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APR/MAY 2013

LET’S PLAY!

The ESO’s 2013/14 season is announced

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ESO MUSICIANS

In a Lighter Classics Night of Encores

CHRISTOPHER O’RILEY

Late Night & The Masters

THE ESO GOES ABBA

With tribute band Arrival from Sweden

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SIGNATURE Contents Volume 28, Number 7 | APRIL/MAY 2013 pg. 5

ARTISTIC & LEADERSHIP TEAM

pg. 6

EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2012/2013

pg. 7

(Eddins, Petrov, Waldin, Buchmann, Rival)

PUBLISHED FOR the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra at the Francis Winspear Centre for Music 9720 102 Avenue, Edmonton AB T5J 4B2 Administration: 780-428-1108 Box Office: 780-428-1414 E-mail: info@winspearcentre.com Website: www.edmontonsymphony.com ESO EDITOR

WELCOME

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PREVIEW OF THE 2013/14 SEASON

Next Season will be memorable due to the fabulous programming and special guests, but also because ESO Assistant Principal Trumpet Bill Dimmer will retire next year.

D.T. Baker Allan Gordon Bell, Allan Gilliland & D.T. Baker

THE EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

PROGRAM NOTES

2012/2013 SEASON

Letters to the editor, comments and/or suggestions are welcome.

PUBLISHED BY

FRIDAY MASTERS & LANDMARK CLASSIC MASTERS TCHAIKOVSKY’S FIFTH SYMPHONY (APRIL 12 & 13)

10259 105th Street, Edmonton AB T5J 1E3 Inquiries: 780-990-0839 Fax: 780-425-4921 Email: sales@venturepublishing.ca Website: www.venturepublishing.ca PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER EDITOR ART DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR ADVERTISING SALES

José Luis Gomez, conductor Benjamin Grosvenor, piano 18

Ruth Kelly Joyce Byrne Michelle Lindstrom Charles Burke Andrea deBoer Colin Spence Anita McGillis Glenda Dennis Kathy Kelley David Frazier

Signature magazine, the official publication of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, is published from September to June. Contents copyright 2013 by Edmonton Symphony Orchestra/ Francis Winspear Centre for Music. No part of this publication should be reproduced without written permission. ESO Assistant Principal Trumpet Bill Dimmer sounds off on the ESO’s upcoming season with Music Director William Eddins on pages 8 & 9. Photographed at Fort Edmonton, the season brochure features ESO musicians with a nostalgic flair, and is available in the lobby. Photo by Michael Woolley.

ON THE COVER APRIL/MAY 2013

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pg. 8

pg. 11

ROBBINS POPS FIVE BY DESIGN IN LIVE! FROM THE ULTRA LOUNGE (APRIL 26 & 27)

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LATE NIGHT WITH BILL EDDINS RADIO FROM THE HEAD (MAY 3)

pg. 18

LANDMARK CLASSIC MASTERS RAVEL AND SIBELIUS (MAY 4)

pg. 21

Robert Bernhardt, conductor Five By Design, guest artists

William Eddins, conductor Christopher O’Riley, piano

William Eddins, conductor Christopher O’Riley, piano

ESO PRESENTS ARRIVAL FROM SWEDEN PLAYS THE MUSIC OF ABBA (MAY 14) Robert Bernhardt, conductor Arrival From Sweden, special guests

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ROBBINS LIGHTER CLASSICS A NIGHT OF ENCORES (MAY 16)

pg. 26

MIDWEEK CLASSICS BAROQUE & CLASSICAL FIREWORKS (MAY 22)

pg. 32

STORIES FROM THE AUDIENCE

pg. 37

ESO / FRANCIS WINSPEAR CENTRE FOR MUSIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & ADMINISTRATION

pg. 40

Robert Bernhardt, conductor with members of the ESO

William Eddins, conductor Chloë Hanslip, violin

pg. 24

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W WELCOME

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UTTING TOGETHER A NEW SEASON IS ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING – AND

challenging – things that we do. Our Artistic Administrator, Rob McAlear, likens it to piecing together an enormous jigsaw puzzle. After all the hard work, it’s rewarding to unveil what the months of planning have led to. We are thrilled to give you just a taste of all the exciting concerts and events we have lined up for 2013/14 on pages 8 & 9 of Signature. We have brochures in the lobby and lots of helpful staff to answer any of your questions. So whether you’re here to listen to Christopher O’Riley perform with us, see some of your talented ESO musicians present a Robbins Lighter Classics night of encores, or check out the dazzling tribute to ABBA, make sure you know what’s coming up next season, too! As you’ll see from the 2013/14 line-up, we keep on presenting a diverse array of concerts that only your Edmonton Symphony can deliver. Subscribe early – and often!

William Eddins



Annemarie Petrov

ESO / Winspear Centre Vision: Providing outstanding music experiences for individuals, families and the community and a place where those experiences evoke the height of personal emotion, adventure and excitement.



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Culture and Community Spirit

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aving recently completed his tenure as Enbridge Resident Conductor of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, LUCAS WALDIN returns to the ESO in the dual role of Enbridge Artist in Residence and Community Ambassador. This newly created position will see a focus on establishing strong ties with our community through

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RIC BUCHMANN studied violin at the

Conservatoire de musique de Montréal and at the Université de Montréal, where he earned a Bachelor of Music and a DESS degree. In 2001, he moved to Los Angeles to continue his studies at the University of Southern California. Two years later, he joined the New World Symphony in Miami Beach where he played under the direction of Michael Tilson Thomas and many other music directors from all over the world. His

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Fleming and the KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra. On May 8, 2012, Bill made his Carnegie Hall debut conducting the ESO at a memorable concert featuring four Canadian soloists, and music by three Canadian composers alongside Martinů’s rarely-performed Symphony No. 1.

inventive outreach initiatives in addition to programming and presenting the ESO’s education and family concerts. With frequent appearances as well on a variety of subscription series, Lucas will lead the ESO in more than 20 concerts during the 2012/13 season. During his time as Enbridge Resident Conductor, Lucas collaborated with some of North America’s finest musicians including Jens Lindemann, Angela Cheng and Sergei Babayan. An experienced conductor of pops and crossover, he has worked with a range of artists such as Ben Folds, Chantal Kreviazuk and the Canadian Tenors. Strongly dedicated to Canadian composers, he has performed over 25 Canadian compositions including six world premieres, and has collaborated closely with composers such as John Estacio, Allan Gilliland, and Malcolm Forsyth. In recognition of his valuable contribution to the artistic life in Canada, Lucas was awarded the 2012 Jean-Marie Beaudet Award in Orchestra Conducting by the Canada Council for the Arts. Lucas studied conducting and flute at the

Cleveland Institute of Music, and has conducted in master classes with Helmuth Rilling, Michael Tilson-Thomas, Colin Metters and Bernard Haitink. In 2012, he was invited to conduct the National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa) in a conductor workshop, and as a participant of the St. Magnus Festival, Orkney, Lucas conducted both the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and the BBC Scottish Symphony. Prior to his appointments with the Edmonton Symphony, Lucas was twice a Discovery Series Conductor at the Oregon Bach Festival and Assistant Conductor of Cleveland’s contemporary orchestra Red {an orchestra}. He has performed with a number of orchestras across Europe, including the Jugendsinfonieorchester Kassel, Bachakademie Stuttgart, and Staatstheater Cottbus. The 2012/13 season will see debuts with the Modesto Symphony Orchestra, the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony and Orchestra London Canada.

Photo: Michael Woolley

Photo: Michael Woolley

is also quite fond of biking, tennis, reading and pinball. He recently completed building a state-ofthe-art recording studio at his home in Minneapolis, where he lives with his wife Jen (a clarinetist), and their sons Raef and Riley. While conducting has been his principal pursuit, he continues to perform as pianist, organist and harpsichordist. He has conducted the ESO from the keyboard on many occasions, and in 2007, joined then-ESO concertmaster Martin Riseley and cellist Yo-Yo Ma in Brahms’s Piano Trio No. 1 at a gala concert celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Winspear Centre. In 2008, he conducted Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess for Opéra Lyon, leading to repeat performances in Lyon, London, and at the Edinburgh International Festival in 2010. Other international highlights include a 2009 tour of South Africa, where Bill conducted three gala concerts with soprano Renée

Photo: Rachel J Photography

Photo: Michael Woolley

ow in his eighth season as Music Director of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, WILLIAM EDDINS has a captivating energy, a magnetic stage presence, and an adventurous musical curiosity that continues to propel the orchestra to unique, new and exciting achievements. His commitment to the entire spectrum of the ESO audience brings him to the podium for performances in every subscription series, as well as for a wide variety of galas and specials. A distinguished and versatile pianist, Bill was bitten by the conducting bug while in his sophomore year at the Eastman School of Music. In 1989, he began conducting studies at the University of Southern California with Daniel Lewis, and Assistant Conductorships with both the Minnesota Orchestra and the Chicago Symphony (the latter under the leadership of Daniel Barenboim) followed. Bill has many non-musical hobbies including cooking, eating, discussing food and planning dinner parties. He

violin teachers include Sonia Jelinkova, Vladimir Landsman, Jean-François Rivest, William Preucil and Martin Chalifour. Eric Buchmann joined the First Violin section of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra in 2006, and was appointed Associate Concertmaster following auditions in 2009. Since then, Mr. Buchmann has acted as Interim Concertmaster with the ESO, performing as soloist on numerous occasions. He is also a member of the Alberta Baroque Ensemble under the direction of Paul Schieman.

