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November 2019

Gobble, Gobble, Walk, Run

Edmond’s Turkey Trot Celebrates 10 Years

Talkin’ Trash in Edmond

In the Nick of Time

The Rail Spur District


Features

“Why Edmond? Why isn’t your business in downtown OKC where all the other design agencies are?” I remember getting asked that a lot early on. In 2000, when I started my business, I was living in Prague, Oklahoma. I had just moved there with my family from New England. My late wife had relatives in Prague and a series of events landed us back in Oklahoma. I figured I could start my business anywhere - so I set up a desk in the den overlooking the back forty. Not my acreage, but it was a nice view. It was a perfect time to start a web development business. The internet was young and growing. People and businesses needed help. The work was out there. I just had to go get it. And part of getting it was traveling out to the metro area, where my bigger clients were. That’s when I discovered Edmond and thought, “Oh, this is nice. I want to live here.” Not long after, I found a house in southeast Edmond and settled into Chimney Hill. So 168 monthly magazines and thousands of web projects later, I’m in the process of moving again. This time it’s my company that’s getting boxed up. And this time it’s a very short move. 6 miles (or 25 minutes with Edmond traffic). We purchased a building at Covell and Kelly. If all goes as planned, we will be moving in December 1st. Back40 will be the same business with the same heart for service. We’ll still be branding, web developing, digital marketing, hosting and publishing this magazine, just from a different location.

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ASK EDMOND

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VISIT EDMOND CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Our readers share Thanksgiving traditions Rodeo, 5K run and ice skating are a few must-do events

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LOCAL EATS: TED’S CAFE ESCONDIDO

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LEADING BY LISTENING

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A WELCOME HOME

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Next level Mexican food and fun

UCO’s new president is focused on the needs and hopes of her staff and students Darrin Hand shares his family’s adoption love story THE RAIL SPUR DISTRICT

City and developers team up to revitalize historic Downtown Edmond GOBBLE, GOBBLE, WALK, RUN

A Thanksgiving 5K tradition celebrates 10 years TALKIN’ TRASH IN EDMOND

Collection and disposal is a high-tech $9 million operation IN THE NICK OF TIME

Edmond’s crooning councilman releases his debut album

Business

I really don’t get asked “Why Edmond?” anymore. I guess it’s because we’re home. It’s where we belong. If you need creative marketing - click, call or stop by. I look forward to meeting you.

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NP 2 GO

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SPANISH COVE

Dave Miller Back40 Design President

Expert medical care comes to your door Growing senior living community offers range of care

Columns

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LOUISE TUCKER JONES

Season of Family

Cover photography by Crimson Clover Photo ADVERTISING l Laura Beam at 405-301-3926 l laura@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN EDMOND/NORTH OKC 80 East 5th Street, Suite 130, Edmond, OK 73034 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com November 2019 Volume 15, Number 11

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Edmond Outlook is a publication of Back40 Design, Inc.

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© 2019 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l ADVERTISING MANAGER Laura Beam l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend, Anne Richardson l PRODUCTION Rachel Morse PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond & North OKC homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


LOCALLOOK

Ask Edmond

Quirky Thanksgiving Traditions

Do you have a beloved Thanksgiving tradition or ritual? Or perhaps one you’d like to start? Outlook’s Facebook friends shared a few of their own favorite customs. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family.

Barbara McCrary Retired OSRHE Chief Information Security Officer

Devon Hughes Freelance Researcher for Clinical Studies

My brother, Tim, who is gone now would always stuff a pillow in his shirt and we would take a picture of him with a drumstick in his hand or mouth while he layed back in a recliner. We always loved those pics. Thanksgiving was his favorite holiday. Mine too.

We all get pennies and go around the table saying one thing we are thankful for this year. The pennies then go to the host as a thank you.

Amanda Bowen Director of Leadership Programs, Edmond Chamber of Commerce

Mike Bosley President, Seatbelt Planet

Donna Popp Vice President, First Fidelity Bank

Our Thanksgiving isn’t complete without a game of “friendly” tackle football. But what makes the annual game extra interesting is we play in a cow pasture. Let’s just say it’s a high stakes game.

Our annual tradition of a Mexico beach-based Thanksgiving has moved to a San Diego (with the uptick in reported violence). We celebrate with a pot-luck style dinner. The night before heading home each year, we all participate in a family talent show complete with comedians, singers, jugglers, and skits.

