comes to St Theresa’s The pupils of St Theresa’s, Sutton Manor, St Helens had their first taste of the works of William Shakespeare when they performed in the National Theatre’s Shakespeare Schools Festival at the Parr Hall, Warrington. The school’s Year 6 pupils experienced all aspects of theatre work, from stage craft and performance to historical research. ‘Performing in the theatre has been a magical experience, where our children have worked as an ensemble cast to entertain and inspire others about Shakespeare,’ said Specialist Drama Teacher, Andrew Bain. ‘It is perhaps the proudest moment of my career.’

A blessing for St Teresa’s

Starring role for Tom

Parish Priest, Father Austin Griffin, joined Headteacher Anne Bleasdale and the school community of St Teresa’s, Penwortham, to bless two new pieces of art. The works have been fashioned by local parishioners for the school, one in glass and the other in fabric; each depicting the school’s Mission Statement: ‘Christ be in our hearts and in our heads and in our hands’. ‘The parents and children are delighted with these visual reminders of what every catholic school is about,’ said Mr David Irving from the parish, ‘putting Christ at the centre of all our searching.’ Mrs Patricia Wilson’s glass fusion and Mrs Sheila Shepherd’s work in fabric, now adorn the walls of the school foyer.

Tom Pauline a Sixth Former from St Mary’s, Crosby was centre of attention after playing a starring role in a Merseyside-based film about the problem of knife-crime. The film ‘Small Creatures’ has already won awards at film festivals in Kansas and Milan, and has been screened to an audience of Merseyside school children. ‘I was delighted to get the part in “Small Creatures” and I’m equally happy that the film has received such a positive reaction wherever it’s been shown,’ said Tom. ‘Drama and music are a very important part of life at St Mary’s, and this has been a big influence on me in terms of wanting to become an actor.’

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news diary Tom bows out

American visitor at Archbishop Beck

Dr. Craig V. Hamilton, the Lena Goodwin Trimble Professor of Music, Director of Bands, Coordinator of Instrumental Studies and Chairman of the Music Education department at Ouachita Baptist University, USA, paid a visit to Liverpool, where he led a workshop with the school band from Archbishop Beck Catholic College.

Photographer Tom Murphy is set to retire after 36 years of taking pictures for the Catholic Pictorial. He started in 1977 and with a small break in the early 80’s has popped up in just about every church and school in the Archdiocese. ‘Although I am stepping down from the hustle and bustle of the commercial world I hope still to do some work on a more leisurely basis,’ said Tom. ‘Having worked first for the Catholic Pictorial, then for the publishing house Mersey Mirror, which included other publications, I’m feeling my age now and have to step aside from that busy lifestyle.’ ‘Giving up taking pictures is something I don’t think I can do,’ continued Tom, ‘so having worked happily and willingly for others it’s now time to do something for myself. I’d like to take this opportunity thank the thousands of people I have photographed or dealt with over the fifty years I have been taking pictures, from the very famous to the truly humble. ‘Thank you all for everything, and I hope to see you again soon,’ said Tom.

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The event was part of Hope University’s ‘WindFest’ weekend and the College band was put through their paces by Dr Hamilton. After the hour long workshop he praised the performances of the band, the excellent young musicians and their dedication to achieving such a high standard. Bruce Hicks, Director of Music, said, ‘this was an outstanding opportunity to have our students work with such a world renowned conductor, we look forward to his next visit’.

Crosby conundrum Sacred Heart College, Crosby set local primary schools a ‘Mission Impossible’ in a day of events, puzzles and quizzes designed to tax their mathematical skills. But the youngsters proved to be more than a match for the tasks presented them, and made light work of the conundrum. ‘All the pupils from the primary schools really enjoyed themselves and worked really well on the puzzles,’ said Mr Douglas, the Mathematics teacher who helped organise the event. He was thrilled with how successful the day proved to be. ‘They were a great credit to their schools and we were delighted to welcome them’ he said.


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spotlight

News from the Ecumenism Commission

Over the past year the Ecumenism Commission members have been rereading, studying and discussing Unitatis Redintegratio - the Degree on Ecumenism from the Documents of Vatican II. The discussions have brought to mind highs and lows with regard to Ecumenism in the Archdiocese over the fifty years since the degree was written.

so as to help all believers in Christ to acquire a more conscious and vigorous adherence to the Gospel, especially at a time of profound change such as humanity is currently experiencing’ (Porta Fidei 8). He urges the faithful to re-read and study the Vatican documents and the Catechism of the Catholic Church, written twenty five years ago.

When considering Chapter two of the document, The Practice of Ecumenism, it reminds us all that: ‘Concern for restoring unity pertains to the whole Church, faithful and clergy alike. It extends to everyone, according to the potential of each, whether it be exercised in daily Christian living or in theological and historical studies. This very concern already reveals to some extent the bond of brother/sisterhood existing among all Christians, and it leads toward that full and perfect unity which God lovingly desires.’ (Unitatis Redintegratio 5)

In preparation for the Year of Faith the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a note with pastoral recommendations. With regard to Ecumenism it states that during the Year of Faith, in co-operation with the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity, various ecumenical initiatives are to be planned, aimed at ‘the restoration of unity among all Christians’ which was ‘one of the principal concerns of the Second Vatican Council’ (Conc.Ecum.VatII, Unitatis Redintegratio 1) In particular, there will be a solemn ecumenical celebration in which all of the baptised will reaffirm their faith in Christ.

