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Issue 155 August 2017

Father Michael Barrett Our new priest INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Thank you Sister Brigid

Our Jubilarians celebrate


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School Chaplain, St Helens Dates: Salary: Location: Contract type: Contract term:

Closing date 11/09/17 SCP26-28 (£23,166-£24,717) pro rata De La Salle School, St. Helens 37 hours per week, term time plus 3 weeks Fixed Term to 31st August 2018

We are seeking to appoint a school chaplain who feels called to make a significant and exciting contribution to the faith journey of every member of our distinctive Lasallian community. The successful candidate will be a practising Catholic with a strong personal faith and a passion for encouraging young people in their faith. You will be able to develop a strategic, systematic and inspiring plan for the students’ spiritual development in keeping with our Lasallian tradition. Inspired by the example of St. John Baptiste De La Salle, our school strives to pursue excellence in all that we do. “Pupils... expressed the view that De La Salle is ‘a family school’.” – Ofsted March 2016 For further information and for an application pack, please go to the school's website at www.delasalle.st-helens.sch.uk to download and complete the application form. Please submit all applications via email to Joanne Peet at peetj@sthelens.org.uk Please note we are unable to accept CVs. Closing date: Monday 11th September 2017, 4.00pm The school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children. To ensure that this is achieved we expect all employees and volunteers to share this commitment and staff will be recruited and selected in line with safer recruitment policy and practice. The successful applicant will undertake an enhanced DBS check.

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contents Issue 155 August 2017

Welcome This month we welcome Father Michael Barrett to priestly service in the archdiocese. Father Michael was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Malcolm at St Mary’s, Leyland on Saturday 15 July and celebrated his first Mass at St Anne’s, Ormskirk, the following day. He will serve in St Teresa and St Mary Magdalen in Penwortham and St Oswald, Longton. We remember him in prayer as he begins his ministry among us and wish him many happy years. We also celebrate with our priests who have jubilees this year, together they have offered 335 years of service to the archdiocese. We give grateful thanks for their ministry among us. Ad multos annos. The end of the school year can be a time to give thanks for those teachers who, often after a life time of service in our schools, are retiring. This month we pay tribute to the outstanding service given to Catholic education by Sister Brigid Halligan FCJ MSc OBE. Sister Brigid announced her retirement during the academic year after 38 years of service to Bellerive FCJ Catholic College, 24 of them as headteacher. August is a time for holidays and relaxation and we pray for safe journeys and a time of true refreshment.

From the Archbishop’s Desk One of the joys of a Bishop’s life is to ordain new priests and deacons. Ordinations are the fruit of many years of preparation by the man who is being ordained so understandably there is a sense of achievement, but much more significant is the hope that ordination signifies for the Church. This summer I have had the joy of ordaining three men to the priesthood and five to the diaconate for our own diocese and three religious orders. Furthermore, my spirits have been lifted even higher as five others have joined the archdiocese to prepare for the priesthood. I am realistic enough to know that these are small numbers and may not affect the overall future of our parish communities very much but I am also aware that these men are God’s gift to us, and that he has not left us without hope. Some of you may remember the definition of hope from the Penny Catechism: ‘Hope is a supernatural gift of God, by which we firmly trust that God will give us eternal life and all means necessary to obtain it, if we do what he requires of us.’ It is worth pondering, as it seems to me that our trust in God has been rightly placed because by giving us new priests he is making it easier for us to be closer to him and live better lives. Without priests there would be no Eucharist and no Sacrament of Reconciliation. Where would we be if that were the case? My prayer this summer is to the thank God for the hope which he has kept alive in our Church by sending us new priests. Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool Editor Peter Heneghan

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Father Michael Barrett Our new priest INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Thank you Sister Brigid

Our Jubilarians celebrate

Cover: Ordination of Father Michael Barrett

Contents 4

Main Feature ‘A faith journey is full of twists and turns’

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Knowsley opening doors 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Jimmy O’Donnell Sharing precious memories 21 Animate Youth Ministry Looking back on 2016/17 25 Cathedral Record A New Cathedral, 1960 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 28 Pic Life Why we must be industrious in our goodness 29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Why love lies at the heart of justice

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‘A faith journey is full of twists and turns’ by Simon Hart rdained as the Archdiocese’s newest priest on 15 July, Father Michael Barrett explains why he chose to embark on a new life in the Church at 61.

O

For Father Michael Barrett, the newest priest in the Archdiocese of Liverpool, there is one question he keeps hearing from those who have known him longest. ‘The people that have always known you as Michael suddenly have to rejig their thoughts and some of the family have said, “What are we calling you now?”.’ Given that he has filled other significant roles in his 61 years, this uncertainty surrounding his newfound status as ‘Father’ is easy to comprehend. After all, Father Michael has been a husband, parent and head teacher, yet, as he explains, his path to the priesthood was one that, slowly but surely, he felt compelled to take in the years following the death of his wife Jackie, and which will now enable him to put to use many of the life lessons already learned. Father Michael said: ‘A journey of faith for everybody is one with twists and turns, ups and downs, it’s the journey of life really. My thoughts about the priesthood didn’t grow until the passing away of my

‘The ordination at the tomb of St Paul gives you a sense of the historical perspective of our faith’ 4

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wife 12 years ago. ‘I had thoughts about the priesthood because of the nature of my faith and the people that have surrounded me in my profession as a primary teacher in nearly 40 years of teaching and the importance of faith in running a Catholic school as a head teacher. ‘I wanted to look at whether I could support people spiritually and pastorally in parishes and that is how the thought grew. It had to be right in terms of overcoming my own and our own bereavement in terms of being a married man and having two grown-up daughters, and looking towards their support. I’m thankful to have two wonderful daughters, Angela and Christina, who’ve supported me along with my sister Maureen and her family and obviously my late wife’s family. They have been equally courageous. Otherwise I wouldn’t have made the step I have towards the priesthood.’ These steps led to his ordination by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon at St Mary’s, Leyland, the only ordination in our diocese this summer, and for Father Michael, the next step is to begin a new role as curate based with Father Philip Inch at St Oswald’s in Longton and serving also the parishes of St Teresa’s and St Mary Magdalen’s in Penwortham. At his Mass of Ordination, Archbishop Malcolm alluded to the understanding of family that life has afforded Father Michael, though this is not just through his own personal experiences; another layer of understanding comes from his long career in teaching. He was at St Anne’s Catholic Primary School in Leyland for 23 years before retiring and embarking on his training for the priesthood at the Pontifical Beda College in Rome. ‘As a teacher you’re obviously keen to work alongside families and work with them for the growth, in educational terms, of their children,’ he said. ‘This may be another opportunity to continue that, to develop and to support them spiritually and to engender that sense of family within each of the parishes.’

