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Issue 151 APRIL 2017

ARCHDIOCESE

FREE

Journey to Holy Week Inside this issue: Profile: Phil Thompson

Celebrating our Schools


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contents Welcome A busy April lies ahead in terms of the life of the Church. As the month begins we are in the season of Lent, our journey, pilgrimage, to Holy Week and all the drama that we remember as we celebrate the great Triduum of Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. Then two weeks of Easter joy to end the month. This month our columns take a look forward to the great feast and our Whats On pages have many services and reflections for the final days of Lent. We also report on the RCIA Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion which was celebrated in the Metropolitan Cathedral on the First Sunday of Lent. As we continue our own Lenten journeys we pray for those on that journey in faith. We also celebrate our Catholic schools as we look back on their awards ceremony held in early March and report on the celebrations for the fiftieth anniversary of St Cuthbert’s church, Wigan. May our journey continue through the remaining days of Lent and Holy Week so that we may truly celebrate a Happy and Blessed Easter.

From the Archbishop’s Desk Like the Archbishop of Canterbury I had a ‘Lent Book’. The one I chose is called ‘Washing Feet’ by Tom O’Loughlin of Nottingham University. He reminds us that to wash each other's feet is a command of the Lord. Jesus says we ought to do this to each other. (John 13:14), yet for some reason, the church only does this symbolically on Maundy Thursday. The Mass of the Lord’s Supper is an obvious place to put it, but that is the only time we do it. We do other things that the Lord has commanded daily, such as the Eucharist, so why not wash each other's feet more often?

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Main Feature A celebration of our schools

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News From around the Archdiocese

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Autism at Height 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese

Washing feet has many good effects. It is an act of humility; as when Pope Francis washed the feet of young offenders in a Roman prison. That has to be good for anyone in authority as it reinforces the idea that we are all called to serve each other and not to dominate. Another reason is that it causes a bond between the washer and the one who is washed. This builds relationships and community. Also in these times when ecumenism between our fellow Christians has entered a rather barren period, and communion seems a long way off, we could at least wash each other's feet as a clear sign of the new commandment that we should love each other as Jesus loved us.

19 Profile Phil Thompson Reds legend getting into the swing for Nugent

Lent will be almost over by the time you read this but ‘foot washing’ just like love should not be confined only to Lent.

26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC

Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures Cover: Tom Murphy Main feature: www.nickfairhurstphotographer.com Advertising Sales team 0151 709 7567 Publisher CPMM 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

21 Animate Youth Ministry Paving the way for Easter 25 Cathedral Record A rich tradition

28 Pic Life Why we must fuel love with forgiveness

Copy deadlines May issue 5 April 2017 CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Building a ‘poor Church for the poor’

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A celebration of our schools The inaugural Liverpool Archdiocese School Awards event served to showcase the ‘heart and soul’ of Catholic schools in our region. By Simon Hart For an insight into the excellence being attained by Catholic schools across Liverpool Archdiocese, the place to be was the Liver Buildings on 3 March. This was the setting for the first Liverpool Archdiocese School Awards event and what it illustrated was the impressive breadth of educational possibilities and achievements found in our places of learning. In the words of Rebecca Flynn, named Primary Head teacher of the Year for her work at St Teresa's Catholic Primary School in St Helens, this was about something ‘more than league tables’. She explained: ‘Catholic schools have their own vision and ethos and it’s lovely that this is recognised. During that ceremony, there wasn’t one mention of Ofsted or SATS or results and league tables. It was about schools providing a spiritual education as well as an academic one.’ This meant, for instance, that Megan Holmes from All Hallows Catholic High School in Penwortham received an award for the Inspirational Young Entrepreneur of the Year. It was her reward for having created the concept of ‘Hope Bags’: sleeping bags for those living on the streets of Preston, which were sold to members of the public who, in turn, were encouraged to give them to the homeless. The pupils and teachers of St Hugh’s Catholic Primary School and Chatham

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Nursery were similarly rewarded with the Contribution to the Community prize for their efforts to support vulnerable families, including welcoming those new to the country. As Tim Warren, Archdiocesan director of schools and colleges, put it: ‘This was an event which showcased the hearts and souls of our Catholic schools and those who work and learn in them.’ A celebration of the outstanding work of students and staff from among the Archdiocese’s 228 schools, it was an event sponsored by New Direction Education, an education recruitment and training agency, and attended by over 150 delegates. This number included head teachers, pupils, staff, governors and parents together with Archbishop Malcolm McMahon and Father Michael O'Dowd, the Episcopal Vicar for Schools and Colleges. There were also officers from the Schools and Christian Education departments of the Archdiocese. The event, hosted by Radio City DJ Leanne Campbell, was opened by the Archbishop, who spoke of the ambition attached to Catholic education, and featured music from pupils of St Edmund Arrowsmith Catholic Centre for Learning in Whiston. The awards ceremony itself incorporated eleven different categories, recognising everything from spirituality to sporting achievements via the exceptional contributions made by school governing bodies and support staff. The award for School of the Year went to St Sebastian's Catholic Primary School in Liverpool which was described as ‘a

beacon of inspiration for pupils, teachers, the local community and the family of schools’. It was the second recent accolade for St Sebastian’s whose executive head teacher Dennis Hardiman received an MBE in the New Year’s Honours’ List for his work in bringing together St Sebastian’s with St Cuthbert's Primary School to form the first federation of schools in the city. Jacqui Davies, head of school at St Sebastian’s, said: ‘It was a huge honour, especially as it was the first of its kind. We feel it’s a reflection of our hard work and determination to fulfill our school ethos through our parents, children and staff. We all join together so our children can be the best they can possibly be and aspire to achieve every potential they have. ‘We see it as an honour for our federation with St Cuthbert’s because together both schools have the same goals and initiatives and aspirations for the children, and our children and staff work together as one in many different ways.’ The other schools shortlisted were St Patrick’s Catholic Primary School and Hope Academy in Newton-leWillows whose principal Patrick Ferguson was named as Secondary Head teacher of the Year. Chosen ahead of fellow nominees Paul Dickinson (Archbishop Beck Catholic Sports College, Liverpool) and Ivan Gaughan (Holy Cross Catholic High School, Chorley), Mr Ferguson was credited for his efforts in taking Hope Academy out of special measures and, in the words of host Leanne Campbell, developing ‘a happy, growing, and successful school that has delivered the best ever GCSE outcomes for its students’. The Primary Head teacher of the Year prize, meanwhile, went to the aforementioned Mrs Flynn from St Teresa’s, who was selected ahead of Marcella Armstrong (St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School, Knowsley) and Bernadette Wood (St Oswald’s Catholic Primary School, Longton). She has overseen a similar turnaround to that witnessed at Hope Academy, and was praised for ‘creating an exciting and vibrant school with the highest expectations


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feature for all’. Explaining the school’s change in fortunes since she took the head teacher’s role in 2014, Mrs Flynn said: ‘The first year I arrived we were 51st out of 53 schools in the league table and had a second RI (Required Improvement) inspection. We’re now tenth in the authority and the school has been

transformed. The children are now excited to learn and it’s a lovely school to be in. ‘The award is not due to me but the hard work and dedication of the staff and parents. Every single member of the school community, from the lunchtime supervisors, cleaners and caretakers to

the rest of the teaching staff, works tirelessly to ensure the children of St Teresa’s have the best possible education. And it’s not just an education in school, we are teaching the wider curriculum through hands-on experience, for example, we’ve acquired an allotment and the children will be growing things and giving

‘This was an event which showcased the hearts and souls of our Catholic schools and those who work and learn in them’

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feature

Archbishop Malcolm addresses delegates

‘It was a huge honour, especially as it was the first of its kind’ : Jacqui Davies, head of school at St Sebastian’s 6