In his Apostolic letter ‘Porta Fidei’ for the indiction of the Year of Faith, Pope Benedict XVI reminds us that ‘Reflection on the faith will have to be intensified,

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All the faithful, called to renew the gift of faith, should try to communicate their

own experience of faith and charity (Porta Fidei paragraph 14) to their brothers and sisters of other religions, with those who do not believe, and with those who are just indifferent. In this way it is hoped that the entire Christian people will begin a kind of mission toward those with whom they live and work, knowing they ‘have welcomed the news of salvation which is meant for all’ (Conc.Ecum.VatII pastoral constitution, Gaudium et Spes n1) In this Year of Faith it would be good if all parishes or pastoral areas took time to reflect on Ecumenism using the Vatican II documents and the Catechism of the Catholic Church as resource documents, and to consider where they are on the road to unity. The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity in Great Britain and Ireland is traditionally observed from 18th to 25th January. Churches Together in Britain and Ireland published a leaflet which is still available from 39 Eccleston Square, London SW1V 1BX or downloaded from www.ctbi.orh.uk/weekofprayer


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sunday reflections On a liturgical note After barely four weeks of the green vestments of Ordinary Time, we return to the purple of expectant hope and renewal of life – sometimes referred to as metanoia, or a ‘changing of heart’. Our season of Lent, which the liturgy refers to as a ‘gracious gift each year’ (Prefaces of the Eucharistic Prayer), is a period of hope and expectation precisely because we recognise our need for repentance, for change of heart and for renewal. We are once again overwhelmed by the love of the Father who has sent us the gift of His Son who ‘suffered for us, died and was buried. He descended into Hell. On the third day He rose again’ (The Apostles’ Creed). In the power of the Holy Spirit, given by the Risen Christ for the forgiveness of sins and for the uniting of all peoples in praise of the glorious works of the Father’s love, we celebrate our reconciliation through the work of Our Lord Jesus. Lent, in this sense, is not a dark or sombre season, but a time of renewal and celebration of the gift

Sunday thoughts In spite of the high number of jobless people, employers today complain about the quality of applicants: they allegedly lack skills, experience and qualifications. What would today’s HR directors say about the recruitment processes employed by Jesus? Equalities legislation aside, Jesus appears to have chosen his disciples from an unpromising pool of talent. The best qualified applicant in the Gospels was the rich young man. In spite of performing impressively at interview, when offered the position the candidate withdrew his application. Jesus was not exactly a high flyer himself: ‘This is Joseph’s son surely?’ Yet it is reassuring to note that the disciples were not of the highest calibre. They were not the ‘A’ team. And Jesus and his followers in turn attracted a trail of the failed and discarded. They were criminal, disgraced, immoral, victims of contagious diseases or victims of their own inadequacy. Jesus appears to have been drawn to their

Canon Philip Gillespie

of our Christian initiation – the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and the Holy Eucharist. As a community of faith we prepare to renew our Baptismal vows at the Easter Vigil, and we accompany with prayer and with the witness of our daily life those becoming part of the Full Communion of the Church through their initiation and reception at the Vigil. Our words that evening will have all the greater sincerity if we enter into this season wholeheartedly, so that ‘with mind and heart renewed’ we will celebrate the Risen Christ and his presence and promise among us. So, instead of giving something up for Lent, why not take something on which you feel will help renew your heart and mind? Doing this will make it all the more a joyful season and be a ‘gracious gift’ to those with whom you share your lives.

Mgr John Devine OBE

hopelessness unlike the rest of society, both religious and civil, who were repelled. With Jesus there was mutual recognition. They got the punch lines of his parables while the respectable were still scratching their heads. And they recognised in the Beatitudes the reality of their own lives. The prophet Jeremiah was aware of his shortcomings yet still responded: ‘Here I am, send me’. And it was not false modesty but pride that led Paul to say: ‘It was as though I was born when no one expected it.’ Peter, James and John walked away from their jobs with a sense of freedom and abandon that must have enraged the jobsworths. They left everything and followed Jesus. And when it came to the eventual choice of leader, the least promising CEO in history became the rock on which Christ built his Church.

Chinese whispers My Uncle Bernard and Aunty Kitty lived life as though the 1930s had never ended. Every Boxing Night our family would get together at their house. We always had salad for tea and then afterwards it was time for party games followed by singing round the piano. One of the games we played was Chinese whispers and it was the one game I really enjoyed because it always made me laugh when I saw just how far from the original statement we could get. I think most of us play Chinese whispers. We hear something and put our own interpretation on it and before we know it, we are off on the wrong track. We seem to have an innate capacity for misunderstanding and not listening. It happens internationally and it happens within the Church. We seem to get ourselves caught up with so much that Jesus was not remotely interested in and to move away from what he was interested in: love, compassion, mercy, forgiveness. Maybe we mishear and get caught up in things that are less than important because of the challenge that the basic Gospel message gives us. It is far easier to get caught up in what does not matter than to really get to grips with what does because to let Jesus’s message touch our hearts involves a lot of letting go and we do not really want that. We would rather keep control. We would rather build our own little kingdoms of power and authority. We would rather judge and criticise and pass comments about people. Anything rather than face ourselves and become what the Gospel invites us to be, that people of love and service. The same thing had happened to the Disciples. They misunderstood Jesus. They had moved a million miles from what was important to him. They argued about power and who was the greatest when the truth is that God’s kingdom is not about power and status. To illustrate the point Jesus took a little child as the example of what it means to be a kingdom person. In Jesus’s time, children did not have any status or rights but were the property of their father who could do what he wanted with them. Jesus is saying something very powerful by taking that little child and placing it before the Disciples. He is saying: be like the little ones, don’t be into power or status. That is how to be part of the kingdom. The call of the Gospel is to stand apart from the power struggles, to serve and to love. So don’t play Chinese whispers with the Gospel message but take it, reflect on it, and allow it to revolutionise your heart and your mind. Fr Chris Thomas