Places of meaning A native Londoner, Father Michael had initially begun his teaching career at Blessed Dominic Barberi in his home city. In 1986 he moved to the northwest and took the post of deputy head at St Teresa’s in Penwortham, a move taken to be closer to his wife’s family in Ormskirk. These are two places that featured on the map of a momentous couple of weeks in July. ‘I was deputy head teacher at St Teresa’s many moons ago before I went on to St Anne’s so on my last Sunday as a deacon I went to St Teresa’s to actually help as a deacon with Father Philip and meet parishioners there, and there were some who I’d taught, some who were parents at the school and some fellow teachers as well. My wife Jackie also taught at the school. Her impact is well remembered.’ If he has an immediate connection with that parish, the parish where he said a Thanksgiving Mass shortly after his ordination holds an even stronger resonance. ‘I said a Thanksgiving Mass in St Anne’s in Ormskirk as that is where my wife is buried and where I was married in 1980.’ Father Godric Timney, the parish priest of St Anne’s, is just one name on a list of clergy to whom Father Michael feels thankful. From the initial stages of exploring his vocation to his studies in Rome via pastoral placements in the Archdiocese, a significant number of guiding lights have illuminated his way. ‘I talked about it initially with Father Stephen Maloney, the then vocations director, and I also spoke to my parish priest, Father Gerald Anders at Our Lady Help of Christians in Tarleton, which is a very close family parish, and also Father Jonathan Cotton, the Benedictine parish priest at St Mary’s, Leyland,’ he explained. There was support later from Father James Preston, the current vocations director, along with the priests and parishioners encountered during his placements. ‘I was at Holy Family in Southport with Father Philip Gregory, with Father Kevin McLoughlin at Holy Name, Fazakerley and St Philomena’s, and last


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Archbishop Malcolm receives Father Michael’s blessing after his ordination summer as a deacon at St Margaret Mary’s with Father Mark Moran. The parishioners in all these parishes have been so supportive too.’ In Rome, meanwhile, two rectors at the Beda College lent their support: first, Monsignor Roderick Strange and then Canon Philip Gillespie, our very own Pic columnist. For Father Michael, the return to the classroom as a student in Rome was a challenge, but one to enjoy. ‘I remember

my daughter Angela once saying to me, “I didn’t know these things” when she started studying A Level Law and when it came to deepening my knowledge of religion through the study of our faith, you discover its richness.’ It was in Rome in June last year, at St Paul’s Outside The Walls, that Father Michael was ordained as a deacon. ‘The ordination at the tomb of St Paul gives you a sense of the historical perspective of our

faith,’ he said. It was in Rome too that he served as a deacon alongside Pope Francis during a service for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. Last month’s ordination took place closer to home. ‘I always tried to come back and visit Leyland and St Mary’s,’ he explained. ‘Father Jonathan had said, “You are going to be ordained here, Michael, aren’t you?” “Well, okay, if we get there”.’ Now he has got there, and it is not only

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feature

Father Michael with his daughters Christina and Angela

‘Now they have got a priest they’ve had to change their rules’ 6

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family, with their doubts over what to call him, who have been adjusting to Father Michael’s change of status. His old friends in the Ormskirk Catenian Association have had to rewrite their rule book to accommodate him. ‘Now they have got a priest they’ve had to change their rules to allow me to stay as a Catenian,’ he said of the lay association.

‘It hadn’t occurred before so it was an irony, yes, we’ll pray for vocations but once you’re a priest you can leave now! This has now changed. The Ormskirk circle have lived up to the Catenian motto of strengthening family life through friendship and faith. Their prayers and friendship have been invaluable.’

More pictures from the Ordination can be seen at:

www.flickr.com/photos/liverpoolcatholic


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Bishop Tom Williams; George Foster, and Father Joe Kendall; with year six pupils from St. Monica’s Primary School in Bootle (l-r): Faith Morley, Charlotte Halsall, Rhys Donevly and Seth Walker

Silver Wolf Award for Alec Beavers, Cubs and Scouts from all five Widnes Scout Groups in the parish of St Wilfrid held their annual Service and Promise Renewal at St Bede’s Church, Widnes. During the service one of St Wilfrid’s parishioners, Alec Wynne, Group Scout Leader at 4th Widnes, St Bede’s Group was presented with ‘The Silver Wolf Award’. This is the highest award given to Scout Leaders and is only given after many years of exceptional service to Scouting. It is the personal gift of the Chief Scout, Bear Grylls, and was presented to Alec by Deputy County Commissioner for Scouts, Val Thomason.

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Fr Joe Bibby, Alec Wynne, Val Thomason

Bishop Tom blesses new Stations of the Cross Garden Bishop Tom Williams has blessed and opened a new Stations of the Cross Garden in the woodland gardens at St Josephs Hospice in Thornton. Local school children, hospice trustees, staff and volunteers joined Bishop Tom as he dedicated the special place of tranquillity and reflection created by staff and volunteers. The new garden creates a mini pilgrimage of reflection and meditation around the fourteen Stations. A Service of Reflection also took place in the garden during the hospice’s 55th Anniversary Garden Party in July. George Foster, Chair of Trustees at St Joseph’s Hospice, said: ‘We are all incredibly proud to be able to unveil this wonderful new garden which will offer members of our community, as well as patients and their families, a special place to visit and reflect in the peaceful woodlands at the hospice. ‘We would like to thank those individuals who contributed towards the garden and look forward to many people coming to visit it over the coming weeks, months and years.’ The Stations of the Cross Garden is open to the public.


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news diary Syro-Malabar celebrations on the Feast of St Thomas The Syro-Malabar community held a day of celebrations at De La Salle, Liverpool, to mark the Feast of St Thomas, the founder of the Christian faith in the Indian sub-continent. St Thomas, landed at Cranganore (Muziris), Kerala, India in 52 AD and founded seven Christian communities; he was martyred in 72 AD at Mylapore, near Chennai/Madras. The day began with Mass in the Syro-Malabar Rite, celebrated by Bishop Joseph Srampickal, Bishop for the community in Great Britain. Bishop Tom Williams, preached the homily. The Mass was followed by a traditional procession and meal with a social gathering showcasing many cultural events.

The World of Atherton

Obituary of Sister Mary Teresa McCarthy RSM Sister Mary Teresa McCarthy RSM, Chair of Governors and previous long standing Headteacher of Maricourt Catholic High School died recently, current Headteacher, Brendan McLoughlin looks back on her life. Sister Mary Teresa was born on 2 September 1942 in Dooneen, Castletownsend, Skibbereen, County Cork, the youngest of eight children. She attended the National school in Dooneen and transferred to the Convent of Mercy High School in Skibbereen at the age of 14. Sister Mary Teresa entered the Convent of Mercy, Mount Vernon, Liverpool, at the age of 18, on 27 August 1960. She was received into the Order on 24 April 1961. She made her first profession on 24 May 1963 and her Final Profession on 27 August 1966. She attended Liverpool University in 1968 to read Chemistry and Physics and gained her degree in 1971. She was appointed to teach Science at Maricourt in 1972 originally for one year, but stayed for thirty-five years. At Maricourt she taught Chemistry and Physics. She was Deputy Head from September 1984 until December 1989 and Head from January 1990 until 2007. The school continued to flourish and develop during her headship, being regularly oversubscribed and becoming one of the first specialist Technology Colleges. Building works continued throughout these years including new Food Technology and Textiles rooms, the extension of both dining rooms, a Fitness suite and a new English annex. In 2007 the McCauley Performing Arts Centre was completed providing outstanding facilities for Drama, Music and Dance. All these projects were funded entirely by the Sisters of Mercy. Above all, Sister Mary Teresa was committed to the spiritual formation of pupils reminding new Year 7 pupils each year how they were each created by God with unique talents to be used in His service. Following her retirement she continued her active involvement in the school as a foundation governor becoming Chair of Governors in September 2014. She regularly accompanied the Sixth Form HCPT pilgrimage to Lourdes and led the Youth Mercy Associates within the school. Pupils, parents, staff and governors all attest to her dedicated service to the school, her generosity of spirit and above all her joy of life.

