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April 2018

AARON’S INSIDE TRACK

OKC’s Streetcar Project Takes Shape New Taste To Try: Wagyu Japanese BBQ Pokey the Puppet Remembered Coffee With a Cop


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Features

I turned 55 years old this past month - not to be confused with 55 years wise. Here’s a list of things I had hoped to accomplish by this ripe old age, but sadly, have not:

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WAGYU FOR YOU

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MIMI & CLEO: KINSHIP 105

Japanese BBQ Comes to Town Wisdom of 105 Years Shared

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POKEY THE PUPPET

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MY STREETCAR TOUR OF AMERICA

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Remembering Oklahoma TV History Inside Track on OKC’s Streetcar Project OKIES FOR MONARCHS

Volunteers Ready Themselves for the Migration COFFEE WITH A COP

Edmond Police Visit with Citizens

Business

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NORTH POINTE BAPTIST CHURCH

Doing everything to show the love of Christ BAD TO THE BONE DOG SHOW

Tornado Alley Bulldog Rescue Hosts their First Ever Dog Show

Columns 28

LOUISE TUCKER JONES

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DR. J. DAVID CHAPMAN

Dave Miller Back40 Design President

Jay’s Birthday Surprise

Building Community through Beer, Food & Spirits

Cover photography by Marshall Hawkins

ADVERTISING l Laura Beam at 405-301-3926 l laura@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN EDMOND/NORTH OKC 80 East 5th Street, Suite 130, Edmond, OK 73034 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com April 2018 Volume 14, Number 4

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© 2018 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l ADVERTISING MANAGER Laura Beam l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend and Sable Furrh PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins l www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond & North OKC homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


FEATURELOOK

Wagyu For You By Heide Brandes

On small, contained grills in the center of the tables, delicate cuts of meat ranging from Wagyu beef, basil chicken and hanger steak sizzle in light, fresh marinades. The grill is self-contained, the smoke that would normally billow out instead gets sucked down into a filtering unit. After 45 seconds, the thin slices of meat are ready to turn. Wagyu Japanese BBQ, located at 3000 W Memorial Rd. in Oklahoma City, is the first Japanese barbecue restaurant in the state, and for owners and founders Jade Han and Li Chen, the style of food is a mixture of adventure, socialization and, of course, the finest meats and marinades that visitors grill themselves. “Japanese barbecue is based on Korean barbecue, but we developed our own marinades and different cuts of meat,” said Chen. “We cut the meat to proper size, like maybe one bite sized, and the meat is only marinated right before it comes out. So we’re keeping the meat fresh.” A new style of cuisine, Wagyu Japanese BBQ offers a traditional way of enjoying a meal, but with an adventurous twist that combines quality meat, light and fresh flavors and a wide variety of choices to choose from. Called Yakiniku, Japanese barbecue has a new home on Memorial Road.

Expect an Adventure

Chen and Han both met at the University of Oklahoma where Chen was studying petroleum and Han was studying health sciences. Both had experienced Japanese barbecue in larger cities like Chicago and on the east and west coasts, but nothing like it existed in Oklahoma. “We felt like we really wanted to bring this to Oklahoma City because we feel like people were open and accepting,” Chen said. “Oklahoma people have a very open mind. This is pretty popular in other bigger cities like Dallas.” In addition to the food, which ranges from traditional barbecue meats to Ramen bowls to creative appetizers, diners at Wagyu can expect an 8

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adventure when they come to dinner, Han said. “They should expect a very unique dining experience. You are your own chef, and have the chance interact with your friends and family,” she said. “You cook food together and enjoy it and your time here. “ Wagyu offers several traditional Korean dishes on the menu as well, including kimchi bibibap, fried rice served with kimchi and a mild spicy gochujang sauce in a sizzling hot stone pot; a mild, spicy beef soup with egg and green onion; and garlic noodles also served in a sizzling hot stone pot.