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what’s on Saturday 2 February Feast of the Presentation of the Lord ‘Crossing the Threshold.’ 10.00 am4.00 pm a free resource day to support ministry and outreach to non churchgoing Catholics at St Mary’s, Leyland. The programme includes Mass, talks, workshops, sharing time, stalls and more. New World Symphony Concert. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 3 February ‘Be a Chorister for a Day’. 10.30 am4.00 pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Boys in Years 3-5 are invited to come and meet the choristers and have the opportunity to sing in the largest Catholic church in the United Kingdom. Details from the Cathedral Music Office Tel: 0151 708 7283. Email: music@metcathedral.org.uk Website: www.liverpoolmetrocathedral.org.uk

Monday 11 February World Day of Prayer for Sick People Tuesday 12 February Ministry Day. 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day for people in full-time or part-time ministry with input and sharing and time for quiet prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk ‘Walk and Talk amongst the Treasures’ with Monsignor Peter Cookson, former Dean of the Metropolitan Cathedral. Organised by the Friends of the Cathedral the talk will begin at 7.00 pm in the Pontifical Hall of the Cathedral Crypt (access via the car park). Tickets £7.50 from Cathedral House, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool, L3 5TQ.

St Joseph’s Prayer Centre Blundell Ave Formby L37 1PH. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 16 February Ikons Concert. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 17 February RCIA Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion. 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Friday 22 February Cafod Lent Fast Day

Saturday 9 February Training Day for those with training in Spiritual Accompaniment. 10.00 am4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. Details Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Cursillo Day of Reflection. 10.00 am at St Benedict, Rhodes Street, Warrington, WA1 3LB. Sunday 10 February Day of Prayer for the unemployed. Loyola Day. 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day of quiet with input including guidance in prayer and sharing on a theme, ending with Mass. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Annual Civic Mass. 11.00 am at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool. Celebrant: Bishop Tom Williams. ‘Discovering God’s plan for you.’ The Archdiocesan Vocations Team’s monthly discernment meeting. 2.00 pm at St Charles Borromeo, 224 Aigburth Road, Liverpool, L17 9PG. This meeting is aimed at young men aged between 1521 with opportunities to pray, socialise and learn more about the vocation of the priesthood. Details: Father James Preston Tel: 0151 727 2493. Mass for the World Day of Prayer for the Sick. 3.00 pm at Holy Name, Moss Pits Lane, Fazakerley, L10 9LG. Celebrant: Bishop Tom Williams

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Wednesday 13 February Ash Wednesday. Day of fasting and abstinence. Clergy Day. 10.30 am-3.30 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A short presentation, prayer and discussion including Exposition and an opportunity for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Thursday 14 February ‘Sacrosanctum: Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy. 4 December 1963’ a talk by Father Mark Beattie part of a series for the fiftieth anniversary of Vatican II and the Year of Faith in the St Thérèse of Lisieux Pastoral Area. 7.00 pm in St Mark’s annex, Penmann Crescent, Liverpool, L26 0UG. Friday 15 February to Sunday 17 February ‘For such a time as this’ - Exploring the Book of Esther. Irenaeus Scripture Weekend led by Father Chris Thomas at

Saturday 23 February Unveiling of statue of William Gladstone by Frank Field MP. 12.00 noon at Our Lady, Star of the Sea, Church Road, Seaforth Village, L21 4LJ. Sunday 24 February to Sunday 3 March A Retreat in Daily Life from Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. Opening Meeting 3.00 pm on Sunday 24 February; Individual Meetings from Monday to Friday; Closing Meeting 3.00 pm on Sunday 3 March. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Tuesday 26 February Cursillo Ultreya. 7.30 pm at St Michael and All Angels, Sidney Powell Avenue, Kirkby, L32 0TP. Tuesday 26 February ‘Angels and Demons’ Lenten Reflection by Father Daniel O’Leary. 5.30 pm-7.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Details Tel: 0151 709 1328 Email: liverpool@pauline-uk.org


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february LOOKING AHEAD Friday 1 March Feast of St David, Patron of Wales Womens World Day of Prayer Monday 4 March to Tuesday 12 March Novena of Grace at St Francis Xavier church, Salisbury Street, Liverpool, L3 8DR. Daily talk at 12.00 noon Mass (10.15am on Sunday). Monday 4 March to Friday 8 March Loyola-Metro Liverpool Retreat in Daily Life at St Francis Xavier church, Salisbury Street, Liverpool, L3 8DR with introductory meeting on Saturday 2 March at 10.30 am Tuesday 5 March ‘Angels and Demons’ Lenten Reflection by Father Daniel O’Leary. 5.30 pm-7.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Details Tel: 0151 709 1328 Email: liverpool@pauline-uk.org Sunday 10 March Loyola Day. 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day of quiet with input including guidance in prayer and sharing on a theme, ending with Mass. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Tuesday 12 March Ministry Day. 10.00 am-4.00 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A day for people in full-time or part-time ministry with input and sharing and time for quiet prayer and reflection. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk ‘Angels and Demons’ Lenten Reflection by Father Daniel O’Leary. 5.30 pm-7.00 pm at Pauline Books and Media, Bold Street, Liverpool, L1 4HR. Details Tel: 0151 709 1328 Email: liverpool@pauline-uk.org Wednesday 13 March Clergy Day. 10.30 am-3.30 pm at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A short presentation, prayer

and discussion including Exposition and an opportunity for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Saturday 16 March Amadeus Concert. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral Crypt Concert Room. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Tuesday 19 March Feast of St Joseph Saturday 23 March ‘Via Crucis’ by Franz Liszt with reflections. 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool.

