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October 2019

Meet the Muralists

3 Local Artists Make Edmond their Canvas

Local Eats: Klemm’s Smoke Haus Take a G-G-G Ghost Tour! Citizen’s Police Academy


Features

This past Friday we closed early and took a field trip to the State Fair. After some group pics, we ventured out to take in all the fair has to offer. Some set out for a “deep fried” taste experience. Another more daring group went for the thrill rides, and a less adventurous group headed for the exhibit hall. Alison and I went off in search of the quintessential fair cultural experience - pig races! After making our way through the crowd, we climbed up into the grandstand and got the perfect view of the miniature oval track. Within a few minutes, we were watching a set of 4 cute little oinkers speed around the track in hopes of winning an oreo cookie. Our favorite, a piggie aptly named Kevin Bacon, won the third and final heat. We were thrilled. Some would say we experienced enough culture for the day, not us. After a quick wardrobe change (my overalls and no shirt outfit, though extremely comfortable and well-suited for the fair, would simply not do for our next venue), we were off to the premiere performance of The Barber of Seville Opera at the OKC Civic Center.

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ASK EDMOND

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HISTORICAL G-G-G-GHOST TOURS

Halloween Memories Re-enactors share mysterious happenings and unlucky coincidences

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EARS ON THE AIR

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LOCAL EATS: KLEMM’S SMOKE HAUS

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CITIZEN’S POLICE ACADEMY

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Edmond Amateur Radio Society is ready when needed German twist brings the heat to local BBQ

Free class series brings residents together with the Edmond Police Department MEET THE MURALISTS

Discover the inspiration behind Edmond’s three new city displays

The performances of this classic comic opera date back to the early 1800s. It was quite an experience. A full orchestra and amazing voice performances - and, of course, lots of singing in Italian - and lots of reading of supertitles (like subtitles for a movie, but for an opera - so they’re super). Alison and I really enjoyed it. By the second half of the opera, I stopped referencing the supertitles and simply followed the story by listening to the emotions of the performers.

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ON THE TRAIL TO RECOVERY

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FRANCIS TUTTLE PATENT PROS

It was a unique day. Interested in planning your own day of cultural experiences? This month there are some great events happening locally. There are Historic Ghost Tours happening downtown (more info on page 10). There’s an exhibit of Edmond’s architecture at the Edmond Historical Society & Museum called Steeples and Stones. And, Storybook Forest returns over at Arcadia Lake. Please don’t tell me there’s nothing to do around Edmond.

Business

High school students work to solve real-life problems

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ROBERT BAXTER ELECTRIC

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COSMETIC SURGICAL ARTS

Four decades of family business Providing surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures

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Dave Miller Back40 Design President

INTEGRIS opens new recovery center

LOUISE TUCKER JONES

Visiting Mama

Cover photography by Marshall Hawkins

ADVERTISING l Laura Beam at 405-301-3926 l laura@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN EDMOND/NORTH OKC 80 East 5th Street, Suite 130, Edmond, OK 73034 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com October 2019 Volume 15, Number 10

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Edmond Outlook is a publication of Back40 Design, Inc.

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© 2019 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l ADVERTISING MANAGER Laura Beam l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend, Anne Richardson l PRODUCTION Rachel Morse PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond & North OKC homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


Ask Edmond

LOCALLOOK

Halloween Memories

As candy and costumes make their annual appearance, some locals reflect on their favorite moments of Halloween past.

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Patti Ziegenhain

Emily McGrew

Stacie Dillard-Self

Andrew Jech

“Halloween 2016 was so fun because my grandchildren (Zoey Waggoner, Elouis Mayse, Aydan Mayse, Landon Mayse) dressed up as characters from “Toy Story”, Buzz Lightyear, Bo Peep and Little Lamb and Woody.”

“One of my favorite Halloween memories is going out trick or treating with all my daughters’ friends then coming home late and being patient while my young counters had to slowly count each individual piece.”

“On the left is my daughter in 2001 and on the right is my son in the same costume in 2013. These are my favorite memories because my mom made it for my daughter, then passed away in 2007 and never got to meet my son.”

