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Issue 139 APRIL 2016

ARCHDIOCESE OF LIVERPOOL

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Pilgrimage of Mercy Inside this issue: Celebrating 24 hours for the Lord

Brother Peter Bray on life at Bethlehem University’

New Sixth Form Centre at Crosby


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contents Welcome A happy and blessed Easter and a reminder that Easter celebrations last for a full fifty days in the Liturgical Calendar of the Church. In our Holy Week celebrations we remembered those days in the Holy Land which saw the death and resurrection of the Lord. This month we meet in our profile Brother Peter Bray, a De La Salle Brother who is Vice Chancellor of Bethlehem University. His interview offers us something of the beauty of that land but also reminds us of the challenges which Christians face on a daily basis. It is a reminder too that we have to hold all who live there in prayer. In this Year of Mercy we all have an opportunity to make a pilgrimage of prayer to our Metropolitan Cathedral. Each of our Pastoral Areas has been assigned a Saturday morning to visit the Cathedral: to enter through the Holy Door, pray the Stations of Mercy and celebrate reconciliation and Mass. The first groups have already visited and our main feature gives a flavour of the prayerful atmosphere which they enjoyed. Let us all take this opportunity to pray for our needs and those of the world around us.

From the Archbishop’s Desk

The Pope Paul VI font which welcomes pilgrims to the Cathedral for the Year of Mercy pilgrimages, pictured as Bishop Tom Williams celebrates Mass for pilgrims from Knowsley

Contents 4

Main Feature Year of Mercy Pilgrimages Experiencing the love and kindness of God

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News From around the Archdiocese

One of the enduring memories of my childhood was seeing the Wakefield Mystery Plays at Bernard Miles's famous Mermaid Theatre at Puddle Dock in the City of London, just a stone's throw from the medieval Blackfriars. The stage for the plays was built on two levels. The upper part, which was bathed in light, was the place of truth where the great works of God's glory were acted out. The lower stage was in darkness and it was a place of betrayal and untruth, suffering and death. Of course the irony contained in the conclusion to the play is that after Jesus has been nailed to the cross on the floor of the dark, lower stage, the cross is hauled into an upright position, and as Jesus the Son of Man is lifted up on this instrument of execution it breaks through into the light of the upper level. In this simple portrayal of the crucifixion of Jesus, we can grasp the heart of the mystery of our redemption: that crucifixion can lead to glorification, that suffering and death leads to resurrection. During this Easter season let us look for the signs of redemption that are before our eyes, the glimpses of the resurrection of our Lord. Let us look for signs of life amongst the desperate struggles in the Middle East, the refugees and asylum seekers, among those who are hungry and homeless. And, you never know, you might be such a sign of Christ’s light and life to someone who is living in darkness. Most Rev Malcolm McMahon OP Archbishop of Liverpool

14 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 15 Nugent News Nugent Care at 135 16 What’s On Whats happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Brother Peter Bray FSC Vice Chancellor of Bethlehem University 25 Cathedral Record Joyful alleluias at the Cathedral 26 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 27 Animate Youth Ministry My year in youth ministry

Editor Peter Heneghan Editorial Catholic Pictorial Magazine Liverpool Archdiocesan Centre for Evangelisation, Croxteth Drive, Liverpool L17 1AA Tel: 0151 522 1007 Email: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk Pictures Cover, main feature and profile; Peter Heneghan Advertising Andrew Rogers 0151 709 7567 Publisher 36 Henry Street, Liverpool L1 5BS

Copy deadline May issue 11 April 2016

28 Pic Life There but for the grace of God…

CPMM Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced copied or transmitted in any form or by any means or stored in any information storage or retrieval system without the publishers written permission. Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, Catholic Pictorial Ltd. can accept no responsibility for the veracity of the claims made by advertisers.

29 Join In Family Fun and More Mullarkey 30 Justice and Peace Reflections on the EU referendum

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Cathedral welcomes first Year of Mercy pilgrims Pilgrims draw strength from peace, togetherness and God’s mercy at the Metropolitan Cathedral By Simon Hart 'WHEREVER you looked, you could see people experiencing the love and kindness of God.’ These were the affirming words of a parishioner of St Margaret Mary’s, Knotty Ash after the first day of pastoral area pilgrimages to the Metropolitan Cathedral for the Year of Mercy. That gathering of pilgrims on 27 February marked the beginning of a Saturday series of pilgrimages to the Cathedral as the celebrations of this special year gathered momentum within Liverpool Archdiocese. More than 700 pilgrims descended on the Cathedral from Liverpool North, Stoneycroft and Croxteth on the first Saturday and the following weekend, another group arrived at the Door of Mercy at the East Porch, this time from Liverpool South, Woolton and Halewood, and Liverpool Central. A week later, on 12 March, it was the turn of the new pastoral area of Knowsley (Prescot, Huyton and Kirkby). Bishop Tom Williams led each of this

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opening trio of pilgrimages and each began with words of welcome from Canon Anthony O’Brien, Dean of the Cathedral, who said: ‘It is good to stop here on the threshold of the Holy Door and give thanks for all the “doors” God opens for us.’ For every Year of Mercy pilgrim in 2016, their pilgrimage will follow the same format: it will begin with the Stations of Mercy, continue with a Service of Reconciliation and private confessions, and then conclude with midday Mass. Father Mark Moran, parish priest at St Margaret Mary’s, spoke of the affecting experience of the opening pilgrimage at the end of February. ‘Fifty parishioners attended and we did not know what to expect,’ he said. ‘We went because we had been invited to go by Archbishop Malcolm but what a wonderful morning we had. The Stations of Mercy were beautiful and the accompanying booklet with the reflections allowed you to really focus on the mercy of God. The Cathedral was packed but there was a great sense of peace.’ As Father Mark mentioned, each pilgrim receives a booklet to accompany their

‘It is good to stop here on the threshold of the Holy Door and give thanks for all the “doors” God opens for us’

Right: Bishop Tom leads pilgrims in the Stations of Mercy worship and help them reflect on the six Stations of Mercy. Each station provides a specific theme to ponder. The first offers an image of the face of Jesus and an opportunity to follow the call of Psalm 46 and ‘Be still … and know that I am God’. Next comes an invitation to experience the forgiveness of God. The image inspired by Luke’s Gospel of the sinful woman washing Jesus’s feet with her tears and drying them with her hair is a cue to consider how ‘God loves you and forgives you just as you are’. The third station focuses on the Eucharist. ‘The Mass,’ we are told, ‘is a meeting with mercy. Jesus said, “This is my body, given for you. This is my blood, poured out for you.” For most Catholics Mass is the place where we know we are close to God.’ The fourth station, titled Mercy When We Die, is a reflection on Psalm 23 (‘Even if I walk in the valley of death…’), offering a contemplation on death – a subject often evaded in our contemporary culture. After Station Five, which looks at the healing power of mercy through the parable of the prodigal son, we are asked in the sixth and final station to look at ways of ‘living mercy’ in our world today. The words of Pope Francis are particularly pertinent as he tell us: ‘Prayer that doesn’t lead to concrete action towards our brothers and sisters is a fruitless and incomplete prayer.’ For Father Mark, other aspects of the


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pilgrimage were equally fruitful. He said: ‘As a priest I found it humbling to hear so many confessions of people who had not been to confession for many years but they felt they had to come and receive this outpouring of God's love for them. The Mass was a real celebration too, a wonderful sense of togetherness and community. To be fair, I was sceptical about what was going to happen when we all turned up at the Cathedral that Saturday morning, but I left at 1pm full of

joy, peace and feeling the real forgiveness and mercy of God in my life once more.’

welcoming more groups from across the Archdiocese as the Year of Mercy continues.’