Sunday 24 March to Sunday 31 March Cross Walk and Holy Week for people in their 20s and 30s at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. A group carries the Cross from Palm Sunday for four days arriving at Loyola Hall for the celebration of the Triduum. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk Wednesday 27 March to Sunday 31 March Holy Week Retreat for people in their 20s and 30s at Loyola Hall, Warrington Road, Rainhill, L35 6NZ. Details from Loyola Hall Tel: 0151 426 4137. Email: mail@loyolahall.co.uk Website: www.loyolahall.co.uk

Sunday 24 March Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord

‘Recovering and moving on after Divorce’ Divorced/Separated Support from the Archdiocesan Marriage and Family Life Department, (Pastoral Formation). The next series of six weekly meetings starts on Monday, 15 April in Liverpool 17, from 7.30 pm to 9.00 pm. A one-day meeting will be held on Saturday 13 April for those who cannot attend the six evenings. For more information or to make a booking (essential) contact Frances on 0151 727 2195 or Maureen 0151 722 1029.

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youth ministry

A new approach for Youth Alive January was much like the calm before the storm. We made the most of some rare time in the office, gathering and creating resources to aid our work with the schools and other groups that we will be working with this year. However, we have not just been cooped up inside the office – the team were busy running a Eucharistic Ministers’ course for the young people of the Archdiocese and also a day for adult catechists, where we shared resources for working with young people. We are not a group to rest on our laurels, but rather seek ways to continuously improve our work and with this in mind, now is probably a good time to tell you about the changes we have made to Youth Alive. Monthly Youth Alive Masses have been taking place for over a decade now, playing a large part in the faith development of so many young people. But with the Diocese ‘leaving safe harbours’ and beginning to implement a model of Family Catechesis, and following the youth ministry conferences held at De la Salle School, it has been an opportune time to evaluate these Masses, their strengths and weaknesses, their purpose within a broader Diocesan structure and how they fit in with the provision of youth ministry as a whole. A broad consultation has taken place across the Diocese concerning the future model of Youth Alive Masses and while there can never be a universal consensus, the following points have emerged: • An earlier Mass time • More involvement/opportunity to participate in the Masses • Lively music • More activities for the over-18s • Opportunities for Lourdes reunions, especially in social settings • An almost 50/50 split that Masses be held in a central location

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in St Helens and that they move around the Diocese As such, from February 2013 there will be some changes to the monthly celebration of Youth Alive Masses. Following the Holy Father’s exhortation for the faithful to reacquaint themselves with the essential truths of our faith in this ‘Year of Faith’ (‘a concerted effort by every Catholic to rediscover and study the fundamental content of the Faith’) we will have a period of catechesis in the form of a ‘day retreat’ to help reflect on the theme and readings of the Mass and other universal topics affecting the life of the Church. This will give young people an opportunity to build on the relationships and work begun in School Day Retreats and Missions and Sacramental Preparation, and to further their faith development before participating in Mass. This will start at midday. There will then be a time of Mass preparation from 2.15pm for those wishing to be more involved in the celebration of the Mass (music ministry, readings, drama, etc). Mass will be at 3pm and there will continue to be social time afterwards. Over-18s There will be a specific monthly event at Lowe House for Over-18s, scheduled for the Saturday before each Sunday Youth Alive Mass. Starting at 6pm it will take the form of a time of discussion, with input from guest speakers and food available, and will be followed by Mass at 7pm. Again, following Mass there will be some opportunity for social time.

Venue These events will continue to be held in a central location at least for this calendar year. When Youth Alive Masses began over 10 years ago it was probably necessary to have a large-scale centrally organised Mass. However, as we strengthen the concept of pastoral areas it seems appropriate to follow the wider Diocesan trend and concentrate on smaller cell-like structures of youth ministry. Already we have seen examples of the success of smaller-scale models in Leyland, Warrington, Wigan, Ormskirk, Knotty Ash, Upholland, Crosby. These groups have either developed organically from young people returning from Lourdes or World Youth Day Pilgrimages, or have been organised from above by parish or PA committees. To help facilitate these smaller groups we held a ‘Day for Adult Catechists’ in January, providing resources for existing groups and enabling the disparate groups in the Diocese to come together. We envisage regular meetings throughout the year to help forge individual identities for individual groups while allowing them to feel supported by a central Diocesan agency. Animate are at the service of any parish or pastoral area looking to either initiate a form of ministry for young people or to invite us to lead a retreat for an existing group. One recent example was the parish retreat at St Theresa’s, Upholland, which took place on a Saturday leading up to the parish’s evening Mass at which the young people involved played a large part. Such events can be useful in maintaining post-pilgrimage links for specific geographic areas (for example, Lourdes coach areas). Also, it allows Animate to be involved outside the central hub of St Helens, but does require an invitation to be issued by parishes and/or deans. • The CYMFED Congress 2013 takes place in Newcastle on Saturday 16 March. More details of this conference for those working with young people can be found on our website www.animateyouth.org or by emailing s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk.