We have a tablecloth that you could write on and each year we write what we are thankful for. This is a fairly new tradition, but I have a 99-yearold grandpa and wanted to preserve his handwriting and memories.

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Morgan Lankford-Gordon Licensed Professional Counselor My family exchanges Christmas ornaments on Thanksgiving. We always have a special, new ornament to hang when we put up the tree.


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LOOKAHEAD

November Find more details and events at www.visitedmondok.com

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7, 14 & 21

Kaleidoscope Dance Company Fall Concert

Scorpions and Petticoats: A Living History Program

6-6:30 p.m. 1889 Territorial Schoolhouse 124 E. 2nd St. Free admission

12 Daniel Hope, Violin with Zurich Chamber Orchestra 7:30 p.m. Armstrong Auditorium 14400 S. Bryant Rd. $31-$71

8-9 Edmond Craft Fair

5-9 p.m. Fri.; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. Downtown Community Center 28 E. Main St. Free admission

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14 Keeper of the Lost Cities: Legacy Edmond Tour Stop 7-8:30 p.m. Central Middle School 500 E. 9th St. $25

Papa Nooch Band Debut and CD Release 8 p.m. UCO Jazz Lab 100 E. 5th St. $7-$20

3 p.m. Mitch Park 1501 W. Covell Rd. $12 general admission $8 children 5 and under

9 a.m. Arcadia Lake 9000 E. 2nd St. $50-$80

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

Lazy E Arena 9600 Lazy E Dr. Free admission

16 Edmond International Festival 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Festival Market Place 30 W. 1st St. Free admission

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23 Luminance Opening 5:30 p.m. Mitch Park 1501 W. Covell Rd. Free admission

28 - Dec. 1 Rising Stars of Calf Roping Lazy E Arena 9600 Lazy E Dr. $10 at the gate

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Turkey Shoot Doubles Disc Golf Tournament

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Barrel Futurities of America World Championships

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Opening Day at the Edmond Ice Rink

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7:30 p.m. UCO Mitchell Hall Theater 100 N. University Dr. $10-$20

Holiday Extravaganza Pajama Party Preview

22 Holiday Extravaganza Pajama Party Preview 6-8 p.m. Madeline’s Flowers 1030 S. Broadway $20 in advance; $25 at the door

Edmond Turkey Trot 8 a.m. Downtown Edmond 28 E. Main St. $0-$26


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FOODLOOK FEATURELOOK

By Laura Beam

Local Eats: Ted’s Cafe Escondido Next level Mexican food and fun

(Left to right) Hana Nasser, Bryan Welch, Stephan Schock, Nicole Frazier, Cameron Bentley, Erica Garcia

The fresh vibe, the fun drinks, the free cheese sauce — what’s not to love about the hot new mood and menu at one of the metro’s most epic restaurants? Ted’s Cafe Escondido has upped the wow factor, big time, especially at its remodeled Danforth location in Edmond. The artsy decor, expanded views of the woodsy outdoors, exciting new bar scene and crazy good, shareable drinks are turning heads. If a mega goblet rimmed with fresh fruit and two straws doesn’t scream fun to you, the variety of other cantina favorites and made-from-scratch menu newcomers will.

from the create-your-own menu loaded with Ted’s most popular items and served with rice and beans. Upgrade to premium sides like garlic mashed potatoes, creamy spiced corn or the awesome grilled vegetable medley that’s good enough to be an entree on its own. Ted’s does grilled vegetables right, even if you’re picky about your veggies.

With 28 years of excellence under their belt, Ted’s is a true homegrown success story. Throughout the 10 Oklahoma locations, guests are seeing new technology, decor, drinks, music and menu options taking the eatery to next-level enjoyment. “It’s always about an experience when guests come to Ted’s,” says David Foxx, Chief Operating Officer. “We’re all about the choice and convenience that today’s guests expect. Even as we’ve opened new locations and brought in new technology, we pride ourselves on excellent, speedy service and all food prepared fresh daily from scratch.” The signature and the setup Let’s talk tortillas. Ted’s has been rockin’ them since day one. Where else can you walk in hungry and immediately grab a steamy, just-made flour tortilla to nibble on before being seated? This old school fave was a hit 28 years ago when the chefs first created it and it’s still Ted’s signature standout today. The warm welcome gets even better when Ted’s famous setup comes to your table. What is it about light-as-air homemade tortilla chips dunked in your own individual bowl of hot cheese sauce that just seems to make the world a better place? Whatever it is, Ted’s gets it. Served along with salsa (again, in your own bowl, because who ever wants to share?), vegetable relish, grilled peppers and onions, atomic salsa and flour tortillas--all complimentary with your entree--it’s a pre-dinner fiesta. Your way, all day When you just need to have things your way, choose one, two or three items