Canon Anthony O’Brien was equally pleased with the success of these first few pilgrimages. “The feedback from the days has been very positive with pilgrims commenting that the mornings have been enjoyable, prayerful and very worthwhile. Even the clergy have enjoyed them! We are looking forward to

Future pilgrimages: April 9 – Leigh, Ashton and Wigan April 16 – Widnes and Warrington April 23 – St Helens April 30 – Bootle and Crosby October 1 – Southport and Leyland October 8 – Chorley October 15 – Ormskirk and Upholland

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feature

Above: Pilgrims from Knowsley enter through the Holy door

‘Going through the Door gave a sense that we were really passing through something special’ 6

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Pilgrims’ impressions ‘I found it very emotional as we walked through the Holy Door to think of the first door into Church, Baptism, and all the doors that have opened since in our lives. It was great to see so many at Confession – people have told me they had not been for years and that they really felt the mercy of God expressed by the priests who welcomed them. For some people it was their first time in the Cathedral. It was good to see what a wide age range was there.’ Mary Colghlan ‘A warm and uplifting experience of peace, pilgrimage, companionship, community and of God’s mercy.’ Maureen Wilcock ‘I wanted my sins, past and present, to be forgiven by Jesus but I was nervous as I did not really know what it would entail. We went outside and walked to the side of the Cathedral and I could see a door. I asked one of the group: ‘Is that the Mercy Door?’ ‘Yes,’ they replied. I started to feel excited inside my soul as I knew the moment I walked through and asked in my soul for Jesus to forgive, he would. We all said a small prayer before entering and then walked through. I noticed a picture on the wall saying, ‘As soon as we repent, God forgets’. I thought this was beautiful. I am truly glad I went.’ DelRita Abdulah ‘Going through the Door gave a sense that we were really passing through something special. We blessed ourselves in the font and then were off to the Lady Chapel where Father Grant Maddock gave us a fantastic reflection on Mary and the Year of Mercy. After this we journeyed on around the Cathedral, which gave us the sense of pilgrimage, to the Baptistery. After another wonderful reflection and renewal of Baptismal promises we moved on to the stations. The reflections were beautifully presented, after which Canon Tony O’Brien brought us back together to experience a beautiful Reconciliation Service with individual confessions. This was a most wonderful time, with the Cathedral still bathed in a strong red glow from the Reconciliation Chapel window.’ Peter Benson ‘It is quite a while since I have been at the Cathedral as part of a celebration, but I was truly amazed and heartened to see so many young families taking part. They are a credit to our parish and wider Catholic community.’ Liz Scrutton


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“An Outstanding Catholic School” Liverpool Archdiocese


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News diary If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Island honour for Canon John

Monsignor John Devine, Parish Priest of St Mary of the Isle, Douglas and Dean of the Isle of Man has been installed as a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter of St German at the Anglican Cathedral of the Isle of Man. The Cathedral Chapter of St German consists of the Dean, the Archdeacon and four Canons. The Bishop of Sodor and Man has formed a body known as the 'Greater Chapter', consisting of members of the Cathedral Chapter together with a number of people of his choice as Honorary or Lay Canons. Each member of the greater chapter accepts an area of responsibility for the Island-wide life and mission of the Cathedral. Bishop Robert Paterson, Bishop of Sodor and Man, said following the installation, 'I am pleased that John has joined the Cathedral Chapter and brings with him a great wealth of experience which we look forward to seeing enrich the life of the Cathedral and ecumenical relations across the Island.'

Dementia Friends More and more people these days are close to someone living with dementia, which may be why more than 100 participants turned up for the Pastoral Formation Department’s recent session on Dementia Awareness for Funeral Ministers, Bereavement Teams and School Chaplains. If those present had been asked if they knew what dementia is when they arrived they would probably have said either ‘I think so’ or ‘I am not sure’. If you had asked them again as they came out, you would have got much more confident answers. Some left saying it was one of the best and most enlightening sessions they had been to in a long time. Phil Sergeant, the Archdiocesan Adviser for Sick and Retired Clergy and a Dementia Friends Champion, led the Alzheimer’s Society’s Dementia Friends information session, explaining the five things about dementia that everyone should know and inviting people to sign up to become a Dementia Friend. He was followed by Brenda Stagg, the

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Dementia Support Manager from the Alzheimer’s Society, who explained the different forms of dementia, how they can be recognised, and how people can be supported. Gina Shaw, a former nurse, then gave an insight into her own personal experience of slowly discovering that she has a dementia. She explained how she had to struggle to get an early diagnosis of her condition, how she came to terms with it and the way she has turned it into a positive opportunity. She is now the poster girl for the Dementia Friends programme and actively engaged in spreading awareness of what dementia is and how people can live well with it. As part of its action plan to create Dementia Friendly Communities, the Archdiocese is committed to making the Alzheimer’s Society Dementia Friends

information session available in all our parish communities. To make this happen, we need people who have completed the one-day training and become Dementia Friends Champions. If you are a Dementia Friends Champion, or you would like to become one, please contact Maureen Knight at the Pastoral Formation Department, 0151 522 1046, m.knight@rcaol.co.uk You can find out more about the training at https://www.dementiafriends.org.uk The diocesan Action Plan drawn up by our Dementia Working Group is now on the Dementia Action Alliance website where it is listed as Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool: www.dementiaaction.org.uk/local_alliances /3012_liverpool_dementia_action_alliance.


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news diary Sixth form celebrations in Crosby

Archbishop Malcolm joined staff, students and guests at Sacred Heart High School, Crosby to celebrate the official opening of their new Sixth Form Centre. The Archbishop blessed the new building after words from Monsignor John Furnival, Parish Priest of St Peter and St Paul, Crosby. As part of the ceremony students past and present gave renditions of Vivaldi’s ‘Spring’ (‘Four Seasons’), James Bay’s ‘Hold Back the River’ and Puccini’s ‘Nessun Dorma’. Work on the new block, which houses a new coffee bar, gym and study facilities, started approximately a year ago. Headteacher, Ian Walker, said: ‘These are very exciting times for us at the College. Strong performances across a whole range of areas have meant our Sixth Form numbers have grown considerably in recent years. The Archdiocese of Liverpool has kindly worked with us in bringing the next exciting phase of our journey to fruition. ‘The new block will add to the updated study facilities provided in the last academic year, when we invested in new computing and wifi facilities for our Upper School students to use during study periods. We are really proud of our students and want to get the best for them.’

24 hours for the Lord at Holy Cross Holy Cross church in St Helens town centre united with Pope Francis in Rome for a celebration of ‘24 hours for the Lord’ at the beginning of March. Holy Cross is designated as a Jubilee Church for the year of Mercy and from 4.00 pm on Friday 4 March to 4.00 pm on Saturday 5 March it opened its doors to become a centre for reconciliation and mercy. Over 700 people from across the Archdiocese and beyond came to pray before the Blessed Sacrament with an estimated 150 receiving the Sacrament of Reconciliation as priests remained available for private confessions throughout the night. Parish Priest, Father Sean Riley, said, ‘there were so many blessings during the 24 hours with hundreds of people through our doors and non-stop confessions. Everyone who came to the church received a listening ear and some made return visits during the time of pilgrimage.’ Saturday’s midday prayer was celebrated by Father Peter Kelly, one of the ‘Missionaries of Mercy’ specially commissioned by Pope Francis. The Vigil concluded with Evening Prayer followed by Benediction with Father Joe Bibby presiding.

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news diary

In memory of Sister Dorothy

Bishop Tom Williams, celebrated Mass with Father Graeme Dunne of St Anthony’s, Scotland Road and Father Michael Fitzsimons from St John the Evangelist, Kirkdale at Notre Dame Catholic College to dedicate the performing arts area as the Dorothy Stang Theatre.

the late 1990s she was named on a ‘death list’ created by the power brokers of the area. Sister Dorothy had put into place programmes that created self-sufficient communities of people committed to their own independence as well as to the sustenance of the rain forest.

Sister Dorothy Stang, of the Notre Dame De Namur community, was tragically murdered in February 2005 while working in the Amazon Rain Forest in Brazil. She worked to help poor farmers build independent futures for their families and as a result, in

In the naming ceremony, attended by college staff and a large contingent of Notre Dame Sisters, Bishop Tom and Headteacher, Frances Harrison, unveiled a plaque in Sister Dorothy’s honour.

£10,000 for Cafod

Since the early 1980s Mike Merriman and Mike Dooling MBE have raised over £450,000 for Cafod with the money often going to support emergency appeals. Last December’s run raised more than £10,000 for the Emergency Syria Appeal which has gone to provide food, shelter and support to those most in-need. Children have received crucial counselling in safe spaces, to help them cope with the atrocities that they have experienced. There were challenges at home too for Mike and Mike with the floods almost forcing Mike Dooling to stay at home. However, he battled floods at six o'clock in the morning, to make it through saying; ‘Floods couldn't keep people away.’