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Picture: Tom Murphy

profile

Frank Cogley Top marks for departing schools’ director By Ann Todd Frank Cogley can retire as director of Liverpool Archdiocese’s schools department with the comforting knowledge that he has made a significant contribution to restoring the reputation of its schools. ‘The happiest period of my working life’ is how he describes his 11 years overseeing the Archdiocese’s 235 schools and 90,000 pupils – arguably the largest pupil population of all Catholic dioceses in England and Wales. His remit has included working with some of the region’s leading schools – including Broughton Hall High (West Derby), Bellerive College (Sefton Park), St John Bosco College (Croxteth), Sacred Heart (Crosby), St Edmund Arrowsmith (Wigan) and the Academy of St Francis Assisi (Newsham Park) – and the results have been satisfying. ‘The standing in which the Archdiocese schools service is now held by schools throughout the Archdiocese is very pleasing, as is the way the partnership with schools, head teachers, governors and the eight local authorities has developed. We have done very well on that basis,’ explained Frank. ‘We have also managed to create a very effective relationship with the Church of England diocese and built on the work carried out by Archbishop Derek Worlock

and Bishop David Sheppard in creating joint Catholic and Church of England schools. ‘Another key point is the trust in which the Archdiocese has been held in the wider community. Three primary schools and two high schools have been designed to serve the whole of the community; where a local community school has closed we have provided at their request a school for the whole community. This is a clear manifestation of the Archdiocese’s commitment to realising social justice.’ It helped, he added, that he did not encounter ‘the same political restraints as in the public sector’, where he had worked for many years. Frank, from St Cecilia’s parish and an old boy of St Francis Xavier’s College, has dedicated his life to education. After university and post-graduate degrees (Durham and Manchester), the father of four taught in Liverpool for eight years before moving to Altrincham to teach at a coeducational comprehensive. A move into education administration in Cambridgeshire followed but he returned home in 1989, as director of Liverpool Education Authority, and from 1999 was chief executive to the Northern Examinations and Assessment Board. On the future of the Archdiocese’s

schools service, he added: ‘It is in the very good hands of a splendid team led by Father Michael O’Dowd, the episcopal vicar. I have absolute confidence the service will continue to thrive under his guidance. The team is in very good heart and ready for the future challenges coming its way from the government. ‘The Archdiocese has stood firmly by its commitment that in the main our pupils and students are best served by the voluntary-aided model for schools, and should not be forced into becoming academies as it remains unconvinced there is any clear benefit for the pupils or students. In particular cases, for pragmatic reasons, that was the appropriate route to take.’ Frank is not retiring altogether but will collaborate with Liverpool Hope University on teaching formation matters. ‘I am looking forward to that very much. I will enjoy building on existing relationships with colleagues at Hope but shall greatly miss the many close colleagues and friends I have had during the 11 years with the Archdiocese of Liverpool.’

“It is in the very good hands of a splendid team led by Father Michael O’Dowd” Catholic Pictorial

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justice & peace

Together for the common good By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker A recurring question in this column has been: what motivates people to work for justice? Why is it that some people, when they get up off their knees and leave the church buildings, have a new and urgent priority? They are moved to go into the world to help other people. Two famous clerical examples of this change of heart are Archbishop Derek Worlock and Bishop David Sheppard who, in the 1980s, personified this search for social justice as they moved beyond the boundaries of their own faith communities to lead a vibrant ecumenical movement that explored issues of housing, unemployment and unrest. Along the way, they discovered that there was more to unite them than to divide them. That was then. What of now? We are entering times of austerity and economic uncertainty. The ‘cuts’ are only just beginning to bite and we don’t yet know what their effect will be on most of the population. There is a great need for more work on identifying the key features of today’s context – economically, socially, politically, theologically and ecclesiologically. Together for the Common Good (T4GC) is a national ecumenical initiative seeking to explore how faith groups can work better together for social justice. It aims to understand the present and explore the future by examining the past. It will seek present-day examples of joint endeavours both across the Christian churches and between Christians and people of other faiths throughout the country. The

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organisers of T4CG are looking for good examples, especially recent ones, and if you know of any, please email research@togetherforthecommongood .co.uk. T4CG wants to identify areas where people from different faith groups can further their collaboration based on the belief that the social good can be enhanced when we work together, standing side by side with our communities. The relationship between Christian belief and social justice is at the heart of T4CG. Its website www.togetherforthecommongood.co.uk lists its concerns as: • Then and now – identifying the differences and similarities between the current Church and the Church as it was in the context of the Sheppard and Worlock collaboration

• Recognising the role of the Church as an advocate for the most vulnerable people and neighbourhoods • Acknowledging denominational differences but moving beyond to adopt a common focus on being ‘the servant Church in a hurt city’ • Recognising that involvement and engagement with social and economic policies and institutions is a key step in tackling social justice • Exploring how far collaboration between faiths, civic institutions and local business is effective in meeting social need and fostering greater social cohesion • Examining the current and future social context to

explore the impact of austerity on family life, inequality, health and wellbeing • Identifying the key elements that help to build effective working relationships of trust between people of different faiths • Looking at changes in Church life, asking how we can look outwards and focus on community action • Looking at the practical implications of collaboration, identifying transferable elements and good practice lessons to inform fitfor-purpose wider Church institutions that will bring about dynamic community engagement A major conference is planned at Liverpool Hope University on 6-8 September to examine where and how different faiths can work better together now for the common good. Our faith calls us to make this journey.