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them to the food bank in our church.’ It is worth reiterating that this was a celebration of all aspects of school life. So the Inspirational Teacher of the Year prize went to Jay Stewart from the Academy of St Francis of Assisi (ASFA) in Kensington for fostering his pupils’ love of music. And this was not the only nomination for ASFA. Ryan Dickens, a winner at the England National Schoolboy Boxing Championship who went on to compete for England on the international stage, was shortlisted for the Sport Achievement award taken home by the Year 11 rugby league team from St Peter’s Catholic High School who won their national championship. Tara Welsh, meanwhile, received a nomination for the Inspirational School Support Staff prize won by Ann Murphy from St Michael’s Catholic Primary School in Widnes. The full list of award winners is: Spirituality in our School – St Michael and All Angels’ Catholic Primary School, Knowsley Contribution to the Community – St

Hugh’s Catholic Primary School and Chatham Nursery, Liverpool Creative Team Project of the Year – Sacred Heart Catholic College, Sefton Sport Achievement – Year 11 Rugby Team, St Peter’s Catholic High School, Wigan Inspirational Young Entrepreneur of the Year – Megan Holmes, All Hallows Catholic High School, Penwortham Inspirational School Support Staff of the Year – Ann Murphy, St Michael’s Catholic Primary School Widnes Inspirational Teacher of the Year – Jay Stewart, The Academy of St Francis of Assisi, Kensington, Liverpool Governing Body of the Year – St Mary’s Catholic High School, Leyland Primary Head teacher of the Year – Rebecca Flynn, St Teresa’s Catholic Primary School, St Helens Secondary Head teacher of the Year – Patrick Ferguson, Hope Academy, Newton-le-Willows School of the Year – St Sebastian’s Catholic Primary School, Fairfield, Liverpool


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FEAST OF DIVINE MERCY Sunday 23rd April 2017 Our Lord asked Saint Faustina to promote the Devotion to His mercysaying: “The soul that will go to Confession (within the octave of the feast) and receive Holy Communion on the Feast day, shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment” St Faustina confirms Our Lord’s command to her: “If I cannot show mercy, by deeds or words, I can always do so, by prayer. My prayer reaches out even there, where I cannot reach out physically.”

Are you called to Carmel?

Archdiocese venues celebrating the Feast of Divine Mercy - start time

St Leos, Lickers Lane, Whiston 1.30pm Confession Devotions, Mass 4pm (Peter - Divine Mercy shop) St Clares, Arundel Avenue, Liverpool 3.00pm Devotions, Exposition, Confessions OUr Lady of the Annunciation, Bishop Eaton, Lpool 5.00pm Rosary, Devotions, Blessing of Image, Mass 6.00pm St Francis of Assisi, Garston, Liverpool 2.30pm Confession Devotions, St Aloysius, Huyton, Liverpool 2.00pm Devotions, Confession, Mass 5.00pm St Elizabeth of Hungary, Litherland 2.00pm Confessions, 3pm Devotions, Mass 3.15pm Holy Spirit, Ford 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions, Exposition Our Lady of Lourdes Birkdale 1.30pm Confession, Rosary, Devotions, Mass 3.15pm St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo 2.00pm Confessions, Ven of Image, Devotions and Mass St Peter & Paul, Haresfinch, St Helens 2.15pm Confession, 3pm Devotions St Mary’s, Broadfield Drive, Leyland 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions, Healing Service Mass 5.00pm Sacred Heart, Brooke St, Chorley 3.00pm Exposition, Confessions Devotions, Mass 4.00pm St Mary’s, Standishgate, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions, Mass 4.30pm Holy Family, New Springs, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Our Lady Star of the Sea, Ramsey, Isle of Man 2.30pm Confessions, Devotions

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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Pax Christi Act of Witness

Around 35 people gathered at the steps of St Luke’s Church in Liverpool, to reflect on Pope Francis’ Peace Day Message in the light of our government’s plans to renew Trident nuclear weapons writes Jan Harper, Chair of Pax Christi, Liverpool. We were joined by other members of Justice and Peace groups from across the archdiocese, Quakers and members of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Pausing at various points on our way we stopped in the heart of the city to mark one another with ashes and to mark an image of Trident with ashes. Listening to testimonies from survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we expressed our remorse for the possession of such weapons of mass destruction and our failure to honour the obligations we had made under the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty. At our final stop at the Law Courts we used rainbow coloured ribbons attached to the cross, naming a person or an initiative that made us feel hopeful. 'Let there be peace shared among us' was our final song, after listening to a moving plea from Setsuko Thurlow, survivor of Hiroshima (Hibakusha) to take real steps to disarmament.

Future Medical Students at St John Rigby 22 St John Rigby medical students recently completed their ten-week work placement at Wrightington Hospital, during which they had the opportunity to experience the patient journey, starting with admissions, on the wards and theatre before outpatients and physiotherapy. The St John Rigby Future Medics and Dentists Elective comprehensively

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prepares students for a medical or dental degree at university. In addition to the 30 hours of work placement, students also obtain a first aid qualification, participate in a mountain rescue simulation and complete medical research as part of a Crest Award. Kate Lancaster (Medic and Dentist lead) said ‘These exceptional young people proved themselves to be worthy future

medics. To make a successful application to medicine work experience is extremely important. However, the students must obtain top grades too. With the work experience phase of the programme completed students can now revise for their mock exams to ensure the grades they achieve match their obvious potential.’


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news diary Anniversary celebrations at St Cuthbert’s

Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated Mass for the Golden Jubilee of St Cuthbert's Church, Pemberton. Concelebrating with the Archbishop were Parish Priest, Father John Causey and Father Dominic Risley, from joint parish St Edward's, who was ordained

last year and is now based at the Metropolitan Cathedral. During the Mass the Archbishop blessed a memorial stone which had been donated and installed by local Funeral Directors R Banks and Son. Picture: www.nickfairhurstphotographer.com

Cafod presentation at St Edwards Sixth Form students from the Cafod Club of St Edward’s College, West Derby, presented a cheque for £2,933.60 to Cafod representatives Angela Pender and Ann Hayes. The amount raised was a result of two years of hard work and fundraising by members of the club through activities such as cake sales, selling candy canes at Christmas-time, guessing the number of sweets in a jar and many other fun events. During assembly, Anne and Angela delivered a talk on the work Cafod undertakes in the developing world, demonstrating to all pupils and students the excellent causes that the money raised will be used for.

Papal Honour for Carmella Carmella Robinson, housekeeper at Our Lady Immaculate and St Joseph in Prescot was presented with the Papal Award, Bene Merenti, from Bishop Vincent Malone in recognition of almost sixty years of service in the archdiocese. Carmella began her duties at St Anne’s, Overbury Street, in 1958 later moving to St Peter and St Paul, Crosby. In 1982 she moved to St Malachy’s in Liverpool when Monsignor Tony Dennick was appointed Parish Priest. While there she taught teenage girls in the parish to cook and sew. In 1995 she moved to Prescot where she became a Eucharistic Minister and spent many hours visiting the sick in their homes. She is pictured with Bishop Malone who, as a young priest, was based in St Anne’s in 1958.

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news diary Celebrations at St Francis de Sales

On Tuesday 21 February Archbishop Malcolm celebrated the Mass of Induction at St Francis de Sales for Father Gerard Callacher as new Parish Priest. Father Ged replaces Father John Thompson who died last October after thirty-two years as parish priest. Archbishop Malcolm also presented the papal award Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice to Mrs Roberta (Bobby) Green for her work as parish secretary to both St. Francis de Sales and St Monica, Bootle for over 35 years as well as her work as auditor for the Metropolitan Tribunal. Father Ged said he was very pleased to share the occasion with Bobby who has been an invaluable help to him since taking over from Father John who was a long serving and much loved parish priest.