Mike Dooling and Mike Merriman with Cafod’s Colette Byrne. 10

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The run is now in its third decade and planning for this year’s event has already begun. Each year volunteers are needed to fulfil a variety of roles and to help plan the Fun Run. Anyone interested should contact Colette Byrne, Tel: 0151 228 4028, or email: cbyrne@cafod.org.uk


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news diary Warrington’s goodbye to Passionist Sisters Parishioners from St Oswald’s in Warrington came out in force to say goodbye to the Sisters of the Cross and Passion at a special farewell Mass. The Farewell Mass of Thanksgiving on Tuesday 23 February marked the end of an era for the Passionist Sisters, who had maintained a presence in Warrington for 117 years. A dozen Sisters were present at the Mass which was attended by a large number of parishioners as well as staff and pupils from St Oswald’s primary school. Father David Heywood, Parish Priest of St Oswald’s, concelebrated the Mass with Father John Gildea from St Peter’s, Woolston and Father Austin Griffin. In his homily, Father Heywood explained the origins of the Passionist Sisters – an Order established in Manchester in 1851 and which in January 1899 opened a convent in Warrington beside St Mary’s Benedictine church and priory and took charge of St Mary’s girls’ and infants’ schools. The Sisters left that convent on Buttermarket Street in 1929 and moved to Bruche Hall in Padgate in the newly

Presentation to Sister Maire O’Sullivan, Provincial Leader

founded St Oswald’s parish. At one stage they taught in six different schools across Warrington – including St Oswald’s where they worked until 1988. By 1997 none of the Warrington Sisters were teaching but from their convent at Bruche Hall and then from Tree Tops Close they continued their other apostolates: instructing converts; parish visitation, especially of the sick and needy; opening the convent and its grounds for days of recollection; helping with sacramental programmes; organising pilgrimages; and

parochial involvement as Readers or as Eucharistic ministers. At the end of the farewell Mass, Father Heywood presented Sister Maire O’Sullivan, the Provincial Leader, with a cheque from the parish to help to pay for providing nursing and care homes for the sick and elderly Sisters. In the words of one member of the Order, Sister Dominic Savio: ‘The Sisters did not want to leave but, like the clergy, they were experiencing a dwindling number of vocations and increasing age.’

20,000 palms in Aintree The weeks leading up to Palm Sunday were busy for Liverpool company Hayes and Finch as the Aintreebased firm import some 20,000 specially cultivated palms from Spain every year meaning a strict four-week palm delivery procedure. On their arrival, the branches, each one measuring approximately 20 foot in length and still in a raw state, cut straight from the palm tree, undergo a series of processes including sorting, chopping and stripping to create a selection of finished products, including display branches and batches of single palm leaves. Given the time-sensitive nature

of the operation and the strict delivery schedules for churches throughout the United Kingdom and Ireland, the company employs additional workers during this period to facilitate a successful operation. Hayes and Finch palm manager, James Finch says, ‘We have approximately four weeks from time of delivery, to process, pack and dispatch the palm to ensure it reaches our customers in good time for Palm Sunday.’ James has been overseeing these proceedings for over 15 years, even visiting the plantations to ensure the cultivation of the palm meets the highest standards.

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new diary

Cardinal Heenan House hosts Dementia Awareness Day

Bishop Tom Williams with (right) Kerry Ellison, manager together with residents and team leader (left) Kelly McPherson. Picture: Champion Media Group

“A magical occasion” was one description of the 6th Annual Dementia Awareness Day at Cardinal Heenan House in Roby Mill, Upholland on 12 March. This was the verdict of Father Stephen Beale, chaplain to the community at the care home which offers specialist dementia care. Father Stephen was part of an impressive cast list of speakers who contributed to an event attended by Bishop Tom Williams, Methodist minister Rev Daniel French, and Councillor Nikki Hennessy, the Mayor of West Lancashire. It was Father Stephen who began the day with a presentation titled ‘HeARTs and Minds’, a pastoral care project initiative currently in gestation which invites young people, through the arts, to train as volunteers to visit people with dementia in their homes or care homes. Local musical duo Alan Hart and Ian Unsworth then showed the importance of music for people with dementia, who are still able to remember songs and hymns, and next was a presentation delivered by Sister Rachel Duffy, who spoke about her involvement with ‘The Reader’, a Liverpool-based project which highlights the importance of reading – poetry, in particular – to those living with dementia. Children from St Marie's Parish in Standish participated with the readings and then had the opportunity to meet some of the Cardinal Heenan House residents. They saw how some residents have ‘dementia dolls’ which call to mind children they may have once cared for.

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The afternoon session included talks from Father Stephen, who spoke about the spiritual aspects of dementia, and Libby Wilson, a founder member of OWLS (Older, Wiser and Longer), who discussed her group’s community efforts and her own experience of living with her husband Ted, who has been diagnosed with vascular dementia. Bishop Tom offered a reflection on his parents’ dementia and then it was the turn of Anne Marie Sandelands – a physiotherapist working with people living with dementia and representative of Dementia Friends, an Alzheimer’s Society initiative – who spoke about the five main points defining dementia. The final speaker of the day was Joanne Tocker, a team leader from the Cardinal Heenan House staff who promotes the dementia resource Dignity, highlighting the need to approach all people living with dementia as respected members of the community.

‘Spirituality within our School’ Friday 29 April is the closing date for a photographic competition for schools in the Archdiocese with the theme ‘Spirituality within our School’. The competition organised by the Archdiocesan Secondary Schools’ Partnership follows on from last year’s successful student conference on British values. There will be categories for year groups in schools with prizes for the top three entries in each. Winning entries will be displayed in a number of locations across the Archdiocese. Later in the year on Friday 1 July the partnership will be holding a Public Speaking Contest open to 11-14 year old students and hosted by Archbishop Beck Catholic Sports College in Liverpool.


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FEAST OF DIVINE MERCY Sunday 3rd April 2016 In St Faustina’s book ‘Diary’, she quotes Our Lord who told her to paint an image of the vision she saw of Him. 47 Paint an image according to the pattern you see, with the signature: ‘Jesus, I trust in You.’ 299 The two rays denote blood and water. The pale ray stands for the water which makes souls righteous. The red ray stands for the blood which is the life of souls... 570 By means of this Image I shall be granting many graces to souls; so let every soul have access to it. 1379 Already there are many souls who have been drawn to my love by this image. My mercy acts in souls through this work. 699 “The soul that will go to Confession (within the octave of the feast) and receive Holy Communion on the Feast day, shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment” Archdiocese venues celebrating the Feast of Divine Mercy - start time Our Lady Star of the Sea, Seaforth 1.30pm Devotions, Confession Mass 4 pm (Divine Mercy shop - bus 53 from Liverpool) St Francis of Assisi, Garston, Liverpool Saturday 6 pm Vigil Mass and talk by Polish nuns Sunday 2.30 pm Devotions, Confession St Monica’s, Fernhill Road Bootle Due to renovations, devotions will be in English Martyrs School Lane, Litherland. 1.30pm Confessions, talk by Polish nuns, 3pm Devotions and Mass St Clares, Arundel Avenue, Liverpool 3.00pm Exposition, Devotions, Confession, Benediction Our Lady of the Annunciation Bishop Eaton Liverpool 2.00pm Rosary, Devotions, 3pm Bless Image, Mass (refreshments after Mass) St Aloysius, Huyton, Liverpool 2.00pm Devotions, Confession Mass 5.00pm Holy Spirit, Ford 3.00pm Confessions, Exposition, Devotions St Edmund of Canterbury, Waterloo 2.00pm Confessions, Ven of Image, Devotions and Mass Our Lady of Lourdes, Hillside, Birkdale 1.30pm Confessions, Rosary, Devotions, Mass 3.15pm St Patrick, Clinkham Wood, St Helens 2.30pm Confessions, 3pm Devotions St Mary’s Broadfield Drive, Leyland 3.00pm Devotions, Confessions, Healing Service Mass 5.00pm Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley 3.00pm Exposition, Confessions Devotions Mass 4.00pm St Mary’s, Standishgate, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Confessions Mass 4.30pm Holy Family, New Springs, Wigan 3.00pm Devotions Our Lady Star of the Sea, Ramsey, Isle of Man 2.00pm Confessions, Devotions

DIVINE MERCY SHOP for leaflets, Divine Mercy pictures etc.