The Wagyu Beef Steals the Show

But the Wagyu beef steals the show. The various cuts of Wagyu are served with marinades designed to complement each cut of meat and include miso, tare sweet soy, spicy gochujang, ponzu and more. “We take the marinades and match them with different cuts,” said Chen. “For example, if you have a cut with very beautiful marbling, then we will match with a sweet marinade so you get that perfect taste.” The cherrywood smoked filet comes served in a bowl and covered in a buttery paste, and the longer the meat sits and smokes in the bowl, the deeper the flavor. The Zabuton Wagyu is a must for many, Chen added. Wagyu Japanese BBQ also serves chicken and seafood cuts to grill, and the dinner combination specials allow for families to sample numerous choices in one meal. “We have instructions on how to cook the meat on the table, but the server will also give instructions,” said Han. “It’s catching on, but there are still a lot of people who do not know we are here.” Wagyu is open for both lunch and dinner, and lunch specials start at $12.99 for two choices of meat or $15.99 for three. Fast and simple lunch options, like cooked meals, get people in and out quickly. Coming soon, look for Bento Boxes, updated menu, and happy hour 11:30am-5pm everyday. For more information, visit www.wagyujapanesebbqokc.com


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FEATURELOOK

Mimi & Cleo: Kinship 105 By Amy Dee Stephens

Mimi and Cleo are both 105 years old and live in the same assisted living center. From wartime experiences to musical choices, it’s uncanny how these centenarians have lived such similar lives—even though they have never met. These lovely ladies witnessed moments in time that most of us only read about in history books. Both claim that they’re nothing special, but they are.

Mary “Cleo” Davenport

Cleo was born in 1913 in Rosedale, OK. In 1915, the family moved to Ardmore when a railroad tanker accidentally exploded, decimating the town. Since Cleo’s father was a carpenter, he helped rebuild Ardmore. Cleo married Syl Davenport just before the Great Depression hit. Her father lost everything, but Syl found a job changing truck tires for $5 a week, which barely supported Cleo and their baby daughter, Joyce. In 1939, the family moved to Oklahoma City and bought a house on 50th street, later moving to 19th street. When Syl entered the Air Force during World War II, Cleo took a job at Tinker Air Force Base. She checked airplane flight panels and replaced any malfunctioning instruments. Whenever Syl flew into Tinker field, Cleo’s boss allowed her time to visit with her husband.

Shared Beliefs

Foy “Mimi” Couch

Mimi is adamantly proud of her age. “I’m 105 and a half!” She was born in 1912 in the small town of Milburn, OK. Her father had a beloved ranch, and Mimi grew up riding horses. The family traveled by horse and wagon until they got a Model T Ford, which Mimi learned to drive, under-aged. Mimi came to Oklahoma City after high school to live with relatives. She worked at a stage theater that hosted vaudeville shows and early movies. She remembers the actors making appearances at the theater, including the western movie star, Buck Jones. The theater was owned by Phillip Isley, whose daughter, Jennifer Jones, became an academy award-winning actress. Mimi married Charles Couch and they had one daughter, Charlene. Charles’ parents came to Indian Territory during the Land Run. Couch Drive, a street in downtown Oklahoma City, is named for his family. During World War II, Mimi traveled with Charles to Florida, where he was stationed as a marine. Although he was in the U.S., Mimi knew he was always in danger from “spy boats.” In the 1950s, the couple moved to a house on 50th street in Oklahoma City, where Mimi lived most of her adult life. She remembers swimming at the nearby Belle Isle Amusement Park and eating at the Charcoal Oven Drive-In. Her husband opened the first Interurban restaurant in Norman and managed the Sportsman Club. After his passing, Mimi went to work as the floor manager for Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant in Edmond. Mimi’s six grandchildren say that no one baked pumpkin pies like her, and she misses doing that. 10

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Mimi and Cleo seem to have lived parallel lives. Their small-town roots led them to the same stretch of road in Oklahoma City during their mid-life and then landed them one hallway apart at a local senior living center. They both love Elvis music, although Cleo said, “I didn’t like his gyrations very much, but he had a beautiful voice.” They both have strong memories of the John F. Kennedy assassination. The staff regularly drops by to chat with Mimi and Cleo during their breaks because they are such sweet souls—but Mimi and Cleo seem baffled as to why people enjoy their company. “I’m just like everyone else,” Mimi said. “I guess it’s because they can’t believe I’m so old.” Cleo said, “A friend once told me that I’m a special person. I said, ‘No I’m not, I’m just like anybody else.’ I never did find out why she thought that,” Cleo mused. So what’s their advice for living to 105? “I say thank you to God for my blessings every day, instead of just asking for things,” Mimi said. “Maybe that’s why I’m still here.” “I haven’t any idea how I made it to 105!” Cleo said. “I guess it’s because I never did smoke, drink or go to bars. We lived a low-key life. We went to church. I would say that you must read the Bible and seek your own salvation. That’s what I did. I never even thought about being this old, but God’s still taking care of me.” She laughed softly. “I wish he’d hurry up and call me home. But then, you’re never ready.”