Peter’s Passion in Woolston Peter's Passion: A musical meditation: The Stations of the Cross as seen through the eyes of St Peter will be presented at St Peter's Church, Woolston, Warrington at 7.30 pm on Good Friday, 14 April, with a cast mainly of young people. A story that reflects on the last hours of Jesus' life. A story that began more than 2,000 years ago, the story of a man who loved his friends so much that he laid down his life for them. A story of a mother's love and a best friend’s betrayal, one of repentance, forgiveness and reconciliation: a story of hope. It also asks you to reflect on your own journey of faith. The aim of the 18 songs is to challenge and inspire each of us in our search for the answers to some of the deepest questions about who we are and what Christ's suffering and death means in our life today. Peter's Passion was first performed in St John Almond's High School and St Charles' Church, Aigburth, in 1987 and every year to the present day. It was written by Bernadette Egan, the then Head of RE and music leader at the 6.30 pm parish Mass. This year will be its 30th Anniversary and, therefore appropriate for it to be performed in St Peter's Church, Woolston whose parish priest, Father John Gildea, was formerly parish priest at St Charles in 1987. 10

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Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion This year The Rite of Election and Call to Continuing Conversion, which always takes place in the Cathedral on the First Sunday of Lent, was supported by staff and students of Archbishop Beck Catholic Sports College. Led by Chaplain, Peter Benson, two beautiful pieces of art work and two banners illustrating the call of Samuel (I Samuel 3: 1-11) and the call of the first disciples as told in Matthew’s gospel (Matthew 4:18–22) were produced. They were carried into the Cathedral by the Head Girl and Head Boy in the Entrance Procession. This annual celebration marks an important step on the journey to full membership of the Roman Catholic Church for those, from across the Archdiocese, who have been learning about what it means to be a Catholic and feel ready to receive the Sacraments of Initiation during Eastertide. For those who have not been baptised, there is the declaration, by Archbishop Malcolm, of their election: recognition that they have indeed been chosen and called by God to be baptised, confirmed and share fully in the Eucharist as members of the Body of Christ, the Church. Once they have been presented to the Archbishop, they sign their name in The Book of the Elect, which remains on display throughout Lent. For those already baptised the Archbishop calls them to continuing conversion during the Lenten season

in preparation for their full sharing in the Easter Mysteries. During the service Godparents and Sponsors testify to the readiness of those they are accompanying and all who are present promise to support them in prayer. This year saw a further increase in the number of those seeking Baptism (46 Catechumens) with fewer people already baptised (66 Candidates). This trend is replicated throughout dioceses in the Catholic Church, for further details conact the Pastoral Formation Department Tel: 0151 522 1040 or e-mail V.Murphy@rcaol.co.uk


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news diary Civic Mass at the Cathedral At the end of February Archbishop Malcolm McMahon celebrated the annual Civic Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral in the presence of the Lord Mayor of Liverpool, Councillor Roz Gladden; the Lord Lieutenant was represented by Deputy Lieutenant, Peter Woods DL and the High Sheriff of Merseyside, Jim Davies OBE DL, also attended together with civic dignitaries and members of the judiciary from throughout the region. The Mass is an opportunity to pray for and show support for those in public service.

Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral The Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral are a voluntary fundraising committee dedicated to supporting the spiritual and temporal life of the Cathedral by a programme of voluntary work and fundraising events. Currently new committee members are being recruited and applications are invited from interested parties. The ideal applicant should be prepared to help organise and assist at events, have some IT skills and attend four planning meetings per annum. Please consider if you could help in this rewarding mission and contact the chair of the Friends with a brief outline of any experience in the voluntary sector and any special skills which you can offer. Please contact Mr Peter Woods, Chair, Friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral, Cathedral House, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool, L3 5TQ.

Chance to shine at St Albert’s The Prince’s Trust and Merseyside Fire and Rescue came to the aid of St Albert’s parish in Stockbridge Village when they sponsored a project to fund and refurbish the ‘Youth Centre’ behind the church building. Twelve young people from the Huyton area spent two weeks repainting and improving the building before proudly handing it back to the parish in a special ceremony. Parish Priest, Father David Potter, was delighted with the results of their work saying, ‘I think its great that they chose a Church-based project when they receive so many other requests.’ As well as serving as a meeting room and hosting the Little Church on Sundays and winter weekday Masses, the building has recently offered a home to the local Shine Dance Academy.

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news diary Remembering Joanna A memorial garden for a much loved 11-year-old Liverpool schoolgirl has been carefully reconstructed at Our Lady of Walsingham Primary School in Netherton following the closure of St Ambrose Barlow Catholic College. Joanna Walker was a pupil at the senior school when she became seriously ill in 2009 and died after suffering a fatal brain haemorrhage. After her death the school community raised funds to create a garden in her memory which has now been transferred to the primary school. A Service of Dedication was held to remember Joanna and to bless the garden.

Notre Dame Candlemas Reunion 2017 Each year, there is a Notre Dame College Reunion on or about Candlemas Day, 2 February. Known as the College birthday, Candlemas is the anniversary of the opening of Our Lady’s Training College in Mount Pleasant, Liverpool in 1856. The reunion is held on the Liverpool Hope University Childwall campus where the Training College moved to in the 1980s. Once catering for the Liverpool Notre Dame Training College former staff and students, this has been extended to include all with connections to Notre Dame. There are now participants from the Notre Dame Associations, the High Schools, the convents and other training

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establishments. The day began with tea and coffee before Mass was celebrated by Bishop Vincent Malone who was once Chaplain to the College. A special request for an old College song ‘Tenting’ had been made and the words were found by a former student who had trained in the 1950s. This piece, based on an American Civil War song, had had new words written many years ago by a Notre Dame sister. It brought back many happy memories as it had been regularly sung during training at Our Lady’s College in Mount Pleasant. After lunch people could take a tour of the Childwall campus. One striking new

feature is the illuminated entrance arch to the part of the site once referred to as ‘the Christ’s side’. Called the ‘New Gate’, this is also used for gatherings of students and staff on special occasions. On a day to day basis it is a welcome feature with inspiring quotes from the Bible on the inner surface. A warm welcome is extended to former students and staff and members of the Notre Dame ‘family, to join this annual reunion, to find out more, please contact Clare Baker, Alumni Relations Manager, Liverpool Hope University, Hope Park, Liverpool, L16 9JD. Tel: 0151 291 3219 email: alumni@hope.ac.uk


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sunday reflections On a liturgical note Happy Holy Week, Happy Easter and Happy Eastertide! We use ‘happy’ quite generously at this time of the year – but of course the problem with happy is that it can be subject to the cold winds of reality, and our moods can swing from happy to sad in an instant. Perhaps that is one of the reasons why in the recent retranslation of the Missal, the word ‘happy’ was replaced by ‘blessed’ in the invitation to receive Holy Communion: ‘Blessed are those who are called to the supper of the Lamb.’ The supper to which we refer is at first hearing the supper known as the Last Supper which we celebrate on the Thursday of Holy Week and which we celebrate constantly whenever the Church gathers for the Mass – both in our faithfulness to the command of the Lord to ‘Do this in memory of me’ and, more importantly and fundamentally, Jesus’s faithfulness to his promise that ‘I am with you always’. Blessed-ness is our closeness to

Sunday thoughts The Moon is 250,000 miles away – 10 times the circumference of the Earth. It would take six months in a VW Golf at 60mph to get there. It took Neil Armstrong three days in 1969. Using current space technology it takes eight hours. In space terms, the Moon is very close (any closer and we would be in danger of banging into it). Our nearest, neighbouring star, Proxima Centauri, is not so close. Using existing technology it would take 80,000 years to travel there. Astronomers have recently identified Trappist 1 as the closest star with orbiting ‘Goldilocks’ planets (neither too hot nor too cold) that could potentially sustain life. The problem is that Trappist 1 is 40 light years away. It would take us 800,000 years to reach it. Both of these stars are in our backyard in comparison with the rest of the Milky Way. And

Canon Philip Gillespie

God, the putting in right relation of our actions and our attitudes, the gratuitous and loving gift of God’s own love – or as Cardinal Newman puts it in a hymn that will often be used in our parishes over these days: ‘ Praise to the Holiest in the height … O loving wisdom of our God.’ The Christian faith tends to talk more about ‘joy’ than happiness. Joy runs a little deeper too. Its source is to be found deep down, rather than on the surface where it can be increased by some circumstances or swept away by others. The source of joy is to be found in what we believe, and it is unaffected by the events of today or the fears of tomorrow. Joy is like an underground river whose power can be heard if you press your ear to the ground. I wish you the Joy of a Blessed Holy Week, Easter and Eastertide!