Photo: Michael Woolley

ARTISTIC & LEADERSHIP TEAM N

www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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William Eddins,

Lucas Waldin, Enbridge Artist in Residence & Community Ambassador

Music Director

Photo: Michael Woolley

ARTISTIC & LEADERSHIP TEAM

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NNEMARIE PETROV, Executive

Photo: Michael Woolley

Director of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra (ESO) and Francis Winspear Centre for Music, brings more than 25 years of experience to a role that oversees one of Alberta’s flagship performing ensembles and one of the world’s premier concert halls. With a combined annual budget of over $12 million, Annemarie supervises day-to-day operations, long-term planning, government relations and com-

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OBERT RIVAL, a native Albertan, returns for a second season as the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra’s Composer in Residence. His music, written in a contemporary tonal style and inspired by the Canadian wilderness, literature, and classical and romantic musical forms, has been described as “well crafted”, “engaging”, “immediately appealing”, “melodic and accessible”, “sophisticated”, and

munity support of both organizations. A native of Montréal, Annemarie is a graduate of McGill University where she majored in French Horn Performance. Following several years in Europe, she returned to Canada and stepped into the role of General Manager of Symphony New Brunswick. Work at the National Arts Centre Orchestra was followed by the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, where she also oversaw the popular Winnipeg New Music Festival. She joined the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and Winspear Centre in 2007. Annemarie’s profound love of the arts has been her guide in a career focused on every aspect of the concert experience – from international orchestral tours to concerts in curling rinks in Canada’s North. She is fuelled by the belief that participation in live music is essential to our well-being and is driven to make it accessible to everyone. Annemarie is a frequent guest speaker at arts industry conferences and has served on the board of Orchestras Canada. “memorable”. During his first season, he composed a dramatic symphonic poem, Achilles & Scamander, and for the orchestra’s Carnegie Hall debut, Lullaby, lauded as an “atmospheric dream world” that he dedicated to his newborn son, Raphaël. The ESO also performed his light-hearted Scherzo “Crème Brûlée,” and on its education concerts, The Great Northern Diver. Other orchestral works include Symphony No. 1 “Maligne Range,” and a children’s work, Maya the Bee. Rival oversees the ESO’s Young Composers’ Project. He has also launched two new initiatives: podcasts on contemporary music the orchestra programs and liveblogging of its open dress rehearsals. He holds a doctorate in composition from the University of Toronto, is married to Chantal-Andrée Samson, a realist oil painter, and enjoys running in Edmonton’s river valley. www.robertrival.com

Composer in Residence program generously sponsored by

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Robert Rival,

Composer in Residence

THE EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

2012/2013 SEASON

[ VIOLIN I ] Rhonda Taft 3 Eric Buchmann, Rob Aldridge Interim Concertmaster The John & Barbara Poole [ FLUTE ] Family Concertmaster Chair Elizabeth Koch 1 Virginie Gagné, Shelley Younge 2 Interim Assistant Concertmaster [ OBOE ] Broderyck Olson Lidia Khaner 1 Richard Caldwell Paul Schieman 2 Joanna Ciapka-Sangster The Steven & Day Alissa Cheung 3 LePoole Assistant Anna Kozak Principal Oboe Aiyana Anderson-Howatt 3 Chair Neda Yamach Jim Cockell [ CLARINET ] Julianne Scott 1 [ VIOLIN II ] David Quinn 2 Dianne New 1 Susan Flook 2 [ BASSOON ] Heather Bergen William Harrison 1 3 Pauline Bronstein Edith Stacey 2 Robert Hryciw Zoë Sellers [ HORN ] Murray Vaasjo 3 Allene Hackleman 1 Tatiana Warszynski Megan Evans 2 Gerald Onciul 2 [ VIOLA ] Donald Plumb 2 1 Stefan Jungkind Charles Pilon 2 [ TRUMPET ] Rhonda Henshaw Robin Doyon 1 Mikiko Kohjitani William Dimmer 2 Andrew Bacon [ TROMBONE ] [ CELLO ] John McPherson 1 Colin Ryan 1 Kathryn Macintosh 2 The Stuart & Winona Davis Principal Cello Chair [ BASS TROMBONE ] Sheila Laughton 2 Christopher Taylor 1 Ronda Metszies Gillian Caldwell [ TUBA ] Derek Gomez Scott Whetham 1 Victor Pipkin [ TIMPANI ] [ DOUBLE BASS ] Barry Nemish 1 1 Jan Urke John Taylor 2 [ PERCUSSION ] Janice Quinn Brian Jones 1

The ESO works in proud partnership with the AF of M (American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada) Local 390.

[ HARP ] Nora Bumanis 1 1 PRINCIPAL 2 ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 3 ON LEAVE

ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL Eric Filpula, Orchestra Personnel Manager Sheila Jones, Librarian The following musicians may appear at performances in this issue: Aaron Au Violin Ray Baril Saxophone Eddy Bayens Bassoon Jeanette Comeau Viola Susan Ekholm Viola Elizabeth Faulkner Flute Joel Gray Trumpet Mary Fearon Horn Matthew Howatt Bassoon Marie Krejcar Violin Regine Maier Violin Michael Massey Keyboards John McCormick Percussion Brian Sand Trumpet Diana Sapozhnikov Violin Yukari Sasada Bass Martina Smazal Viola Jeremy Spurgeon Keyboards Alison Stewart Violin Dan Sutherland Clarinet Kate Svrcek Violin Brian Thurgood Percussion Dan Waldron Oboe Doug Zimmerman Trumpet

In addition to our own concerts, the ESO provides orchestral accompaniment for performances by Edmonton Opera and Alberta Ballet.

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F FEATURE

FEATURE

BY MICHELLE LINDSTROM

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TIDINGS FROM THE ESO’S 2013/14 SEASON BRING GREAT NEW MUSIC, OLD FAVOURITES AND A FOND FAREWELL TO A 40-YEAR VETERAN

Photo: Michael Woolley

CL ASSY BR ASS : Two ESO veterans, double bassist Rhonda Taft and trumpeter Bill Dimmer, from the Fort Edmonton photo shoot for the 2013/14 season brochure.

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HE MAKINGS OF A FULL SEASON’S WORTH OF ORCHESTRAL PROGRAMMING

comes together much like a magical potion – a little bit of this, a little bit of that, and a whole lot of meetings, phone calls and luck. Then voila, 10 months of concerts are ready for public consumption. Bill Eddins, the ESO’s Music Director, is part of the discussions that determine with what magical concoction to present patrons each season. And the ESO’s Assistant Principal Trumpet, Bill Dimmer, will tell you that Eddins has been known to step away from the status quo. “Our musical boundaries and horizons have expanded enormously since he’s been here,” Dimmer says, about Eddins. “The kind of repertoire that we do, the kinds of pieces that we tackle and bring to the Edmonton audience is interesting, new, exciting, difficult …” Dimmer trails off, chuckling. “But I believe that part of the reason that the orchestra is successful right now is because we do interesting stuff.” Eddins and Dimmer agree that new music, if they were to feature it all the time, would be tiring for the orchestra as much as it would be for the patrons who want to hear some of what they already know and love. “It takes a lot of brain power to constantly learn new music so, every once in a while, you just want to fall into the comfortable rhythms of a Beethoven symphony,” Eddins says. “If you do this right and you’ve got a nice mix, it makes the old stuff fresh.” And that’s what patrons and ESO musicians can expect of the 2013/14 season: a good mix of fresh compositions with well-known programming to tickle everyone’s fancy. There’s even some Bugs Bunny to look forward to, which is not just for the kids, assures Eddins: “Some of the greatest orchestral writing done in the 20th century was done down in the basement of Warner Brothers.” Next season contains a lot of 20th-century music, and the irony to that, Eddins says, is that it used to be considered modern music. But now, in 2013, it’s not really that modern. Next season’s 20th century options will include American music (Billy the Kid), which will finish the season with a bang, much as this year’s Rite of Spring is going to. The 2013/14 season will likely be Dimmer’s most memorable, though he’s gathered decades of shared ESO experiences, such as collaborating with British rock group Procol Harum to produce a platinum-selling album, learning to love opera because of Irving Guttman, and switching performance venues from the Jubilee Auditorium to the Winspear Centre. Dimmer retires as a full-time trumpet player with the ESO next season. “At some point, it becomes time to make some room for new blood,” he says. He adds that he wants to enjoy some new life experiences “while there is still time and health to do that.” The Carnegie Hall adventure last season was, of course, a life-changing and memorable musical experience. It was an experience that also helped Dimmer decide it was time to retire. “Carnegie was one of the things, whether I realized it or not, that was on my bucket list,” he says, adding that he’s done everything a person should do in his or her orchestral career. Dimmer is proudest of the legacy he’ll leave from his involvement with the ESO’s education programs. After about six years of helping build the program with David Hoyt, former ESO Resident Conductor, more than 25,000 kids take part in the program annually. Dimmer says it’s important to get kids away from the ubiquitous screens in their lives and into the same physical space as musicians who work and produce live music. This kind of experience simply isn’t commonplace anymore. On the flip side, the ESO needs to keep up with the tech-savvy generations dipping their toes in orchestral music. That’s where the “fully realized” www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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2012/2013 SEASON CUE THE TRUMPETS COMMON GROUND : Chantal Kreviazuk and Bugs Bunny both play a part in next season’s Air Canada Presents programming.

version of Bartók’s Miraculous Mandarin will wow patrons next season and help check one item off of Eddins’s bucket list. A “fully realized” performance, he says, will incorporate multi-media, dancers and a pantomime artist. And there are challenges, like not having a pit for the orchestra to retreat to when a dance troupe joins them. Eddins offers that creative solutions are in the works. There’s no chance he is passing up this opportunity. “I saw Miraculous Mandarin danced when I was 14 in Buffalo, New York,” he says. “It left one of those indelible impressions on me because it’s dark, it’s tragic, but it’s redemptive. The music is just harrowing at times and it’s an incredible piece.” Guest artists Eddins looks forward to working with next season include close friends and former colleagues like Joshua Bell – an upcoming Gala artist with whom Eddins recently did a show in Cincinnati. “He’s a hell of a violinist, let’s be honest about that one,” says Eddins. “He’ll make a fantastic gala artist.” He also gives a shout out to Edgar Myer, a “great double bass player” who Eddins looks forward to working with again. The season will start up, as it usually does, with Symphony Under the Sky, but next season will include Ray Charles tribute artist Ellis Hall. He joined the ESO late in the 2011/12 season for a Pops show, which is when Eddins decided he was in the presence of genius. “From the moment this guy came on stage, it was just utterly electric,” Eddins says. The patrons trust and support the symphony no matter what the programming – they know they’ll be on an adventurous, worthwhile, ride. “The patrons in Edmonton are rather special in a couple of ways. Often we don’t have a select few patrons that give gobs of money,” Dimmer explains. “Edmonton has always been a city with a broader base and there are a lot of people who understand and believe in having that kind of constitution in the city, and have always supported it in the hard times.” At the end of next season, it will be hard for trumpeter Bill Dimmer to say goodbye to the many friends he’s made, but he says he’s eager to move on to other interests, such as flying (he’s a pilot for the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association), conducting community orchestras, and writing music. He says, “I just hope, as I get old and it gets towards the end of the season, that I don’t screw up.” No pressure Mr. Dimmer, but just a heads up that Mr. Eddins, although he thinks the world of you, is waiting to capitalize on just such a moment. APRIL/MAY 2013

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“The kind of repertoire that we do, the kinds of pieces that we tackle and bring to the Edmonton audience is interesting, new, exciting and difficult.” – Bill Dimmer, ESO Assistant Principal Trumpet

JOSHUA BELL : He takes to the ESO stage in September for a Gala concert.