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Corpus Christi Celebrations at St Edward’s Archbishop Malcolm joined staff and students at St Edward’s College to celebrate the Feast of Corpus Christi. Pupils prepared and took part in Mass after which the Archbishop led a whole school procession of the Blessed

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Sacrament concluding with Benediction on the front lawns of the school with Archbishop Malcom preaching. The Archbishop is pictured with school prefects and the College Principal, Stephen Morris.

Papal Award for Joan Joan Loveridge has been awarded the ‘Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice’ in recognition of her work in the parish of St Helen’s, Crosby, and is pictured being presented with the award by parish priest, Father Martin Caddell. Joan came to St Helen’s in 1939 and has lived there ever since. She was a teacher in the local Catholic secondary school, and served as a special minister of the Eucharist and sacristan for decades. She has also found time to be the local secretary for Mill Hill Missionaries and has done that job since 1955.


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news diary

Welcome to the new Lieutenant Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated a Mass of Welcome for His Excellency Michael Byrne KC*HS on his appointment as the new Lieutenant of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem for England and Wales. The Mass took place on Sunday 16 July in Michael's home parish of St Bartholomew, Rainhill and was attended by Knights and Dames of the Order from throughout England and Wales. Founded in the twelfth century the Order supports the Catholic Church in the Holy Land with charitable, cultural and social works and has traditional ties with the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem. It has over 23,000 members in 50 countries.

Knights and Dames of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem with Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP after the Mass of Welcome

Obituary of Rev Peter Morris Father Peter Morris who served the archdiocese for almost sixty-seven years died at the age of 92 on Tuesday 13 June. Peter Morris was born in St Helens on 6 December 1924, the son of John and Mary Morris. He attended St Thomas of Canterbury School and West Park Grammar School, St Helens, before studying for the priesthood at St Joseph’s College, Upholland, where he was ordained priest in the college chapel by Bishop Joseph Halsall on 19 May 1951. Following ordination he served in a number of parishes as assistant priest: at St Anne’s, Liverpool from September 1951; St Edmund’s, Waterloo from March 1957; St Nicholas, Liverpool from April 1960 and St Francis de Sales, Walton from September 1967. In March 1978 he was appointed Chaplain to the Convent of the Sisters of Our Lady of the Apostles, Leigh. By the summer of 1980 his health had deteriorated to such an extent that he could no longer continue his chaplaincy duties. In July of that year he moved to Sacred Heart, Liverpool, and thereafter to St Elizabeth’s, Litherland, in April 1985. In both parishes he exercised his priestly ministry as and when his health permitted. He eventually retired in December 1993 and lived quietly in St Helens for the remainder of his life. His Funeral Mass was celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon at St Thomas of Canterbury church, Windleshaw, St Helens on Thursday 22 June prior to burial in St Helens cemetery.

His Excellency Michael Byrne KC*HS with his wife Felicity and Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP.

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news diary Thank you Sister Brigid It was a mixture of joy and sadness as the extended Bellerive FCJ Catholic College community gathered at the Metropolitan Cathedral on 20 July to give thanks for the outstanding service given to Catholic education by Sister Brigid Halligan FCJ MSc OBE. Sister Brigid announced her retirement during the academic year after 38 years of service to Bellerive, 24 of them as headteacher. During her time as headteacher, the school has experienced significant growth and improvement, she leaves behind a very healthy legacy for the new headteacher, Mrs Niamh Howlett who joins Bellerive from St.Anselm’s College.

Muirhead, the Lord-Lieutenant of Merseyside. In his homily, Bishop Williams paid a warm tribute to Sister Brigid’s many years of service and her determination to ensure the best possible experience for all students in her care. He spoke with great fondness about his own long association with Bellerive dating back to 1973. In paying tribute to Sister Brigid, Sister Brid Liston reminded Bellerive students past and present how blessed they were to have had her as their headteacher with her gentle but firm manner, which combined with her deep faith and commitment to excellence had ensured

Staff, students, governors and parents, past and present, joined in the celebration of Mass, led by Bishop Tom Williams, himself a former chaplain to Bellerive. Among the concelebrants at the Mass were Canon Tony O’Brien, Canon Aidan Prescott and Fathers Des Seddon, Peter Morgan and James Preston. Music was provided by the Bellerive school orchestra and the Year 7 choir who were supported by, Cathedral Organist, Mathew Searles. The musical choices provided a fitting accompaniment to the occasion and the congregation was especially moved by the ‘FCJ Magnificat’. Sister Brigid was joined by Sister Brid Liston FCJ, who is the FCJ provincial for Europe, as well as fellow sisters from the FCJ community across the country. Bellerive also welcomed Dame Lorna

that Bellerive moved into the next stage of its history with great hope and, in the words of Marie Madeleine FCJ foundress, ‘great courage and confidence’.

Further tributes were paid during refreshments in the Piazza and a number of messages were shared including two from some of Sister Brigid’s favourite singers namely Daniel O’Donnell and Father Martin O’Hagan from the popular choral group ‘The Priests’. In addressing the Bellerive staff following Mass, Sister Brigid offered her sincere thanks and appreciation to everyone who had helped her in her mission to build a school to be proud of. She finished her remarks by reflecting that as she sat and observed the impeccable conduct of the students during the Mass, she felt that the mission she had embarked on in 1993 when she was appointed as headteacher had been accomplished. All in attendance and indeed all connected to the wider Catholic education community wish Sr Brigid a healthy and happy retirement.