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sunday reflections On a liturgical note You may think me a little behind the times in wishing you this, but Eastertide is 50 whole days, so the greeting which is customary in some of the Eastern churches at this time of the year will serve well here: Christ is Risen – He is risen indeed. The whole of the Liturgical year is celebrated with this as the permanent perspective: the Lord IS risen, and the fact of the Resurrection changes everything – the way in which we pray, the way in which we celebrate, the way in which we live – and indeed the way in which we die, for ‘dying you destroyed our death, rising you restored our life…’. But it is amazing (or startling) how the year flies by, for no sooner will we have celebrated the Feast of Pentecost – the 50th day after Easter, this year on 15 May – than the television will be wooing us with the ‘musthave’ present for Christmas 2016! The time certainly flies by but hopefully somewhere, somehow, we become that bit wiser, that bit closer to God –

Sunday thoughts As well as riding them I enjoy taking motorcycles to pieces and putting them back together again. I will also have a go at washing machines and vacuum cleaners. I’m not Isambard Kingdom Brunel or George Stephenson but I find that solving mechanical and electrical problems is the perfect antidote to dealing with people. My bike doesn’t work, I fix it; task complete. So when I read that a significant number of Islamic fundamentalists are engineering graduates, it set me wondering if the same might apply to Christian fundamentalists. Scientists hate unanswered questions. That is what drives them. Students of the humanities, however, are happy to live alongside unanswered questions. Artists and novelists and musicians aren’t really concerned with the ‘right’ answers. They answer one question with another. When it comes to decision time they tend to go with their feelings. I think that Thomas the Apostle might have been an engineer. He wanted to know the right answer. He lined up the evidence and found it wanting. He probably berated the other

Canon Philip Gillespie

and that bit more able to witness to the neverchanging reality of the Resurrection, and the gift of the Holy Spirit which is the very lifeblood of the Church. Well, that is the hope anyway! The reality we may feel is very different – but often we are our own worst critics. This Eastertide, therefore, be grateful for the many ways in which in the past, present and, we hope, future, the life-giving Spirit has guided us to make best use of the many gifts and talents we have received from the gracious hand of God. We may sometimes be the last person to actually recognise those gifts we have, so may we always be ready and open to what others recognise and suggest for us – and willing to put our gifts at the service of the family of faith, for God loves a cheerful giver!

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There are lots of golden moments that I have held on to down the years from the time my mum was dying. When we were told that she was terminally ill, Mum cried then she sat up in bed, wiped her eyes and said, ‘Well, now it’s time for me to put my money where my mouth has been. It’s time to die as a believer in resurrection and life.’ I have realised over the years how costly it is to live in that way. It is far easier to live believing in badness rather than goodness, death rather than life, to be bitter and angry at what life throws at you. This seems to be the response to life that most human beings have. Without grace we live in narrow prisons of our own making. We point the finger and blame and judge.

Mgr John Devine OBE

apostles for getting carried away. The wounds in Jesus’s hands and feet were the decisive piece of evidence he sought. The contrast between Peter and Thomas is clear. Peter is always ready to have a go and take the plunge; to shoot first and ask questions later. Thomas makes a virtue of suspicion. The description ‘Doubting’ is seen by most of us as negative. Thomas would have been pleased with his nickname. Is faith an issue of the mind or the heart? Some Christians delight in scouring the scriptures to find clues that will make their faith watertight and rational. Others are warmed by accounts of the powerful chemistry between Jesus and his followers and those whom he healed. Is faith a gift, a grace, or is it a puzzle to be solved? ‘My Lord and my God’ and ‘You are the Christ, the Son of the living God’ are both perfect acts of faith. Thomas and Peter arrive at the same place by different routes.

Weekly Reflections are on the Archdiocesan website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/reflection 14

Disciples of the Risen Lord

To live in the light of the resurrection invites us to deep, inner radical change where the fruits of the resurrection are seen in our lives. To be a disciple means living by values that contradict the values of those around you. Compassion, love and mercy become our core values, the building blocks of our lives as they were for Jesus. That, in turn, means that we can no longer divide and separate. It means we have to choose to find goodness in all things. It means we have to learn to respect the created order. It means that we have to hold the tension, refusing to judge or condemn even when this is demanded of us. To be a disciple in today’s world demands deep inner change at the very core of our being. It is about widening our vision and seeing more clearly. Grace is the only means for that change to happen. The question for all of us is whether or not we are prepared to be committed to allowing grace to lead us into the way of radical change so that the world will see in us, and through us, the risen Jesus . Father Chris Thomas


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nugent news Nugent Care at 135 2016 sees Nugent Care celebrate its 135th anniversary

The origins of Nugent Care date back to the 1800s and the pioneering work of Roman Catholic Priest, Monsignor James Nugent (1822-1905). Father Nugent was a passionate social reformer, appalled by the state of the homeless living in the squalor of Victorian England and dedicated his life to the education and rescue of destitute children and founded the Liverpool Catholic Children's Protection Society on 16 April 1881. Father Nugent was born on 3 March 1822 in Hunter Street, Liverpool and was ordained to the Diaconate in 1845, a year later he was ordained to the Priesthood at St Nicholas, Liverpool. As well as founding Nugent Care, his many achievements include: starting a Ragged School in Spitalfields, a Middle School for Boys in Rodney Street and a refuge for fallen women in Paul Street, establishing the Catholic Reformatory Association, founding the Catholic Times, being appointed the first Catholic chaplain to Walton Gaol and launching the Clarence Reformatory Ship to send children to Canada. In 1892 Father Nugent was made domestic prelate with title of Monsignor by Pope Leo XIII. Father Nugent’s statue (erected in 1906) can be seen today in St John’s Gardens, adjoining St George’s Hall in Liverpool. The plaque on the statue reads ‘Apostle of Temperance, Protector of the Orphan Child, Consoler of the Prisoner, Reformer of the Criminal, Saviour of Fallen Womanhood, Friend of all in Poverty, a

foot to the lame, the Father of the Poor.’ The work of Father Nugent had a dramatic impact on the lives of thousands of vulnerable people and his work continues to this day, through Nugent Care. Nugent Care is the Social welfare arm of the Archdiocese of Liverpool but our work reaches out to anyone in need and last year we worked directly with over 370 children and young people, supported through our schools and projects, over 200 adults in our residential care homes and over 4,200 individuals gained support through our community services. Today the wide range of services Nugent Care has to offer allows us to provide a highly individualised and tailored approach to all our service users. We work with children, adults and community groups through our homes, schools and community based projects throughout the North West, ensuring people’s rights, independence, interdependence, choice and inclusion are integrated into everything we do. As we celebrate our 135th anniversary Nugent Care is looking forward, and developing a revitalised vision to continue the kind and essential work started by Father Nugent, helping the most vulnerable people in our communities, caring, educating, protecting and inspiring those in need and being an advocate: A voice for the voiceless.