Mgr John Devine OBE

the Milky Way is only one of billions of galaxies. At the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday night we relive the story of creation and of our salvation in Christ. We hear the call of Abraham, the account of the Exodus and listen to the writings of the prophets. Events recorded in the Bible feel like ancient history. Yet in comparison with the vastness of the universe, the period between Abraham and Jesus and the present day is 4,000 years, no time at all. The human race is only 200,000 years old. Abraham looked up and saw the same night sky as we do. If he had set off on an 800,000-mile journey to Trappist 1 his spacecraft would not be that far ahead of us if we decided to follow him today

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection

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Life comes from death Several years ago I met June, a woman whose life had been marked by pain – the pain of abuse, loss, addiction, heartache and rejection. Her reflection on her life led her to one conclusion: that God is with us even when it appears that He is a million miles away. The most powerful Scriptures for her were the stories of Christ’s death and resurrection that we will reflect on in a few days’ time. She saw in the ancient stories of Holy Week her own story being played out. Every moment of betrayal, rejection, hurt and pain could be found there. She began to recognise that there wasn’t a moment in her life when the Lord had not been present. I often think that Lent is a time that challenges us to reflect on the pain in our own lives that we would rather run away from. It is a time when we can recognise the truth that whatever we might go through, God is not separate from the mess but in the midst of it. The pain and confusion that are so often in our lives can either make us stronger, more rounded people, or make us bitter victims. Lent enables us to take time to reflect on our lives and let go of those things that make us less than we might be. It is a time when we can focus on our search for God in the midst of the mess of our lives. It is not an easy thing to do but faith is about being real and, in the midst of reality, learning how to trust and hope in a God who has walked the same journey as we walk ... a God who is with us, a God who shows us that after every Good Friday, there comes Easter Day. There is just a short time left in this season. Use it wisely. Reflect on your life. Don’t run away but know that in everything that has happened to you God is present and will bring life out of each death you have experienced if you allow Him the space and time to do that. Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Autism at Height The spring is a time of new beginnings and hope. The blossoms on the tree give us encouragement that summer is soon on its way. Even as storm Doris blew much of the blossoms away, some still held steadfastly to the delicate branches. As you saw in last month’s column, we are living in such storms within social care economy.

Achieving personal goals is something we all struggle with, whether it be setting ourselves a challenge that will help us be a better person, a simple new year’s resolution or giving up something for Lent. One of our former pupils from Nugent House School set himself a huge challenge that really did take him to a new level. Last year Jamie Owen made an attempt on the Matterhorn (4478m) in Switzerland. Jamie was a pupil at Nugent House School for six years from the age of11 when he was ‘Defiance: The Eiger Paraclimb’ is a film of Jamie and 2015 ascent of The West Flank route to the diagnosed with Autism, Georgia’s summit of The Eiger (3970m). and at that time, Jamie welcoming to Jamie. I think that’s says, ‘I couldn’t have dreamt of doing why Jamie enjoys the sport so much. this, I had very poor memory skills He calls climbing his medicine. It and my co-ordination was terrible.’ just makes him feel more comfortable and more at ease than Jamie climbs with the Autism at he’s ever been.’ Height project: the brainchild of climbing coach Mark McGowan, and Mark McGowan started the Autism at the team, led by Mark, reached a point 300m below the summit (4170m Height project whilst coaching Jamie in the build up to their successful above sea level) on the Hörnli Ridge, Eiger Paraclimb in 2015 he sums up before making the tough decision to the Matterhorn attempt: turn back as a storm descended. Describing his condition Jay said: ‘Explaining autism is like finding a gorilla in a jungle, climbing the Amazon trees and trying to describe the view of the horizon to the gorilla.’ ‘Doctors used to say to me I’ll never be able to go on a pair of skates or go on a pair of roller blades. It took me ages to ride a bike without stabilisers.’ Jamie’s mum Melanie said: ‘The climbing community have been very

‘A summit would have been great but we chose a tight weather window and unfortunately the weather came quicker. It was a great adventure for the guys sharing the various elements of an alpine multi-day climbing experience.' He added: ‘Hopefully in time Autism at Height will expand beyond what it is today and become a community that enables more access to adventure for autistic climbers to enjoy what climbing has brought Jay.’

This past February, with great sadness, we had to close Geel and Hitchen Court Care Home which had been providing safe and effective care for decades to those suffering from Dementia at the end of their lives. The staff from Geel are End of Life Specialists. The Registered Manager, is an End of Life Ambassador. These dedicated individuals gave their professional lives to ensuring that people lived the end of their days, with compassion, dignity and respect. We worked closely with families, the CQC and Liverpool City Council to find alternative homes for the people who lived at Geel. Fortunately, we were able to re-deploy many of the staff from Geel and Hitchen to another of our care homes in Liverpool. We are also saying goodbye to some staff from our Volunteer Team, our Creative Vision Team, and our Hear Here team. Again, staff who have given their professional lives to helping others within their communities. We will continue to support the users of these services, through our volunteer services. I wish to thank all of our staff, those who are departing and those who remain with us, for their dedication during their time with Nugent: their investment has touched the lives of many people. I also wish to thank the individuals who use our services and their families, for their understanding and support during this time. You will see that we have begun our Caritas Roadshows, to highlight the great work that we continue to steadfastly and faithfully deliver. In February, we were in Sacred Heart Church in Southport, sharing the good work that we do. Thank you to Father Tony Slingo and the parish, for working together with us on launching this initiative. Please do support our work through your parishes. We wish to keep as many hopeful blossoms on our branches as possible to ensure that the mission of Father Nugent as a vigorous, prosperous and effective charity continues. Thank you and God Bless. Normandie Wragg Chief Executive Nugent Care

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what’s on Saturday 1 April Reflections on Matthew’s Gospel Led by Father Chris Thomas at St John Stone, Ainsdale, PR8 3RN. Sunday 2 April Fifth Sunday of Lent. ‘Catholicism: A Journey to the Heart of the Faith’ DVD Presentation followed by discussion. 3.00 pm at Our Lady, Help of Christians, Hesketh Lane, Tarleton, PR4 6AS. Stations of the Cross and Reflections on the Passion 4.00 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Liverpool Bach Collective Johann Sebastian Bach Cantata 182: ‘Himmelskönig, sei willkommen’ (‘King of Heaven, be thou welcome.’) 6.30 pm at St Helen’s Church (Sefton Parish Church) Bridges Lane, Sefton L29 7WG. Singers and Players directed by Philip Duffy. Monday 3 April Lenten Mass and Morning Prayer 8.00 am at St Albert the Great, Hollow Croft Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Dementia Information Meeting 7.30 pm at St Albert the Great, Hollow Croft Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Tuesday 4 April Support Group for people living with dementia and their carers 1.00 pm at Our Lady Help of Christians, Portico Parish Hall, Prescot, L34 2QT. Details: Joan O’Hanlon Tel: 07984 735590. Everyone welcome. Lenten Reflection 7.00 pm at St Luke the Evangelist, Shaw Lane, Whiston, L35 5AT. ‘The Passion, Death and Resurrection of Jesus.’ Lenten reflection by Father Tom Cullinan. 7.30 pm at Our Lady, Star of the Sea, Crescent Road, Seaforth Village, L21 4LJ. Service of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Stations of the Cross and Benediction 7.30 pm at St Albert the Great, Hollow Croft Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Wednesday 5 April ‘Songs we Remember.’ A morning of singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, followed by lunch, at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges

Saturday 8 April Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: The Irenaeus Project Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk

Exposition followed by Mass 5.00 pm at St Thomas of Canterbury, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD.