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CLEAN MY GRILL

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FEATURELOOK

Pokey the Puppet

By Amy Dee Stephens

When Louise married Bill Howard in 1959, she had no idea her husband would be best known for his role as Pokey the Puppet. Pokey was the sassy sidekick of HoHo the Clown, a famous Oklahoma performer from the 1960s to the 1980s. HoHo was played by Ed Birchall, a gentle, beloved man who entertained children on television and at birthday parties in the era before clowns had been portrayed as scary. In contrast, Pokey had an ornery sense of humor that occasionally made HoHo blush. Bill’s dry wit was at its peak when he was tucked out of view of the cameras, sitting behind a draped desk with a sock puppet on his hand. “Bill was so outgoing and funny, but his humor was more for adults,” Louise said. “He cracked HoHo up off camera--but if they were taping, Pokey enjoyed getting HoHo so flustered by saying something that wasn’t kid appropriate, like, ‘I need a cigarette.’ HoHo would stop the tape and say, ‘You can’t say that—this is a children’s show!’” In truth, playing Pokey was just a portion of Bill’s 30-year career at KOCO Channel 5. Because he was lead cameraman, he witnessed a vast amount of Oklahoma history unfolding through his lens. Bill was often in the field to capture community events, tornadoes, local tragedies, and of course, the Oklahoma City bombing.

HoHo the Clown (Ed Birchall) and Pokey the Puppet (Bill Howard) Photo Courtesy of the Oklahoma Historical Society

In his book, Confessions of Pokey the Puppet, Bill described his panic as he rushed to the scene to check on Louise, who was working at the downtown public library, just a few blocks from the explosion. Fortunately, Louise had left just 10 minutes prior. After that initial panic, Bill was able to focus and put in the long hours it took to cover the disaster. Continued on Page 16

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• Sweeping • Mopping • Vacuuming • Laundry • Dusting • Linens & More!

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FEATURELOOK

Continued from page 14

More often, Bill’s work was lighthearted. He met a steady flow of celebrities who visited KOCO to promote their latest work, such as Ann Margaret, Natalie Wood and The Judds. He helped shoot some of the scenes for the movie, Rain Man. In-studio, Bill was stage manager for the camera crew. He directed many of the Jude ‘n’ Jody country music shows and over 3,000 episodes of the Ida B Show, a female-hosted television series that ran for three decades.

Pokey the Puppet is currently on display at the Oklahoma History Center. “Bill was intrigued by the camera and enamored with television,” Louise said. “The kids and I were very much a part of his career. We got to go to the studio, and we got invited to fun things, like the circus. HoHo would show up for our birthday parties. Our family had a lot of fun because of Bill’s career.”

Louise remembers how much the friends of her two children, Chris and Dawn, admired Bill. “Bill would stand in the house with that sock puppet on his hand and talk to them—and they’d look right at the puppet, like Bill wasn’t standing there talking. Of course, Chris and Dawn weren’t too impressed, because that was just regular stuff for us.” Over the years, Pokey’s sock would wear out, so a replacement was sewn. One is currently on display at the Oklahoma History Center, and Louise has one at home. Although Bill has been gone for five years, he’s still in the memory banks of many Oklahomans. He finished writing Confessions of Pokey the Puppet at the end of his life, just before cancer overtook him. Louise and her children say that reading the fun stories in Bill’s book is like listening to him talk. “My son has read the book about five times, but he said it’s always sad at the end because there won’t be any more stories,” Louise said. “We had a great life and I miss him a lot. “ Louise Howard and Pokey