“This picture was Joey’s first Halloween, in our new house, and he was 6 months old. We were excited because our new neighborhood seemed like it would have manyTrick-orTreater’s. Our favorite memory was just how excited Joey got when kids would come to the door, and giving him pieces of candy to hand out (even though he hadn’t quite grasped the concept of letting go of anything he was holding)!”

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FEATURELOOK

Historical

G-G-G-Ghost Tours By Amy Dee Stephens

During the daylight, walking through downtown Edmond is “business as usual:” visit the shops, have lunch, go to the bank. But everything changes if you take an evening stroll down Broadway on Oct 25 or 26. It’s not just the scarecrow decorations that create a decidedly-spookier atmosphere—it’s the ghosts! Although Gottlob Fink has been dead for 120 years, there he is, in the flesh, talking about his time as Mayor of early Edmond. Mrs. Jennie Forster, wearing a big floral hat from 1889, shares how she put Edmond’s first library books on a shelf in her husband’s grocery store. John Steen is happy to tell visitors about the eeriness of being the sole family living along the railroad tracks in the 1880s, before Edmond became a town. Even the radical prohibitionist, Carrie Nation, sometimes makes an appearance, bemoaning the fact that when she showed up in Edmond in 1905 with an axe, hoping to chop down a saloon—she didn’t find one.

Carel revived them, since they’d gone defunct in the 1990s. “I brought the tours back to life, because when I travel, I get to know other peoples’ towns from their ghost stories,” Carel said. “I grew up running around downtown Edmond, so I love the story of our past, and I wanted to bring that here.” Each year, the ghost tours vary. Although Edmond’s most beloved characters remain, some new stories are introduced. A recent popular addition is the current-day story of a local man who has experienced ghostly encounters in his own house. After hearing his experiences, paranormal possibilities seem a little more plausible, and the nighttime tour takes on new level of creepiness.

“We have an amazing past and I love sharing our rich history”

These historical re-enactors are posted along the street as part of Edmond’s Historical Ghost Tours. Although there are no spooks jumping out at folks, it’s not uncommon to get a few ghost bumps…err…goose bumps. The stories of Edmond’s founding fathers are sprinkled with mysterious happenings and unlucky coincidences. “Some of the stories are told in front of the buildings where the ‘ghosts’ actually worked or lived. You hear about the adventures and difficulties they had,” said Stephanie Carrel, President of the Edmond Historical Preservation Trust and organizer of the ghost tours. Ghost tours are not new to Edmond, although they have taken various forms over the decades, from walking tours to cemetery tours. In 2013,

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Set against the dusky backdrop of Edmond’s Victorian/ Edwardian era buildings, the “modern day” begins to disappear, and visitors feel like they’ve stepped back in time. LED light bulbs seem to be replaced by firelight, and cars are replaced by horse-drawn carriages. But wait, that really happens! The firelight is coming from the S’more fire pit sponsored by the Edmond Fire and Police Departments, and visitors can enjoy free horse-drawn carriage rides. “After the tours, visitors tell me how much they enjoyed it,” Carel said. “They are shocked at how little they knew about the town they live in. We have an amazing past, and I love sharing our rich history.” Further Information: The 45-minute walking tours start at Hurd & Broadway, leaving every 15 minutes between 6-8:00pm. Tickets cost $7 each, cash only please. Children are welcome, but adults are the target audience.