Lenten Reflection 7.00 pm at Our Lady, Help of Christians, Portico Lane, Prescot, L34 2QT.

Exposition 6.45 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF.

Service of Reconciliation with personal confession and absolution 7.00 pm at St Teresa, Devon Street, St Helens, WA10 4HX.

Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at Holy Rosary, Aintree Village, L10 2LG.

Thursday 6 April Stations of the Cross 9.50 am at St Patrick, Marshside Road, Southport, PR9 9TJ. Stations of the Cross 12.35 pm at St Marie on the Sands, Seabank Road, Southport, PR9 0EJ. ‘Come back to me with all your heart’ Lenten Reflection. 1.00 pm at St Wilfrid’s Pastoral Centre, Mayfield Avenue, Hough Green, Widnes, WA8 8PR. Oasis: a listening ear and a cuppa 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm at St Thomas of Canterbury church, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: Tel 0151 949 1199 or email: jenny@irenaeus.co.uk Stations of the Cross 6.30 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. ‘Come back to me with all your heart’ Lenten Reflection 7.30 pm at St Wilfrid’s Pastoral Centre, Mayfield Avenue, Hough Green, Widnes, WA8 8PR. Friday 7 April Lenten Mass 7.00 am at Our Lady, Star of the Sea, Crescent Road, Seaforth Village, L21 4LJ. Lenten Mass 7.00 am at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Stations of the Cross followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 11.00 am at St Bernadette, Wigan Road, Shevington, WN6 8AP.

Stations of the Cross 7.00 pm at St Joseph’s, Harpers Lane, Chorley, PR6 0HR. Mass of Reconciliation (with private confessions) 7.00 pm at St Luke the Evangelist, Shaw Lane, Whiston, L35 5AT. Night Prayer led by the Choir 8.45 pm at St Mary’s, Church Road, Woolton, L25 5JF. Saturday 8 April ‘Carrying the Cross’ with the Missionaries of Charity 2.00 pm from the crossroads of Church Street and Lord Street, Liverpool City Centre to St Luke’s church at the top of Bold Street, pausing along the way for prayer. Details: James Ross Tel: 07766 706766. Brahms: A German Requiem Concert with the Metropolitan Cathedral Orchestra 7.30 pm in the Metropolitan Cathedral. Tickets and details Tel: 0151 707 3525 or Email: bookings@cathedralconcerts.org.uk www.cathedralconcerts.org.uk Sunday 9 April Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord. ‘Catholicism: A Journey to the Heart of the Faith’ DVD Presentation followed by discussion. 3.00 pm at Our Lady, Help of Christians, Hesketh Lane, Tarleton, PR4 6AS. Monday 10 April Lenten Mass and Morning Prayer 8.00 am at St Albert the Great, Hollow Croft Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA.

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april Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament 2.00 pm at St Marie of the Annunciation, Almond Brook Road, Standish, WN6 0TB. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Meditation on the Seven Last Words 7.00 pm at Holy Rosary, Aintree Village, L10 2LG. Tuesday 11 April Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person (bring your own lunch). For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Service of Reconciliation 7.00 pm at Holy Rosary, Aintree Village, L10 2LG. Stations of the Cross 7.30 pm at St Alban’s, Bewsey Street, Warrington, WA2 7JQ. Service of Penance and Reconciliation 7.30 pm at St Albert the Great, Hollow Croft Stockbridge Village, L28 4EA. Wednesday 12 April ‘Songs we Remember.’ A morning of singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, followed by lunch, at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: The Irenaeus Project Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk Tenebrae: A programme of choral music for Holy Week with the Choir of St Mary’s Shrine 8.00 pm at St Mary’s Priory, Smith Street, Warrington, WA1 2NS. Music by Lotti, Scarlatti, Couperin, Elgar, Casals, Lauridsen, and Allegri. Admission free. Holy Saturday 15 April Holy Saturday Ecumenical Walk of Witness led by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP and Bishop Paul Bayes 11.00 am at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King walking through the City Centre and concluding with prayers and refreshments at Liverpool Parish Church of Our Lady and St Nicholas. Details email: enquiries@livpc.co.uk Wednesday 19 April ‘Songs we Remember.’ A morning of singing and enjoyment for anyone who likes to sing but particularly geared towards those living with dementia and their carers. 11.00 am to 12.30 pm, followed by lunch, at St Thomas of Canterbury Parish Hall, Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. Details: The Irenaeus Project Tel: 0151 949 1199. Website: www.irenaeus.co.uk

Thursday 20 April Newman Association Talk: ‘Communion for the Divorced and Remarried?’ Speaker: Father Martin Clayton. 7.30 pm (after 7.00 pm Mass) at St Helen's Parish Centre, Alexandra Road, Crosby, L23 7TQ. Details: John Potts Tel: 07889 841096 Monday 24 April Solemnity of St George, Patron of England Wednesday 26 April Familias event: ‘The Joy of Love: the challenge of Amoris Laetitia in the Home, Parish and School’ with Fr Chris Thomas

10.00 am to 3.00 pm at Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation with lunch. £20 (£10 for Familias members). Booking essential Tel: 0151 522 1040 or email: formation@rcaol.co.uk. Saturday 29 April Quiet Day 10.00 am to 4.00 pm at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person (bring your own lunch). No booking required. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

Holy Week and Easter at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King: Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord 9 April 8.30 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 10.00 am Family Mass (Crypt) 11.00 am Procession of Palms and Solemn Mass Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP 7.00 pm Mass (Crypt) 7.30 pm Tenebrae (Cathedral) Monday of Holy Week 10 April 7.45 am Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 12.15 pm Mass (Crypt) followed by Sacrament of Reconciliation 5.15 pm Sung Mass (Girls’ Choir – Blessed Sacrament Chapel) Tuesday of Holy Week 11 April 7.45 am Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 12.15 pm Mass (Crypt) followed by Sacrament of Reconciliation 5.15 pm Sung Mass (Boy’s Voices – Blessed Sacrament Chapel) Wednesday of Holy Week 12 April 7.45 am Morning Prayer (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 8.00 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 12.15 pm Mass (Crypt) 7.30 pm Mass of Chrism Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP THE EASTER TRIDUUM Maundy Thursday of the Lord’s Supper 13 April 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Girls’ Choir) (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 7.30 pm Mass of the Lord’s Supper Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP followed by Watching concluding with Night Prayer at 10.30 pm Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion 14 April 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Cathedral Choir) (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 11.30 am Stations of the Cross led by Bishop Tom Williams (Cathedral) 3.00 pm Celebration of the Lord’s Passion Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP presides Holy Saturday 15 April 10.00 am Sung Office of Readings and Morning Prayer (Youth Choir) (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 9.00 pm The Easter Vigil and First Mass of Easter Celebrant: Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP Easter Sunday of the Lord’s Resurrection 16 April 8.30 am Mass (Blessed Sacrament Chapel) 10.00 am Family Mass (Crypt) 11.00 am Solemn Mass of Easter Day 3.00 pm Solemn Baptismal Choral Evening Prayer 7.00 pm Mass (Crypt)

the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2017 Catholic Pictorial

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profile hil Thompson has a quiz question: which two lads from the same town captained different teams to European club football’s biggest prize in successive years? The answer, he explains, is himself and Dennis Mortimer. ‘Dennis was two years older than me at Brookfield Comp in Kirkby, so you had two European Cup-winning captains – Aston Villa for Dennis and Liverpool for me – from one small town. It’s quite a trivia question.’