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FEATURELOOK

My Streetcar Tour of America By Amy Dee Stephens

For every child who grew up loving Thomas the Train—there’s a man with an even bigger job than that of Sir Topham Hatt! His name is Aaron Adams, and he is a project manager who oversees the construction of streetcar systems in major cities. Adams is currently stationed in Oklahoma City managing the MAPS 3 downtown streetcar construction, which is slated to wrap up in about a year. Adams is ultimately responsible for every aspect of the project. He facilitates all the staff and contractors, and communicates with city leaders about the streetcar system’s progress. Every project Adams has worked on has its own personality and challenges, but in his experience, Oklahoma City had a well-planned streetcar layout from the beginning. “It’s the best engineered alignment I’ve ever seen, which means that the route is spread across the square mileage in a way that touches so many beneficial places in the downtown area. Because the city has been cleaned up, and there are not a lot of decrepit buildings, the vacant areas are prime spots for restaurants or apartment complexes,” Adams said. In Adams’ opinion, it won’t take long for riders to appreciate moving easily through town without walking long distances or struggling to find nearby parking. “Once we get past the orange cones and the construction dust—this streetcar is going to be a very good addition to the city. It will get cars off the road and reduce pollution. Businesses are going to thrive.” Building commuter systems for a living equates to a very transient lifestyle. For nearly 20 years, Adams and his family have traveled from state to state, zigzagging from the Midwest to the West Coast. They usually reside in a city for about two years at a time. Adams calls it his Tour of the United States of America. 18

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“It’s like a military lifestyle, except they move five times more than I do,” Adams said. “And we’re living in the coolest of places--thriving metropolises and up-and-coming areas.” Adams credits his wife, Randi Sue, for her ability to mobilize quickly as they transition from city to city. Their two children, Brandt (9) and Lucy (6) also adjust quickly. Adams said that neither one is shy and has no issue knocking on doors to make friends in their new neighborhoods. “I’m sure that will get harder as they get older, but we remind them that we aren’t losing the friends we made, because we’ll stay in touch. We’re just making more friends at the next place. I think my kids are well-rounded because they’ve experienced so many parts of the country.” So where is Adams moving after he finishes in Oklahoma City next year? “I’m headed somewhere,” Adams said. “I won’t find out until right before it’s time. It only took us six weeks after our Kansas City project to be living in Edmond.” The Adams family has an ongoing tradition as they move on to the next city. “On our last day in a town, as we’re about to hit the road, we take a family picture by our street sign. In each one, you can see the kids getting bigger and dad getting balder,” Adams laughed. “But I like those pictures, and I want to do that forever.” It’s not a lifestyle for everyone, but Adams is passionate about working with trains and he loves showing off his work with others. “It’s totally awesome to show off the big, cool things we build! Maybe I didn’t place each piece of concrete, but I was integral in getting it into place. I really love it that my kids will ride a streetcar someday, even if it’s five extensions down the road, and know that we were responsible for the inaugural streetcar.”


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FEATURELOOK

Okies for Monarchs By Amy Dee Stephens

We pass thousands of insects each day without notice, but butterflies are different. We notice. Whether a butterfly lands on a nearby flower or drifts past our windshield during traffic, our eye is drawn to its graceful movement. Probably the most eye-catching butterfly in Oklahoma is the monarch. Each fall, masses of black and orange monarchs head south through the Midwest— the most mysterious migration on earth. Scientists are still trying to unlock the secrets of how four generations of this species travels from Canada to Mexico and back each year. In the spring, the offspring of the fall monarchs meander back through Oklahoma on their way North. The migration is less obvious, but they still need places to eat and rest during their journey. Thanks to recent awareness campaigns, Oklahomans are increasingly alarmed at the decline in monarch butterflies. They aren’t just beautiful, they are major crop pollinators! Over forty organizations have teamed up to form the Oklahoma Monarch and Pollinator Collaborative, called “Okies for Monarchs.”

Our goal is to encourage the planting of monarchfriendly plants along the migration route The goal of Okies for Monarchs is to encourage the planting of monarchfriendly plants along the migration route. Oklahoma cities are taking the initiative to plant wildflowers along highways and replace native trees and flowers after major construction projects. Businesses are getting involved, too. Oklahoma-based Hideaway Pizza created a custom “pollinator pizza” drizzled with honey. The pizza is available until May 14, with proceeds going to help monarchs. Concerned citizens are learning more about planting butterfly-friendly gardens by visiting sites such as the Myriad Botanical Garden or the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden. 20