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Relics of St John Bosco

Students and staff at St John Bosco Arts College welcome the relics of their Patron saint to the city. 2015 will Celebrate the 200th Anniversary of the birth of St John Bosco, as part of the celebration his relics have been on tour around the world. The UK part of the tour took place in January ending in St Georges Metropolitan Cathedral London. The Merseyside events began with an evening of activities at Thornleigh Salesian College where staff and students from 5 Salesian schools across the country welcomed the relics with an evening of celebration, followed by quiet reflection with a candlelit walk into the chapel for each school to lead prayers through the night. The following day the relics were moved to the Metropolitan Cathedral in Liverpool where more than 1000 people came to

Mass to welcome the relics to Liverpool. St John Bosco Arts College took the opportunity to take all of their students to the Cathedral and experience the relics in their city. This was a fantastic opportunity for students to experience with the help of the volunteers, activities and quiet moments with the relics, another element to their Salesian Education. Samantha Jones Year 12 said “It was an inspirational visit, it felt like I was connected with our schools patron saint that spent his life working for young people like me� This was a special visit for the city and the young people who were able to have a relics experience to help celebrate this special Saint.

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MP praises Bellerive On January 11th Shadow Secretary of State for Education, Stephen Twigg, visited Bellerive FCJ Catholic College and declared himself “hugely impressed” after spending a morning meeting staff, chatting to students and visiting classes. Mr Twigg also chatted to a group of girls representing every age group to find out about their experiences and views. He was really interested to hear about their aspirations, which include becoming an RAF pilot, studying management, and applying to Oxford University. He spoke about his own

experience of being a state school pupil studying at Oxford. “I am hugely impressed with the school,” said Mr Twigg. “You can judge a school in the large part by the behaviour of the students, and I had very intelligent conversations with the students. There’s a very pleasant and calm atmosphere in the school. I am very keen to be a friend of the school as we move forward, and, working with Louise Ellman, give whatever support I can.”

Students raise £1,000 for local charity Young group present cheque to Oli the Elephant Students at Everton’s Notre Dame Catholic College are celebrating their fundraising efforts on behalf of Alder Hey Children’s Charity. The students baked, styled and played their way to reach their £1,000 target for the local cause and presented

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their donation to Alder Hey’s ‘Oli the Elephant’. To raise this great sum, Notre Dame’s drama studio was transformed into a winter café where hot drinks, fairy cakes and treats prepared by the College’s hospitality students were available to purchase. Hair and beauty students offered their

glamorous styling services to their peers looking to have their hair curled or braided and offered chic manicures. Sports games were set up and stalls sold handmade bracelets and One Direction merchandise, all in aid of Alder Hey’s innovative work and care for its young patients. “We’re very proud of our students for working together to raise funds for Alder Hey,” said Mr Patrick Kearney, Deputy Headteacher at Notre Dame Catholic College. “The students led the event at every step of the way, from brainstorming fundraising ideas to organising activities on the day and baking cakes all morning ready for hungry staff and students. It was wonderful to see students across all years working creatively to achieve such incredible results.” Alder Hey is the busiest children's hospital in the UK caring for over 270,000 young patients each year and Alder Hey Children's Charity raises funds to support the hospital's pioneering work and aims to improve the quality of life for our patients and through the its innovations and research, the quality of life for children across the world.The students also raised a further £500 on the day for Brain Tumour UK.


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Culture Minister visits Liverpool’s leading hub for music education Ed Vaizey MP meets students at Resonate Music Education Hub Young people at Resonate Music Education Hub, funded through Arts Council England, were joined by Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries Ed Vaizey today (Thursday 17th January) for a tour of the state-of-the-art facilities and an opportunity to discuss how music education has impacted on the lives of Liverpool’s pupils. Ed Vaizey MP was instrumental in the recently published Government’s National Plan for Music Education, the driving factor behind Resonate’s new Hub status and funding to provide music education to every child in Liverpool. “It is an honour to welcome Ed to Resonate and introduce him to the children and young people benefiting from this wonderful resource for the City,” said Mr Jonathan Dickson, Head of Service at Resonate Music Education Hub. “We have big ambitions for the future of music education in Liverpool: if every child is learning an instrument this will create lots of bands, groups, choirs and concerts. It also means that our pool of young musical talent will expand,

and we know that Liverpool has a legacy of producing world-leading talent in music.” During his visit, Ed Vaizey MP met and performed with the Resonate Singers, a junior vocal group, rocked out with students in Resonate’s Rock Pod and took part in a roundtable discussion with a group of children who benefit from the

initiative along with representatives from Resonate, Notre Dame Catholic College and Liverpool Philharmonic’s In Harmony. Culture Minister Ed Vaizey said: “A high-quality music education can make a hugely beneficial contribution to the lives of young people. It is often a source of regret for adults that they didn’t learn a musical instrument when they were at school; now every child will have the opportunity to develop this life-enhancing skill. Not only will this give them great pleasure, but it will help provide our fantastic creative industries with the next generation of talent, which is why Government is investing more than £171 million of funding up to March 2015 in a network of music education hubs across England.” Led by Everton’s Notre Dame Catholic College, Resonate benefits from strong links with Liverpool’s family of schools and expert partners, forming a sustainable, long-term framework for music education that goes beyond musical achievement and impacts on the life and employability skills of Liverpool’s young people. “I am hugely optimistic about what music can do for our city,” continued Jonathan Dickson. “Music encourages creative thinking, it engenders in our young people a sense of belonging, it promotes teamwork and provides opportunities for communication and expression − a truly fantastic set of outcomes for our community and future workforce.”