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note On the 15th of this month we keep the Solemn Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The place of Mary in the prayer life and devotion of the Church and the Liturgy is well summed up by the words of the preface for the Feast, which describes her as ‘the beginning and image of your Church's coming to perfection and a sign of sure hope and comfort to your pilgrim people.’ Mary is at the heart of the Church at prayer, just as she was at the heart of the praying Church of the Upper Room after the Resurrection, the Church which received the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. She is the one who is ‘full of grace’ and yet – or perhaps we would be better to say and therefore – she points away from herself and tells the people of God throughout the generations to do whatever He, Jesus, tells us (see John 2:5). Having recently returned from the Shrine at Lourdes, many of our Diocesan family will be truly blessed

Sunday thoughts The Transfiguration is a positive, affirming experience. ‘It’s wonderful for us to be here,’ says Peter. His reaction is the one we get when we climb a hill and enjoy the view. The world below looks different. Fears and frustrations evaporate. We want to bottle the experience for ever. Matthew’s gospel depicts a series of encounters with Jesus in which individuals lives are changed. The following week some of the same group have a completely contrasting experience. Rather than being elated, they are terrified at the prospect of drowning in a small boat; a fear compounded by the appearance of a ghost-like figure – the grim reaper. The surprise is that it is Jesus himself. He is with them in the storm. Jesus is present in the danger and turbulence just as he has been present in the elation of the mountain top. Usually it is Jesus who encourages

Canon Philip Gillespie

for having shared something of this ‘Marian spirituality’ at the Grotto – and yet it is a way of praying and living which is taught to us by Mary each and every day, wherever we find ourselves. The Liturgy gives us a ‘balanced diet’ at the school of prayer: Feasts of the Lord Jesus, Feasts of Mary, and Feasts of the Martyrs and Saints, they all flow from and lead us back to the one great mystery proclaimed in and through our daily living – that God so loves, treasures and values the world that He gives His only Son so that we may enjoy life in its abundance and in its fullness. • If you did not get to Lourdes this year, or cannot make it across to Walsingham, then there is a lovely shrine to the Blessed Virgin at Ladywell, Fernyhalgh, just outside Preston which is well worth a visit.

Mgr John Devine OBE

the disciples to overcome their prejudice and welcome the outsider. But the gospel for the third Sunday in August has the disciples pleading with Jesus to help the Canaanite woman. Jesus grudgingly changes his mind. His prejudice overcome, he is taken by surprise at her faith in him. (So often I respond reluctantly to an inconvenient request only to find my faith enriched by it.) These three stories are stepping stones in a faith journey that leads up to that familiar but no-less-sublime act of faith: ‘Who do you say I am?’ Jesus asks. Having recognised the presence of Jesus in good times and in bad, Peter can say: ‘You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.’ Christ is present in every twist and turn of our lives.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

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Discernment – a gift for our times Over the next two months I’d like to reflect on discernment, a gift of the spirit that is vital for us as we try to determine how God is calling us and leading us. It seems to me that the only question that matters when reflecting on faith and life is: ‘Do we love?’ Love is the core message of the Gospel. The kingdom of God is about love. I was once told that all our understanding and our theology and our practices come to nothing when we stand before God who will simply ask: ‘Did you love?’ If we are trying to discern God's will for our lives it's already laid out in the Scriptures. We are called to live our lives for love. God's primary call on our life is love, radical Gospel love. The heart of the Gospel message is this: that an infinite God seeks and desires intimacy with the human soul. Richard Rohr says: ‘Once you experience such intimacy, only the intimate language of lovers describes what is going on for you: mystery, tenderness, singularity, specialness, changing the rules “for me”, nakedness, risk, ecstasy, incessant longing, and, of course also suffering.’ It's when we know that truth that we’ll be able to love as the Gospel invites us to. The Pope has recently said: ‘Agape, the love of each one of us for the other, from the closest to the furthest, is in fact the only way that Jesus has given us to find the way of salvation and of the Beatitudes.’ So love is really the plan that God has for us. At the core of the Gospel philosophy of love is an appreciation of difference and respect for what is other. Agape love has nothing to do with like-minded people supporting one another. You know most of Jesus’s stories are about foreigners, aliens and misfits being welcomed and loved so we have to ask ourselves whether our hearts have been so enlarged by the spirit of God that love is at the centre of our lives. We are called to love with a love that goes beyond the emotional and the shallow. We are called to love with the sort of love that would go to the grave for the sake of humanity. That’s God's call on our life but within that call love, God has a specific calling for us and we’ll look at ways to discover that next month. Father Chris Thomas


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Knowsley Opening Doors Could you be a friend? Help us to change the future of loneliness and isolation for older people in Knowsley. Betty used to love going out, she went out every day and loved to visit her sister. Betty was very active until a recent fall some months ago. She now uses a walking frame to get around the house and has lost all her confidence; she had not been out for several months until she became involved with the Opening Doors project. Betty is 88 years old; she lives alone and has no friends. Her sister is in a care home and her brother is the sole carer for his wife. Social workers had tried to encourage Betty to attend different day activities but Betty is too nervous to go out alone after the fall. Nugent introduced Betty to Jean, a volunteer; together they went and took part in a chair based exercise class. Jean supported Betty for twelve weeks to go to the classes. That extra support from the volunteer has had a massive impact on Betty’s life as she has made new friends and now feels more involved in the local community and she doesn’t feel isolated any more. Betty is now confident to go the exercise classes on her own and looks forward to seeing her new friends every week.

Nugent has been running the Opening Doors volunteer befrienders service in Knowsley for the past two years. The project is changing the lives of isolated older people who are over the age of 55 and feel socially isolated and/or lonely. With the help of our volunteers we connect people back into their local community by supporting them to access local social groups and rebuild friendships. We need friends. We are looking for volunteers who are good listeners and have a warm and sociable outlook to join our team of befrienders. Volunteers offer social support on a one to one basis: sharing some of their spare time befriending isolated elderly people. Befrienders must be aged 18 years and be able to visit someone who lives in the Huyton and Halewood, Prescot and Kirby area, ideally you will be able to commit to visiting on a regular basis for at least two hours per week or fortnight, for a minimum of three months. If you could be a friend and would like to help older isolated people get involved in their community again please get in touch with us. We are working with Knowlsey Council. Please call Emily Nolan or Julie MartinCorkhill on 0151 261 2000.

Let’s embrace the ‘yes!’ Being confident in environments where you are a visible minority can be an uncomfortable space to occupy. Mentors and role models are a great source of confidence, enabling our self-belief. A recent work place study showed that a third of women felt more confident speaking their minds and negotiating deals linked to an increase in visible powerful female role models in politics. Here are three tips on how you can ‘embrace the yes’ and improve your confidence: 1. Say yes Ever heard of imposter syndrome? It’s surprisingly common amongst high achieving people who are convinced they don’t deserve success. The fear of being ‘found out’ can hold us back from achieving our unique purpose and making the most of our talents. Try and say yes more, get outside of your comfort zone and tackle this impulse head on. 2. Celebrate your talents Tracking your successes, writing them down and reflecting is a great way to improve the way you think of yourself. When you’ve identified what you’re good at, find ways to build on these, taking time out to develop your area of expertise is a great way to boost your self-belief. 3. Find a role model Role models are powerful: so much can be learned from strong leaders, from their methods of handling conflict to their oration skills. Find a mentor to learn directly from their experiences, ask questions and soak up their life experience. At Nugent our service users are our role models, their strength in adversity and courage in hardship helps us lead with confidence, to be a voice for the voiceless, and deliver the very best for them. Ayo Bakare Head of Strategic Relationships, Nugent

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what’s on Saturday 5 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Joe Watson (Metropolitan Cathedral Organ Scholar). Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Wednesday 9 August Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father John Cullen. Saturday 12 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Sam Austin (Aldenham School, London). Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses.

Wednesday 16 August Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father Tom Leigh. Saturday 19 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Matthew Searles (Metropolitan Cathedral Sub-Organist). Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Wednesday 23 August Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father Tom Neylon.