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Some of the greatest advocates for butterflies are school children. Washington Irving Elementary in Edmond is one of the many schools that maintains a butterfly garden. Mrs. Cheryl Coffelt Kern and her late husband started the garden in the late 1990s when the school was brand new and the playground was red dirt. Now, 20 years later, the school has a large garden filled with pollinator plants and trees. It is maintained by select fifth graders. They call themselves the Watching Outdoor Wonders (WOW) club. “This year, we have 18 WOW kids who’ve committed to take care of the garden all year,” Mrs. Kern said. “They learn all about planting, garden maintenance, and how to attract butterflies.” Each season brings new lessons. Spring is for planting and summer is for watering. Fall is monarch migration, and during the winter, the students focus on fundraising activities for the garden. The WOW students also take their skills to other grades, helping younger students learn to plant flowers and bulbs. “Each fall is an annual family picnic where the students give garden tours and teach the grown-ups what it’s all about,” said Mrs. Kern. “We also talk to the neighborhood families who stop by to visit the garden or walk the school’s trails while we’re working.” Like all butterfly enthusiasts, Mrs. Kern is hopeful that more people will start taking the simple steps to keep monarchs and other butterflies thriving: select butterfly-friendly nursery plants, plant them in the sun, and place multiples together so that the butterflies can see the mass of flower color from above. Most importantly for monarchs, plant milkweed species—the plants upon which the monarch lays eggs. “Butterflies are extremely important to nature since they pollinate so many plants,” said Everett Daugherty, a former WOW student who continues to volunteer with Mrs. Kern each year. “Not only are they fascinating to study, they are so beautiful and interesting. People can help butterflies just by planting herbs like dill, fennel or parsley. It’s beneficial for you and for the butterflies.” “I’ve had some magical moments happen in our garden,” Mrs. Kern said. “I’m happy that it’s impacted a lot of young people who’ve gone through here at Washington Irving—and I’m pleased that they are spreading the news about helping monarchs.” To learn more, visit okiesformonarchs.org


FEATURELOOK Walking into a room full of policeman can seemingly be a stressful event. At Edmond’s monthly “Coffee with a Cop” sessions, however, it’s an opportunity for the public to put names and faces to the officers who wear the badge and make our community a safe place to live, work, and visit.

By Mustafa Kujo

Hosted by the Edmond Police Department, Coffee with a Cop meets on the second Tuesday of every month from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. Locations vary and are announced in advance on the Department’s Facebook page. A group of eight to ten morning shift patrolman, very often accompanied by Edmond Chief of Police, JD Younger, volunteer to start their shift meeting the public over coffee and snacks. Sessions are informal, conversations are easy, the atmosphere relaxed and casual. At 7:30, everyone just wants to enjoy some good, strong coffee together. Potential police academy recruits attend and sip their morning Joe, asking officers what typical days on the job are like, the physical standards needed to pass the academy, and educational requirements. As Edmond has grown, so have the requirements to patrol ever larger areas, and with it, the need to sufficiently sustain the force. Says Major Tim Barnthouse, Commander of the Patrol Division, “The department is in the process of hiring up to fourteen new recruits and Coffee with a Cop is a great way to meet future officers.” For others it’s a chance to nosh a bagel with a patrolman and learn what it takes to provide an effective police service. Edmond PD offers many programs to help build strong community partnerships. The Citizen’s Police Academy is a free annual, 13-week course offered to residents, in addition to ride-alongs, and personal safety education classes. University of Central Oklahoma patrolmen also participate. Sergeant Austin Bolding of UCO Police Services ended his night shift tour drinking coffee with the public, “to help get the word out of how the two police departments share jurisdiction and assist each other responding to emergencies.” UCO officers often coordinate investigations and training with Edmond PD, even sharing a radio network to enhance communication between agencies. Edmond’s Coffee with a Cop program began in June 2017 and is part of a larger nationwide effort that began in 2011. According to CWAC’s website, it’s to “bring police officers and the community members they serve together– over coffee–to discuss issues and learn more about each other…one cup of coffee at a time.” National Coffee with a Cop Day is the first Wednesday of October annually. Edmond’s program has continued to grow, with more community participants attending each month. Hosting coffee shops have ranged from Ellis Island and Cafe Evoke downtown, to Panera Bread at 15th & Bryant, and Perk Place on West 33rd. As the session ends, participants smile, shake hands with the officers, and walk to their cars going back to jobs or homes, all the while watching the patrolman prepare for their day’s work in uniforms wrapped over ballistic vests. Jenny Wagnon, the department’s Public Information Specialist says it best. “For many, the only time they’re up close with a patrolman is when they see the flashing red and blue lights in the rear view mirror. Coffee with a Cop gives the public a chance to see that up close, we’re just like them, raising families, and doing our jobs in and for the community.” To learn more, visit facebook.com/edmondpd

