Page 1

E D O J O S E P T 2 0 1 0

K O S E I I N O U E

Kosei Ju do Le ge nd

Inoue

Kosei Inoue: Meeting a Judo Legend. Article, interview & images by Fergus Dullaghan

F E R G U S D U L L A G H A N

PAGE 1


E D O J O S E P T 2 0 1 0

K O S E I I N O U E

Kosei Inoue is one of the most successful judo players ever. Born in 1978, he is a  three time World Champion, an Olympic gold medallist and a multiple winner of  the All Japan Championships. In his homeland he is a celebrity; indeed Sky news  recently called him judo’s answer to David Beckham. 

Kosei Inoue Ju do Le His marriage to the stunning Japanese actress and television personality Aki  ge Higashihara has done this comparison no harm at all!  She herself is well known for  nd her television interviews with top K1 fighters and other martial artists, which is ac‐ tually how she and Inoue first met, during an interview in 2003. 

Inoue’s long and exciting judo career came to an abrupt end in 2008. Following two  shock defeats in the 2007 World championships in Rio de Janeiro (where he none‐ theless achieved a respectable 5th place,) and an early exit from the 2008 All Japan  Judo Championships, which cost him his place in the Olympic team for Beijing,  Inoue announced his retirement.  However, one gets the impression that the real  work is just beginning for him.  F E R G U S D U L L A G H A N

After hanging up his gi (so to speak) Kosei travelled to the UK to learn English and  to assist Billy Cusack coaching in Edinburgh.  This was certainly a coup for Judo  Scotland, as the eyes of the judo world turned their jealous gaze upon them. For  fighters like 2010 European Bronze medallist Euan Burton and 2009 European  Silver medallist Sarah Clark, both based in Edinburgh, Inoue’s arrival can only have  helped with their development. In addition to his coaching duties Inoue also  recently released a well received, though somewhat pricey DVD compilation.  PAGE 2


E D O J O S E P T 2 0 1 0

K O S E I I N O U E

Kosei Ju do Le ge nd

Inoue

I first met Inoue in Cardiff, where he was guest of honour at the opening of the new  Welsh national dojo on October 28th 2009. The media was scrambling for his  attention, with BBC TV cameras, photographers and journalists from all over all  baying for time with him. As you may expect for one who is so used to such  attention Kosei handled all this as calmly as he used to handle most of his oppo‐ nents.   When things had finally quietened down Inoue sat on the edge of the mat with me  and Welsh judo Development Director Mike Callan, where he spoke frankly and  humbly about his experiences in the sport of judo. I noticed that he was always  quick to laugh with an infectious bear‐like roar which makes him instantly like‐ able. While we were chatting he began playing with his new baby, who was born in  Scotland. He pretended to throw the infant onto the mat and pin her on the  ground. The gentleness with which he did this was amazing to watch, having seen  how distinctly ungentle he can be to his opponents. 

F E R G U S D U L L A G H A N

PAGE 3


E D O J O S E P T 2 0 1 0

K O S E I I N O U E

The second time I met Inoue was earlier this year, when I finally had the opportu‐ nity to have a randori with him during a British team session in Dartford judo club.  This was a chance for me to have a pull‐around with the most outstanding player  of recent generations.  Somewhat disconcertingly Inoue did not attempt to contest  grips with me, simply allowing me to take whatever grip I wanted.  When he then  casually took his grip on me the power I could feel in his posture and arms was  quite terrifying. It was clear that even from a totally neutral grip he had complete  control over my movement.  This presented a psychological challenge: Should I show proper spirit and attack  him with 100% of my ability (and risk him switching into competition mode) or  should I, having seen that he does have a gentle side, underplay slightly and hope  not to take too much of a hammering? It is obvious what the correct answer should  be, but when confronted with the reality of the situation being a sissy is quite an  attractive option. Well I soon found out that I had very little choice in the matter  as Inoue began throwing me all over the place at will.  I had to play my A game just to survive the five minutes. Like all good masters,  Inoue was able to operate just above the skill level of those he is fighting. So he was  able to beat me comfortably but without having to utterly destroy me.