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FEATURELOOK

EARS on the Air By Maria Veres

It’s a scenario nobody likes to think about. On an ordinary afternoon, your Behind the Scenes electricity flickers out. You grab your phone to report the problem, but you The club helps our community during calmer times, too. “EARS has its can’t get online. With no warning, a cyber attack has knocked out the town’s fingers in a lot of different projects,” says Clay. They run communications at internet and power grid. Emergency personnel across Edmond are trained to the Liberty Fest parade, and they’re involved in other Liberty Fest events as act quickly in emergencies like these. And they have help from a dedicated well. They work with other hams in the metro area to coordinate OKC events group of volunteers who have assisted with disaster like the St. Patrick’s Day and Stockyards City parades. response since before the internet existed. “Whether it’s a cyber attack or a weather emergency, our EARS handles many of the communications for the Ready for the Worst radios work even when the OKC Memorial Marathon. Besides coordinating the You may not be familiar with the Edmond Amateur traffic flow for thousands of runners, hams help with internet, cell phones, and Radio Society (EARS), but you’ve heard them at communications for the medical teams and other electrical power go down.” support personnel. Most EARS members are quiet work. They’re the ones who monitor siren tests every month, making sure those wails are good and loud. types, so you won’t hear much about their involvement They participate in monthly emergency response trainings with the City of around town. But many of our favorite events wouldn’t run smoothly without Edmond, and they practice emergency communications at their own events. their support. “We would approach a cyber attack like any other disaster,” says Clay Mayrose, EARS public information officer. “You solve the problems as they New Hams Are Welcome come at you.” Amateur radio operators (also called hams) use equipment that Anyone can apply for an amateur radio license. “It’s very easy to get into runs on batteries. Their radios work even when the internet, cell phones, and amateur radio these days,” says Clay. Each ham is assigned an individual electrical power go down. Whether it’s a cyber attack, a weather event, or radio station and call letters. (Clay’s are WA6LBU). They broadcast out of another emergency, hams stand ready to help. their homes or vehicles and converse with other hams across the globe. There are no age limits, making amateur radio an ideal hobby for people of all EARS trains for emergency communications every year at an event called generations. Hams must pass a written licensing test. EARS offers monthly Field Day, where they test radio performance in a variety of conditions. testing sessions in Edmond. For anyone who needs extra help, the club also “Field Day gets us out, gets our hands dirty, and we find out what works and runs test prep classes. EARS offers a great way to serve the community, what doesn’t,” says Clay. Clubs across the nation participate. build new skills, and have fun. Whether or not you get involved yourself, now you’ll know who to thank the next time you hear a siren test. During bad weather, EARS members serve as storm spotters. Some observe conditions from their homes and broadcast them over their personal amateur The EARS board of directors meets the second Tuesday of the radio stations. Others, like Clay, do actual storm chasing. The hams’ reports month at the Edmond Downtown Community Center. Guests are are relayed to the National Weather Service in Norman. “Storm spotting welcome. Learn more at www.k5eok.org. can be somewhat boring,” says Clay, “followed by two to three minutes of absolute terror, then more boredom.”

Clay Mayrose

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FOODLOOK FEATURELOOK

JJ Clem, Jan Clem, Ashley Thomas

Local Eats: Klemm’s Smoke Haus

By Laura Beam

German twist brings the heat to local BBQ BBQ—how can those three simple letters make your mouth water with anticipation and conjure up both the fun of summer and the hearty joys of fall all in one? Nothing satisfies all the senses like BBQ done right. And when German family creativity meets smoky meat madness, it’s a dining thrill you’ll crave again and again. Prepare to be surprised as you dig into the flavor of this local joint that puts a new spin on an all-time classic. Celebrating their fifth year with the restaurant and eighth year with the food truck, Klemm’s Smoke Haus bears the original spelling of the Clem family name. And they bring that German heritage to life in every tender morsel of on-premise, pit-smoked brisket, ribs, pulled pork, brats and chicken. No pushbutton, overnight smoker here, John Clem is up at 2am everyday manning the menu lineup, while wife Jan Clem, son JJ Clem and daughter Ashley Thomas manage other aspects of the business. “Our brisket is prime. We pay extra because taste means everything to us,” says Jan. “And our pork spare ribs are to-die-for. They fall off the bone. It’s a big deal to us for customers to not go away hungry. Our portions are amazing.” Burnt ends, baby -- it’s a real thing! We all love it--that deliciously charred bark on the edges of the brisket--and Klemm’s makes it a menu reality, not just a happy accident you’re lucky enough to get on your plate once in a while. The hunky cubes of salty meat with a peppery crust are epic. A true customer favorite, the burnt ends have limited availability, usually until about 2pm, so get there early to get yours. And if you want to take your indulgence to the next level, order the burnt ends atop deviled eggs. That’s a menu reality as well! Lost in the sauce Let’s face it, every meaty entree just gets better when the BBQ sauce and side dishes are a slam-dunk. Klemm’s gets it, big time. Their BBQ sauce is mildly sweet and savory, complementing the smoked meats nicely without stealing the show. Just try not to dip your perfectly seasoned, crunchy okra or hand14