I am a person of Action To move quickly (but safely) takes courage with a good dose of optimism. Recently we have been preparing for a series of short conferences highlighting the great work that Nugent Care carries out and discussing the direction of our future in an ever changing world. In doing so, I was passed a piece of work by a fellow named Andy Andrews. Mr. Andrews is an American author of self-help/advice books and a corporate speaker. In one of his books, ‘The Traveler’s Gift’, he makes mention of a viewpoint called ‘The Seven Decisions’. One of these seven decisions particularly resonated with me. This is decision number three; the Active Decision. He writes; ‘I am a person of action. I am energetic. I move quickly. Knowing that laziness is a sin. I will create a habit of lively behaviour. I will walk with a spring in my step and a smile on my face. The lifeblood rushing through my veins is urging me upward and forward into activity and accomplishment. Wealth and prosperity hide from the sluggard, but rich rewards come to the person who moves quickly.’ Clearly within the charitable sector we do not chase wealth in its most common form but we constantly are looking for riches in terms of a healthy, happy and dignified life for beneficiaries of the services we provide. Our external environment ever changing. Funding is changing, organisations are changing, legislation changing and the greater world is changing. In order that we continue to provide care, inspiration and education for the most vulnerable in our community we must be mindful to move with alacrity. To do otherwise would be a disservice to the people we serve. Children are experiencing developmental milestones, older adults may be experiencing care at the end of their lives and in order to continue to be there for them we must be fleet of foot in order to assist both in our professional lives, and in our personal lives. Taking action inspires others to do the same. We are looking forward to moving quickly with courage, and a healthy dose of optimism. Normandie Wragg Chief Executive – Nugent Care

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what’s on Sunday 3 April Day of Divine Mercy Divine Mercy Devotions 2.00 pm at Holy Family, Hall Lane, Cronton, Widnes, WA8 5DP. Divine Mercy Service 3.00 pm at Sacred Heart, Brooke Street, Chorley, PR6 0NG. 3.00 pm Chaplet of Divine Mercy, followed by individual Confessions, Rosary and Mass at 3.45 pm. Monday 4 April Adoration and Healing evening with Benediction on the Feast of the Annunciation 7.30 pm at St Oswald’s, Padgate Lane, Warrington, WA1 3LB. Adoration led by Deacon Tony Kerrigan with Healing Ministry led by Canon Eric Fisher (Anglican Priest). Details Tel: 01925 480279 Thursday 7 April Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Saturday 9 April Car Boot Sale 8.00 am onwards in the Cathedral Car Park. Pitches £10. Details from Claire Hanlon 0151 709 9222, Ext. 201 or c.hanlon@metcatherdal.org.uk ‘Mercy and Compassion An inter-faith conversation.’ 9.30 am to 5.00 pm at Boarbank Hall, Allithwaite, Grange over Sands, Cumbria, LA11 7NH. Cost: £10 including buffet lunch and tea and coffee. Details: Sister Margaret Atkins Email: margaret@boarbankhall.org.uk Tel: 015395 32288

Friday 1 April to Friday 22 April St Francis of Assisi: challenger, mystic, visionary: Saint for our times: Thekla Kampelmann’s Exhibition of paintings on display in the Abraham chapel at the Metropolitan Cathedral. A parishioner of St Paul’s Poynton, Cheshire, Thekla’s art shows the particular relevance of Francis to our own times as we celebrate the Year of Mercy. At a time when moral standards were in decline and Christian discipleship was superficial, Francis challenged people to respect all humanity, all creatures and the whole cosmos as God’s work of art. That belief in the dignity of every human person, that respect for the natural world, for all creatures great and small, is now massively challenged by a world being torn apart. Thekla Kampelmann’s paintings suggest that St Francis has an important message for our times. for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King.

Sehion Youth Ministry Pursuit Retreat led by Father Kevin McLoughlin 11.00 am to 4.00 pm at Holy Name church, Moss Pits Lane, Fazakerley, L10 9LG. Open to age 16+. Details: Justin Tel: 07990 623054 or Sharon Tel: 07712 472609.

Saturday 23 April Solemnity of St George, Patron of England

Thursday 14 April ‘We find our joy in the Risen Lord.’ Day of Retreat for the Year of Mercy led by Father Pat O’Brien. 10.30 am - 3.30 pm (Mass at 10.00 am) at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, Formby, L37 1PH. Tel: 01704 875850 Email: theprayercentre.stj@gmail.com Suggested donation: £20. Saturday 16 April UCM Annual General Meeting 1.00 pm in the Gibberd Room of the

World of Atherton

Sunday 10 April ‘Mercy and the Augustinian Charism.’ 3.30 pm to 6.30 pm at Boarbank Hall, Allithwaite, Grange over Sands, Cumbria, LA11 7NH. Details: Sister Margaret Atkins Email: margaret@boarbankhall.org.uk Tel: 015395 32288 Tuesday 12 April Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time

website at www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk/holyweek2016 16

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Sunday 17 April World Day of Prayer for Vocations

Wednesday 27 April Taize Chants with Scripture Reflections and Prayers 7.15 pm at St Joseph’s Prayer Centre, Blundell Avenue, Freshfield, Formby, L37 1PH. Tel: 01704 875850 Email: theprayercentre.stj@gmail.com Saturday 30 April Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.comLooking ahead:


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april Looking ahead Monday 2 May HCPT Diamond Jubilee Mass 12.00 noon in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. Wednesday 4 May UCM Bi-monthly Mass 7.30 pm at Holy Rosary, Altway, Liverpool, L10 2LG. Thursday 5 May Agape Mass 8.00 pm at St Mary’s, Prescot Road, Aughton, L39 6TA. Details: Archie Cameron Tel: 01704 224286. Tuesday 10 May Time Out on Tuesdays 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Open to all who are involved in any form of ministry or service to others, giving time for silence and personal reflection. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com Saturday 28 May Quiet Day 10.00 am at the Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Time to be quiet, reflect and pray. Offering £10 per person. For further details contact: Sister Winifred. Tel: 0151 722 2271, Email: winniecenacle@mail.com

Cenacolo supporting families hurt by addiction For people struggling with drug and alcohol addictions – and the families affected – there is a Catholic community in Liverpool which offers a fresh source of hope. Cenacolo is an organisation with a worldwide network of homes for young people stricken by addictions and which also provides support and prayer groups for worried parents and youngsters seeking advice. Here in Liverpool, the Cenacolo support group meets at the Blessed Sacrament Shrine on Dawson Street each Tuesday evening (7-9pm) under the guidance of Father Michael McCormack, the spiritual director. This weekly gathering offers an opportunity for families of children receiving support from Cenacolo, or parents burdened with questions, to come together in front of the Blessed Sacrament for a period of prayer, followed by a meeting. Cenacolo also organises a Holy Hour each Sunday evening from 7-8pm at Holy

Family Church in Cronton, Widnes, while on the final weekend of February, the Liverpool Archdiocese group held a retreat at Boarbank Hall in the Lake District (see photo). Cenacolo was founded in Italy in 1983 by Mother Elvira, a religious Sister from Saluzzo in northern Italy. She saw the need to help young people struggling through drug or alcohol addiction. After receiving the donation of a derelict house, she had it rebuilt and this became the first of what today is a community of 69 homes around the world for young men and women. There are homes in Lourdes, Knock, Fatima and Medjugorje – and also Dodding Green in Cumbria, where the house caters for young men. The Bishop of Lancaster, Michael Campbell, will be celebrating a Mass there for Cenacolo’s English community on 1 May. Deacon John McClure works with Cenacolo in the Liverpool Archdiocese and says: ‘We have an ethos built on spirituality, love and God’s providence. In this Year of Mercy Cenacolo really puts

this into effect with the work they do and the help they have given to thousands of young people.’ For further information, contact: • Fr Michael McCormack 0151 424 2129 • Margaret Stanley 0151 342 1043 • Jean McGuiness 01928 795326 • Deacon John McClure 01925 723146

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profile

Brother Peter Bray FSC

Lighting a beacon of hope in the Holy Land by Simon Hart ‘Lord, the work is yours.’ This is a mantra that Jean-Baptiste de La Salle would famously use during times of trouble and Brother Peter Bray admits the words of his order’s founder have echoed in his head many times over his eight years as Vice Chancellor of Bethlehem University. ‘I have never been confronted so often with situations where I have absolutely no idea what to do,’ he says. ‘What I have done these last eight years is to consult with people, to talk to people, to explore options, to pray about it but in the last analysis to take a step in faith and just do it.’ Brother Peter, a New Zealander, arrived in the Holy Land with more than 30 years’ experience in education – in his home country, in Australia and in the United States, where he earned a doctorate in Leadership Studies from the University of San Diego. Yet life at Bethlehem University – established in 1973 as a joint venture between the De La Salle order and the Vatican – is like nowhere else he has known. ‘Without doubt this would be the most difficult job I have had,’ he says, citing the ‘huge impact’ of the IsraeliPalestinian question as the first of