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Vegetarians, rejoice! You have your own special menu jam-packed with everything from appetizers and combo plates to chimichangas and quesadillas. These are 40+ items you need in your life right now! Ted’s also offers gluten-sensitive options. Sometimes the best way to enjoy your favorite food...is in your comfy pants at home! Take advantage of delivery options available through Postmates, DoorDash, Uber Eats, Grubhub and more to get your Ted’s fix. Kicked up cantina Check out Ted’s new bar scene and extensive drink menu with fun sips like the Cherry Barb--an adult cherry limeade named for a guest in Lawton. So yum! The 36 oz. shareable drinks brimming with fruit are also a huge hit and great to enjoy with friends. Save room for a complimentary sopapilla, and once your belly is full and happy, don’t forget to take your selfie in front of the popular sugar skull mural by artist Sharon McCoy before you leave! Visit Ted’s Cafe Escondido’s Edmond location at 801 E. Danforth Rd. or www.tedscafe.com for other locations in the OKC Metro, Tulsa and Lawton.

Laura Beam is a writer and advertising manager with 25 years in radio, newspaper and magazines. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Facebook.


Edmond Ice Rink AT

MITCH

PARK

Open from

NOVEMBER 15TH through

JANUARY 5TH For more details go to

EDMONDICERINK.COM Mitch Park

1501 W Covell Rd

Edmond, OK 73003

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FEATURELOOK

Leading by Listening By Amy Dee Stephens As Patti Neuhold-Ravikumar embarks on her fourth month as the new president at the University of Central Oklahoma, she’s sharply focused on channeling the needs and hopes of her staff and students. In fact, she’s spent much of her inaugural time in meetings with a broad range of advisory groups—a process she describes as time-consuming, but completely worthwhile. “I’m getting a broad perspective of ideas and I’m constantly being inspired by stories about how impactful UCO is in people’s lives. We have intelligent, creative people here. I believe the best way to lead is to channel these creative voices so that UCO is forward-thinking and nimble.”

“Our students trust us with their dreams and hopes and aspirations. I approach this role with excitement and reverence.”

Neuhold-Ravikumar is responsible for a tremendously large operation, covering a 210-acre campus, 2,000 faculty and staff, and 15,000 students. She’s not a new face on campus, as she’s worked at UCO for 12 years, most recently as the Chief Financial Officer. She notably led the institution through the $10.5 million dollar decline of tuition revenue and $12.3 million loss in state funding, without sacrificing any jobs on campus. It’s a feat that led her to receive the President’s Award in Applied Leadership in 2018.

“I believe that every experience, decision and destination in my life has prepared me for this opportunity, not one particular moment,” Neuhold-Ravikumar said. One of those many experiences involved singing cows. “I haven’t talked about that one in a long time,” Neuhold-Ravikumar said, laughing as she remembered the scene. “I was in a sorority at Oklahoma Christian University, and one of their yearly competitions, called Spring Sing, is for all the clubs to dress up in costume and sing clever lyrics about a particular theme. We picked cows. I was the co-director, and yes, it was utterly silly— but we actually won that year!” Spring Sing was one of her early experiences in successfully leading a group of people, but her formal background as she moves into her presidential role is, surprisingly, not in management or accounting…or music. She has two psychology degrees, in which she largely focused on how groups function. “I actually believe I’ve used it every day, because understanding how an organization is structured and how communication works is so important in higher education.” It’s one of the reasons Neuhold-Ravikumar feels so strongly about spending time learning alongside the people she leads and in meeting those who wouldn’t normally have a voice in deciding where the university is headed. “Our students trust us with their dreams and hopes and aspirations. I approach this role with excitement and reverence. This university began in 1890 when we were a small, year-old community that began with people running by horse and buggy to grab a stake in the land. Then this huge, beautiful, modern-for-the-time building, Old North, was built. It was the biggest thing in town!” Neuhold-Ravikumar now sits in that same stone building, playing her own role in the school’s 129-year history. She’s the 21st president and the institution’s first female president. “UCO is proud to educate the citizens of the metropolitan Oklahoma City area, to fill jobs, and to be leaders for this community. The institution and this community—we’re all a part of each other. We are family. I want to get this right.” 14