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cut, twice-fried French fries in this addictive concoction. You’ll be obsessed. Klemm’s also makes their own German mustard and their own Ranch dressing that brings people in just to buy it alone. Sides and sweets The macaroni and cheese is a crazy good side dish that pairs well with the hearty meats. “We originally created the cheese sauce for a wedding we were catering,” Jan recalls, “and it’s been a staple ever since.” The silky smooth cheese clings to every bite of penne pasta in perfect proportion, making it the ultimate comfort food with a grown-up bite. The famous cheese is also, well...amazing, on the Porking Amazing sandwich with brat, pulled pork and slaw. Other favorite sides are their tangy red cabbage apple coleslaw and tasty deviled eggs finished with a cayenne kick. Save room for their homemade banana pudding, decadent salted caramel dark chocolate brownie or one of their monster cookies, aptly named! Klemm’s restaurant is only open Thursday, Friday and Saturday each week from 11am-8pm and the food truck is available for bookings. You’ll be in good company at the restaurant, as local police officers and firefighters frequently enjoy lunch here each day. “Many of the guys from Firehouse #2 eat here all the time,” Jan remarks, “but luckily, they’ve never had to come here for a fire.” Klemm’s is located at 2000 S. Broadway in Edmond. Visit www.klemmssmokehaus.com for more. Ask about their turkey and fixings for Thanksgiving and Christmas!

Laura Beam is a writer and advertising manager with 25 years in radio, newspaper and magazines. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Facebook.


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FEATURELOOK

Major CJ Wise

By Mustafa Koprucu

Citizen’s Police Academy I never imagined taking a family night out to the Edmond Police Station, but on a warm Tuesday night, there we went, my wife and I along with our 25-year old son, who was fascinated by the idea of attending the Citizen’s Police Academy. Chief JD Younger greeted us at the door, then, to a fully-packed conference room, he gave us an overview of the Academy along with his vision, values, and focus for the department as a whole. Twice a year, Edmond PD hosts this 11-week course with the goal of improved problem-solving by building strong community partnerships. My son was the one who talked us into signing up. For the past five years he’s been learning all he can about law enforcement, even attending many of the monthly “Coffee with a Cop” get togethers in Edmond. When my wife learned about the academy, we decided to sign up as a family. And so, over the next three months, we spent 2-3 hours every Tuesday night at the police station and I too became fascinated learning about the scope of what this 160-person team does. With a $21M budget, responsibilities to provide a safe environment to live and work for 100K citizens in 90 square miles, Chief Younger outlined how his team responds within four minutes anywhere in the city for an emergency call (six minutes for non-emergency). Risks faced everyday Like many others, up until now my main interest with the police department had been limited to not getting pulled over for exceeding the speed limit. But as we watched dash camera videos of routine traffic stops or calls for assistance escalate into dangerous situations, it became clear how easy it had become for me to take for granted the risks these officers face each day.

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In addition to the criminal and crime scene investigations that accompany most police departments, detectives described to us how Edmond provides liaisons to larger Drug Enforcement Agency and Joint Terrorism Task Forces, each of which brings valuable training and intelligence sharing back to the community in return for the manpower investment. Special Weapons and Tactics demonstrations The highlight of the course is an entire Saturday spent at the Edmond Police Training and Firing Range off of Danforth and Midwest Blvd. Here new recruits go through a 21-week program of physical conditioning and procedural training. For us, it was a morning spent learning and watching how K-9 officers build bonds with their animals and train them to perform searches, Special Weapons and Tactics demonstrations, as well as the Milo Range Simulator, a hi-tech virtual reality training area where patrolmen simulate shooting and use of force scenarios in a computerized environment. Upon graduation, all three of us received our certificates and became eligible to join the Edmond Citizen Police Academy Alumni Association, an organization that meets monthly and hosts fundraisers such as the 10 Oct Golf Tournament at Oak Tree. Alumni members are also eligible to volunteer assisting at the security booth at the station, helping direct queries to the right office. The last thing left for our family was to schedule ride-alongs. As part of the program each Academy member is encouraged to sign up for a morning, evening, or back-shift ride-along with a patrol unit to watch and learn more about the daily life of a patrolman as they respond to calls for service. My son remarked that he’d be sure to have the patrolman help me watch my speed on 33rd Street! For more information go to: www.edmondok.com/576/CitizensPolice-Academy and www.wesupportedmondpd.org