several layers of complexity. ‘Over 70 per cent of our students are Muslim so the Muslim-Christian thing is another element,’ he continues. ‘Then it is a very tribal society so that impacts on the politics around Bethlehem and then you have the family thing – everybody is related to somebody at the university.’ On top of that there is ‘the unpredictability’ of day-to-day existence and ‘the restrictions imposed by the Israelis. I feel embarrassed I can come from New Zealand and go anywhere in the Holy Land and we have Christian students born in Bethlehem whom we can’t take into Jerusalem.’ To illustrate this point he recounts how one student, 21-year-old Walid, shocked a group of visiting pilgrims by telling them he had never seen the sea – or stepped inside Jerusalem for that matter. ‘Their world of experience is so limited.’ Yet thanks to Bethlehem University he visited the United States last summer for an internship in Providence, Rhode Island. ‘He was staying with the brothers there and they took him down and showed him the sea. The irony is there is a place there called Galilee so they took him to Galilee to see the sea. He came back and said, ‘Brother, I’ve seen

the sea’. I’ve never been in a place where it is so obvious that what we are doing is worthwhile.’ For its 3,200 students, Bethlehem University provides faculties of education, nursing, science, business and arts, along with an institute of hotel management and tourism. What it offers more than anything is hope. ‘One of our biggest challenges is keeping hope alive,” says Brother Peter. ‘When people step on to our campus I want them to know they are safe and there are people there who really care about them. We talk about creating an oasis of peace for them and we want to be a beacon of hope in the midst of all of the things they are dealing with.’ In this sense, Brother Peter notes, it is worth stressing the significance of visits to the campus by pilgrims from abroad who speak to student ‘ambassadors’. ‘Hope is different from optimism,’ he adds. ‘When the Palestinians look back over the last 60-odd years there is very little that leads them to be optimistic. So I think hope has to be something different. It has to do with our students realising they are not going through this suffering by themselves.’

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St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School Pilch Lane, Liverpool L14 0JG Tel: 0151 477 8490, Fax: 0151 477 8491 Email: stmargargaret@knowsley.gov.uk Website: www.smmj.co.uk

ST EDMUND ARROWSMITH CATHOLIC CENTRE FOR LEARNING Cumber Lane Whiston Merseyside L35 2XG Principal: Martyn Campbell Assistant Principal – Teaching and Learning Leadership Group Pay Range L19 - L24 £60,131 - £67,290 per annum To commence September 2016 St Edmund Arrowsmith is an outstanding Catholic Centre for Learning and has an excellent reputation for ensuring its students achieve to the best of their ability. The Governing Body is seeking to appoint a practising Catholic as an Assistant Principal who can lead teaching and learning throughout the Centre delivering the expectation that all teaching is at least good and seeking to be outstanding within the learning environment. This is a newly created permanent post and the successful applicant will work alongside the Senior Leadership Team and Lead Practitioners who also have responsibilities for teaching and learning. The successful applicant will have the following skills, experience and professional development: • Outstanding teaching ability • Excellent record of student performance with regard to academic success at key stages 3 and 4 • Experience of having led and managed a successful department • Passion and drive to inspire teaching staff in order to improve their performance • The ability to engage and communicate with learners/students, staff and parents and carers • Self-motivation • The experience of monitoring and evaluating teaching and learning and who has had established plans for improvement for those staff who have failed to acquire good to outstanding teaching regarding lesson observations St Edmund Arrowsmith Catholic Centre for Learning is committed to safeguarding, to promoting the welfare of children and adhering to the Equality Act 2010. The successful candidate will be required to undertake an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check. To comply with the Asylum and Immigration Act 1996 all prospective employees will be required to supply evidence of eligibility to work in the UK. For an application pack and further details please contact Mrs. P. Wilson, PA to the Principal on 0151 477 8770, via email PWilson@seaonline.org.uk or visit www.seaonline.org.uk. Completed applications must be returned directly to the Centre for Learning. Visits to the Centre can be arranged via Mrs. P. Wilson Closing date: noon on Monday, 18 April 2016 Shortlisting: Thursday, 21 April 2016 Interviews: Wednesday, 27 and Thursday, 28 April 2016

Loving, learning, growing together with Jesus Chair of Governors: Mrs M Rawsthorne DEPUTY HEADTEACHER - ISR L11 – L15 £49,481 – £54,503 per annum The above salary is depending upon experience Required from September 2016 The Governors of St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School would be delighted to appoint a celebrating Catholic to our large four form entry Junior school who can demonstrate the highest standards, qualities, attributes, skills and dedication needed to work alongside the Governors and all stakeholders to help move the whole school community forward in the coming years. This will be a non-teaching appointment focused on raising attainment and working in close partnership with the Leadership Team. We are seeking a person who: • Has a strong Catholic Faith. • A clear understanding of leadership within Catholic education. • A strategic leader who can provide leadership of a high quality in the academic, pastoral and management fields and be able to show evidence of the successful implementation of change. • Has the leadership qualities needed to work with the Headteacher in order to inspire, challenge and encourage staff to achieve the best outcomes for pupils. • Is a team player and is able to work in collaboration with the leadership team and has the ability and ambition to raise standards, moving the school to outstanding. • Has excellent interpersonal, intercommunication, organisational and pastoral skills • Will continue to develop collaborative partnerships with Parents, the Parish and the wider community. We are able to offer: • A dedicated and proactive Governing Body who hold the children at the heart of everything they do • A non-teaching Deputy post • Working in partnership with the dynamic Headteacher, Leadership Team and dedicated Governors • A proactive and developing school staff, dedicated to raising standards in all areas and who embrace change • Children who are happy, enjoy learning and embracing new challenges We can offer you the chance to make a huge difference to all our pupils and staff within a friendly and supportive environment where we all strive to live, love, learn and grow together with Jesus. This post would be suitable for either an existing deputy in a smaller school or someone who has extensive leadership and management experience within a leadership team as this post offers significant professional development to Headship. Visits to the school are warmly welcomed by appointment with the Headteacher. How to apply: Further information and application packs are available from Mrs Sandra McNulty, School Business Manager, by telephone on 0151 477 8490 or email Sandra.mcnulty@knowsley.gov.uk. Alternatively, they can be downloaded from the school website http://www.smmj.co.uk or http://www.knowsley.gov.uk/jobs/knowsley-council-vacancies.aspx Completed application forms should be sent by e-mail directly to Mrs McNulty at sandra.mcnulty@knowsley.gov.uk or at the address stated above and marked for the attention of Mrs McNulty. St Margaret Mary’s Catholic Junior School is committed to safeguarding, to promoting the welfare of children and adhering to the Equality Act 2010. The successful candidate will be required to undertake an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check and health clearance by the Local Authority Occupational Health provider. To comply with the Asylum and Immigration Act 1996 all prospective employees will be required to supply evidence of eligibility to work in the UK

Closing date: Wednesday 20th April 2016, at noon Shortlisting : Wednesday 20th April 2016 Observations: Thursday 21st April to Tuesday 26th April 2016 Interviews : Wednesday 27th April & Thursday 28th April 2016


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youth ministry

My year in youth ministry Gemma Smith reflects on her experiences with the Animate Youth Ministries team. This period of Easter reminds me of how much my faith has developed and my joy in God has grown on my life’s journey so far: from primary school to high school to Lourdes pilgrimages to finally being here at Animate. Easter reminds me also of my favourite Scripture passage: “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.” (1 Corinthians13:4.) This comes up at almost every wedding but it has so many deeper meanings and I see it as God’s love for us. He has abounding patience for us, and unconditional love, no matter how many mistakes we make – something which we should never take for granted but also rejoice in, especially at this time of year! He displays his love throughout our lives and fills us with blessings, even when we feel we are drowning under life’s troubles. But not only do I see it as God’s love, I see it also as an example we should follow to love God and our neighbour. I believe Easter is a renewal of how we treat others, as Jesus has renewed us in

his Resurrection; this is why I believe that this piece of Scripture is very relevant at this time of year. I first experienced Animate when they came to my school during my Year 8 for a mission week and again in Year 11 when I visited them for a Eucharistic ministers’ training course. Not until the past year, though, did I consider spending a year at Animate. My goals have always been to follow a career in science and I have my place at university for a science degree next year. A year in youth ministry was not something I had considered before; I had initially wanted my gap year to be filled with travel. However, my feelings changed when I went to the Flame 2 congress for young Catholics with a group that Animate had organised. I loved speaking about my faith freely – being able to talk about the different aspects of it – as well as celebrating it through adoration and praise and worship music with thousands of people of my own age. This experience left me wanting to help other young people feel able to

speak about their faith as well. Animate offered this great opportunity to do just that. The deciding factor came when I visited Lowe House in the summer term last year and saw them with a group from Cardinal Heenan. I loved the whole team’s energy and commitment to the young people. I knew then that I wanted to be part of the 2015/16 team. In my day-to-day life at Animate one of my favourite moments is our community prayer time. We have a morning and evening prayer which we take turns to do in our chapel. This helps us think about different ways to pray, how we can bring God more into our lives and how we can help the people around us. They can be quite creative or more reflective, but all offer something meaningful for us. Morning prayer sets me up to work with young people each day. I’m looking forward to university next year but I cannot imagine not having done this year at Animate. I have learnt so much. I have grown in my faith and met some incredible young people and I hope I have made some impact on them. I will take all of these experiences and use them throughout my life.