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4/2/13 9:07:44 AM


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FRIDAY MASTERS & LANDMARK CLASSIC MASTERS

2012/2013 SEASON

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony

Friday, April 12 | 7:30 PM & Saturday, April 13 | 8 PM

ARTIST BIOS

José Luis Gomez, conductor Benjamin Grosvenor, piano

ARTIST BIOS

Afterthoughts, Friday post-performance, Main Lobby with José Luis Gomez & Benjamin Grosvenor

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BELL

Spirit Trail

SCHUMANN

Piano Concerto in A minor, Op.54 Allegro affetuoso Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso Allegro vivace

(13’)* (30’)*

INTERMISSION (20 minutes)

TCHAIKOVSKY

Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op.64 Andante – Allegro con anima Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza Moderato con anima Valse: Allegro moderato Finale: Andante maestoso – Allegro vivace

(47’)*

Program subject to change *indicates approximate performance duration

His electrifying energy, talent and creativity earned him immediate acclaim from the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, where he was appointed to the position of Assistant Conductor, a post created especially for him by Paavo Jarvi and the orchestra directly upon the conclusion of the competition. Mr. Gomez started his musical career as a violinist, and by the age of 11, he was Concertmaster of the Youth Orchestra of Zulia State - part of El Sistema de Orquestas Juveniles de Venezuela. He graduated from the Manhattan School of Music in New York before embarking on a European orchestral career. Deciding to follow his dream to have more creative input and influence on musical direction, he took conducting lessons from Lu Jia, Muhai Tang and John Nelson. After just six months of studying conducting he went on to win the Georg Solti competition. Since then, he has worked with the RTVE National Symphony Orchestra of Madrid, Houston Symphony Orchestra, National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa, Hamburg Symphony, Basel Sinfonietta, Orchestra of Castille y Leon, Orquesta Sinfonica do Porto, Grand Rapids Symphony, Macao Symphony and the Orchestra 1813 Teatro Sociale di Como. Symphonic highlights of the 2012/13 season include debuts with Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Colorado, Vancouver, and Pasadena Symphony Orchestras. José Luis Gomez is the Principal Conductor of the orchestra of the Teatro Social di Como. He continues assisting Paavo Jarvi at Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, and touring in Europe, Asia and beyond.

Photo: Matthieu Gauchet

Symphony Prelude, Saturday 7:15 pm in the Third Level (Upper Circle) Lobby with Robert Rival

he young Venezuelan-born, Spanish conductor JOSÉ LUIS GOMEZ was catapulted to international attention when he won First Prize at the International Sir Georg Solti Conductor’s Competition in Frankfurt in September 2010, securing a sensational and rare unanimous decision from the jury.

This is Mr. Gomez’s debut with the ESO.

Friday Masters Sponsor

APRIL/MAY 2013

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Landmark Classic Masters Sponsor

Performance Sponsor

Media Sponsor

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2012/2013 SEASON

Photo: Sussie Ahlburg

FRIDAY MASTERS & LANDMARK CLASSIC MASTERS Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony

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ritish pianist BENJAMIN GROSVENOR is internationally recognized for his electrifying performances and penetrating interpretations. He first came to prominence as the outstanding winner of the Keyboard Final of the 2004 BBC Young Musician Competition at the age of 11. Since then, he has become an internationally regarded pianist performing with orchestras including the London Philharmonic, RAI Torino, New York Philharmonic, Philharmonia, Tokyo Symphony, and in venues such as the Royal Festival Hall, Barbican Centre, Singapore’s Victoria Hall, The Frick Collection, and Carnegie Hall. Recent and future highlights include engagements with the New York Philharmonic and the Minnesota Orchestra, and recital debuts at the Sydney Opera House, Concertgebouw, Festival de La Roque d’Anthéron, National Concert Hall Dublin, and the South Bank Centre, London. Mr. Grosvenor recently gave a highly successful North American tour, including appearances in Vancouver, Washington, and New York. In 2011, Benjamin Grosvenor signed to Decca Classics, and in doing so became the youngest British musician ever to sign to the label. His most recent recording for Decca includes Saint Saëns’s Piano Concerto No. 2, Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, and Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G Major. His first recording for Decca had critics marvelling at Benjamin’s musical character. During his brief, but sensational career, Benjamin has received Gramophone’s “Young Artist of the Year and Instrumental Award,” a Classic Brits “Critics’ Award,” U.K. “Critics’ Circle Award” for Exceptional Young Talent and a Diapason d’Or “Jeune Talent” Award. The youngest of five brothers, Benjamin began playing the piano aged 6. In July 2012, he graduated from the Royal Academy of Music, where he was awarded the “The Queen’s commendation for excellence.” Benjamin has had lessons with Christopher Elton, Leif Ove Andsnes, Stephen Hough, and Arnaldo Cohen amongst others. Mr. Grosvenor last appeared with the ESO in March 2012.

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PPROGRAM R O G NOTES RAM NOTES Spirit Trail ALLAN GORDON BELL

(b. Calgary, 1953)

First performed: April 13, 1994 in Ottawa THIS IS THE ESO PREMIERE OF THE PIECE Program note by the composer:

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N A BOOK ENTITLED SONGLINES , THE ENGLISH WRITER

Bruce Chatwin described the manner in which the Aborigines of Australia created maps of the continent in song. Although I know of no such practice in North America, I began to wonder what voices we might hear if we listened imaginatively to a landscape. And, if we heard the songs, would we know where we were. Commissioned by the National Arts Orchestra and dedicated to Mario Bernardi, Spirit Trail is an imaginary journey through prairie, foothills and mountains. Beginning with an evocation of snow drifts and grass waves, it moves through various states of turmoil toward quiescence.

Piano Concerto in A minor, Op.54 ROBERT SCHUMANN

(b. Zwickau, 1810 / d. Endenich, 1856)

First performed: December 4, 1845 in Dresden, Germany LAST ESO PERFORMANCE: NOVEMBER 2008

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AD THINGS WORKED OUT THE WAY ROBERT SCHUMANN

originally intended them to, we would not have his Piano Concerto – at least, not as we know it. In 1846, Schumann presented his one-movement Fantasie for Piano and Orchestra, with his wife Clara as soloist. Reaction to it was tepid, to say the least, enough for Schumann to withdraw it. But rather than abandon the work, Schumann set it aside, returning to it four years later. The original Fantasie became the first movement, and to it he added an Intermezzo and a Rondo finale. The Piano Concerto in A minor premiered in 1845, with Clara once again as soloist and Ferdinand Hiller (the work’s dedicatee) as its conductor. The soloist enters right from the outset, and is rarely silent through the remainder of the work. The songlike main theme given out in the opening measures forms the basis of the thematic material for the entire first movement. Every bit of emotion that can be derived from the theme is obtained through variations built from it. The extensive cadenza is, like Beethoven’s concertos, completely written out by the composer. In the beautiful second movement, the piano and orchestra begin together, but soon a haunting theme is heard on the violas and cellos. A passing reference to the first movement ushers in the Rondo, as taxing a piece for the soloist as Schumann ever wrote. Clever counterpoint and counter-rhythms rush us along to a coda filled with octaves for both solo and tutti, completing a work which Philip Spitta called “one of Schumann’s most beautiful and mature works,” and what has become likely Schumann’s most often-performed work featuring orchestra.

www.EdmontonSymphony.com

4/2/13 9:13:27 AM


Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op.64 PIOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

(b. Kamsko-Votinsk, 1840 / d. St. Petersburg, 1893)

First performed: November 17, 1888 in St. Petersburg LAST ESO PERFORMANCE: OCTOBER 2004

B

Y 1888, TCHAIKOVSKY HAD MOVED INTO HIS

house at Klin, which would be home until the end of his life. Th ings were more settled for him now than they had been during the composition of his Fourth Symphony. In that work, Tchaikovsky’s prevailing theme was of “cruel fate.” In his letters written while he was composing Symphony No. 5, he speaks more of “providence” – a subtle change, perhaps, but to the perpetually overcast Tchaikovsky, an improvement. The “providence” theme with which the symphony opens is a sombre, deliberate theme, marked by descending scales, but ending on a rising phrase of optimism. Th is leads to the body of the movement, an Allegro con anima which defies piecemeal interpretation. Indeed, aside from his stated idea of providence, Tchaikovsky left precious few clues as to any subtext the work may contain. He did, however, suggest that the second movement is a love song. It does have the outline and mood of the pas d’action between Aurora and the Prince from his ballet The Sleeping Beauty, which he composed at about the same time. The horn is the fi rst instrument to

present the beautiful main theme, which is interrupted by brief storms intermittently. The third movement is a waltz, though a delicate and sad one, with falling phrases and a sense of wistfulness. Contrast is provided by a unique, off-kilter solo for the bassoon, as well as a brief reappearance of the “providence” theme. The fi nal movement, in sonata form, has a strong, chordal theme as its fi rst main subject; the second is a much more flowing melody for the woodwinds. Once again, the “providence” idea emerges strongly, and it is this theme which is garbed in grand orchestral clothes for the fi nale. Tchaikovsky was one of the harshest critics of his Fifth Symphony after its fi rst performances – audiences seemed to take to it right away – but he, too, did eventually come around to it. Program notes © 2013 by D.T. Baker, except as noted

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3/12/12 4/2/13 9:16:58 4:29:05 AM PM


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4:29:05 PM

ROBBINS POPS

2012/2013 SEASON

FIVE BY DESIGN in Live! from the Ultra Lounge A Five By Design Production Friday & Saturday, April 26 & 27 | 8 PM

Robert Bernhardt, conductor Five By Design, special guests: Lorie Carpenter-Niska, Catherine Scott, Kurt Niska, Michael Swedberg, Terrence Niska Willis Delony, piano Matt Edlund, drums Willis Delony, Lovell Ives orchestrations Terrence Niska, Michael Swedberg vocal arrangements Paul Heim light and set design Paul Heim technical director Phil Henrickson Sound sound engineer

“OPENING THEME SONG” Delony

“JUMP IN THE LINE”

DeLeon/Bell/Oller/Samuel INTERMISSION (20 minutes)

THEME FROM MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE Schifrin (arr. Custer)

CHARADE

Mancini/Mercer

THEME FROM THE PINK PANTHER Mancini

“A LOT OF LIVIN’ TO DO”

MACK THE KNIFE (FROM THE THREEPENNY OPERA )

“SWAY”

“EPSTEIN CAR COMMERCIAL”

“PERK UP! COFFEE”

“WHAT IS THIS THING CALLED LOVE?” / “DANKE SCHOEN”

Adams/Strouse

Beltrán/Rodriguez/Gimbel Swedberg

“FEVER”

Niska

“ALEXANDER’S SWINGTIME BAND” Berlin

Porter

“HAWAIIAN WAR CHANT”

“SOUL BOSSA NOVA”

Freed/Noble/Leleiohoku

Jones

“TINY BUBBLES”

“LOOK FOR THE SILVER LINING”

Pober

Kern/DeSylva

“MAMBO ITALIANO”

“COME FLY WITH ME”

Merrill

“ISTANBUL (NOT CONSTANTINOPLE)” Kennedy/Simon Ben

Friday Performance Sponsor

Cahn/Van Heusen

©2012 Live! from the Ultra Lounge. All rights reserved. Program subject to change. Artist Representation: Alton Accola (800) 449 7345. For further information on Five By Design’s itinerary, activities and recordings, please visit the ensemble’s website at www.fivebydesign.com.

“MÁS QUE NADA”

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“MORE”

“NIGHT AND DAY”

Marks/Simons

APRIL/MAY 2013

Davenport/Cooley Newell/Ortolani/Oliviero

“ALL OF ME”

Bill & Mary Jo Robbins

Niska

Porter / Gabler/Kaempfert/Schwabach

“POP! GOES THE WEASEL”

Series Sponsor

Weill/Brecht/Blitzstein

Saturday Performance Sponsor

Media Sponsor

Media Sponsor

Artists’ bios appear on page 16.