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You suspect he could talk football all day. Yet the former Liverpool and England defender, who lifted the European Cup as Reds skipper in 1981, is on the phone to the Pic to discuss something altogether different: Nugent, the Merseyside-based charity he serves as a patron. As with his Dennis Mortimer teaser, it was a Kirkby connection – an old friend, Pat Heron – who got him involved following his departure from the role of Liverpool assistant manager in 2004. ‘After I got sacked in 2004, Pat said, “Seeing as you’ve a bit more time on your hands would you fancy becoming patron?” and I said “I’d love to”. I started looking at what Nugent Care was and it was quite astonishing how big it was. It was the oldest charity on Merseyside and I thought, “How have I not heard all the good that it does for everyone from young children to old-aged pensioners?”.’ Phil knows all about it now and he highlights the newly launched Gubay Crisis Fund as a notable example of Nugent’s work with disadvantaged families and individuals in Liverpool Archdiocese. ‘Within twenty-four hours they can be ready to help families in distress,’ he says. ‘It’s a wonderful fund because it helps people immediately.’ If this is a consequence of the Albert Gubay Charitable Foundation donating £20,000 per year for the next three years, Thompson plays his own part in raising funds for the charity’s different services via the Annual Phil Thompson Golf Classic. This year’s event will take place at Houghwood golf course in Billinge on 18 May and the 63-year-old says: ‘It has proved a massive success with anything between 18 and 23 teams regularly playing and us raising a lot of money.’ For those taking part, the day runs from breakfast through 18 holes of golf to a three-course meal and after-dinner

Phil Thompson Reds legend getting into the swing for Nugent By Simon Hart speech from one of his old Anfield pals. ‘I ask one of my ex-colleagues to do the after-dinner speaking and Alan Kennedy, John Aldridge, David Johnson and Phil Neal have all taken part.’ One of the prizes up for grabs, he adds, will be a trip to Sky Sports’ studios to see him in action as a pundit on the Soccer Saturday show. ‘I always give a prize of a day out at Soccer Saturday. It’s the whole experience – photographs on the set with Charlie Nicholas, Paul Merson, Matt Le Tissier and our presenter Jeff Stelling.’ It may rule out Saturday trips to his beloved Anfield but Phil’s involvement with the show is something he savours.

‘I often wonder how it works with four ex-footballers watching a match on a monitor telling you what is happening and making it exciting. I think people see a lot of themselves in us. It’s four guys talking about football, which is what you do in the pub – different characters winding people up and taking the mickey out of each other.’ There should be plenty of that too at Houghwood golf course on 18 May – and all in a good cause. For more information about the Phil Thompson Golf Day 2017, call 0151 261 2000, email MDuckworth@nugentcare.org or visit: www.wearenugent.org/fundraisingevents/

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youth ministry

Paving the way for Easter Animate Youth Ministries team coordinator Tom reflects on his path through Lent. To make Lent as special as possible, the Animate team have been offering services of reconciliation to the pupils in the schools working with us. This provides an opportunity for them to better understand what reconciliation really is, and also to break down some preconceived ideas about the ‘scary’ sacrament. Using game shows, film clips and even some art works, we have tried to bring home the purpose of reconciliation to these young people. We did the same last year but this year has seen a much greater uptake. Coming from a Salvation Army background as I do, I have always taken a slightly different approach to Easter. It usually falls just after our annual Self-Denial Appeal and so I

had never given something up for Lent before. Additionally, we do not celebrate the sacrament of reconciliation in the same way. Yet this does not mean that Lent is not an important time for us and this has led me to think about what Lent really means for me as a Christian. There are certain things people do which have been adopted by the secular world too (notably giving up chocolate for no real religious reason). But there is a wide range of other ways in which people prepare themselves for Easter. People do fast – some out of solidarity for those who go without, or to share in Jesus’s days in the wilderness. Others give money, perhaps by cutting something

out of their usual routines, or with extra charitable works. Some people try to kick bad habits or take up good ones; others seek a deeper prayer life during this period. Regardless of what we do, the really important thing is: why? Do you celebrate Lent simply because you are meant to? Or do you do it because you want to as a Christian? It is a time in which we should humble ourselves before the Lord as we come closer to Good Friday and remember that Jesus took on death for us all, and that this took our sins away; and that if we live for Him and through Him we can find true happiness and eternal reward. So however we have spent Lent, let it be for the right reason: to grow closer to God and into a fuller union with His will. Dates for the Diary: Youth Alive Mass SS Peter and Paul, Kirkby – 9 April (6.30pm) Life and Soul+ St John’s, Wigan – 26 April St Teresa’s, Penwortham –3 May St Bridgets, Warrington – 7 June (7-8pm, but feel free to come and go at any time)

Father Simon Gore writes: In May last year the Archdiocese launched the National Faith in Action Award scheme. This is a scheme designed to encourage young people in our schools and parishes to put their faith into action: to live out the works of mercy in our local communities and reflect on those works in the light of Scripture and Church teaching. The award has been taken up enthusiastically by many schools and parishes and we have over 1,000 young people already signed up and performing works of mercy in our Archdiocese. As part of the scheme each participant must complete a final ‘piece of work’ that shows how they have reflected on the acts performed over the past 12 months. Each work will be reviewed, with feedback given, though this is not a final exam and it will not be assessed. This moderation is more a show of the Diocese supporting and affirming our young people in their efforts. As such, no teaching qualifications are necessary to be a moderator, but simply a willingness to devote a few hours over the summer to affirming the work our young people have done in trying to live out Christ’s message to ‘love our neighbours’. If you feel you could offer some time to act as a moderator for the award, or would be interested to hear more, contact Father Simon Gore at s.gore@animateyouth.co.uk or 01744 740467/740460.

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cathedral by Dr Christopher McElroy

A rich tradition

Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

The Mass of Chrism at the Metropolitan Cathedral) The unique musical tradition of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral is due almost entirely to the Duffy brothers, Philip (Master of the Music 1966-1996) and Terence (Organist 1963-1993, Director of Music 2004-2007). They took on a radically new type of cathedral building, shaped in the round quite unlike anything seen before, and had to implement the thinking of the Second Vatican Council, which revolutionised Catholic worship. With the support of Archbishop George Andrew Beck, the Duffys established an enviable musical tradition, at once Roman Catholic and English, by exploiting the Church’s rich treasury of chant and polyphony while also exploring the growing repertoire of the Anglican choral tradition. With the change of the customary language of the Mass from Latin to English taking effect in the 1960s, the choice of liturgical music in the vernacular was initially very limited. One had either to borrow or to compose afresh oneself. Translations of psalms, Mass parts, offices and other rites, coupled with liturgical sensibilities that called for a greater congregational participation led Philip Duffy, as of necessity, to become a ‘cantor’ in the tradition of

J S Bach, providing new compositions on an almost weekly basis. Today there exist over a thousand such works, primarily psalms, canticles, Gospel acclamations and Mass settings. A couple of generations of Catholics in Liverpool have now grown up attending special celebrations in the cathedral, where they heard and joined in the music of Philip Duffy. With the new translation of the Mass introduced five years ago, many of Philip’s fine responsorial settings of the Mass, often used at big diocesan occasions, were no longer usable as they used the older text. We are delighted that, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Dedication of the Cathedral, Philip has written a new responsorial Mass, entitled the ‘Jubilee Mass.’ The Mass is scored for cantor, congregation, choir and organ with optional brass parts. We will be using parts of the new Mass for the first time at the Chrism Mass during Holy Week (Wednesday 12 April). The Metropolitan Cathedral is a unique setting for music that involves the different forces called for in this new Mass, and it is our hope that this new composition will allow the congregation to prayerfully and vocally participate in one of the most beautiful and moving liturgies of the liturgical year.