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cathedral

Why Sing at Mass? Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

In the aftermath of Archbishop Patrick’s letter of retirement to Rome life here at the Cathedral on one level remains unchanged and yet at the same time there is an air of uncertainty around. We will miss his presence presiding at the important feasts and occasions and his cheerful easy manner with everyone. Any way there is plenty to prevent us being idle, to keep us busy this month.

by Chris McElroy Singing at Mass is a normative experience for us each Sunday, but have we thought about why we sing? What contribution to our worship does singing make? This short article will give an insight into why liturgical singing is so important in our worship. Liturgical singing performs a service to the liturgy, and to the congregation gathered together in celebration. Vatican II describes singing as having a ‘ministerial function,’ making it an integral part of our worship. Liturgical singing is seen as expressing this ministerial function in three ways: firstly, by adding delight to our prayer: singing together is often more beautiful than speaking together, and have you ever noticed how much easier it is to remember texts by heart when you sing them? By singing a text we join together with the heavenly choir, as the preface of the Mass often puts it: ‘we join together with all the Angels and Saints as we sing...’ Secondly, liturgical singing fosters a ‘unity of minds.’ This function has both visible and underlying aspects. Visibly, we see the unity of God’s

church singing together. Whether we speak the same language, employ the same gestures, most cultures employ singing in worship: a unifying act. Similarly, singing helps to unify the undisputable link between Father, Son and Holy Spirit: just as they are three they are one: just as we are many, so we are one in the body of Christ. Thirdly, the liturgical singing confers greater solemnity on our worship. Singing is a more solemn act than speech. In days gone by it is believed that the whole Mass was sung with very little speech (as can be seen in many Eastern churches today.) This solemnity also enshrines beauty within our worship, the same beauty which is the divine glorification of God by his people. As you can see, the church teaches that liturgical singing is a vital part of worship, adding to our prayer, and allowing us to join together with others in praising God’s name. Future articles in this series will go a step further and look at other important questions relating to liturgical singing such as When should we sing? What should we sing? and Who should sing?

Today, Sunday 3 February, there is a ‘Be a chorister for a day’ opportunity for boys interested in joining the choir so it should make for an interesting and lively Choral Evening Prayer at 3.00 pm presided at by Bishop Williams to which all the religious in the Diocese have been invited. The following Sunday 10 February there is the Annual Civic Mass at 11.00 am with Bishop Tom Williams presiding: an opportunity to pray with and for all who are engaged in local public life. The following week Lent begins with Ash Wednesday on 13 February. For those working in the city centre Masses that day at the Cathedral and Crypt are 8.00 am, 12.15 pm, 5.15 pm and 7.30 pm. On the first Sunday of Lent there will be a service of the Word at 3.00 pm in the Cathedral, a Celebration of the Rite of Election for all adults across the Diocese who are preparing for reception into the church at Easter. On the events side there are two concerts on Saturdays this month, the Annual Justice and Peace lecture, a Car Boot Sale Saturday and our Cathedral Charity Beer Festival Preview evening on 19 February, there are a few tickets still available for most of these events.

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Pic extras Mums the Word At our January bi-monthly Mass at St Elizabeth of Hungary, Litherland, Father Mark Madden spoke to us about modern technology. Concerns are being raised about the constant use of text messages. It is not uncommon to see children or young people texting each other while actually sitting opposite or even next to one another. The red flag is that this is instant but impersonal. And while the text message may be efficient, is life simply about efficiency? The Gospel used at the Mass was from St Mark and it spoke of Jesus visiting Simon and Andrew. Jesus's reputation as a miracle worker was spreading and people were bringing their sick to be cured; the whole town was gathered outside the house. Had efficiency been the point, Jesus could have healed everyone in a radius of 100 miles in one go. Very efficient but, something would have been missing – that personal touch that characterises the ministry of Jesus. For him, people were not just a number. It was not about curing in as efficient a way as possible. To cure Simon Peter's mother-in-law was an intensely personal touch. His healing of people is a real sign of his love. His ministry is truly about all humanity experiencing the power of his healing and love through a personal encounter. He helps us by being part of our lives; he wants to be part of our lives. He does not need text messages to reach us and, for our part, all we need to do is come to him in hope and love. My thanks to Fr Mark for letting me share part of this homily with you. I do not feel so bad now about being a Luddite – I do not text and very seldom have my mobile phone switched on. • Our next study evening is on 12 February at St Clare's. The subject is the Year of Faith and the speaker is Bishop Tom Williams. Our next bimonthly Mass is at St Oswald's on 6 March. I hope to see you at these events. Ann Hogg, media officer

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Wirral recruitment campaign gets under way The KSC on the Wirral have begun the new year by embarking on a recruitment drive. Pat Foley, the deputy provincial grand knight, gave a pulpit address during Masses at St Anne’s Rock Ferry on the weekend of 12-13 January, appealing for new members on behalf of the local KSC council 413.

decline in vocations and, as a relatively small group, the KSC is in urgent need of more members to continue and extend the good work it has been trying to achieve over the last 90 years. New members bring fresh ideas and the Wirral council would really welcome interest from men in the area to share their ideals and aspirations.

The congregations heard that the KSC operates on a national, provincial and local scale with alliances internationally across the world. It is the only organisation of its kind that has, as far as is known, a bishop assigned to it as a spiritual adviser. The order supports parish priests and their communities and at a time when the Church is being challenged on moral and spiritual grounds – with our Holy Father and the hierarchy often misrepresented in the media – the KSC believes that strong lay support is needed.

If you would like to know more or go along without commitment to one of the monthly meetings which take place at St Anne’s Highfield Road, Rock Ferry on the second Thursday of each month, please contact Michael McCurry (0151 512 9461; michaelmccurry@hotmail.co.uk) or Tony Paton (0151 645 9934).