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FEATURELOOK

Tory and Darrin Hand and their children

A Welcome Home By Amy Dee Stephens

Darrin Hand has a vivid memory of the first time he saw his tiny baby girl. The day before, he didn’t know he was going to be a dad. It was an emergency situation that changed his life for the better. “We got an unexpected call from DHS that a day-old baby needed a home. My wife, Tory, and I had been recommended as a good couple by the baby’s older sister, a 12-yr-old girl who knew us from church. She had already found a family to live with,” Darrin said. “How could we say no? We were having trouble conceiving, but we never saw this coming.”

That first baby eventually returned home, but the Hands decided to complete their full foster family certification. The day they finished, a second baby needed a home, and two years later, they adopted her. “I can’t imagine life without her. My wife has had two babies since then, so we have three children now. God needed us to wait awhile, until our first daughter was settled into our life.” “Our daughter is so awesome,” Tory said. “She’s artistic, joyful, fascinating and full of love.” As any foster or adoptive parents will tell you—the children touch hearts in unexpected ways. They also have questions. Tough questions. “Children are removed from their homes because of neglect, abuse, addiction or sickness, and sometimes a combination,” Darrin said. “Our daughter knows she is adopted. She knows her skin is a different color than ours. Now that she’s eight, we are trying to help her understand the pieces of her story that are age-appropriate.”

One out of 25 families has an adopted child.

DHS came in the next day to do a background check and an emergency inspection of the Hand’s home. A few hours later, Darrin was a foster parent. He went to the shelter and saw this beautiful infant. “She had nothing, nothing except loaned pajamas and a blanket,” Darrin said. “We didn’t even have a bottle at home, but we had a baby. Our life had literally changed in 18 hours.”

It was a dramatic and unusual beginning. Fortunately, the Hands had several things going in their favor. First, they had church friends that surrounded them and helped gather what they needed. Second, their hearts had already been stirred. “Years before, our pastor’s wife had done a talk about foster care month. We hadn’t walked out thinking let’s foster or adopt, but it opened a door in our hearts. We now believe that was a vital step in forming our family.”

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According to Adoption Network, one out of 25 families has an adopted child. There are over 50 thousand foster kids waiting for a family. Not everyone is able to take in a child, but the Hands believe that everyone can be part of the solution in some way, whether it’s donating to a related non-profit or offering to babysit for foster parents.

“From a dad’s standpoint, I think it’s harder for a guy who is not already a father to make himself open to the idea of adopting. Once you do, though, you start noticing the needs of neglected kids. Pretty soon, it starts to hit you what the alternative is for these kids if you don’t do something. Without you, a kid might end up in a compromising situation. I can’t imagine how different my daughter’s life might have been. I became a dad overnight and that’s how our family came to be. There was a spot for her in my life all along, and our family would be incomplete without her.” November is National Adoption Awareness Month. Learn more at www.heartbeatinternational.org