Holy Week and Easter is the summit liturgical period of our year here at the Cathedral so this month’s record is focussed entirely on the services and events related to this. We gather in the Cathedral garden for the blessing of Palms at 11.00 am on 9th April weather permitting. It is wonderful to see the congregation made up of every nationality and age walking in procession to mark Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem. This is one of the two days in the year when the passion narrative is sung (the other being Good Friday) and this heightens the drama and meaning of the narrative. On Palm Sunday evening at 7.30 pm there is a special Holy Week Tenebrae Service. On Wednesday evening we gather as an archdiocesan family to take part in the Mass of Chrism. At this service the priests renew their commitment and the oils that are used in parishes across the archdiocese for the celebration of the Sacraments are blessed. It is one of the few times in the year when the Cathedral is full to capacity for the celebration of Mass. The three days of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday all begin with a Choral Office of Readings and Morning prayer at 10.00 am. They help to define a structure of prayer throughout these days focussing on the suffering, death and resurrection of the Lord. The Evening celebration of the Lord’s Supper is both a thanksgiving for the gift of the Eucharist and a renewal of dedication to follow Christ through lives of service and this concludes with watching until 10.00 pm. On Good Friday Bishop Williams will lead a service of Stations of the Cross at 11.30 am after the sung office and Archbishop Malcolm will preside in the afternoon at the Commemoration of the Lord’s Passion. All are welcome to join us in an ecumenical walk of witness through Liverpool city centre on Holy Saturday at 11.00 am from the Cathedral to the Parish Church of Our Lady and St Nicholas. Later that evening at 9.00 pm our Easter Vigil begins outside the main entrance of the Cathedral with the blessing of the Easter Fire and procession to celebrate in Vigil and Eucharist the Resurrection of the Lord. Our Easter Sunday Mass times are as a normal Sunday and we have a special Easter Choral Evening Prayer at 3.00 pm for Easter Day. I wish you all a very happy Easter.

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Pic extras Mums the Word Catholics from across England and Wales filled Westminster Cathedral on 18 February to witness the re-consecration and crowning of a statue of Our Lady of Fatima. During Mass, Cardinal Vincent Nichols renewed the consecration made by one of his predecessors – Cardinal Bernard Griffin, the then Archbishop of Westminster – who had consecrated the statue at the Abbey grounds in Walsingham on 16 July 1948. In the prayer of consecration, Cardinal Nichols said: ‘To you and your Immaculate Heart, in this centenary year of the apparition of Fatima, we re-consecrate ourselves in union not only with the Church, the mystical body of your Son, but also the entire world.’ This year marks the centenary of the apparition of Our Lady to Lucia, Jacinta and Francisco in Fatima in May 1917. The statue will tour 20 cathedrals of England and Wales over the course of the year in a tour ending in Wrexham Diocese in October. Writing about this has invoked happy memories from my childhood, when we had a picture of our Lady of Fatima on our livingroom wall and would often hear our mother relate to us how Our Lady had appeared to the poor shepherd children there. Fatima seemed a long way away when I was a child, but I hope to visit the shrine in the not-too-distant future. Closer to home, the Sisters of Charity are holding a procession to honour Our Lady of Fatima on Saturday 13 May, starting at 2pm at their convent in Seel Street, to which we are all invited. • The members of our UCM committee were invited to the Annual Civic Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral on 26 February, an event attended by legal and public service representatives from our city and giving thanks and offering prayers for those in positions of leadership and responsibility. We were honoured to take part in the offertory and, after the Mass, had photographs taken with Archbishop Malcolm McMahon and Roz Gladden, the Lord Mayor of Liverpool. • The theme of this year’s Women's World Day of Prayer was ‘Am I being unfair to you’. Prepared by Christian women from the Philippines, it was both moving and thoughtprovoking. I hope to see you all at our AGM on Saturday 22 April. For now, though, I wish you a happy and holy Easter. Maria Bruns, Archdiocesan president 26

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Bishop Williams honoured at Adelphi dinner

Bishop Tom Williams was installed as a member of honour of the Knights of St Columba at the order’s annual provincial dinner. The knights from Liverpool Province 2 held the dinner on Friday 17 February at the Adelphi Hotel, where Bishop Williams, the auxiliary bishop of Liverpool, received a certificate confirming his honorary status from supreme knight Charlie McCluskey (pictured on right of photo, with provincial grand knight Pat Foley on left).

World of Atherton

The night also featured the presentation of a silver jubilee certificate and medal to Desmond Fraser, a long-serving member of Council 12/13. Among the other guests present at the dinner were KSC supreme director Harry Welsh, and provincial social secretary John Church. Websites: www.ksc.org.uk and www.kscprov02.weebly.com Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life Why we must fuel love with forgiveness By Moira Billinge ‘God created man in His image; in the image of God he created him; male and female He created them … God saw all that He had made, and behold, it was very good’ (Genesis 1:28-30) Was God just seeing humanity as a whole, and finding it to be ‘very good’? Or was He actually looking at each one of us, as individuals – you and me – and deciding that we were, and are, ‘very good’? Each of us is a unique creation, a oneoff. There never have been nor ever will be two completely identical people. Even identical twins are not clones of each other. God told us that, ‘Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you’ (Jeremiah 1:5-6), reinforcing our unique place in His love. That Almighty God could create us and then step back in paternal admiration of his handiwork shows how very precious we are to Him. It should be an endless source of wonder and consolation that God gives us so many opportunities to learn from our mistakes. He really is the God of second chances, using the ordinary moments of our everyday lives to teach us, tailoring our learning opportunities and experiences to meet our needs. Sometimes we only realise where God has worked in our lives in hindsight. He has a knack of offering bite-size snacks of inspiration, often teaching us something that we had not even recognised we needed to know in the first place. I came across a fascinating book about vintage steam trains the other day. Those who know anything about them will be aware of the importance of

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supplying coal to fire the engine. However, the process of shovelling coal into the furnace to keep that fire burning is a much more complicated and exact science than many of us realise. Even a home coal fire is not as easy as it looks to maintain, but needs frequent and energetic stoking and turning of the old embers and the adding of fresh fuel to keep it going. This led me to the saying ‘raking over old coals’, which is a way of describing our clinging to past grievances and allowing them to fester, rather than letting them go. Digging up old problems and remembering old fights is never helpful and can be the spark to reignite the furnace. Hanging on to the pain of old issues merely stokes the flames of the hurt – leaving no room in our hearts for the freedom and healing that forgiveness brings – and robs us of the peace and joy of the present, which is what God wants us to have. In being so ready to lick our old wounds, we can re-open them and easily forget the help that God gave us during those trying times, and the prayers that were offered – and answered – as He helped us to deal with them. We can’t say on the one hand that we forgive the person who hurts us, if on the other we keep a tight grip of the grudge and refuse to let it go. Nor can we justify our expectation of forgiveness for our own wrong-doings if we deny it to others. In forgiving and focusing on doing good, we give the victory to God and not to the sin. As we approach Holy Week, therefore, we must leave the hurts of our past where they belong, at the foot of the Cross – for without the pain and anguish of the Cross there would have been no Resurrection.

Quote from Pope Francis “The light of Jesus is the light of knowledge, but also something more, the light that the world offers us is artificial. It may be bright like the flash of a camera but it is artificial. “Jesus light is gentle, a quiet light a light of peace. It is a light that glows from the heart”.

Worth a visit

Anyone visiting France this year should consider adding to their itinerary a place frequented by pilgrims for 1,000 years, writes Lucy Oliver. With its Black Madonna statue, Rocamadour is a celebrated stop on the way to Santiago de Campostela. This dramatically situated village clings to a cliff-side above the River Alzou in the Dordogne region. Its three tiers reflect the medieval social order: knights lived on the upper level, clerics occupied the middle, and secular workers the lowest section of this walled village. Medieval buildings line one long, narrow street – the Rue de Couronnerie – and the 216 monumental steps of the Grand Escalier lead pilgrims to the chapel where a bell is said to ring whenever a miracle occurs at sea, and a sailor’s life is saved. Here you will find the Chapelle Notre Dame, which houses the Black Madonna statue, carved in wood by Saint Amadour. Rocamadour has become France’s second most visited pilgrimage site and on leaving the main village, those glancing back may see within the rock’s natural colouring an image of the Virgin cradling the infant Jesus. For a visit to Rocamadour, you could contact Leisure Time Travel pilgrimage operators, or fly to Toulouse, which is 80 miles away.