Kosei Ju do Le ge nd

Inoue

Inoue threw me with foot sweeps, Hari ‐goshi, Osoto‐gari, in fact just about what Inoue threw me with foot sweeps, Hari ‐goshi, Osoto‐gari, in fact just about what‐ ever he wanted, whenever he wanted. Kindly, he would allow me to make several  attacks in‐between, occasionally nodding in approval before throwing me again.   Once when he used his Osoto‐gari as a counter to some effort of mine he threw me  so hard that he ended up running the entire width of the dojo, (around 12‐15m I  guess) just to stay on his feet. While I was airborne I must have been rotating at a  rate that would have left a Rolls Royce Jet engine green with envy. But when I came  down it felt like I went through the mat like an Olympic diver cutting through the  water at the deep end of a pool...but a lot less gracefully.   

F E R G U S D U L L A G H A N

As I pulled myself to my feet one of the girls on the British team voiced her  encouragement. “Good work Fergus” she said jokingly,” if you keep him running  like you’ll tire him out eventually! Good tactics!” I breathed a sigh of relief when the randori was over. (Until Theo Spalding‐Mcin‐ tosh, a GBR international heavy‐weight then asked me for the next one!). That  aside, all in all, I have rarely been so happy to be thrown.  I know that being  smashed by Inoue puts me in very illustrious company indeed. PAGE 4


E D O J O S E P T 2 0 1 0

K O S E I I N O U E

Kosei Inoue interview (Oct. 2009)

Kosei Inoue Ju do Le I’ve been in Edinburgh for about nine months but I’m moving to London soon. ge nd What is your impression of British judo?

Thank you for talking to us at edojo.tv Kosei. Since you’ve been in the UK you’ve been  based in Scotland. What’s next for you?

I think that British judo is very similar to Japanese judo, because many British  coaches have been to Japan to train so the style is alike.  You are very famous for having one of the best uchimata throws in the world, where  did you learn how to do this? I first learnt uchimata from my father as it was his favourite technique when he was  a player.  I then did many hours of hard training at high school and a lot of uchiko‐ mi (drilling) to develop the correct coordination. Did you do any specific flexibility or balance training for this throw? No, just uchikomi You have an unusual pre‐competition routine, can you tell us about that? Before I fight I clean myself and my home because if I die in competition I want ev‐ erything to be in order and clean. This is the samurai tradition and comes from  bushido. I always think about the risk of death before I compete. This helps me  mentally prepare to fight.

F E R G U S D U L L A G H A N

You must have had several invitations to compete in K1 or in MMA. Why did you  decide to stay in judo and not become a K1 or MMA fighter? I just love judo and I want to contribute to the development of judo forever.

PAGE 5


E D O J O S E P T 2 0 1 0

K O S E I I N O U E

Did you find it hard to readjust to life away from judo and to finish competing?

Kosei Inoue Ju do Le Kano, (judo’s founder) said that judo was more than just a sport, rather it was a way  ge of life. Do you agree with this? nd

No (laughs). Of course I miss hard practice sessions but I can still do judo every day  so it is ok.

Yes. I learnt a lot of things from judo. I think that I have improved my physical and  technical ability through training but at the same time I have also improved my  mind. So judo has an educational value (laughs). This is why I like judo. And finally, I have to ask: how do you feel about the new judo rules (as a direct result  of which, Japan took 14 medals out of 16 categories in the last junior world champion‐ ships at that time)? (Laughs) I like them!  Kosei Inoue is sponsored by Mizuno. Mizuno judo suits are available from  www.judogis.co.uk World Champion 1999, 2001 &2003 Olympic Champion 2000

F E R G U S D U L L A G H A N

PAGE 6

Kosei Interview  

Kosei Inoue Interview edojo.tv

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you