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2012/2013 SEASON

ROBBINS POPS FIVE BY DESIGN in Live! from the Ultra Lounge A Five By Design Production

ARTIST BIOS

ARTIST BIOS

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OBERT BERNHARDT served as Music Director and Conductor of the Chattanooga Symphony and Opera for 19 seasons. He was the second Music Director in the combined company’s history, and is now the first with the title Emeritus. A lover of all genres of music, he is equally at home in symphonic, operatic, pops, and educational performances. He also nears another milestone in his career with the Louisville Orchestra, with this year representing his 31st consecutive season with the LO, and his 16th as Principal Pops Conductor. His vast symphonic repertoire covers most of the standard canon and his commitment to the music of our time is significant. He has been a frequent guest conductor with the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Detroit Symphony, the St. Louis Symphony, and the Boston Pops. He has also been a guest with the Houston, Seattle, Phoenix, Nashville, Colorado, Iceland, and Pacific Symphony Orchestras, among others. He has recorded for Vanguard, First Edition, Carlton Classics, and RPO record labels. He has also conducted the Louisville Ballet, the North Carolina Ballet, the Jacksonville Ballet, and the Lonestar Ballet.

Robert Bernhardt holds a special place in the hearts of Edmonton Symphony Orchestra musicians and audiences. He returns next August for his eighth consecutive year as Symphony Under the Sky conductor, and he frequently leads the ESO in subscription series performances at the Winspear Centre. He last conducted the ESO at Symphony Under the Sky presented by ATB Financial in 2012. He will next conduct the final performance in the Robbins Lighter Classics series on May 16 (see page 26).

F

IVE BY DESIGN’S signature harmonies have withstood the test of time in a career that stands out on America’s musical landscape, spanning more than 20 years. This nationally-acclaimed vocal ensemble has been the choice of symphony orchestras and performing art centers delighting hundreds of thousands. But Five By Design’s creative talents go far beyond their vocal prowess. As the creative talent behind Radio Days, Club Swing, Stay Tuned, and Cool and Swingin’, their productions showcase the group’s penchant for storytelling and the comedic. Whether backed by symphony orchestra or studio big band, Five By Design embraces the unforgettable melodies, lush harmonies, and swinging rhythms that evoke the names of Miller, Mancini and Mercer. The Minnesota-based Five By Design includes Lorie Carpenter-Niska, Catherine Scott, Kurt Niska, Michael Swedberg, and Terrence Niska. Four of the five have been singing together since 1986. The group’s familial ties include brothers Terrence and Kurt Niska and the husband-wife duo of Kurt and Lorie Niska and childhood collaborator, Michael Swedberg. The creative team is supported by in-house artist representatives Alton Accola & Midge Swedberg. Their technical team includes Sound Engineer Phil Henrickson who has worked with the ensemble since 1987.

Debuting in the spring of 2013, is Five By Design’s newest production, Live! from the Ultra Lounge. Set in the format of a faux radio broadcast from a tiki room, Live! from the Ultra Lounge not only travels to exotic locales with tropical rhythms, but it focuses on the kings and queens of cool … the artists that defined the atomic era: Bobby Darin, Rosemary Clooney, Wayne Newton, Peggy Lee and the songs they made famous in fantastic new arrangements. Five By Design takes swing to the next level … for the ultra-hip and the ultra-cool. National media exposure includes a seven city Guest Artist appearance with the 2012 Boston Pops Holiday Tour. For further information regarding Five By Design’s itinerary and activities, visit the ensemble’s website at www.fivebydesign.com. Five By Design last appeared with the ESO in May 2006.

Born in Rochester, NY, Robert Bernhardt holds a master’s degree with honours from the University of Southern California School of Music where he studied with Daniel Lewis. He was a Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude graduate of Union (NY) College, where he was an Academic All-American baseball player. His son, Alex, lives and works in Seattle with his wife and new daughter, and his daughter, Charlotte, is a resident of New York City. He and his wife, Nora, live on Signal Mountain. 16 SIGNATURE

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www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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A

LATE NIGHT WITH BILL EDDINS

2012/2013 SEASON

Radio From the Head Friday, May 3 | 9:30 PM

ARTIST BIOS

William Eddins, conductor & piano Christopher O’Riley, piano

ARTIST BIOS

Photo: Wendy Lynch

There is NO intermission in tonight’s performance. Please join us in the lobby following the concert. A lot of the music to be performed tonight will be announced, and discussed at some length, from the stage.

BROOKER

Procol Fantasy (arr. Gilliland – World Premiere of an ESO commission)

(7’)*

GOULET

Symphonic Chocolates Orchestral sweets in four flavors Caramel Chocolate: A long lyrical melody supported by a rich and enveloping sonority Dark Chocolate: An intense tango of desire and seduction, spiced up with a dissonant bitterness Mint Chocolate: A delicate freshness with icy cold sonorities Coffee-infused Chocolate: An espresso tempo with a Brazilian flavor

ZAPPA

The Dog Breath Variations / Uncle Meat Zappa, FZ, Frank Zappa and the Moustache are marks belonging to the Zappa Family Trust. All Rights Reserved. Used by permission. Frank Zappa, American Composer, fl. 1940-1993

FRANÇAIX

(11’)*

(6’)*

Concertino for Piano and Orchestra in G Major Presto leggiero Lent Allegretto Rondeau: Allegretto vivo

(9’)*

Solo Piano works

(8’)*

STRAVINSKY

The Rite of Spring (arranged by Stravinsky for piano four-hands) Program subject to change *indicates approximate performance duration

Series Sponsor

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Media Sponsor

(33’)*

F

rom his groundbreaking transcriptions to his unforgettably sublime interpretations of the classical canon, pianist CHRISTOPHER O’RILEY has stretched the piano beyond conventional boundaries. His first recording of Radiohead transcriptions, True Love Waits, received four stars from Rolling Stone and was as critically acclaimed as it was commercially successful. His Hold Me to This: Christopher O’Riley plays the music of Radiohead followed suit. Tackling the deeply emotional and complex work from the troubled singer/songwriter Elliott Smith, Home to Oblivion: An Elliott Smith Tribute drew critical praise from both classical and pop music critics. O’Riley’s fourth set of transcriptions from the contemporary popular songbook was Second Grace – The Music of Nick Drake, a collection of repertoire written and originally recorded by the late enigmatic British guitar wizard and songwriter. Mr. Eddins’s bio can be found on page 6.

www.EdmontonSymphony.com

2013-04-04 3:09 PM


Mr. O’Riley has taken his unique vision to both traditional classical music venues and symphonic settings, as well as to entirely new audiences on the radio, at universities and even clubs. As host of the popular classical music radio show, National Public Radio’s From The Top, he works and performs with the next generation of brilliant young musicians. Two years ago, PBS launched the weekly television series From the Top from Carnegie Hall featuring O’Riley as host, directed by Emmy winning director Gary Halvorson. Christopher O’Riley has appeared with the philharmonic orchestras of Los Angeles, New York, Moscow, and the Royal Philharmonic in London, the Minnesota Orchestra, and the symphonies of Pittsburgh, Atlanta, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. From early in his career, Mr. O’Riley was honoured with many awards at the Leeds, Van Cliburn, Busoni and Montréal competitions, as well as an Avery Fisher Career Grant. He studied with Russell Sherman at the New England Conservatory of Music. Christopher O’Riley makes his home in Cleveland. From the Top can be found at www.fromthetop.org. This is Mr. O’Riley’s debut with the ESO.

Once a month

PPROGRAM R O G NOTES RAM NOTES Note: In addition to tonight’s onstage discussion, a program note for the Françaix Concertino can be found on page 22.

W

E’RE ALSO THRILLED TO PRESENT THE WORLD PREMIERE OF A

newly-commissioned arrangement of Procol Harum songs. The arrangement is by the ESO’s second Composer in Residence, Allan Gilliland. Of his Procol Fantasy, Mr. Gilliland says: “The Edmonton Symphony Orchestra has been linked with the prog-rock group Procol Harum since their historic concert, and resulting gold album, in 1972. Th is was one of the first collaborations between a symphony orchestra and a rock band. In recognition of the historic concert, I was asked to compose a feature for the orchestra that explores the themes from two of their most famous pieces, “Conquistador” and “A Whiter Shade of Pale.” The first section of the work explores the Spanish side of “Conquistador,” giving the whole orchestra a chance to shine. Then we slow down for “A Whiter Shade of Pale.” In this section I play with the relationship between this work and the music of Bach before returning to the first section for the big finish.”

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HR Sale

Worth the wait

For details, visit www.sherbrookeliquor.com/signature

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      Landmark CLassiC masters series.

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LANDMARK CLASSIC MASTERS

2012/2013 SEASON

Ravel & Sibelius Saturday, May 4 | 8 PM

Photo: Wendy Lynch

William Eddins, conductor Christopher O’Riley, piano Symphony Prelude, 7:15 pm Third Level (Upper Circle) Lobby with D.T. Baker

RAVEL

Ma mère l’oye (Mother Goose Suite) Pavane de le Belle au bois dormant: Lent Petit Poucet: Très modéré Laideronnette, Impératrice des pagodes: Mouvement de marche Les entretiens de la Belle et de le Bête: Mouvement de valse modéré Le jardin féerique: Lent et grave

FRANÇAIX

Concertino for Piano and Orchestra in G Major Presto leggiero Lent Allegretto Rondeau: Allegretto vivo

RAVEL

Concerto for the Left Hand Lento – Allegro

(16’)*

(9’)*

(19’)*

INTERMISSION (20 minutes)

SIBELIUS

Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op.43 Allegretto Andante ma rubato Vivacissimo Allegro moderato

(45’)*

Program subject to change *indicates approximate performance duration

Landmark Classic Masters Sponsor

APRIL/MAY 2013

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Media Sponsor

Mr. Eddins’s bio can be found on page 6. Christopher O’Riley’s bio can be found on page 18. Program notes can be found on pages 22 & 23.

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2012/2013 SEASON LANDMARK CLASSIC MASTERS Ravel & Sibelius

PPROGRAM R O G NOTES RAM NOTES Ma mère l’oye (Mother Goose Suite) MAURICE RAVEL

(b. Ciboure, Basses-Pyrénées, 1875 / d. Paris, 1937)

Piano version first performed: April 20, 1910 in Paris Orchestral version first performed: January 21, 1912 in Paris LAST ESO PERFORMANCE: OCTOBER 1997

A

S WITH MANY RAVEL COMPOSITIONS, MA MÈRE L’OYE (“MOTHER GOOSE”)

began as a piano work, and was orchestrated by Ravel later. In the original conception of the piece, Ravel intended it not only to reflect the spirit of children’s stories, but also to be performed by children. The work was dedicated to Mimi and Jean Godebski, the daughter and son of a friend. They, however, were not accomplished enough at the piano to present the work, so that honour went to two other children, Jeanne Leleu and Genevieve Durony. “The aim of evoking in these pieces the poetry of childhood led me naturally to make my style simple, and bare the texture of my composition to the essentials,” Ravel wrote. He applied this same principle two years later when he orchestrated the work. The suite begins with the Pavane de le Belle au bois dormant (“The Pavane of the Sleeping Beauty”), highlighted by a melodic, mysterious melody. Petit Poucet (the equivalent of “Tom Thumb”) is depicted as getting lost in the woods, after leaving breadcrumbs to find his way back, only to have birds swoop down and eat them all. Laideronnette, Impératrice des pagodes (“Laideronnette, Empress of the Pagodas”) reclines in her bath, as a court orchestra serenades her – the eastern flavour is evoked through the use of a pentatonic scale. The final two movements are linked, beginning with Les entretiens de la Belle et de le Bête (“The Conversations of Beauty and the Beast”), with her voice given to the clarinet, and the Beast’s to the contrabassoon. After they fall in love, we are taken to the finale, Le jardin féerique (“The Fairy Garden”), which begins softly and tenderly, but builds to an ecstatic, sparkling conclusion.