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FEATURELOOK

Meet the Muralists By Amy Dee Stephens

Edmond is home to 13 outdoor murals. Meet the artists behind the three newest murals on public display: Tropical Oasis by Brooke Rowlands Location: Sunnyside Diner Things moved fast for artist, Brooke Rowlands, when Edmond’s Sunnyside Diner opened. The diner owners, friends of Brooke’s, wanted both an inside and outside mural for their building. Brooke first painted the inside wall, which follows a traditional hometown diner theme, paying homage to Edmond’s culture, complete with Oklahoma symbols. For the outside mural, Brooke was given free rein to design a mural of her choosing—as long as it was colorful. “The back wall of the diner is an alleyway that is only visible to people driving south on Broadway, so I went with bold and vibrant colors,” Brooke said. “I created “Tropical Oasis” because flowers are my passion. Much of my artwork incorporates botanical themes.” It was the hottest week in July when Brooke painted the mural, so she started each morning at 5:45 am, took a midday break, and returned in the evening. “Every time I drive past the diner, I see people taking pictures with it, so that’s been very gratifying.” Continued on page 20

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FEATURELOOK Continued from page 18

Untitled work by Kristopher Kanaly Location: Edmond Railyard The paint is barely dry on Edmond’s latest mural at the new Edmond Railyard downtown, commissioned by The Grant Group and Casey Massegee. “The artwork is inspired by the favorite poem of Casey’s grandfather called Train of Life. It’s a metaphor about sitting at the front of the train to see where life takes you,” Kristopher said. “So of course, trains weave in and out of the mural design.” After reading the poem, Kristopher did a word cloud that covered important aspects of life in Edmond besides trains. The words included: trees, public art, Native Americans, outdoor recreation, neighborhoods, parks, family, etc. In addition, Kristopher included Edmond landmarks, such as the Edmond Armory, the rocket ship slide at Stephenson Park, the downtown clock and the Arcadia Red Barn. The 100 x 22 ft mural is a colorful collage that resembles a large paint-bynumber painting. Kristopher started by projecting his line-drawing onto the wall after the sun went down, tracing the outlines. From there, he spent two weeks filling in the color blocks with spray paint. Having grown up in a family of artists--dating back to his great grandfather who owned an art gallery in Oklahoma City back in 1919—Kristopher is no stranger to the joys and challenges of being an artist. As a teenager, he worked in the gallery and designed his own graffiti culture t-shirts. Next, he was hired to paint murals in restaurants, but only outdoor murals offer the challenges of rain, heat and stinging bugs. Even so, he’s proud to offer his custom artwork to an area which he describes as “underutilized, but undergoing rejuvenation.”

Photo credit: www.beaubrand.net

Psyche by Chris Cargill Location: 14 S. Broadway The mural in the alley of 14 S. Broadway is known by the locals as “The Salvador Dali,” but the name Chris Cargill gave it has deeper meaning. “Last year when I designed it, there was an art gallery in the building—so it seemed fitting to feature an artist, or rather, two artists,” Chris said. “Salvador Dali’s profile is featured with a backdrop of horizontal and vertical color blocks inspired by artist, Piet Mondrian, who tried to show balance in the simplest of forms. I was thinking about all the changes going on in downtown Edmond. Salvador Dali often incorporated butterflies in his painting to represent change, metamorphosis, but with change, you need balance. So that’s the concept of the mural.” Chris painted the mural last October, amidst various rainstorms, so the project took three weeks. “I was at the mercy of the weather, but it was really fun, because over the timeframe, I got to interact with a lot of people who had parked and were walking past. They had many questions, and it was a nice change from working in an art studio by myself.” As with the other murals, Chris is fascinated by the ways that people interact with his art. Psyche is, of course, a selfie site, but he never predicted it would become a backdrop for a local auto detailer who photographs luxury cars in front of the mural. 20