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BIZLOOK

North Pointe Baptist Church

By Morgan Day

North Pointe Baptist Church aims to reach members of the Edmond community in impactful ways as they open their doors to those seeking everything from vacation Bible schools to financial peace workshops, parenting seminars and annual daddy/daughter dances. “Our members love the Lord and and we want to do everything we can to show the love of Christ to our community,” said Matt Blagg, worship leader and missions coordinator at North Pointe. “We try to be a church that’s outwardly focused. That’s a big part of what we do.” Since 2013, North Pointe has been at its 5300 NW 220th St. location, a spot central to the community. On the top of the church’s events calendar is vacation Bible school for 5- to 12-year-olds: a travelling Kanakuk KampOut! Day Camp from

July 23-27. Campers will have the opportunity to fly down a zipline, scale a climbing wall, bounce in inflatables and laugh at crazy skits. The church also hosts an annual Love and Logic parenting seminar with trained instructors, and date nights throughout the year that allow parents to have a night out without the kids. Children also look forward to an annual arts academy where they learn how to develop gifts God gave them. What’s more? North Pointe holds a “prayer ministry” for all local school teachers. Teachers offer up suggestions for prayers and church members stock teachers’ snack bars in their teachers’ lounges, and give gifts and paper at beginning of school year. “Plus, every Sunday is a great day, too, at our church,” Blagg added. “Worship time and church services draw people to the Lord.” North Pointe Baptist Church hosts connecting groups at 9 a.m. Sundays, worship at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays, children’s and youth activities at 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, and Bible studies for adults at 6 p.m. Wednesdays.

Blagg enjoys seeing church members grow in their faith and begin leading other people to the Lord. After all, it’s the people who make North Pointe what it is, he said. “We have wonderful people who love the Lord, love people and love to serve each other. Our pastor encourages us to think outside the box, and we’re united in our mission. That’s a great thing to be a part of.” Learn more about North Pointe Baptist Church by visiting northpointe.tv or by calling (405) 348-9935.

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CITYLOOK

Bad to the Bone Dog Show By Morgan Day

Tornado Alley Bulldog Rescue will host its first ever Bad to the Bone Dog Show at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 21, at Canine Sports Academy in Norman, and all dogs are welcome to participate in six different dog shows taking place throughout the day. “We just want everybody to come out and have some fun,” said Stevie Easter, president of Tornado Alley Bulldog Rescue. “And we want to make sure people understand the fundraiser is for the bulldogs, but we want every breed represented. We want to see every breed out there — the small ones, the big ones, the hairy ones and the bald ones.”

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The organization, which formed in 2012, rescues, rehabilitates and re-homes English bulldogs across Oklahoma, Arkansas and New Mexico, and members are excited to kick off what they anticipate to be an annual fundraiser to pay the organization’s vet bills and supplies. “This will also help pay for food provided to fosters since we provide food, crates, bowls, collars and leashes — everything — and the daily expenses of having a dog in rescue,” Easter said. Pets and their owners can take part in dog shows for the following categories: best costume, best vocal, best smile, best tail wag, handicapable/ seniors, and doggie/owner look-a-like. Winners in each category will receive a prize, as will the winner for best in show. Easter hopes the fundraiser will make Tornado Alley a more recognizable name in the community and shed light on their cause. “Mainly we just want to reach as many people as we can and let them know that we’re here,” she said. “Even after almost five and a half years, there are still people out there, who, when you mention Tornado Alley Bulldog Rescue, they say ‘There’s a

bulldog rescue?’ There’s still that stigma out there that bulldogs don’t need a rescue. So a lot of it is outreach and letting people know we’re here, that we exist.” The fundraiser will feature a silent auction and raffle items donated by BarkBox, gift certificates to local restaurants and pet food supply stores. Snacks and beverages will also be sold. The event is sponsored by A1 Pet Emporium, Ann M. Smith Insurance Agency Inc., Roof Pro Local, Carey Pet & Home Care and Canine Sports Academy at 30217 Santa Fe Ave., Norman. Online pre-registration is encouraged. Learn more at badtothebonedogshow.eventsmart.com.


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ALOOKBACK Given Jay’s preference for games, we had cake and presents at Chuck E. Cheese’s but some unexpected fun happened later at the Saturday night dance at the Bella Vista American Legion. My kids know I love Golden Oldies music so I was excited to hear the rock and roll band.

Louise Tucker Jones ByBy Louise Tucker Jones April brings a birthday to my son, Jay. Each year, we celebrate in some way. Sometimes it’s outlandish, like a limo ride to Sonic, and other times it’s a family party at home. Last year we celebrated in NW Arkansas so Jay could be with his brother, Aaron.