Concertino for Piano and Orchestra in G Major JEAN FRANÇAIX

(b. Le Mans, 1912 / d. Paris, 1997)

First performed: December 15, 1934 in Paris

THIS IS THE ESO PREMIERE OF THE PIECE

T

HE SON OF MUSICAL

parents, Jean Françaix showed talent early on, and at age 18 won first prize in piano performance at a Paris Conservatoire competition. Two years later, he wrote his beguiling Concertino for Piano and Orchestra. Though a young man when he wrote

it, the Concertino still contains the germ of pretty much all Françaix’s music: it is witty, playful, light, and highly entertaining. That has actually been the main criticism levelled at Françaix; that his works lack depth or real musical insight. And while it is true he did not alter the musical landscape, or write profoundly influential masterpieces, there is also no denying the absolute sparkle and joy either. The work is in four very short movements, beginning with a mad dash marked Presto leggiero (“fast, light and delicate”), in which a perpetually scurrying piano is urged on by mischievous taunting in the orchestra. It leads without a pause to the sudden stillness of the Lent (“slow”) second movement, in which the piano scarcely plays anything except single, measured notes, against a wistful string accompaniment. The Allegretto (“quite happy”) part of the third movement begins with muted trumpets, followed by a brief piano passage. Almost right after, the Trio is a gently rhythmic, somewhat folksong-like melody, followed by a slightly longer (the whole movement is a minute and a half!) restatement of the movement’s opening section. The finale is based on the same music as the first movement, only now set in a 5/4 tempo, with the orchestra alternating witticisms with the piano.

Concerto for the Left Hand RAVEL

First performed: January 5, 1932 in Vienna LAST ESO PERFORMANCE: SYMPHONY UNDER THE SKY 1998

T

HE SAME YEAR THAT FRANÇAIX COMPOSED

his youthful Concertino, the more established and famous Maurice Ravel witnessed the premiere of his Concerto for the Left Hand. Paul Wittgenstein, a talented pianist (and brother of the philosopher Ludwig) had lost his right arm in the First World War, and subsequently had commissioned a number of works from composers including Richard Strauss and Franz Schmidt before Ravel’s piece, Britten and Prokofiev after. Ravel was fascinated in the project, not by the novelty of such a work, but how the limitation could be overcome to create a work which would stand on its own merits. It is certainly not without interest to note that nine days after the Left Hand Concerto’s premiere, Ravel’s other piano concerto received its fi rst performance. It is hard to believe that two such disparate works could have been written by the same composer, let alone that they were composed contemporaneously. And it is easy to ascribe the darker tone and brusque physicality of tonight’s concerto – as compared to the lightness and even humour of the G Major Concerto – to the tragic nature of the work’s impetus. But that too casually brushes aside Ravel’s vision for the work, which while played as one continuous piece, is divided into three relatively distinct sections. From the deepest bass notes of the orchestra, the www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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music rises out, moodily and oppressively, to a shattering climax. It is only then that the piano enters with rolling, grand statements of its own – cadenza-like – until it settles down to present the fi rst truly identifi able theme of the work, a rich and rhapsodic one entirely for piano alone. The orchestra at last returns in its own rich garb, taking up the thematic material from the piano. Its fiery mood seemingly assuaged, the piano’s next passage is of surprising tenderness and beauty, soon joined by woodwinds in an ethereal landscape. A sudden fortissimo swell ushers in, of all things, a march with a decidedly military sensibility (the irony that, only years before, Ravel and Wittgenstein were on opposing sides in World War One cannot be overlooked). An English horn ushers in a measured stillness, but the passion builds quickly, leading to a forte central section, bristling with an almost angry energy. It is answered by a dramatic, almost heroic passage, itself answered by a substantial expressive, pensive piano solo. The orchestra is brought back in time for a triumphant fi nish.

Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op.43 JEAN SIBELIUS

After a grand climax in the brass, the strings play an unexpectedly beautiful song, to woodwind accompaniment. The movement ends as the strings and woodwinds engage in a curious dialog. The trio section of the third movement is marked by a stilted melody for the oboe, and is in stark contrast to the almost frantic Vivacissimo of the main Scherzo theme. The Scherzo is tied directly to the Finale, allowing for an achingly long build-up to the work’s climactic moment, “one of the most devastating affirmations in music,” notes Robert Dearling. The final movement begins out of fragments, though these are brought together into two huge melodic passages separated by a transition section. As the coda begins, the work slows to a Molto largamente, full of import and drive – bringing out the passion and a sense of victory accomplished as the symphony concludes. Program notes © 2013 by D.T. Baker

Edmonton Recital Society

Season Seven

(b. Tavestehus, 1865 / d. Järvenpää, 1957)

First performed: March 8, 1902 in Helsinki LAST ESO PERFORMANCE: OCTOBER 2003

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Martin Riseley, violin Janet Scott Hoyt, piano

HE SYMPHONIES OF JEAN SIBELIUS ARE POWERFUL

statements of individuality. He was little concerned with historical precedent or established theory, and showed an actual aversion for thematic development that merely sustained a predictable pattern. Instead, he frequently used short motifs in an almost mosaic pattern. It is difficult in almost any movement of a Sibelius symphony to point out obvious first subjects, developments, secondary subjects, or recapitulations. Often, brief musical ideas are gathered together near the work’s conclusion, making a unified whole out of what has been a patchwork to that point. Sibelius wrote his Second Symphony in Italy, where he spent the winter of 1901-02. The symphony’s opening movement has puzzled scholars and listeners alike, as over a dozen musical ideas are heard, leading one scholar (Philip Coad) to posit that Sibelius, “plays cat and mouse with the dominant key, and the discontinuity of the music is of a new order in the context of a symphonic exposition.” The Andante second movement has pizzicato cellos and basses seemingly at rather loose ends, until they coalesce as the accompaniment for a melody in the bassoon. APRIL/MAY 2013

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May 19, 2013 (Sunday) 7:30 p.m. Muttart Hall, Alberta College Conservatory of Music 10050 MacDonald Drive, Edmonton AB $35 (adult)/$25 (seniors)/$10 (students) For more information, please visit us at www.edmontonrecital.com or contact us at 780.264.2844.

Special Thanks

Warranty expired - now it’s your choice!

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ESO PRESENTS

2012/2013 SEASON

Arrival from Sweden Plays the Music of ABBA Tuesday, May 14 | 7:30 PM

Robert Bernhardt, conductor Arrival From Sweden, special guests

The music for tonight’s concert will be announced from the stage. There will be one, 20-minute intermission in tonight’s performance.

ARTIST BIOS

ARTIST BIOS

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BBA is Sweden’s biggest music export ever, with 370 million records sold. Mamma Mia!, the stage musical built around the songs of ABBA, has proven a worldwide sensation. There is a Playstation game of their music, and plans to open an ABBA Museum in Stockholm. ABBA was the most commercially successful pop group in the world for the entire 1970s. Together as a group for about 11 years (1972-1983), the phenomenon of their music has never really diminished in the intervening three decades. New generations seem captivated by their songs, and their sound (and the clothes).

Media Sponsor

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ARRIVAL FROM SWEDEN began in 1995, and soon became one of the

world’s most popular and best-selling ABBA show bands. The band has toured over 50 countries and appeared on several TV and radio shows all over the world. They have embarked on 30 sold out tours in North America since 2005. Arrival From Sweden, appearing in the world’s greatest ABBA tribute show, “THE MUSIC OF ABBA,” tours the world together with original members of ABBA’s band. This production is the closest you’ll ever get to see ABBA! Arrival From Sweden is the only group to have been given an unreleased ABBA song directly from ABBA, which they released worldwide in 2009. Arrival From Sweden is also the only group to have the exclusive right to copy ABBA’s original outfits, and the only group which has exclusive permission for the use of the name ABBA in their production name - ABBASOLUTELY - permitted by Universal. Arrival From Sweden’s concerts with symphony orchestras, on TV, and radio are presented all over the world. This band is hailed as the most authentic and greatest ABBA show band ever. It is just like ABBA never left.

This is the group’s debut with the ESO.

Mr. Bernhardt’s bio can be found on page 16.

www.EdmontonSymphony.com

4/2/13 9:37:57 AM

000Sig-S


sheancompetition.com

Friday, May 17 1pm-4pm & 6:30pm-9:30pm

Saturday, May 18 2pm-4pm & 6:30pm-9pm

Muttart Hall

Alberta College Campus, Grant MacEwan University (10050 MacDonald Drive)

Adjudicators

David Hoyt, Chair Martin Riseley, violin Yegor Dyachkov, violoncello

Grand Prize

$8,000 and an opportunity to perform with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra

Free admission!

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ROBBINS LIGHTER CLASSICS

2012/2013 SEASON

A Night of Encores Thursday, May 16 | 8 PM

Robert Bernhardt, conductor Gillian Caldwell, cello Richard Caldwell, violin Robin Doyon, trumpet Lidia Khaner, oboe Neda Yamach, violin

J. STRAUSS I

Radetzky March, Op.228 PIANO ENCORES

RACHMANINOFF

Prelude in C-sharp minor, Op.3 No. 2 (arr. Schmid)

PADEREWSKI

Menuet in G, Op.14 No. 1 (arr. Dragon)

SCHUMANN

Kinderszenen, Op.15: Träumerei (arr. Leon)

MOZART

Sonata in A Major, K.331/300i: Rondo “Alla Turca” (arr. Stokowski) VIOLIN ENCORES

DINICU/HEIFETZ

WORLD ENCORES

BEETHOVEN

Turkish March (from The Ruins of Athens, Op.113)

GRIEG

In the Hall of the Mountain King (from Peer Gynt, Op.23)

BRAHMS

Hungarian Dance No. 5 in G minor (arr. Parlow) INTERMISSION (20 minutes) POPS ENCORES

WILLIAMS

E.T.: Flying Theme

ANDERSON Fiddle Faddle

MORRICONE

Gabriel’s Oboe (from The Mission) (arr. Longfield)

BERNSTEIN

Candide: Overture

Hora staccato (arr. Schmid)

VOCAL ENCORES

DVORÁK

FOSDICK/POULTON

MONTI

SAINT-SAËNS

Humoresque, Op.101 No. 7 (arr. Morawetz) Csárdás (arr. Dragon)

Aura Lee (arr. Dragon)

Mon cœur s’ouvre à ta voix (from Samson et Dalila ) (arr. Dragon)

ARBAN

Variations on a Theme from Bellini’s Norma (arr. Brinkmann)

PUCCINI

Viva Puccini (arr. Wendel) Program subject to change

Series Sponsor

Mr. Bernhardt’s bio can be found on page 16.