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BIZLOOK

Robert Baxter Electric By Maria Veres

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After getting his contractor’s license, Robert grew his company into the largest non-union shop in the area. He sold that business in 2012 and founded a new one when he came out of retirement.

After more than forty years, Robert Baxter still loves his job. “I tried to retire and I got totally bored to tears,” he says, “so I went back into business.” He and his team pride themselves on excellent, customer-centered electrical work for homeowners and businesses.

Doing It Right Robert Baxter Electric is a family business. His daughter, son-in-law, and grandson all work with him, along with other carefully chosen team members. Building customer connections is at the heart of everything they do.

Starting from Scratch Most kids don’t daydream of wiring houses, and Robert didn’t either. “I thought I was going to be a professional musician,” he says. As the drummer for a leading local band, he opened for national acts like Three Dog Night and the Beach Boys.

“I’m old school,” he says. “I respect people. I treat my customers right, and I’ve done very well.”

But music didn’t pay well, so he and a friend answered a help-wanted ad for electricians.

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They were hired as apprentices even though they knew nothing about electricity. “No one was going to tell me I couldn’t do it,” says Robert, “and so I did.”

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Safety First Robert understands budget crunches, but he also wants people to know the risks of cutting corners with electrical work. “People try to save money, but they may be creating something that’s not safe,” he says.

Robert Baxter

Robert suggests getting the circuit breakers inspected once a year. If you feel heat on the cover of your breaker box, switch, or plug, it’s time to call a professional. “That’s one area you don’t want to shortcut,” he says. Robert doesn’t plan to try retirement again any time soon, and he’s continuing to grow his business. “I’m very customer oriented,” he says. “And I still love making a light bulb work.” Visit Robert Baxter Electric at 2421 NW 160th Street or online at www.rbeelectric.com.


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BIZLOOK

Cosmetic Surgical Arts By Maria Veres

When you look better, you feel better. That’s why Dr. Michell Cohn is committed to helping patients love what they see in the mirror. Natural Beauty Dr. Cohn is trained in a wide variety of surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures. “My goal is to help people look their best while looking natural,” she says. Recently she has seen an increase of patients coming for breast implant removal. As women age and become less active, larger breasts can lead to medical issues like back and neck problems. “Sometimes it’s necessary to do a breast remodeling,” she says. Facial rejuvenation is also one of her specialties, with over 15 years experience of non-surgical

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facial treatment. Dr. Cohn specializes in nonsurgical facial treatments to lift wrinkles, tighten sagging skin, and add volume to compensate for bone loss. One of the best choices for many patients is PDO Threads. The threads are laid underneath the skin to induce collagen production. They are made the same durable material that’s used in heart surgery sutures. Results can last up to eighteen months. Serving Edmond for Fifteen Years Dr. Cohn grew up in the OKC area and completed her education here in Oklahoma. Her first career was as a board certified dietician, working with eating disordered patients. Later she returned to school for a medical degree. Since she already had experience helping people achieve a healthier body and body image, specializing in cosmetic procedures was a natural fit. She’s a board certified surgeon. When she’s not helping her own patients become more beautiful, she trains other clinicians to perform non-surgical cosmetic procedures.

Dr. Michell Cohn

See for Yourself Dr. Cohn is accepting new patients. Her office holds open-house events several times a year, allowing the community to meet her and her team and learn about the procedures she offers. Mark your calendars for the holiday meet-andgreet event scheduled for December 5. “We’re looking in the mirror constantly,” she says. “It’s OK to want to look our best. I like bringing people to a better view of themselves.” Cosmetic Surgical Arts and Rejuvenation of Oklahoma is located at 12324 Saint Andrew Drive and online at www.cosmeticsurgicalartsokc.com.