Saturday 26 August Summer Saturday Organ Recital 2.00 pm to 3.00 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Organist: Simon Leach (Church of the Holy Name, Manchester). Admission free; retiring collection to defray expenses. Monday 28 August Pilgrimage Mass in honour of Blessed Dominic Barberi. 12.00 noon in the Church of St Anne and Blessed Dominic, Monastery Road, St Helens, WA9 3ZD. Celebrant and preacher: Bishop Marcus Stock, Bishop of Leeds. Wednesday 30 August Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father Dominic Curran.

Looking ahead Wednesday 6 September ‘Songs we Remember.’ A morning of singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, followed by lunch, at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: The Irenaeus Project Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father Joe Kendall. Thursday 7 September Oasis: a listening ear and a cuppa 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm at St Thomas of Canterbury church, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Friday 8 September to Sunday 10 September Heritage Open Days at St Francis Xavier's Church, Salisbury Street, L3 8DG. 9.30 am to 4.00 pm each day. Refreshments available after 12.00 noon Mass on Saturday and 10.15 am Mass on Sunday. Guides available. All welcome. Tuesday 12 September Time Out on Tuesdays. 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection.

Offering £10 per person (bring your own lunch). For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Wednesday 13 September Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father John Bradley. Thursday 14 September ‘Blessed are you…’ Discovering the Beatitudes Scripture Morning. 10.00 am at lrenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk Wednesday 20 September ‘Songs we Remember.’ A morning of singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, followed by lunch, at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: The Irenaeus Project Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk

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Monday 25 September to Saturday 30 September ‘Come to the Quiet.’ An individually directed residential retreat at lrenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Limited places available. Suggested donation £210. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk Saturday 23 September Quiet Day. 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person (bring your own lunch). No booking required. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father Blaise.

Wednesday 27 September Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help 7.15 pm at St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo, L22 8QF. Preacher: Father John Cullen.

Thursday 21 September ‘Blessed are you…’ Discovering the Beatitudes Scripture Morning. 10.00 am at lrenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk

Thursday 28 September ‘Blessed are you…’ Discovering the Beatitudes Scripture Morning. 10.00 am at lrenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk 16

Friday 22 September to Sunday 24 September ‘I believe in miracles.’ Reflections on the miracles of Jesus Scripture Weekend at lrenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk


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august Jubilee Events Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King A New Cathedral, 1960 Designs from the architectural competition for Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. Open from Thursday 27 July. 10.00 am-4.00 pm daily. Free entry. This exhibition brings together for the first time a selection of submissions from the 1960 architectural competition for Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. As one of the major architectural competitions of the post-war period, it attracted international attention, with 299 entries from around the world. This unique exhibition, which has been produced by Dominic Wilkinson of the Liverpool School of Art and Design, will also include newly commissioned physical models of key schemes. It will be located within the main entrance of the Cathedral and this will be an opportunity for the public to see some of the alternative designs, with contemporary reflections upon their merits. The Exhibition has been funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund North West and thanks are also due to John Moores University and the Cathedral Jubilee Committee for supporting the project.

The Marriage and Family Life Department offers support meetings for the Divorced and Separated. The next series starts on 20 September 2017. We welcome Catholics and other Christians who are divorced or separated (recently or in the past) or who are experiencing the breakdown of a marriage or a long term relationship. The small groups are informative, affirming, free and confidential. For information about the meetings and the venues and dates and other events or to book a place please contact Frances Trotman Tel: 0151 727 2195. General enquiries may be directed to Maureen O’Brien at LACE Tel: 0151 522 1044. Email: m.obrien@rcaol.co.uk The National Pilgrim Virgin Statue of Our Lady of Fatima, and Relics of Saints Jacinta and Francisco will be travelling around the country, visiting various Cathedrals abbeys and churches this year, 2017, which is the Centenary year of the Fatima message, which was given by the Blessed Virgin in 1917. They will be at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King in October: Friday 6 October 2.00 pm Arrival at the Metropolitan

Cathedral. 7.00 pm Mass. Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP Saturday 7 October 9.00 am Mass 12.00 noon Mass followed by procession and departure. ‘Come and See’ Conference 2017. Saturday 14 October to Sunday 15 October Keynote Speaker: Rev Timothy Radcliffe OP. Workshops led by: Steve Atherton; Fiona Castle; Dermott Donnelly; Pat Kennedy and David and Mary Matthews. Saturday evening guest speaker: Margaret Duncan. Music and prayer led by Jo Boyce and friends with Steve Murray. Sunday Mass Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. Saturday (9.00 am to 8.30 pm) and Sunday (9.00 am to 6.30 pm) at Christ the King High School Stamford Road Southport PR8 4EX. Suggested donation: £40 (Concessions available on request). Booking forms available (with a stamped addressed envelope) from Irenaeus, 32 Great Georges Road, Liverpool, L22 1RD. Tel: 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk or www.irenaeus.co.uk

Our Jubilarians celebrate Archbishop Malcolm celebrated Mass with priests from throughout the archdiocese who are celebrating Jubilees this year. Three priests are celebrating fifty years of priesthood; four are celebrating forty and one twenty-five, making a total of 335 years of service to the church by our archdiocesan priests. Pictured are (l to r) Mgr Peter Fleetwood, Fr Boniface Moran OSB, Fr John Meehan, Bishop Tom Williams, Canon Christopher Cunningham, Archbishop Malcolm, Fr Chris McCoy, Bishop Vincent Malone, Fr Neil Ritchie and Fr John Johnson.

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news diary

Mass with Seminarians

Before leaving on the annual Lourdes Pilgrimage Archbishop Malcolm celebrated Mass with Seminarians from the archdiocese on Wednesday 19 July at St Charles and St Thomas More, Liverpool. This year five students will begin studies for the priesthood in the archdiocese.

Father Peter offers a Latin American view An Irish Columban priest who has dedicated his life to working with poor communities in Latin America visited St Joseph’s Parish Centre, Wrightington, to talk about his lifechanging experiences. Father Peter Hughes offered insight into his experiences of poverty from a faith perspective. He spoke about the influence climate change is having on indigenous communities in Peru, the link between poverty and the world’s current economic model, and how the Catholic Church is working to protect the environment in which Amazonian people live. He encouraged people to take action against climate change and poverty. Father Peter said: ‘We had a lovely morning of reflection with Cafod supporters from the Liverpool Archdiocese, who were magnificent. You could see very clearly that we were amongst people with years of commitment and experience and the capacity to have critical and open minds. ‘I spoke today from a Latin American perspective about climate change. As Catholics, we all have our own part to play in helping to fight against poverty and climate change across the world.’ Justine Silcock, a Cafod volunteer said: ‘I found Father Peter’s address inspirational. To hear from someone who has actually lived it, and to hear his journey over the years 18

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was really meaningful. It was especially poignant as I travelled to Peru in 2016 and I feel that Cafod’s ‘Power to Be’ campaign, which looks to provide safe, renewable energy to people across the world, can truly make a difference.” To learn more about ‘Power to Be’ visit: www.cafod.org.uk/powertobe