Bill & Mary Jo Robbins 26 SIGNATURE

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www.EdmontonSymphony.com

4/2/13 9:39:41 AM


ARTIST BIOS

Photo: Lightside Photography

ARTIST BIOS

R

ICHARD CALDWELL has been a member of the ESO since 1973.

He holds both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in violin performance from Western Michigan University. He has appeared with many performing arts organizations in and around Edmonton including The Edmonton Chamber Players Orchestra and the Arden Ensemble. In 1982, he established and conducted the Nova Musica Society, which is a local amateur symphony orchestra. Mr. Caldwell was Concertmaster and one of the founders of the Edmonton Chamber Orchestra (ECHO). He is also the Founder and Music Director of The Edmonton Medical Professions Orchestra (TEMPO), an Edmonton community string orchestra whose members are primarily medical professionals. TEMPO is celebrating its 13th anniversary in 2013. In his spare time, Richard enjoys travel, golf, and 10-pin bowling.

A

ILLIAN CALDWELL came to Edmonton in 1977 to join the cello section of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra. Prior to that, her studies took her to the Guildhall School of Music in London, England, McGill University in Montréal, and the Peabody Conservatory at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. With her husband Richard, ESO violinist since 1973, they formed the Rococo String Quartet in 1978, making it the longest-standing freelance classical group in Edmonton. They also formed the (now defunct) Edmonton Chamber Orchestra, and more recently The Edmonton Medical Professions Orchestra. Ms. Caldwell is an avid old house renovator and teaches many adult amateur cellists. She has also served three terms as a member of the ESO Board of Directors.

native of East Angus, Québec, ROBIN DOYON was appointed Principal Trumpet of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra in September 2008. Since then, he has appeared as soloist with the ESO, the Red Deer Symphony, and the Alberta Baroque Ensemble. He received bachelor and master’s degrees in Classical Interpretation from the Université de Montréal. In 2002, he was Laureate of the National Music Festival, the Montréal Symphony Orchestra Competition, and the Radio-Canada Young Artists Competition. Mr. Doyon has been the recipient of numerous prizes, including the 2007 Prix avec Grande distinction from the Conservatoire de musique du Québec à Montréal. He has been a member of the Orchestre des Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal, and a regular performer with the Montréal Symphony Orchestra, the National Arts Centre Orchestra, and Montréal’s Orchestre Métropolitain. Robin Doyon currently teaches at the University of Alberta, having previously been a professor at the University of Sherbrooke.

This is Ms. Caldwell’s debut as a soloist with the ESO.

Mr. Doyon last appeared as a soloist with the ESO in September 2012.

GILLIAN & RICHARD CALDWELL

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APRIL/MAY 2013

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Photo: Michael Woolley

Mr. Caldwell last appeared as a soloist with the ESO in November 2009.

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4/2/13 9:40:34 AM


Life`s Good Sing Along!

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ROB & AUDIE In The Morning

5:30am to 9:00am www.963capitalfm.com Signature7_p26-31.indd 28

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2012/2013 SEASON ROBBINS LIGHTER CLASSICS A Night of Encores

Photo: Stephen Joe

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IDIA KHANER has performed as Principal Oboe with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra since 1996. She studied oboe in her native Poland at the Warsaw Academy of Music and graduated With Distinction in 1987. As a member of the Sinfonia Varsovia and the Polish Chamber Orchestra, she toured around the world playing both orchestral parts and solo concerts. Ms. Khaner played Principal Oboe with the Sinfonia Helvetica from 1992 to 1997. She has recorded works for the KOS label, the Polish radio and television network, CBC and Arktos Recordings. Lidia has performed and recorded solo concertos with the Alberta Baroque Ensemble and soloed with the Edmonton Symphony and the Edmonton Chamber Orchestras. Ms. Khaner has earned her second degree black belt in Taekwando, and has represented Canada at the ITF World Championship in Estonia.

Ms. Khaner last appeared as a soloist with the ESO in September 2012.

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riginally from St. Albert, NEDA YAMACH began studying the violin at the age of five. Under the tutelage of Thomas Williams, she attended McGill University in Montréal where she was a recipient of the Lloyd Carr Harris Scholarship. After receiving her Bachelor of Music Performance degree, she studied with Patti Kopec at the Manhattan School of Music. Ms. Yamach was a member of the Edmonton Youth Orchestra, and spent many summers participating in music festivals at the Banff Centre for the Arts and Meadowmount School of Music in New York. She joined the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra in 2011 following international auditions. She is also a member of the Alberta Baroque Ensemble and Kent Sangster’s Obsessions Octet. This is Ms. Yamach’s solo debut with the ESO. APRIL/MAY 2013

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PPROGRAM R O G NOTES RAM NOTES A Night of Encores – Program Notes

“E

ncore” means “again,” and came about when a piece of music (or even part of a piece of music) stirred an audience to such state that their reaction demanded that the piece be played once more, on the spot. It used to happen all the time, but as the performer began to assume a more prominent role in the concert world, the notion of “encore” also changed. After a particularly admirable performance, if the audience seemed particularly impressed, it became customary for performers to provide an “encore,” an extra bit of music not included on the concert program – as a way of saying thank you, and adding to the extraordinariness of the performance. Tonight’s celebration of favourite encores is set up a bit unusually. For one thing, while the program is divided into sections, such as piano encores, vocal encores etc., this is an Edmonton Symphony performance. So many of the pieces themselves, while well known in other guises, will frequently be heard in arrangements for orchestra, not for their solitary instruments. We begin with the granddaddy of orchestral encores. JOHANN STRAUSS SR. (1804-1849, father of the “Waltz King”) wrote the Radetzky March in 1848, dedicated to Austrian Field Marshal Joseph Radetzky von Radetz. Strauss was commissioned to write the piece for a celebration of Radetzky’s victory at the Battle of Custoza. At the annual New Year’s concert in Vienna, the Vienna Philharmonic presents it as one of their encores, and the audience is encouraged to clap along each time the main theme of the march is presented. Of all the instrumental soloists, pianists are probably the most numerous, and often the most colourful. Early on, it was the pianist-composer who dazzled audiences; in the 20th century, it became more common for a performing specialist to gain fame for their interpretations of others’ music. SERGEI RACHMANINOFF’S (1873-1943) Prelude in C-sharp minor became so well-known and popular, it was called simply “The Prelude.” Audiences would call for it, shouting “C-sharp!” An early work by Rachmaninoff, he lamented that crowds always asked for it at the expense of his later pieces. We will hear an orchestration of it by Adolf Schmid. IGNACY PADEREWSKI (1860-1941) was not only a world-renowned piano virtuoso, but a statesman as well, becoming the second-ever Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland. Tonight, we present Carmen Dragon’s arrangement for orchestra of Paderewski’s Menuet in G Major. One of the first great piano performers was Vladimir Horowitz. A favourite encore of his was the tender and beautiful Träumerei (“Dreaming”) by ROBERT SCHUMANN (1810-1856). Tonight, a violin and orchestra version arranged by Craig Leon is featured. And nearly all pianists have WOLFGANG AMADÉ MOZART’S (1756-1791) lively Rondo “Alla Turca” in their encore arsenal. Its instantly recognizable melody will be presented in an orchestration by the iconic Leopold Stokowski. Second only to the piano, the violin has attracted a dizzying number of virtuoso performers. In 1932, JASCHA HEIFETZ’ arrangement of the Roma-inspired Hora staccato of GRIGORA DINICU (1889-1949), composed in 1906, became not only a favourite encore by Heifetz, but of many subsequent violinists as well. The great Czech composer ANTONÍN DVORÁK’S (1841-1904) light and charming Humoresque has been a crowd-pleaser from its first performances, so when Fritz Kreisler made it a regular encore of his, it was already well-known. Tonight’s version, featuring solo cello and violin, is by Canadian composer Oskar Morawetz. SIGNATURE 29

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2012/2013 SEASO ROBBINS LIGHTER CLASSICS A Night of Encores

The CSARDAS is a traditional Hungarian folk dance, yet the most famous example of it was composed by an Italian, VITTORIO MONTI (1868-1922). You’ll know the tune as soon as you hear it, and you’ll also know it as a whirling and bravura piece for violin – one which nearly all violinists love to show off. Carmen Dragon set the orchestration we hear for this performance. The next section of our performance features popular works that orchestras around the world enjoy presenting as “extras,â€? works with international flavours. The faux Turkish music that proved so popular in the late 18th and early 19th centuries yielded a number of classical “hitsâ€? (the Rondo “Alla Turcaâ€? from earlier this evening is an example), including the colourful and beguiling Turkish March, taken from incidental music LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN (1770-1827) wrote in 1811 to accompany a play called The Ruins of Athens. Beginning quietly and slowly, and finishing loud and fast has made the bracing In the Hall of the Mountain King an orchestral thriller since its 1876 premiere. Like the Beethoven march, it, too, is from incidental music for a play. The great Norwegian composer EDVARD GRIEG (1843-1907) wrote music for his countryman Henrik Ibsen’s play Peer Gynt. A tour with a Hungarian-style violinist gave young JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-1897) the inspiration to write a set of Hungarian Dances which proved extremely popular. Of the 21 he wrote, Dance No. 5 in G minor is one of the best known. Written originally for piano duo, Dance No. 5 was orchestrated soon after by Albert Parlow. Some orchestral encores are great opportunities to showcase particular aspects of either the orchestra itself, or the music. The king of orchestral pops compositions, LEROY ANDERSON (1908-1975), features the orchestral violins in his lighthearted Fiddle Faddle – a staple of the legendary Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra. Fiedler was succeeded at the Boston Pops by legendary fi lm composer JOHN WILLIAMS (b. 1932), so it’s no surprise that some of his movie scores provided his version of the Boston Pops with a few encore numbers as well. Tonight, we’ve chosen the memorable music that propelled Elliott’s bicycle into the air at the climax of the 1982 blockbuster E.T. Next is a haunting and beautiful oboe solo from ENNIO MORRICONE’S (b. 1918) score to the 1986 fi lm Th e Mission. Contrasting that is the scintillating overture to LEONARD BERNSTEIN’S (1918-1990) Candide, full of tricky tempo changes, melodic switching, and other feats of orchestral derring-do. We finish off tonight with encores made famous by singers. Depending on the era from which you hail, you will recognize the familiar melody orchestrated by Carmen Dragon as either the old American Civil War-era song Aura Lee, or as the 1956 Elvis Presley hit Love Me Tender. It was a classic showstopper for the King. Mon cĹ“ur s’ouvre Ă  ta voix (“My heart opens itself to your voiceâ€?) is sung by the character of Delilah in CAMILLE SAINT-SAĂ‹NS’S (1835-1921) 1877 operatic telling of the story of Samson and Delilah. A favourite aria for mezzo-sopranos, the great Marilyn Horne made this a regular encore at her concert performances. There are two ways of looking at the Variations on a Theme from Bellini’s Norma by JEAN-BAPTISTE ARBAN (1825-1889): The first is the actual theme from Bellini’s Norma, which happens to be the famous soprano aria Casta diva (“pure goddessâ€?), which the great Australian soprano Joan Sutherland performed often. And in Arban’s setting as a virtuoso display for cornet, many of the world’s great trumpet soloists have brought crowds to their feet. GIACOMO PUCCINI (1858-1924) has given the music world some of its greatest operatic moments. Robert Wendel stitched several of the most popular together for Viva Puccini, and we conclude our night of encores with a medley of several of them. Listen for the Prelude to Madama Butterfly, the tender O mio babbino caro from Gianni Schicchi, the glittering Musetta’s Waltz from La Bohème, the tragic and beautiful Un bel dĂŹ vedremo from Madama Butterfly, and finishing with the song The Th ree Tenors made into an international soccer anthem – Nessun dorma from Turandot. Program notes Š 2013 by D.T. Baker, with thanks to Rob McAlear