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FEATURELOOK

By Maria Veres

On the Trail to Recovery Whether you realize it or not, someone you know is struggling with substance abuse. It might be the person in the next row at church, the neighbor who waved to you this morning, or a family member. Drug and alcohol addictions affect Oklahomans from all walks of life. Overcoming them isn’t easy. But Arcadia Trails INTEGRIS offers new hope through a longer, more comprehensive treatment model. A Healing Journey “I didn’t realize my life had become abnormal,” says Jane (not her real name). She understood the concept of addiction but didn’t think it applied to her. “I had some denial going on,” she admits. Eventually Jane entered a 90-day residential treatment program that helped her turn her life around. She’s been sober for more than a decade, and she has spent most of that time helping other people recover. She is now part of the staff of Arcadia Trails. Many of Jane’s co-workers at Arcadia Trails are in recovery too. “It’s helpful for patients to know there are people like us who can relate,” she says.

Dr. Wilson. “It doesn’t develop overnight and can’t be cured overnight. That’s why we believe in ninety-day programs. It takes about thirty days for the brain to start healing and at least another thirty days to start developing good coping skills.” New Options for Treatment Until now, most Oklahomans had to travel out of state to find a treatment program longer than thirty days. Arcadia Trails INTEGRIS features a full three-month residential program for males and females age 18 and over. The center grew from the vision of a group of people who saw a need for a different treatment model in our state. “Being an Okie myself, I’m proud to have brought this to fruition in Oklahoma,” says Dr. Wilson. Nestled in the woods near Arcadia Lake, Arcadia Trails INTEGRIS offers a whole-person approach to treatment. Along with group and individual therapy, there’s yoga, pet therapy, art therapy, and more. The center welcomes people of all faiths, and patients are supported in whatever spiritual expressions are most helpful for them. Staff members help patients find a community to sustain their recovery after graduation.

Treatment Takes Time Dr. Kimberlee Wilson, Arcadia Trails opened in May 2019. Located near Medical Director Addiction creeps up on many people slowly, just as it I-35, it serves people from all over the Oklahoma and did for Jane. “There are three main routes to addiction,” beyond. Dr. Wilson and her team recently celebrated the says Dr. Kimberlee Wilson, Medical Director of Arcadia graduations of their first patients, and they look forward to celebrating many Trails. One path is untreated anxiety. “People discover using a substance more. can help them get through the moment,” she explains. The second route to addiction is a genetic predisposition that causes some people to crave For anyone struggling with addiction or watching a loved one struggle, Jane addictive substances more than others. The third route is through opioid has a simple message: Get help. If Arcadia Trails isn’t the right fit, the staff medications. No matter how the addiction starts, a person eventually needs will guide people to other resources. “There’s a ton of help out there,” she more and more of the substance to get relief. says. “We aren’t in the shadows anymore.” Healing can be a slow process, too. Physical withdrawal from the substance Arcadia Trails INTEGRIS is located at 4851 Integris Parkway and is the first step, but it’s even more important to establish new, healthy patterns online at www.arcadiatrails.com. that support a sober life. “Addiction is a learned brain behavior,” says

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ALOOKBACK

Visiting Mama By Louise Tucker Jones

Yesterday, I went to see Mama. I have always enjoyed our visits and phone conversations, but a few months ago, my 102 year-old-mother had a bad fall as well as a stroke and her life changed forever. She no longer shuffles along with her walker or sits in her living room chair watching TV with her caregiver. She is now bedfast and sleeps a lot. I miss those visits and phone calls. I miss hearing her messages on my voice mail telling me to pick up the phone. The last time I made this two-hour trip to my mother’s home, she slept the whole time I was there. But I talked to her anyway. I smoothed her hair away from her face and watched her sleep, wondering how many times she watched me sleep when I was young. Yesterday, she woke up soon after I arrived and talked a little. She smiled when my son, Jay embraced her in a gentle hug. They’re buddies. They have a special love for each other. Jay tends to bring joy to anyone who is fragile, and Mama is definitely fragile. Even frail. While I was there she ate lunch then I put cream on her dry skin and a warm compress on her eye.