Cafod volunteers in Wrightington


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profile

Jimmy O’Donnell Old friend of the diocese now committed to sharing precious memories By Simon Hart immy O’Donnell is explaining the power of music and song. The song in question is one he played at the very first of the interactive sensory reminiscence sessions that he organises for people living with dementia across the northwest. ‘This lady couldn’t finish a sentence because of her dementia but when I opened up this little music box and said, “Does anybody know this one?” she sang every word perfectly. I said, “What was that song?” and she named it – it was Lili Marlene. Everybody gave her a round of applause. This was a lady with dementia receiving affirmation and encouragement for what she could do, instead of the usual frustrations about what she couldn’t do. I thought, “There’s something in this that really touches people’s stories and lives”.’ To his many old friends across Liverpool Archdiocese, Jimmy – originally from St Mary’s parish, Euxton – may be better known for other things. Over almost two decades he had two spells working at St Mary’s Catholic High School in Leyland, first as a chaplain and then as an RE teacher. In between he spent time as a seminarian. In the early 1990s he was actively involved in residential and

J

outreach youth work, based at Upholland and with the Archdiocesan Youth Pilgrimage to Lourdes as leader of the Wigan and Leigh coach. What sowed the seeds for this reminiscence project was the experience of sitting listening to his father Michael’s stories prior to his death. ‘Dad and I got six pages of his story,’ the 51-year-old remembers. ‘Less than a year later he had a major stroke and couldn’t speak. He died a couple of months later and we had these pages that were pure gold to the family. My rationale behind the project is to encourage people to do what I did and more. I wish I’d got six hundred pages.’ The impact of dementia on an aunt was another factor in the eventual leap of faith that Jimmy, now living in Blackpool, took last summer as he left his teaching job and began dedicating much of his time to visiting care homes and day centres to work with people living with dementia. ‘I take along a selection of old objects and prepare a presentation with a PowerPoint projector and bring some old 78 records and take them on a reminiscence journey. Often the senses can take us into powerful parts of our life experiences – a smell can take us back

somewhere or music or something people can see or touch. I’ve got over a thousand objects from the 20th century. The biggest is an old tin bath and the smallest a farthing coin.’ His old wind-up gramophone proves particularly useful for games of ‘Name That Tune’. Jimmy’s other focus is ‘Sharing Precious Memories’, whereby he visits schools and parishes and encourages others to follow his lead, explaining to them ‘the power of reminiscence and challenging people to do something wonderful about it’. He adds: ‘I was in a school a few weeks ago speaking to pupils. I told them that those six pages I’d got before my dad died became as precious as pure gold and you can do the same with older relatives who’ll love the fact you’re valuing their stories. There are so many people who regret not spending time with older relatives. When I got back a month later they’d made videos and PowerPoints and one little girl even brought in her great-granny’s clogs that she wore as a child.’ Precious memories indeed. • For more information about Jimmy’s work, visit www.lancashirememories.com or call 07761-071696.

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news diary

Animate in Malta During May the Animate Team went on pilgrimage to Malta, Benedict, a Gap Year Team Member writes: We decided to head to Malta due to its rich Catholic heritage and tradition as it contains many Catholic Cathedrals and Shrines; in Malta there are more Churches on the Island than days of the year. In around 60 AD St Paul was shipwrecked on the Maltese coast after a violent storm out at sea. It was here that nearly 2000 years of Christianity was born on Malta. As a team we were intrigued to discover more about the ministry of St Paul during his short stay on the island. We started off by going to what is called the ‘Shipwreck Church’ in which we saw relics of St Paul out on display including the pillar on which he was later executed upon back in Rome. We also visited the cave of St Paul, where it is believed that he stayed, which was in the old city of Rabat; it was in this cave that he taught many of the islanders about our Lord.

St Anne’s pupils graduate at Hope 78 pupils from St Anne's Catholic Primary School, Overbury Street, attended their graduation ceremony at Liverpool Hope University to receive their Children's University awards. Pupils from Year 1 to Year 6 enjoyed the ceremony with their family and friends. Headteacher, Janice Shields, said ‘we are immensely proud of all our graduates who throughout the year have shown true commitment, dedication and hard work and thoroughly deserve their awards’.

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We visited many of the well-known Cathedrals including the CoCathedral of St John which was truly outstanding in its architecture and artwork containing all the graves of the previous Grand Masters of Malta, and the iconic Mosta Cathedral, well known for its amazing freestanding dome. We visited the island just off the coast, Gozo, to explore some more of the amazing shrines, including Our Lady of Ta Pinu, which has a beautiful image of Our Lady. We saw that many miracles are attributed to her intercession as we saw hundreds of photographs, thank you notes and memorabilia. We shared times of prayer and reflection and above all seeing the sites and relics from St Paul’s ministry on Malta was inspiring for our own ministry that from one shipwreck emerged a country that surrounds itself in faith.


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youth ministry

Looking back on 2016/17 Father Simon Gore reflects on another productive year for Animate Youth Ministries. Once again it is my turn to offer a small retrospective on the year here at Lowe House. It seems to come around very quickly as it only seems a few short weeks ago that I was writing about the team of 2015/16 leaving and yet here are their 2016/17 successors heading off on their separate journeys too. This year has been an interesting one in many ways: we have had a smaller team than in the past but we have also attempted a number of new initiatives with this smaller team. As the year began I was a little apprehensive over how this would play out. I wondered if a smaller group would be able to manage the different work thrown at them. Fortunately, as our time together as a community comes to an end, I think we can look back on a productive year. Over 2016/17 we have worked with

the majority of our diocesan high schools, offering day retreats, mission weeks and mission days. We have also worked with a large number of primary schools with transition days for Year 6 pupils in the final term. We have spread our wings too and worked with schools in our neighbouring dioceses who do not have access to a team such as Animate. Our thanks goes to all of these schools. Additionally, we took Life and Soul, our night of praise and worship before the Blessed Sacrament, on the road this year. Many of you reading this article may have been to one of the evenings. It was a lovely experience for us to meet so many people in their own home parishes. The feedback we received was very positive from those that came along and so we will be doing the same next year.

Finally, after its launch in May last year, the new Faith in Action scheme was put into practice in the diocese during 2016/17. With a new scheme there is always some trepidation over how plans on paper will transfer into reality. Fortunately, we had over 400 young people from parishes, primary schools and high schools taking part. The majority aimed for the lowest award – the pin level – but a handful completed the highest gold award. My hope is that those who began with the pin level will continue with the scheme over the next few years and work up to the gold award, so helping the scheme to grow as the years go by. Many thanks, therefore, to all those young people, teachers and priests who supported and led Faith in Action this year. With many different things happening through the year it might have been easy for the team to lose focus but it has been good to see them adapt to the challenges faced and grow in confidence as their time together progressed. And so, having thanked the teachers and young people of the schools we have worked with, and the parishioners who attended the Life and Soul events, and all those involved in Faith in Action, it is only right to end by offering my thanks to the team of 2016/17 for all of their hard work. Please remember in your prayers Michael Oakley who will be going to train as a teacher in the Wigan consortium of Catholic schools, and Benedict Ratchford who will be going to university to study Geography. Sarah Beatty, Lauren Lynch and Tom Hallsworth will remain with us and we will introduce you to the new team members who will be joining them in the September issue.