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4/2/13 9:46:11 AM


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M MIDWEEK CLASSICS

2012/2013 SEASON

Baroque & Classical Fireworks Wednesday, May 22 | 7:30 PM

ARTIST BIOS

William Eddins, conductor & harpsichord Chloë Hanslip, violin

AVISON

Concerto grosso No. 2 in G Major “After Scarlatti” Largo (after Sonata K.91c) Allegro (after Sonata K.13) Andante (after Sonata K.4) Vivace (after Sonata K.2)

BACH

Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068 Ouverture Air Gavotte I / Gavotte II Bourrée Gigue

ARTIST BIOS

(14’)*

(20’)*

HANDEL

Music for the Royal Fireworks: Orchestral Suite (arr. Harty) Ouverture: Maestoso – Allegro Alla Siciliana Bourrée Menuetto

(13’)*

INTERMISSION (20 minutes)

PAGANINI

Violin Concerto No. 1 in D Major, Op.6 Allegro maestoso Adagio Rondo: Allegro spirituoso Program subject to change *indicates approximate performance duration

(31’)*

S

ince her BBC Proms debut in 2002, 25-year-old British violinist CHLOË HANSLIP has firmly established herself on the international stage. With a special affinity for contemporary repertoire, she plays the concertos of John Adams, Benjamin Britten, Philip Glass, John Corigliano, Michael Nyman, and Brett Dean. During the 2012/13 season, Ms. Hanslip will appear with the Buffalo Philharmonic, Minas Gerais Philharmonic Orchestra/ Brazil, and the Virginia Symphony, as well as the London Philharmonic, Royal Philharmonic, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Prague Symphony, Lahti and Oulu symphonies in Finland, the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, and the London Mozart Players. In the U.S., Ms. Hanslip has performed with the Detroit Symphony, Houston Symphony, Jacksonville Symphony, Phoenix Symphony, and the Sarasota Orchestra. Worldwide engagements include the Bavarian Radio Orchestra, BBC Concert Orchestra at the Proms, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Beethoven Orchester/Bonn, Birmingham Symphony, Bournemouth Symphony, City of London Sinfonia, Hamburg Symphony, Malaysia Philharmonic, Moscow Symphony, Norwegian Radio Symphony, Philharmonia/London, Orquesta Sinfonica de Castilla y Leon, Real Filharmonia/Galicia, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Singapore Symphony, and the Tokyo Symphony. Chloë Hanslip has received outstanding reviews for her two Naxos CDs: The John Adams Violin Concerto with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra under Leonard Slatkin, and The Violin concertos of Benjamin Godard with the Slovak State Philharmonic. Two earlier CDs for Warner Classics won her, respectively, the German ECHO Classic Award for Best Newcomer (2002), and Young British Classical Performer at the Classical BRITS (2003). Now recording with Hyperion, her first CD (The Vieuxtemps violin concertos with the Royal Flemish Philharmonic under Martyn Brabbins) will be released this season. Ms. Hanslip studied for 10 years with the great Russian pedagogue Zakhar Bron. She has also worked with Robert Masters, Ida Haendel, Salvatore Accardo, and Gerhard Schulz. For more information, please visit www.chloehanslip.com This is Ms. Hanslip’s debut with the ESO. Mr. Eddins’s bio appears on page 6.

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4/2/13 9:53:55 AM

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PPROGRAM R O G NOTES RAM NOTES Concerto grosso No. 2 in G Major “After Scarlatti”

Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068

CHARLES AVISON

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

(b. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1709 / d. Newcastle, 1770)

(b. Eisenach, Saxony, 1685 / d. Leipzig, 1750)

T

I

HE STORY OF TONIGHT’S FIRST WORK HAS TWO ORIGINS,

both from Italy. The concerto grosso, as a form, originated there, as of course did the composer Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757). Scarlatti became best known for his hundreds of single-movement sonatas for solo keyboard, considered a summit of harpsichord technique. The concerto grosso was a popular musical form, with a solo “group” of two violins, cello, and continuo matched against a larger string ensemble. By the time Charles Avison became the chief musician in his hometown of Newcastle, the British appetite for concerti grossi (the plural form of concerto grosso) was seemingly inexhaustible, and composers did whatever they could to bring new sets before the public. Borrowing, or adapting, other composers’ music was quite common, and so it was that Avison took the solo keyboard music of Scarlatti as his starting point for a set of 12 concerti grossi in 1744. The four brief movements which make up the second concerto of the set are based on the slow-fast-slow-fast design common in concerto grosso design.

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T IS THOUGHT THAT BACH WROTE MORE THAN THE FOUR

orchestral suites we know of, but that any others he might have written have been lost. The Third Suite stands out from its fellows in its more sumptuous instrumentation, including prominent brass parts. Like Handel’s suite to be performed tonight, the Bach suite is based on a French model, which typically begins with an “ouverture” (given the French spelling), followed by a series of French dance forms. The overture to Orchestral Suite No. 3 begins with a sense of expectancy, and features a fugue in its middle section. Then, rather than the expected series of dances in the French manner, Bach adds an “air” in the Italian style. This famous slow movement, which has become (incorrectly) known as Air on the G String, is one of the most famous and popular melodies Bach wrote. The French dances follow: a sprightly-stepping pair of gavottes, a vigorous bourrée – and a rousing gigue (a French spelling, by the way, of the brisk English “jig”), featuring a soaring trumpet line.

4/2/13 11:44:35 AM


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Music for the Royal Fireworks: Orchestral Suite (arr. Harty) GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL

(b. Halle, 1685 / d. London, 1759)

H

ANDEL WAS THE FAVOURED COMPOSER OF THE BRITISH

royal court. He was charged with writing the Music for the Royal Fireworks for a celebration marking the 1748 signing of the treaty of Aixla-Chapelle. The actual event – particularly the success of the fireworks themselves – fell short of the hoped-for spectacle, but Handel’s music was a rollicking triumph. The original music, of course, was written for a baroque-sized orchestra, with few strings. As baroque music began to come back into fashion in the latter part of the 19th century, it was quite common for conductors to adapt the music for the orchestras of the day (the idea of “authentic period performance” was a 20th century way of thinking). Irish conductor and composer Hamilton Harty (1879-1941) arranged Handel’s music for the larger orchestra of his time. The overture which begins the suite is in rich formal dress: a ceremonial, slow beginning, followed by an energetic and appropriately rousing second half. Following the overture are three dance movements, an Italian-inspired Siciliana, and two French dances: a duple-time Bourrée, and a 3/4 Menuetto.

Violin Concerto No. 1 in D Major, Op.6 NICCOLÒ PAGANINI

(b. Genoa, 1782 / d. Nice, 1840)

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HERE IS NO DOUBT THAT NICCOLÒ PAGANINI’S REPUTATION

as one of the greatest violinists who ever lived is well-deserved. But there is also no doubt that he used more than his share of tricks and short cuts to make his amazing talent seem other-worldly to the audiences of the day. A true pop star in the modern sense of the word, Paganini did nothing to dispel rumours that his talents were the result of a pact with the devil. In order to keep his trade secrets, Paganini published very little music while he was alive. He is known to have written four concertos and left at least two others incomplete. His Violin Concerto No. 1 is the most often played today, and shows more than one of his masterful sleights of hand. Throughout the work tonight, watch for such displays as: extended arpeggios (the notes of a chord played in a rapid sequence up or down), left-hand pizzicato (using the fret hand to pluck the strings, allowing the bow hand to also play, creating two distinct voices at the same time), and rapid runs in thirds, fifths, and even harmonics. Fortunately, the concerto’s popularity is not confined to its technical wizardry. There is a solid musical foundation supporting the work, one derived from the Italian passion for opera. There is a very strong influence of Rossini, particularly in the first movement of Paganini’s concerto, which opens with a grand statement by the orchestra - some 94 bars before the violin even makes its first appearance. Once it does, however, it is clearly the star, with a main theme featuring large intervallic leaps, much like a florid operatic aria, and connecting subjects not unlike recitatives. The slow movement is a quiet, dignified Adagio, contrasting entirely with the dashing final movement. This is a Rondo, the main subject of which is an engaging, light-as-air melody based around the technique of spiccato – a way of playing notes rapidly by using a loose wrist and the middle of the bow, and “bouncing” the bow on the strings – alternating with a sweet melody in the upper register. Program notes © 2013 by D.T. Baker

www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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STORIES FROM THE AUDIENCE

NAME: VLADIMIR AND CATHRYN BRECKA

How long have you attended the ESO? Cathryn: Since 1967. Vladimir: Right! We moved to Wetaskiwin in 1966. We missed a year or two when our daughter was born, so definitely 40+ years. Lawrence Leonard was the first conductor we knew.

You mentioned you were teachers. Were you both music teachers? Do you both play an instrument? Vladimir: I was a math teacher. I can tap out just about any tune, but I’ve never played an instrument. Cathryn: I was a music teacher and used to play the violin. I even used to play for the musicals, like Oklahoma! in Wetaskiwin. Do you have anything that you make sure to bring to every ESO concert? Vladimir: Well, back before I was so musically inclined, I would bring a transistor radio so I could check up on the Stamps during intermission. What is your favourite pre-concert drink? Cathryn: Coffee. We used to come to the Friday Night Masters and after having taught all week it sure was nice to have a cup of coffee. Do you have a funny memory associated with the ESO? I bet you have a few. Cathryn: For me, it was when one of the conductors, I can’t remember who, accidentally tossed his baton right into the audience. I probably laughed out loud at that.

DATE: DECEMBER 20, 2012

For me, it was when one of the conductors, I can’t remember who, accidentally tossed his baton right into the audience. I probably laughed out loud at that. When you turn on your radio, CD player, or MP3 player, what’s playing right now? Cathryn: Right now, it’s Leahy. Vladimir: They had a concert here about 10 years ago, it was tremendous. Cathryn: *Laughs* And we have a six-year-old grandson – he just loves their music. He loves getting the “old folks” up and dancing. What is your musical “guilty pleasure”? Cathryn: I definitely have one. My family won’t let me play it very often. Klezmer music. Christmas Klezmer music. Vladimir: Oh no. I can’t stand that stuff. It just sounds so junky to me. *Laughs* What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory? Vladimir: The organ. We came to the opening gala and it was wonderful. Every time I look at the organ it’s a “wow”. Cathryn: What was that silent movie we did this year? Phantom of the Opera? I just loved that. And the year before, they did a Charlie Chaplin movie, that was good, too!