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cathedral

Joyful Alleluias at the Cathedral by Dr Christopher McElroy Director of Music, Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

Cathedral Record Canon Anthony O’Brien – Cathedral Dean

An early Easter means that we are into Eastertide prior to the beginning of the month of April. The 50 days of Easter are often given less importance than the 40 days of Lent, but liturgically, here at the Cathedral, we try and keep the joyful Alleluias ringing right the way up to Pentecost. We had a record number of boys this year taking part in our voice trails to select new boy choristers for the Cathedral choir. Many of the boys took part in our new ‘Boys make noise’ singing sessions which took place in January and February. It was wonderful to see so many enthusiastic Catholic families from across the Archdiocese expressing an interest in their sons joining the cathedral choir. The decisions for the voice trial panel were very difficult, but we are very hopeful that we shall have an excellent new group of boys and their families joining us in September. The summer term sees us turn our recruitment focus to girls currently in year 5. If you know of a girl that might be interested, please direct them to the cathedral website which has all the information they require. As the Cathedral Choir is on their post Easter break during the first half of April, it gives me chance to tell you of some of the notable and exciting events coming up. As a Catholic Cathedral Choir it is important to remember that we do not exist in isolation, but rather as part of a larger body of Cathedral musicians in other Catholic cathedrals across the world, and particularly here in the British Isles. We are very much looking forward to welcoming the choirs from Brentwood Cathedral (Essex), the Pro-Cathedral,

Shortly after Easter the association of Anglican Cathedral Deans will be meeting in Liverpool for a four day annual conference. The theme this year is ‘Cathedrals in Partnership’ with speakers addressing topics on education, civic life, and ecumenical opportunities. I have been the Catholic Deans representative on this for a number of years and I have to admit that it is a much bigger and more professionally run association than our own Catholic Deans group.

Dublin and St Peter’s Cathedral, Belfast to join our own choir at Solemn Mass during June and July. When Cathedral choirs combine there are usually issues of space, and where to put everyone. Needless to say, here at the Met we don’t have that problem. Looking even further ahead, 2017 is the 50th anniversary of the Dedication of the Metropolitan Cathedral. It is shaping up to be a very exciting year with a variety of liturgies, concerts and other events planned for throughout the year. Several very exciting concerts are in the pipeline and will be publicised once confirmed. We plan on recording a special 50th anniversary CD to be sold at events during the jubilee year. The idea is to include music that has played an important role at events over the last 50 years. For example, the Cathedral’s own hymn ‘Hail Redeemer, King Divine.’ Another evergreen favourite is the chant ‘Christus Vincit.’ Archbishop Worlock had a particular love for the hymn ‘Love is his word.’ All these, and many others will hopefully feature on the CD. Watch this space for more details.

The Conference will be coming to our Cathedral for the afternoon and evening on 5th April. Archbishop Paul Gallagher will be travelling from Rome to speak to them on ‘The Holy See in global partnership – now, and in the coming decade.’ After evening prayer and a bite to eat Archbishop Malcolm and Bishop Paul Bayes will be sharing a session on working in partnership. If this doesn’t impress the visiting deans I don’t know what will. The Pastoral Area Holy Year Pilgrimages continue throughout the Saturdays in April. Our experience so far has been that most parish groups have attended in considerable numbers and the feedback from the days has been very positive with pilgrims commenting that the mornings have been enjoyable, prayerful and very worthwhile: even the clergy have enjoyed them. On Saturday 9th April it is the turn of Leigh and Wigan, on 16th Widnes and Warrington, on 23rd St Helens and Newton Le Willows and on 30th Bootle and Crosby. If any priests from other deaneries are able to come along and help with confessions on any of those Saturdays between 11.00 am and 12.00 noon it would be greatly appreciated. I will definitely need a holiday by the end of this.

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Pic extras

Mums the Word On Saturday 20 February, over 90 members of the Liverpool Archdiocesan Union of Catholic Mothers gathered for our business meeting in the Gibberd Room at the Metropolitan Cathedral, followed by a penitential service. Father David Potter, our spiritual adviser, led us through the Holy Door of Mercy (despite the rain) and on to the Blessed Sacrament Chapel where he conducted a simple and prayerful service which touched us all. This was followed by the Sacrament of Reconciliation. It was a wonderful way for us all to celebrate the Year of Mercy together. A few days earlier, on 17 February, Maria Bruns, the UCM study officer, had organised an evening for nearly 70 members at St Margaret Mary’s foundation. Due to unforeseen circumstances, the planned speaker was not able to come but thanks to the quick thinking of Maria and the wonderful team at Nugent Care, the evening was saved. Francesca Darcy, fundraising assistant at Nugent Care, gave a very interesting talk on their work, which spreads far beyond Liverpool. Many thanks, therefore, to Francesca for her contribution. • I attended a National UCM Study Day for media officers in Birmingham on 27 February. The theme of the day was how to get our message about the UCM ‘out there’ to the public. We looked at using the internet, emails and Facebook. Mrs Val Ward, our national president, conducted two of the sessions and showed us the new UCM web page – ucm.co.uk – which, I must say, is very good and full of information. She was also very keen for as many members as possible to join the UCM Facebook page. You need to be a member of Facebook (ask a child/grandchild!) and then search for the Union of Catholic Mothers page. This is a closed page for UCM members only so you can join up without worrying about others outside our organisation being able to access your details. • Saturday 16 April is the date for our AGM at the Cathedral, starting with lunch at 12 o’clock. This will be a wonderful opportunity to say a big thank you to our retiring diocesan president Angela Moore and secretary Kate Moss, and to welcome the new officers – Maria Bruns (president, St Paul’s) and Catherine Lydon (secretary, St Richard’s). I look forward to seeing you all there in the spring sunshine. God bless, Madelaine McDonald, media officer

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News from the Liverpool Province of the Knights of St Columba

Another recruitment campaign begins The Order has again embarked on a recruitment campaign for new members. A Pulpit Appeal was conducted at Masses at St Monica’s and St Richard’s churches in Bootle on 5 and 6 March while there were leaflets distributed at St Mary’s, Woolton on the same weekend. We thank the parish priests, Father Pat Sexton and Father Tim Buckley, for their kind permission to seek new members in their parishes. If you would like further information following these appeals please send your enquiries to the email address given below. Annual dinner held The annual dinner for the members of Liverpool Province 2 took place at the Britannia Adelphi Hotel on Friday 12 February. Distinguished guests included Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, who is the national spiritual adviser to the KSC, and supreme knight Charlie McCluskey and his wife Sandra. They are pictured here below, together with provincial grand knight Pat Foley and his wife Anne; past provincial grand

knight John Hamilton; provincial chaplain Rev Tom Wood; and provincial social secretary John Church and his wife Patricia. Supreme Knight Charlie McCluskey installed Archbishop Malcolm as a Member of Honour of the order (see last month’s Pic) and presented Silver Jubilee certificates and medals to two long-serving members, Brothers Peter Cherry and Albert Smart (pictured above). Websites: www.ksc.org.uk www.kscprov02.weebly.com www.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Email: dpokeane@aol.com