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cathedral St Nicholas pupils celebrate the Golden Jubilee On Wednesday 28 June it was the turn of pupils from St Nicholas Primary School, within the parish of the Metropolitan Cathedral, to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Cathedral. A garden party was arranged for them as a treat, but unfortunately the rain poured down and Plan B was put into operation with a retreat to the Gibberd Room for sandwiches, jellies and cakes. The garden party games had to be abandoned due to lack of outside space but the party food, a little bit of singing, followed by Mr Trix, the magician in full clowns outfit, kept the children entertained for the afternoon. Cathedral Dean, Canon Tony O’Brien says, ‘I think the adults, myself included, enjoyed the fun as much as the

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

children. I still can’t work out how the magician made the live white rabbit appear! It made a welcome change from all the more formal Jubilee occasions and you can’t beat a bit of jelly if you want to create a party atmosphere.’

Throughout August and September there will be an exciting exhibition in the entrance area of the cathedral entitled ‘A New Cathedral, 1960’ An Exhibition of Designs from the architectural competition for the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. I invite you all to enjoy what will be another celebratory item in our Jubilee year. The potential design for the Metropolitan Cathedral was thrown open to international competition in 1959: to quote Archbishop Heenan, ‘It seems incredible that three hundred architects from every part of the world had the courage to attempt to comply with an almost impossible set of rules. The financial limit was one million pounds at 1959 prices (by 1967: £2million). The low sum must have daunted many an architect but not the brave three hundred. It was stipulated that the new building be wedded to the existing Crypt. There must be room for three thousand people in the body of the Cathedral with an unobscured view of the high altar. It seems that we were looking for an architect not only of talent but of genius.’ The assessors tasked with judging the submissions very quickly shortlisted down to twenty plans that were of ‘first’ quality. Eventually the Gibberd design emerged as the undisputable winner but many of these final shortlisted schemes, though highly praised, have until now remained filed away in the archives and offices in various locations. As part of the fiftieth Jubilee Celebrations of the completion of the Metropolitan Cathedral a decision was taken to collate plans and formulate a number of models of the other shortlisted designs for the Cathedral. They give a wonderful insight into the changing nature of church design of that period and the many different interpretations of the brief given for the project. We are blessed to have a unique and instantly recognisable Cathedral building. This Exhibition is not so much a case of what might have been but rather a celebration of the best of architectural design of the 1960’s.

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Pic extras Mums the Word The UCM annual pilgrimage to Our Lady's Shrine at Walsingham was a great success with the fine weather that she usually provides for us. As Liverpool was the lead diocese this year, Bishop Tom Williams was at the front alongside our national chaplain, Bishop Alan Williams. He said that though there may be other Bishop Williams’s in the Church, these two definitely were the best – and we all agreed.

News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Liverpool knights enjoy Welsh retreat

The three coaches from Liverpool Diocese joined with hundreds of women from all over the country to make this a holy and memorable occasion. Our thanks go to Angela Moore, our deputy president, for her excellent organisation for the Liverpool contingent. • Do you remember in last September's column I wrote about the UCM joining with the Society for the Protection of the Unborn Child (SPUC) to organise a postcard petition to the Royal College of Midwives (RCM)? This was to protest against the support that their chief executive, Professor Cathy Warwick, was giving to the complete decriminalisation of abortion, which could have led to abortion up to full term. There were 10,000 of these postcards delivered to the RCM and in January, Prof Warwick announced that she would be retiring this month as RCM CEO. Whether or not this was the result of the campaign we do not know, but it was good news all the same. • In recognition of the UCM’s work, our national president Val Ward, secretary Irene Mitchell and treasurer Angela Higginson were invited to attend the Royal Garden Party at Buckingham Palace. They thoroughly enjoyed the occasion, representing all of us members. This could be you next time if you volunteer to be an officer. Enjoy your summer breaks, and may the weather be kind to us all. See you at St Paul's for the bi-monthly Mass on 27 September. Madelaine McDonald, Media Officer

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A weekend retreat in north Wales provided an early summer highlight for a group of Liverpool knights. The brothers from council 493 travelled to St Winifred’s hostel in Holywell on 23 June along with Father Sean Kirwin, parish priest of St Paul’s and St Timothy’s. They spent their first evening together reflecting on a passage from St Matthew’s gospel and the next day headed for Pantasaph Friary to pray at the Stations of the Cross before returning to Holywell to participate in a prayer service and veneration of St Winifred’s relic. The weekend retreat concluded with Mass said by Father Sean and the photo above shows some of the brothers during their time away. All unanimously agreed that they had thoroughly enjoyed the experience and felt spiritually refreshed by this wonderful weekend together. Earlier in June, the members of the same council had celebrated their annual dinner at St Paul’s parish centre, attended by provincial grand knight Pat Foley and his wife Ann.

Brother Pat highlighted the work that all the councils undertake in the province and thanked everyone present for supporting the event. Outgoing council grand knight Andrew Cleary, meanwhile, spoke passionately about how proud he was of the fundraising work undertaken by the council and of their continued support for the local food bank, while there was a warm welcome for his newly elected successor, Mark Thompson. Finally, a Mass for council 458 members on the Isle of Man included a special ceremony at which plaques donated by Canon Philip Gillespie, the former council chaplain, were given to past grand knights. Present at the ceremony were Fathers Leo Stoker and Brian Dougherty and the wives and widows of council members, and a hot-pot supper followed in St Columba’s parish hall.

Websites: www.ksc.org.uk and www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life Why we must be industrious in our goodness By Moira Billinge The elderly priest was one of the few remaining who had retained the services of a live-in housekeeper. Mary was a patient soul who listened carefully to his endless list of gripes against one person or another. No one escaped his criticism. Mary had looked after him for decades, understood him more than most and knew that, once his tirade was over, he would calm down and whatever had sparked the incident would soon be forgotten. She refused, however, to let him get away with his rants stock free, and would always endeavour to say something kind in the defence of the person who had triggered his angst. One evening he was particularly agitated; everything had gone wrong for him. A delivery hadn’t arrived, his car wouldn’t start so he was late for an important meeting and his deacon had succeeded in annoying him for the umpteenth time that week. With her usual charity, Mary defended the deacon explaining that his arthritis was troubling him and he wasn’t sleeping very well. On this occasion the priest stopped in his tracks, put down his cup of tea, turned to her incredulously and said: ‘Mary, I do believe that you would even find something good to say about the devil himself!’ She considered her response carefully, being acutely aware of the challenge in the priest’s demeanour as he waited for her to reply. Eventually she broke her silence and said: ‘Well Father, he IS very industrious!’ The moral of this anecdote, told to me years ago by a young curate, is of course, accurate. The devil is indeed, consummately ‘industrious’ and ‘prowls