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As we walked inside, they were singing Happy Birthday to an elderly lady. Jay thought it was for him. I told the woman selling tickets it was his birthday. She passed the word along. A few songs later, the lead singer announced that it was Jay Jones’ birthday and would he please stand up. Oh my, what fun! Jay stood. The band sang then the guy said, “And Jay needs a lady to dance with him!” Up jumped a woman from a table and grabbed Jay’s arm and pulled him onto the dance floor. My smiling son “rocked and rolled” and loved it. During the band’s break, one of the entertainers sat at our table and got acquainted with Jay. When he got back onstage he announced that they wanted to celebrate with Jay again and got the whole crowd singing and dancing to “It Makes Me Want To Shout!” That place was

rocking! Jay loved it and was pumping his arms in the air along with the crowd. What an unexpected birthday surprise!!! But here’s the best part. I saw my son with Down syndrome loved and accepted by people who didn’t even know him but held no prejudice whatsoever. Jay wasn’t the only one having fun. Everyone was having a ball while interacting with him and watching the joy on his face. Isn’t that the way life is supposed to be? And no, I have no idea what this year’s celebration will hold, but I know it will be fun. Happy Birthday, Jay Jones! Love you bunches!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


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CITYLOOK

Building Community through Beer, Food and Spirits By Dr. J. David Chapman

I live in and love Downtown Edmond. Years ago, my family made a commitment to move to Downtown Edmond and started investing in property, businesses, and people in the community. I like meeting with colleagues in the coffee shops and pubs to discuss our projects or just learn what’s going on in each other’s lives. To me that is community. We live across the street from the Patriarch Craft Beer House and Lawn. The owners of the Patriarch understand community and have built a successful business model around the concept. In my first encounter with the owners a few years ago they stated that the big-screen TVs would only be used if a local team such as the Thunder was playing. They also said they intended to have live music, but that it would always be there as background music and never inhibit conversation. Community and understanding is built one conversation at a time, and why not do so over a craft beer at your local pub on the coolest lawn in the metro. Saint Patrick’s Day was huge in Downtown Edmond, falling on a Saturday and the first Heard on Hurd of the season to boot. Community was on display in the small quaint downtown. The owners of the Patriarch took advantage of this festive environment to launch a new restaurant concept with supertalented chef Jonathon Stranger. Together they are adding Japanese “fun food” to the beer and spirits lineup. Essentially, they took the “shack out back” and converted it into a kitchen and call it OK-Yaki!. A few days after

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the big weekend and grand opening, I sat down with Patriarch General Manager Brad Mullenix and OK-Yaki! Chef Jonathon Stranger. Chef Jonathon has wanted to prove this Japanese-style cuisine for some time and the Patriarch is the perfect opportunity. The Patriarch has noticed an opportunity to serve customers better with a full-time kitchen in lieu of the food truck concept that has gotten them where they are today. According to Brad, they want to provide food options for customers even when it isn’t profitable for the trucks to be there. Jonathon believes the Japanese-style “grilled meat on a stick” is the perfect accompaniment to craft beer - salty, smoky, and sweet. As I interviewed Chef Jonathon he was preparing chickenon-a-stick. He prides himself that OK-Yaki! uses farm-to-table food from local farms and ranches. His goal is to provide an amazing food experience that is not exclusive and expensive. The Patriarch will celebrate their 3rd anniversary in May in style with a week-long party. During that week Chef Jonathon will be serving meat-ona-stick from the OK-Yaki! kitchen, the Patriarch will be pouring craft beer brewed from all over Oklahoma and announcing a new partnership with local distillery Prairie Wolf. So, if you are up for a little local – I suggest you come up to the northern end of Downtown Edmond and have Patriarch Bartender Lisa draw you an Oklahoma craft beer, ask OK-Yaki! Chef Jonathon for a little meat-on-a-stick, and maybe sit by the fire and enjoy a glass of Oklahoma-made Prairie Wolf whiskey, vodka, gin, or coffee liqueur. And, if you see me there, let’s have a conversation and build community! Dr. J. David Chapman is an Associate Professor of Finance & Real Estate at UCO. jchapman7@uco.edu


80 East 5th St., Ste. 130 Edmond, OK 73034

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - April 2018  

Edmond Outlook - April 2018  

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