If you have a story you would like to share or would like to be interviewed for “Stories From the Audience” please contact Erin Mulcair at 780-401-2539 or emulcair@winspearcentre.com

APRIL/MARCH 2013

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4/2/13 10:03:21 AM


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STORIES FROM THE AUDIENCE

NAME: RICHARD & BARBARA BAKER

How long have you attended the ESO? Barbara: Well, we went to the Jubilee for at least five years when the ESO was performing there … Richard: … so, around 20 years to the Pops Do you play, or have you ever played, an instrument? Richard: In high school I used to sing. I was in the University of Alberta Mixed Chorus. Barbara: I play the piano. If you could learn to play another instrument, which would it be? Richard: For me it would have to be the organ. Barbara: Maybe the harp? What does your typical concert night look like? Do you have a tradition? Barbara: We do! We go with my sister and her husband, and for as long as we’ve been subscribers, we have had dinner together before the concert. Richard: Yup, ever since we started. If you could meet any musician, dead or alive, any genre of music – who would it be? Richard: Bill Eddins is quite inspiring! I’d love to meet him. Barbara: k.d. lang. I’d probably choose her. What is your funniest memory associated with the ESO or the Winspear Centre? Richard: When Bill Eddins interacted with Measha Brueggergosman at the Gala. They were quite funny. Barbara: In general, when Bill Eddins conducts that Pops, he always brings a humour which I enjoy.

DATE: DECEMBER 21, 2012

What is your favourite genre of music today? What did you listen to when you were a teenager? Richard: I can never remember. Well in my teenage years I would listen to Elvis and The Beatles. Barbara: Elvis for me, too, and The Platters and Patti Page. What’s your theme song? Richard: “What a Wonderful World” Barbara: We always turn up the radio whenever the Jupiter movement from Gustav Holst’s Planets comes on the radio. Richard: Yes, that’s right. Life is … Richard: Good! Barbara: A bowl of cherries. Music is … Richard: Spiritual. Music heals the soul. Barbara: Inspiring. Happiness is … Richard: Family. That’s the glue. Barbara: 50 years of marriage! What is your favourite ESO or Winspear Centre memory? Richard: When David Hoyt conducted. Anytime you combine the orchestra with choirs. I also enjoyed when the Canadian Brass came and played … oh, and Rita MacNeil! Barbara: The Simon and Garfunkel concert … and The Beatles concert, too. I can only recall the more recent concerts! *laughs*

If you have a story you would like to share or would like to be interviewed for “Stories From the Audience” please contact Erin Mulcair at 780-401-2539 or emulcair@winspearcentre.com

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www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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THE EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FRANCIS WINSPEAR CENTRE FOR MUSIC

BOARD & STAFF

N 1952, A SMALL GROUP OF DEDICATED VISIONARIES formed the Edmonton Symphony Society with the goal of creating an ongoing, sustainable Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, and providing Edmonton with the finest in orchestral music, enriching the lives of its audiences. Since then, the ESO has grown to a full-time core of 56 musicians. Its performance home – another goal realized by committed community volunteers – is the magnificent Francis Winspear Centre for Music. Transcending the original board’s vision, the ESO now has a budget of $8.5 million annually, and it performs over 85 concerts, in addition to performances with Edmonton Opera and Alberta Ballet. None of this would be possible without the tireless work of the Board of Directors and the society which they voluntarily administer.

LIST OF PAST BOARD CHAIRS Mrs. Marion Mills Dr. H.V. Rice Mr. John D. Dower Mr. Gerry M. Wilmot Dr. A.O. Minsos Mr. E.M. Blanchard Mr. A.G. Culver Mr. D.D. Campbell Mr. D.M. Ramsay Mr. Merrill E. Wolfe Mr. Ken R. Higham Mr. George M. Peacock, Q.C. Mr. Robert L. Horley The Honourable David C. McDonald Mrs. Madeline Williams The Honourable Tevie H. Miller Mr. Jack W. Kennedy The Honourable Roger P. Kerans Mr. Richard W. Palmer Dr. John R. Huckell Dr. John L. Schlosser Mr. J.R. Singleton Mr. D.A. Cox Mr. Ron Ritch Mrs. Margaret Clarke Mr. Brian Hetherington Mr. Charles T. Austin Mr. Neil Wilkinson Mr. Robert Binnendyk Mr. Ron Pearson Ms. Audrey Luft Mr. Andrew Hladyshevsky, Q.C. Mr. Douglas Noble Mr. D. Mark Gunderson, Q.C. Mr. W.D. (Bill) Grace, F.C.A. Mrs. Phyllis Clark Mr. Steven LePoole 40 SIGNATURE

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1952-53 1953-54 1954-56 1956-57 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62 1962-63 1963-65 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 1970-71 1971-72 1972-73 1973-76 1976-77 1977-79 1979-80 1980-82 1982-84 1984-86 1986-88 1988-90 1990-93 1993-95 1995-97 1997-00 2000-01 2001-03 2003-04 2004-07 2007-11

EDMONTON SYMPHONY SOCIETY / FRANCIS WINSPEAR CENTRE FOR MUSIC

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jim E. Carter, P.Eng., Chair Reginald Milley, Vice Chair Steven LePoole, Past Chair Cynthia Hansen, C.A., Treasurer Brian W. Summers, LL. B., Secretary/Legal Counsel Bart Becker, P.Eng. Carolyn Campbell Maria David-Evans Megan Evans Peggy Garritty Bill Harrison Travis Huckell Leanne Krawchuk, LL.B. Carol Ann Kushlyk, C.M.A., C.F.E. Ron New, C.A. Rhonda Taft

EDMONTON SYMPHONY & CONCERT HALL FOUNDATION Phyllis Clark, Chair John Brennan Jim Carter Ed Hahn Bob Kamp Ron New Gary Smith

EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA / FRANCIS WINSPEAR CENTRE FOR MUSIC

EXECUTIVE Annemarie Petrov, Executive Director MaryGrace Johnstone, Executive Coordinator Meghan Unterschultz, Executive & Government Communications

www.EdmontonSymphony.com

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ARTISTIC OPERATIONS Rob McAlear, Artistic Administrator Jerrold Eilander, Orchestra Operations Manager Susan Ekholm, Library Assistant Christa Eriksson, Artistic Assistant / Library Resource Eric Filpula, Orchestra Personnel Manager Sheila Jones, Orchestra Librarian COMMUNITY RELATIONS Michael Schurek, Director of Community Relations Shirley Nowicki, Associate Director of Community Relations Kris Berezanski, Media & Communications Coordinator Philip Paschke, Communications Manager EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH D.T. Baker, Associate Director of Educational Outreach Alyssa Paterson, Education & Community Relations Coordinator EVENTS MANAGEMENT Ally Mandrusiak, Director of Events Management Leanne Persad, Associate Director of Events Management Warren Bertholet, Head Lighting Technician* Catherine Boissonneau, Box Office Supervisor Diana de Sousa, Client Services Coordinator Rob Hadfield, Head Audio Technician* Alan Marks, Head of Stage Management* Margo Pardely, Interim Patron Events Manager

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Stacy Parkins, Patron Services Assistant Manager Mike Patton, Assistant Head of Stage Management* Cat Walsh, Box Office Assistant Supervisor FINANCE & OPERATIONS Barbara Foley, Director of Finance & Operations Sandy Carter, Senior Accountant Shirley Chaytor, HR Payroll Coordinator Sandy Haslam, Systems Administrator Beth Hawryluk, Tessitura Systems Analyst Olena Kotova, Accountant Pat Molloy, Maintenance Manager Aline Mukabalisa, Finance Assistant Erika Ratzlaff, Business Analyst PATRON DEVELOPMENT Elaine Warick, Director of Patron Development Eleanor Finger, Associate Director of Patron Development Jeffory Magson, Patron Relations Associate & Volunteer Coordinator Erin Mulcair, Patron Relations Manager Teresa Ryan, Patron Events Manager Adam Trzebski, Patron Relations Manager *THE ESO & WINSPEAR CENTRE WORK IN PROUD PARTNERSHIP WITH IATSE LOCAL 210

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THANK YOU

Community Support of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra & Winspear Centre

The Edmonton Symphony Orchestra is a registered charitable organization, incorporated under the Societies Act of the Province of Alberta on November 22, 1952. As Canada’s fourth largest professional orchestra, the ESO is financed by ticket sales, grants from government agencies, and by contributions from corporations, foundations, and individuals. Government Agency Support:

Series Sponsors

Title Sponsor

Title Sponsor

Landmark Classic Masters

Sponsor

Sunday Showcase

Robbins Pops / Robbins Lighter Classics

Presenting Sponsor

Title Sponsor

Title Sponsor

Sponsor

Late Night with Bill Eddins

Esso Symphony for Kids

Air Canada Presents

Friday Masters

Our Program and Education Sponsors

Sponsor

Sponsor

Musicians in the Making

2 for 1 Introductory Series Offer

through the Edmonton Community Foundation

Naming Sponsor ENMAX Hall

Sponsor

Sponsor

K to Gr. 3 Education Program

Sponsor

Gr. 4 to 6 Education Program

Pulse8

Presenting Sponsor

Presenting Sponsor

Christmas at the Winspear

Christmas at the Winspear

Our Performance Sponsors

Our Media Sponsors

CityTV

Capital FM

Global

CKUA

Edmonton Journal

Fresh FM

Lite 95.7 FM

Pattison

CBC

Our Exclusive Caterers

Our Suppliers

Official Bike Supplier to the ESO Conducting Team

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Publications Sponsor

Print Sponsor

Wine Supplier

Official Airline of the ESO

Craft Beer Supplier

Official Floral Supplier

2013-04-02 10:51 AM

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japanese sword blade forging

NAIT’s Continuing Education Blacksmithing Program invites you to come out to a fascinating demonstration on the ancient art of Japanese sword blade forging. The blades of both tanto and wakazashi swords will be revealed during the one and a half day course taught by David Goldberg, our world-renowned instructor. On Friday evening, the instructor will work on Damascus steel to show laminating and pattern creation techniques. On Saturday, students will witness clay tempering presentations and the initial grinding that will ultimately reveal the frosted or hamon line at the edge of the blade.

dates: June 14 – 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm June 15 – 9:00 am to 5:00 pm fee: $250 location: SOuch campus 7110 Gateway Blvd, Edmonton register: Student Success contact centre phone 780.471.6248 fax 780.471.8448 email asknait@nait.ca

Enrol today! www.nait.ca/ConEd or call 780.471.6248

education for the real world

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Come Feel The Difference

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OUR VIP SERVICE INCLUDES: HASSLE-FREE SERVICE APPOINTMENTS: Complimentary loaner vehicles, valet service or chauffeur service Complimentary car wash, vacuum and paint rock chip touch-up with service appointments Express service oil changes (completed within 45 minutes) Complimentary breakfast while you wait for your service (Mon – Sat)

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LEXUS OF EDMONTON IS PROUD TO SPONSOR THE EDMONTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

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ESO Signature Magazine Apr/May 2013