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around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour’ (1 Peter 5:8). The more secularised society becomes, the more freedom he has to create the havoc that he is succeeding in perpetrating, and he is present in all division and discord. He is ingrained in the skewed logic of the terrorists and wherever human life, dignity and worth are compromised; in the abortion industry and its spin-offs, and the promotion and practice of euthanasia. He is the driving force in war-ravaged countries, in the worldwide persecution, murder and torture of innocents; in human trafficking, racism and discrimination. He utilises division and friction in communities and thrives on the medium of gossip and false rumour which seldom considers the praiseworthy aspects of people’s lives, but instead feeds on and highlights their mistakes. The devil can sometimes appear to hold the greater share of the reins, but his plans are disturbed each time we pray or show love, kindness, gentleness, charity and forgiveness. His work is thwarted whenever we try to become peace-makers, or strive for justice. St Paul encourages us, in Ephesians 6: 10-11, to ‘grow strong in the Lord, with the strength of his power. Put on the full armour of God so as to be able to resist the devil’s tactics.’ Amid the chaos that exists in the world we should be consoled by Christ’s promise that ‘the gates of hell will never prevail against the Church’. In dying for our sins on the Cross He redeemed mankind and every celebration of the Mass is the triumphant and unconditional ‘I love you’ from our father in Heaven who ‘has prepared a banquet for you in the sight of my foes’.

Quote from Pope Francis “May there be an end to armed conflicts which cover the earth with blood; may the clash of arms be silenced; and everywhere may hatred yield to love, injury to pardon, and discord to unity. Let us listen to the cry of all those who are weeping, who are suffering and who are dying because of violence, terrorism or war”.

Worth a visit

Any visitors to the region of Castile and Leon in northwest Spain would be wise to include Valladolid on their itinerary, writes Lucy Oliver. This medieval city and regional capital is home to some impressive medieval religious sites, including the Spanish Gothic San Pablo Church. Dating from the 1400s, it is best known for its stunning façade, and interior paintings, one of which depicts the conversion of Saint Paul. Also on the Plaza de San Pablo is the Royal Palace, or Palacio de Pimentel, birthplace of King Philip II. Valladolid hosted the Spanish court on many occasions and also, briefly, provided the residence of Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote. The city was a central meeting place for explorers too, including Christopher Columbus who died here in 1506, though his remains were later removed to Seville Cathedral. The National Sculpture Museum, in the former Colegio de San Gregorio, is worth seeing, meanwhile, for its rich collection of art, tapestry and religious sculptures and so too is the beautiful 12th-century church of Santa María La Antigua. This smaller, white building in the gothic style features a prominent bell tower and spectacular stained glass windows in honour of Our Lady.


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join in Children’s word search

Eating Out

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary whose Feast we celebrate on 15 August

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More Mullarkey From Johnny Kennedy Father Mullarkey and the Young Curate were sitting at the kitchen table in the presbytery. The auld fella was dipping his chocolate biscuit in his tea.

You have earned a break, try to take it easy during August and enjoy time with family and friends. We have listed a few eateries you might like to visit. Bottle and Glass In St Helens Road, Rainford 01744 882712 Claudes of Churchtown 98 Botanic Road, Southport 01704 228334 Town Green Inn 17 Town Green Lane, Ormskirk 01695 229864 Chez Jules Northgate Street, Chester 01244 400014 Marino Lounge Marino Point, Kings Parade, Wallasey 0151 639 7050 Pollards Inn Village Square, Willaston 0151 327 461

Greeting Cards from Carmel

The YC was reading the Catholic Pic. ‘This is interesting,’ he said. ‘Some Anglican vicars are having trouble getting bats out of their churches.’ ‘Is that a fact?’ said the auld fella. ‘You don’t seem very bothered.’ ‘Well, it’s not exactly going to keep me awake at night.’ ‘Maybe not,’ said the YC, ‘but it’s quite a problem for the vicars. Didn’t you ever have any bats in your churches in Galway when you were young?’ ‘No,’ said Father Mullarkey. ‘We didn’t play cricket.’?’

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

There are so many lovely greetings cards at Carmel Shop that it is hard to choose which to buy. Try to visit the Shop to see for yourselves at Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com

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justice & peace

The Kingdom of God IS here so let's get involved By Steve Atherton, Justice & Peace fieldworker. I would like to ask you to do something this summer. When you have a quiet moment, when you are free to sit with nothing in particular to do, ask yourself this question: ‘How do I feel while God is looking at me with love?’ This simple invitation asks you to recognise God’s presence in your life and insists that God looks at you with love. God is not condemning you. God is loving you. In fact, why not stop reading this for a moment and let yourself enjoy God’s love now … Thank you for trying that, and if you have kept on reading, here are some thoughts about why we know that God loves us, rather than judges or condemns us. Our God is a God of love and a God of justice. Our spirituality is about bringing that insight into our lives and our work. For some people, spirituality seems to be only about which rules we follow. We all know, because our experience confirms it for us, that God is present in a special way when we act justly, when our relationships are right. The simplest and best explanation I know of Justice & Peace, and associated gratuitous acts of kindness, is Right Relationship – that is to say, a right relationship with God, with ourselves, with each other, and with the earth. Relationship with God: Total dependence for our being; awe and reverence. But also, and amazingly, intimacy and love. Right Relationship with ourselves: respect for who we are, a sense of our own worth without becoming overwhelmed with selfimportance. Right Relationship with each other: to see others as manifestations of God, with the same dignity that we have. Right Relationship with the earth: the earth is part of God’s self-revelation; dominion does not mean the right to destroy and misuse. Dominion properly means ‘to care for’ as the Lord cares for us. A few years ago, I elaborated a long list that grew ever longer of different types of justice: legal justice, commutative justice, social

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justice, racial justice, gender justice, etc. Then I wondered which came first, love or justice? The answer is that God’s love for us came first: our love is important but it is only possible because of God’s love for us. Then I struggled for years with the question: ‘What is God’s justice?’ Now I am increasingly certain that the Gospel of Jesus is about care for the needy and the marginalised. Catholic Social Teaching calls it ‘The option for the poor’. Why am I so certain? Luke tells us that Jesus’s first sermon in the synagogue in Capernaum began with reading from the prophet Isaiah: ‘He took down the scroll of the prophet Isaiah and read ‘I have come … to bring the good news to the afflicted … to proclaim liberty to captives, sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free … To proclaim a year of favour from the Lord.’ That is a pretty clear agenda! And his final sermon as recounted in Matthew 25 tells us: ‘For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you made me welcome, lacking clothes and you clothed me, sick and you

visited me, in prison and you came to me.’ Which is a pretty clear summing-up! Last year’s ‘Year of Mercy’ was a graced time of increased understanding. The Hebrew word for God’s mercy is ‘hesed’, which is the word used for the love that a mother feels for the infant she suckles. That is how God loves us! That is why we can be certain that God’s eyes are full of love when they look at us. It is time for another quiet moment …

‘I have come … to bring the good news to the afflicted … to proclaim liberty to captives, sight to the blind’


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Profile for Educate Magazine

Catholic pic august 2017  

Catholic news from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic pic august 2017  

Catholic news from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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