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PIC Life There but for the grace of God… By Moira Billinge His young shoulders were shaking with sobs, as the terrified boy stood at the side of a traffic island, unable to dodge the hurtling cars which barred his route to safety. How many times had he tentatively placed a foot on the carriageway and just given up? There was nothing he could do and so he remained at the edge of the roundabout, immobilised by fear. It was a busy Saturday afternoon and I was also attempting to negotiate the same roundabout; car window down and caught up in the vehicular jumble of confused drivers criss-crossing from lane to lane in the traffic free-for-all. The only hope for pedestrians of negotiating a safe passage to the shopping centre opposite is if they manage to locate the designated traffic lights which are few and far between. The boy – he looked about 13 – must have been there for some time to have reached that level of distress. He had obviously tried to take a short cut to the shops and although many drivers would have wanted to stop and help the poor lad to safety, it was at a very dangerous section. If one car were to brake, others might not and there was a real danger of a catastrophic pile-up. With the benefit of hindsight, the most sensible action would have been to phone the police who would have been in a better position to help but instead I carried on to the next roundabout so that I could double back, find somewhere to park and go over to him. Thankfully, someone else had reached him first and I watched with huge relief and gratitude as a gentleman steered him safely across. I realise that it is rather stretching an analogy but his situation reminded me

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of the rescue of refugees as they flee their war-torn countries. Despite his terror, however, my ‘roundabout boy’, surrounded by the swirling, relentless, deafening traffic, could not have been far away from his family, a warm home and a nourishing meal, though it seemed to be little consolation to him; indeed, at that moment in time, his face mirrored the expressions of the migrants as they are hauled from the seas and their sinking boats. For the genuine asylum seekers, who have risked and lost everything, the prospect of any such home comforts must seem a very remote dream indeed. They have escaped one enemy, only to find that they are in the clutches of perhaps an even more dangerous one – from which they are unable to extricate themselves. They can only be saved by our mercy and willingness to treat them as human beings. It is all too convenient to regard them as a problem for someone else to solve yet this is exactly what is happening because our initial sympathies – from when we first watched them emerging, traumatised from the perilous waters – has started to wane as they, in greatly increasing numbers, seek refuge wherever and however they can. These desperate people are now being seen by many as a drain on resources and a threat to our (by comparison) comfortable way of life; as a consequence, countries continue to haggle over whose responsibility they are. I hope that if members of my family were to be caught up in such dire circumstances somebody would – out of love rather than a begrudging sense of duty – feed, clothe and provide them with shelter because it really is a case of ‘There but for the grace of God go I’.

Quotes from Pope Francis for the Year of Mercy “The Church must be a place of mercy, freely given, where everyone can feel welcomed, loved, forgiven and encouraged to live the good life of the Gospel” “Sinners are in need of mercy, Jesus Christ is the face of the Fathers mercy”

Worth a visit

This month, plan a trip to a Picardian French town filled with history, writes Lucy Oliver. Amiens, about an hour’s train ride from Paris, is known for its UNESCO World Heritage gothic architecture and its proximity to the Somme battlefield. The cathedral of Notre Dame on the town’s main square welcomes visitors to pray. It is the largest of the cathedrals built in the 13th century, and has, arguably, best endured the ravages of history, including the two world wars of the 20th century. Since the Middle Ages, farmers have worked land around Amiens that is reclaimed from marsh. Today, idyllic floating gardens border the canals in the town and the rivers Avre and Somme. These fertile lands – known locally as ‘Les hortillonages’ – have traditionally fed the townspeople and produced three harvests a year. Visitors can take a boat ride through the gardens and, if there in June, see the annual water market. Another site worth visiting in Amiens is the Maison de Jules Verne, home of the 19th century author. The unusual building ascends into a tower via spiral staircases, with each floor showcasing his eclectic talents – for the Law, poetry and plays – in addition to the novels for which he is best known.


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join in Children’s word search

Eating Out

St George, Patron Saint of England. His feast is celebrated on 23 April. See what you can find out about him from our clues.

Now we have our lovely light evenings back again maybe you would like yo take a walk or drive and have a meal at one of our listed eateries.

GEORGE

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PERSECUTED

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VICTORY

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ENGLAND MARTYR FOLLOWER

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The Windmill Mill Lane, Parbold 01257 462935 Eton Place Woolton Road, Liverpool 16 0151 738 1368 Royal Oak Liverpool Road, Aughton 01695 422121 Blue Mallard Burscough Wharf, Liverpool Road North, Burscough 01704 893954

EXAMPLE Armadillo Bebington Road, Wirral 0151 645 5878

More Mullarkey

The Railway Wigan Road, Euxton 01257 275005

From Johnny Kennedy

Greeting Cards from Carmel

Father Mullarkey and the young curate were watching Songs of Praise from a Methodist Church in Bootle. ‘They’re great singers, these Methodists,’ said Father Mullarkey. ‘They really belt it out. Us left-footers have never been any good at singing. Our lot are useless. You can hardly hear them.’ ‘Maybe they’re shy,’ said the YC. ‘I was reading in the paper that scientists have invented a pill to conquer shyness.’ ‘What good is that?’ said the auld fella. ‘The people who need it would be too shy to ask for it!’

Audio copy of the Pic out now An audio version of the ‘Catholic Pictorial’ is available free of charge, compiled by students, technicians and Chaplain, Dan Antonio, at All Hallows RC High School, Penwortham Anyone interested in receiving the audio copy should contact Dan Antonio on 01772 746121

Lovely greeting cards for all occasions including priestly jubilees, get well and thinking of you messages are on sale at Maryton Carmel. Call to the Monastery at: Maryton Grange, Allerton Road, L18 3NU. Telephone the card office on 0151 724 7102 or Email the Sisters at marytoncards@outlook.com Try to make a visit to the monastery to buy some of the delightful cards.

Catholic Pictorial

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justice & peace

Reflections on the EU referendum By Steve Atherton, Justice and Peace fieldworker Faith is not a private matter that can be kept in a box reserved for private piety. We must get involved in society. On 23 June we will have the chance to vote in the In/Out referendum on membership of the European Union. I imagine that most people already know how they will vote because most of us make decisions with our hearts rather than with our heads. That is why the media and politicians tend to appeal to emotions rather than reason when they want to influence us. In my own case, it is hard to imagine voting for Brexit because I was a student at the time of the previous referendum and have been passionately pro-European ever since. In discussions on the EU, I think of the two world wars and am thankful that disagreements can now be settled without recourse to slaughter; I think of the minimum wage and employment protection and other social justice measures that the EU introduced and the UK resisted; I think of the EU social fund that rebuilt large parts of the northwest of England. When I hear bitter complaints about Brussels’ inefficiency I think that it is a price worth paying while we pursue the reforms needed to remove bureaucratic red tape. (In the first draft of the above paragraph I included the line: ‘We should resist the temptation to take our ball back and go off to play in the darkness on the outskirts of Europe.’ I include it here to illustrate how easy it is to become emotional and use pejorative language in place of reasoned argument.)

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Catholic Pictorial

When we apply the Cardijn ‘SeeJudge-Act’ framework to our decisionmaking, the principles of Catholic Social Teaching become the criteria we use at the ‘Judge’ part of the process. It is immediately clear that the two ‘pillars’ of the CST house – Subsidiarity and Solidarity - are integral to what the EU stands for. The telling argument for Brexit would be if these principles of fraternal solidarity, subsidiarity, mutuality and social harmony were not borne out by what actually happened in member states. The example of what has happened to Greece shows that the EU solution has not prevented massive poverty among ordinary citizens. All is not yet right. Some respected Anglican commentators are calling Brexit ‘The second reformation’ and cast Brussels as the new Rome that has to be defied and resisted. This is not an argument that particularly appeals to Roman Catholics! Now, having admitted my point of view, I have a duty to test my opinions by

listening to those with whom I disagree. I want to put my cross on the ballot paper with an open mind. Finally, most of the public discussion about the referendum is framed in terms of economic benefits to the UK with very little said about philosophical or wider ethical issues. Whatever the outcome of the referendum, neither the geographic proximity of the UK to the rest of Europe will change nor the need to have shared responses to such issues as trade, refugees and terrorism. If staying in means that we still have to shape the EU along with others, then leaving means that we will have to engage with ‘partners’ who will be less inclined to give us what we want. The point is that it takes two to partner, and we simply do not know what can be guaranteed. The Church of England and the Church of Scotland offer a very interesting website to discuss European issues in the run-up to the EU referendum: www.reimaginingeurope.co.uk


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Profile for Educate Magazine

Catholic pic april 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

Catholic pic april 2016  

Catholic News from around the Archdiocese of Liverpool

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