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join in Children’s word search

Eating Out

Look at the clues in our Easter word search and learn more of this wonderful time.

SAVIOUR

H

L

N

Z

H

J

S

E

H

L

Y

S

RADIENT

Q

E

Q

A

K

A

V

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K

U

C

Z

I

B

C

Q

V

U

G

I

T

O

L

E

T

N

E

I

D

A

R

A

S

D

X

G

M

D

O

H

O

T

B

R

A

A

T

L

RISEN GLORY REJOICE

N

U

B

L

S

J

W

P

L

X

Z

O

PRAISE

R

N

N

I

O

Q

E

T

V

F

N

R

EXALT

G

L

R

D

T

U

G

R

A

T

I

Y

LIGHT

F

H

R

I

S

E

N

Y

T

Z

Z

M

C

T

H

G

I

L

T

Y

I

X

H

O

A

K

H

Z

K

T

A

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K

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SALVATION CHRIST

More Mullarkey

Celebrate the peace, love and joy of Easter by eating out at one of our listed restaurants. Do book your table for this busy day. Deli-Fonseca Dockside, Brunswick Dock, Sefton Street, Liverpool 3 0151 255 0808 Cheshire Cat Whitchurch Road, Christleton, Chester 01244 332200 The Old Stables Allerton Manor Golf Club, Allerton Road, Liverpool 18 0151 428 7490 Maray Allerton Road, Liverpool 18 0151 709 5820 The Ship Wheat Lane, Lathom 01704 893117 Pollards Inn Village Square, Willaston 0151 327 4615

From Johnny Kennedy Father Mullarkey was dipping his chocolate biscuit into his tea when in walked the young curate. “I got told off by the bus driver on the way back from town,” said the YC.

Easter Cards from Carmel

“What for?” asked the auld fella. “I wanted to get off when the bus stopped at the traffic lights but he wouldn’t let me. Said I had to wait till we got to the proper stop. I had to walk 200 yards back to get here.” “That happened to me once on the train from Dublin to Galway when I was about ten”, said Fr Mullarkey. “It was an express train but it stopped unexpectedly at a little station near where I lived, so I got out. The guard said, “You can’t do that” so I said, “Why?” and he said, “Cos we don't stop here”. As I ran down the platform I shouted, “That’s OK then. I never got off!”.”

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

There are still some beautiful Easter cards available at Maryton Carmel to send Easter greetings to your family and friends. Easter Sunday is 16 April this year so contact the Sisters as soon as you can. You can contact the Sisters at the Monastery: Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com

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justice & peace Postcard from Valladolid Joseph Champion-Williams’s latest month at his Spanish seminary took him from a carnival to a silent retreat – and an important spiritual question. In the past few weeks we have begun our Lenten practices of prayer, abstinence and almsgiving. But before we began our preparations for Easter, I had the wonderful opportunity to experience the Carnaval here in Valladolid. Carnaval is a time of partying, dressing up and taking part in parades. Historically it is also coupled with excessive consumption of alcohol and meat, which are both proscribed during Lent, though that part of it has mainly been left behind in Spain. But nonetheless, it is designed to prepare oneself for a sombre time of penance, and it was certainly an experience which I won't forget soon! After the noisy celebrations, we embarked on a quite different experience for the first week of Lent – a silent retreat. In preparing us for our retreat, Father Willis, the spiritual director, told us that we were only allowed to bring two things with us, a Bible and our breviary, as he didn’t want us distracted in any way during this time of silence. The evening before we began, I walked around the city with one of my brother seminarians and we discussed the upcoming retreat in great detail, particularly the question of ‘distractions’. I am a keen runner and I mentioned that I was going to take along my running gear, to which my brother replied that he had decided – after careful consideration – that this would be a distraction from prayer. Then it struck me. I had always approached the Lord – whether it be at meditation, or when beginning a retreat – with a question: Lord, are you calling me to be a priest? Now I asked myself, is this actually a distraction too? Perhaps it was the biggest distraction of all. By coming to Our Lord with this question always on my mind, I wasn’t actually being open and receptive to His desires. My desire wasn’t for Him, but for myself. On the first day of retreat I was praying a passage from the first book of Kings, and the Lord was making sure I knew this. He said to me, ‘Why are you here, Joseph?’ and I replied, ‘To listen to your voice’. Saint Ignatius of Loyola tells us that ‘the human person is created to praise, reverence, and serve God our Lord’. Our Archbishop Emeritus, Patrick Kelly, explained to me when discussing this that we can only ever approach the Lord with one question: ‘Rabbi, where do you live?’ (Jn 1:35-42). That is to say, where is His heart? The will of the Father when we approach Him in prayer is for us to surrender to His unique and specific desire for each of us, and this has to be rooted in a loving obedience. In Domino, Joseph

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Building a ‘poor Church for the poor’ By Steve Atherton, Justice & Peace fieldworker. One of the first things Pope Francis said on his election was to wish that the Church would be ‘a poor Church for the poor’. What would a poor Church look like, though, and what transformation would be necessary to become such a Church? And can we say we want to be part of this poor Church that the Pope spoke about? When I look at the Church in Rome, where I find great strength and great support, I don’t see a poor Church. My own daughters tell me they are scandalised by the wealth of the Vatican. It is not just us RCs who have ostentatious wealth. Last week I walked past Lambeth Palace, home of the Archbishop of Canterbury ... a bishop in a palace! I look at my own parish in Wigan where we have two beautiful church buildings, two presbyteries, two sets of parish rooms and a school. I don’t see a ‘poor Church’ … slightly shabby, seen-better-days, perhaps, but not poor. I look at myself: I have a home, a car, a bank account, savings, etc. Am I living as a member of a poor Church? I look around at the Church in the Archdiocese and wonder how many of us could feel comfortable with that question. Do our lives match the things we say? And yet, are we actually asked to be poor? Are we required to give away our money and become poor ourselves? Aren’t we rather called into solidarity, into a way of thinking and feeling that asks us to treat our possessions as a gift we can share? That is how Jesus lived His life. His kingdom was a place where people thrived, where lives were transformed, where sickness was cured, where the blind could see, the lame could walk and the dead could live again. Our faith invites us to be part of such a life-giving movement. We can help people out of poverty. We can make a difference. We can put our resources to good use. When I look around, I see this

happening already. Pope Francis installed showers for rough sleepers in Rome and has given a home to Syrian families. The Archbishop of Canterbury has acted similarly, putting some Syrian families into Lambeth Palace. Our Archdiocese is preparing to be part of the Community Sponsorship Scheme. The two cathedrals run the Hope+ food bank. The churches in Liverpool have set up Feeding Liverpool. In short, Church people are involved wherever there is a struggle against poverty. In January, Rev Raj Patta, a Dalit Lutheran currently studying for his doctorate in Manchester, gave our Memorial Lecture. He said that in our times Reformation translates as Hospitality. I like that. We are called to care and to show that we care and not just for ourselves and our families, but for our neighbour – and we all know what an inclusive word that is for Jesus, and should be for us. The focus of our hospitality should not be ourselves, our families or people like us but must, instead, include those most in need. We know this as ‘the option for the poor’. It is good fortune and God’s grace that have placed us where we are, rather than some worthiness or virtue of our own. ‘The poor’ is what we would be if it was not for all the support structures that hold us up. I am convinced that ‘the poor’ reflect back to us how fragile we all are. This realisation is followed by a call to action. We have been helped and we can be part of this virtuous circle of help. We can get involved with national organisations such as Cafod, Church Action on Poverty, Housing Justice and Pax Christi, or we can volunteer locally with an asylum-seeker organisation, a food bank or a credit Union. That way we can help to work with some of the most vulnerable people in our world.


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Catholic Pic April 2017 issue  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic Pic April 2017 issue  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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