Lay organisations are becoming increasingly important given the

• Thanks to Father Philip Atkinson, parish priest at St Anne’s, for allowing Bro Foley to make his appeal. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.ksc.org.uk/province2/ Email: DPOKeane@aol.com


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PIC Life The things we miss in the daily whirl By Moira Billinge What is this life if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare. Time is racing by so quickly! The dusk seems to settle before the sun has even brightened the day. The resolutions which many of us made on 1 January are already forgotten – or put on hold – until it is time to resurrect them for 2014. Which of our resolutions, even for today, have we actually carried out and which have been consigned to the ‘To do’ list? Tomorrow is another day, they say. For some this means tomorrow will offer the opportunity for completing unfinished tasks; for others, it simply means ‘Don’t do today what you can put off until tomorrow’ – and so things are never completed. It is easy to blame other people and circumstances for all the altered plans and that horrible, nothing-to-show-at-the-end-ofthe-day feeling. No time to stand beneath the boughs And stare as long as sheep or cows. Yet we are not hermits. The needs and personal timetables of others necessarily impact on our own responsibilities and schedules. I have just ‘lost’ months of my life in a total blur of busy-ness, and somewhere among those weeks, Christmas was squeezed in. To my shame, I realised that during this time I had not stopped once to ‘smell the roses ’ or appreciate the beauty of the world around me, albeit a very rain-drenched one. I have bewailed the dark evenings more than I have appreciated the light in between. And if I failed to notice the gifts around me, then it follows that I also failed to thank God for them. No time to see, when woods we pass, 28

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Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass. One morning at a station in Washington DC, a violinist sat for 45 minutes and played six pieces of Bach. It was rush hour, and at least 1,100 commuters passed by. After a few minutes a middle-aged man realised that there was a musician playing. He paused briefly and then continued on his way. A minute later, the violinist received his first tip: a woman threw him some money without stopping. Next, someone leaned against the wall to listen, but, after checking his watch, realised that he was late for work and hurried on. A little boy paid him the most attention and tried to stop, but his mother rushed him along. He repeatedly looked backwards as he walked away. Interestingly, other children did exactly the same thing. During those 45 minutes, only six people paused to listen to the violinist. About 20 gave him money, but did not slow down. When he finished playing, nobody applauded. Nobody acknowledged him. The violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the world’s most talented musicians. His violin was worth $35m and two days previously, his concert in Boston had sold out at a cost of $100 a ticket. The Washington Post had organised Bell’s incognito per formance as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and people’s priorities. Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? The guitarist Josh Nonnenmoc asked: ‘If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written how many other things are we missing?’ A poor life this is if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare.

My Favourite Prayer Hail Mary full of grace the Lord is with thee, blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb Jesus. Holy Mary Mother of God pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death. Amen

Marie Sinclair St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo Send your favourite prayer to: Catholic Pictorial, 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Worth a visit IN this Year of Faith, take a trip to an ancient holy site which was key to the growth of Christianity, writes Lucy Oliver. The nor theast market town of Chester-leStreet is home to the first translation into early English of the Lindisfarne Gospels, the treasured medieval manuscripts produced by the monks on Holy Island. In 883, the monks fled their monaster y and built a wooden shrine and church to St Cuthber t at Chester-le-Street to escape the Viking raids. As a boy, Cuthber t had seen a vision of St Aidan being carried to heaven by angels, and discovered his own vocation as a monk and missionar y. The saint’s body was revered at the Chester-le-Street shrine for 112 years until the monks moved to Durham, housing his remains at the cathedral. The early shrine was later rebuilt in stone and became the Parish Church of St Mar y and St Cuthber t. In 950 an Anglo-Saxon translation was added to the Lindisfarne Gospels, a facsimile of which is on display today. Adjoining the church is the anchorage or Anker’s House, home to medieval Anchorites – religious recluses – and later an almshouse. The church welcomes visitors from 10.30-12.30 on weekdays (NovemberEaster). Call 0191 388 3295 or visit www.mar yandcuthber t.org.uk/


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join in Eating Out

Children’s word search

A nice pub lunch is always enjoyable. Try one of our listed eating places.

11th February is the day we celebrate the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes. Try and find out more about her in our word search.

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PRAYERS FAITH

More Mullarkey

White Horse Acresfield Road, Liverpool 25 0151 428 1862 The Bridge Liverpool Road North, Burscough 01704 894172 Cross House Inn Cross Green, Formby 01704 894172 Derby Mills Muirhead Avenue East, Liverpool 11 0151 226 5268 Eureka Halsall Lane, Ormskirk 01695 570819 The Grapes St Helens Road, L34 0151 426 3849

Recipe from the Monastery Kitchen

From Johnny Kennedy The young curate was reading a book about monasticism. ‘There’s a lot to be said for the monk’s way of life,’ he told Father Mullarkey. ‘Wouldn’t suit me,’ said the auld fella. ‘Why?’ asked the YC. ‘No chips.’ ‘Why do you love chips so much?’ said the YC. ‘Because when I was a kid in Galway we had a great chippie run by two monks. One did the chips and the other looked after the fish.’ One day, a woman new to the district said to the monk behind the counter: ‘Are you the fish frier?’ ‘No,’ he replied, ‘I’m the chip monk!’

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Helen Molyneux, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Kevin Lonergan Tel: 01772 744148 or 01772 655433 (home).

Potato Cakes 12oz freshly boiled or left over potato 1.5oz margarine 3oz self rasing flour 6oz grated cheese Small medium onion, grated If using fresh potato drain and mash with margarine, adding seasoning. Grdually incorporate flour, cheese and onions and knead on a floured board. Roll out thinly and cut with pastry cutter. Place in thick based frying pan and brown each side. Delicious served with butter.

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Catholic Pic February 2013  

Magazine for Catholics in the Liverpool area

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