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She told me she hurt so I prayed for her. How many scrapes did she kiss away when I was a child? How many prayers did she pray over me through the years? Hundreds! Thousands! But Mama didn’t stay awake long. In fact, it took me longer to travel to her house than the time she was awake while I was there. But love isn’t measured in waking hours or miles traveled. Love comes from the heart and Mama’s heart has always been full of love. So while my mother slept, I sang over her. I sang, “Jesus Loves Me,” feeling certain she sang that to her baby girl while I slept in her arms. I believe she heard my song, and I definitely believe she felt my kiss on her cheek and heard the words I whispered before leaving…. “I love you, Mama!” ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


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FEATURELOOK

By Amy Dee Stephens

Francis Tuttle Patent Pros Francis Tuttle Technology School students have achieved a nationwide record: the approval of their 12th patent in five years. Incredibly, each patented product was designed by high school students at the Portland Campus, and each is so technologically advanced that major corporations and medical companies are anxiously waiting for the products to make it to market. “Coming out of high school with a patent is extremely rare,” said Brad Sanders, engineering instructor. “It’s a complicated process for adults, much less students who are accomplishing it in one school year—but their projects are so innovative and marketable, that our students are selling their patents, signing non-disclosure agreements and even forming their own companies as they head off to college.” The caliber of the patents is astounding, ranging from LED reflective clothing and marine debris solutions to a hay bale unrolling device. Here’s a description of a few of the patents:

A tornado shelter that mounts onto a classroom wall like a white board, but once detached, it unfolds into a room that anchors into foundation bolts. This “safe room” can hold 24 students and the teacher. The student’s prototype was rated for F5 tornados and is currently undergoing further safety testing. An electronic monitoring device that pinpoints the amount of air left in a patient’s oxygen tank—and then notifies the patient and caregiver electronically when air is getting low. The needle gauge currently on the market only gives an approximate oxygen level. “This idea was initiated by a three students wanting to help an acquaintance who landed in the hospital when his air ran out unexpectedly,” Sanders said. “Our students work to solve real-life problems.”

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Such innovation comes from a capstone program in which high schoolers learn engineering principles and advanced math and science. Early in the year, each student identifies a problem to solve. Sanders and his co-teacher, Jared Keester, help the class narrow the scope down to a final team project. This year’s project ideas vary widely, ranging from teaching music to the blind, a lymph node drainage device, a compost heating system, etc. Senior, Emily Haas, is proposing an early migraine detection system that would alert the patient by smart phone when the early warning signs of a migraine are developing so that the patient can take medication before full-migraine symptoms are in place.

Students have achieved a nationwide record: the approval of their 12th patent in five years

A cross-arm assembly that prevents the “galloping” of electrical lines, which causes the wooden braces to break and shut off power during an ice storm. Working with OG&E, the students designed a steel version, made of such unique components that they earned three patents.

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Jessica Lukowski

As a sophomore, Emily independently developed a myoelectric sensor that allows a prosthetic hand to respond to muscle movement. Her prototype won a national technology competition. “I enrolled expecting to learn about engineering and fix a few things, but the academic challenges here are amazing,” Emily said. “The school has resources, like 3-D printing, that make it possible to achieve endless opportunities.”

Teaching a program with students that are so highly innovative is a “mind-blowing” experience for the teachers. Both Sanders and Keester are constantly having to learn to keep up with their students’ creativity and advancement. “We’re really mentors, because they come up with the content,” Keester said. “They get so fired up that they want us to rush through our lessons so they can get to the lab and work on their own docket of things, like building prototypes. Sometimes we have to say, ‘Hold on, we have to teach you a few things first.’ It’s incredible and inspiring to watch high school students achieve the cutting edge.” To learn more, visit www.francistuttle.edu


80 East 5th St., Ste. 130 Edmond, OK 73034

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - October 2019  

Edmond Outlook - October 2019  

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