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FEATURELOOK

Rail Spur District By Lea Terry

One of Edmond’s latest development projects not only brings something new to the city, but it also gives new life to some of the city’s most historic locations. The Rail Spur District, designed by developers Brandon Lodge and Chip Fudge, will add 14,000 square feet of restaurant and entertainment space to downtown Edmond, thanks partly to a $700,000 grant from the City. The City decided to assist with the project in part because the developers wanted to restore century-old buildings that were in need of repair. “It’s capturing our history,” said Janet Yowell, executive director of the Edmond Economic Development Authority. “I think we should do that everywhere we can. There are downtown buildings that are being maintained, but to be able to take a 100-year-old structure that has so much history behind it and make it into a viable business is pretty cool.” City Incentives This is actually the second attempt for the project, Yowell said. Developers had approached the City a few years ago but found it cost-prohibitive because one of the existing buildings, the former Edmond Ice Company and Creamery, is on the National Register of Historic Places and trying to preserve a historic building like that is expensive. However, the developers recently approached the City again and this time around, the City offered incentives and support to help get the project going. “This one is a perfect example of a project not happening at all unless we put some public money into it,” Yowell said. Public feedback has been positive so far, Yowell said, with social media comments favoring the project. As part of the incentive process, the City had to take the idea through a public process, and Yowell said there was no opposition to the development. Four Restaurants and an Event Center The Rail Spur project, located on nearly three acres at Second Street on the west side of the Edmond railroad tracks, will have five structures, including four restaurants that will range from high-end to more casual, neighborhoodstyle eateries. The project also includes what used to be stables, which will be restored and serve as a small, private events center with a garden-type backyard area. Developers plan to use tax credits to aid in the restoration of the Ice House building and the stables. The City of Edmond is using city-owned property to create 82 additional parking spaces and adding landscaping and lighting to the parking area. The increased parking will be available for people visiting any location in downtown, not just the Rail Spur development, which Yowell hopes will make it easier to get around the area and address residents’ concerns about parking. The project should be completed sometime in 2020, and will likely bring around 80 full-time jobs and 60 part-time positions to Edmond. The project may also contribute to a more vibrant downtown entertainment experience by attracting more people to the area and offering more options. “When you get a combined group of restaurants you’ll get more people downtown, and we hope that the benefit will be more people coming downtown because there are a lot of options to choose from,” Yowell said. “If you can’t get into one you can just walk around the corner and get into another, and our hope is that all of those restaurants will have increased traffic.”

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FEATURELOOK

Gobble, Gobble, Walk, Run Now in its tenth year, the Edmond Turkey Trot began as a fundraiser for local nonprofit Turning Point Ministries, but the annual 5K race has since turned into an Edmond Thanksgiving Day tradition. “It’s popularity told us that people were looking for something fun, healthy and entertaining to do on Thanksgiving morning,” said Edmond Turkey Trot Co-Chair Josh Moore. Held on Edmond’s Main Street, the race includes a 1-mile “Wobble” that begins at 8 a.m. and a 5K that begins at 8:35 a.m. The family-friendly event welcomes strollers and “friendly dogs on a leash.’’ Moore said they’ve tried to make the event a “big family party,” complete with music, kids’ events and a raffle. The race has grown from around 400 participants in its first year to over 2,000 in 2018, and Moore said response this year has already been impressive. Runners and Non-Runners Part of the reason for the event’s enduring popularity is that organizers strive to make it welcoming to both runners and non-runners, as well as create an entertaining atmosphere that encourages people to be active and brings the community together. The race has become a tradition not only with residents but also with many holiday visitors. “You just see a lot of smiles, and that makes us happy. I think it makes other people happy, and I think they come back to see that every year,” Moore said.

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By Lea Terry

The event raises money for Turning Point Ministries, an Edmond nonprofit that builds affordable housing for modest-income families. “Every penny that’s earned from the Turkey Trot will go into somebody’s home, and so that’s important for us, and we count on that each year,” Moore said. The event has not only raised money for the organization but also increased its visibility. “You’ve got more than 2,000 people in one place, and you get to tell them just a little bit about what you do, and then word spreads from that,” Moore said. Register Online Participants can register online or print out a registration form. Early registration lasts until 3 p.m. November 22. The registration fee is $26 for the all-ages 5K with a T-shirt, and $20 without a T-shirt. The adult 1-mile wobble costs $26 with a T-shirt and $10 without for adults, and $10 with a T-shirt for children. The races begin at 8 a.m. Thanksgiving morning. The route starts at 28 E. Main Street. For more information, visit www. edmondturkeytrot.com.

Photos by Crimson Clover Photo


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BIZLOOK

NP 2 Go By Maria Veres

When you’re sick, it’s tough to get out and see your health provider. With NP 2 Go, you don’t have to. Kara de la Pena brings expert medical care straight to your door. Urgent Care on Wheels Kara is an Advanced Nurse Practitioner. She can prescribe most medications, order lab work, and treat common health problems without you ever leaving your home. She doesn’t address life-threatening emergencies that require ER care, but she can give any treatment an urgent care clinic would give. She’ll come to your bedside when you have the flu, give sports physicals, and treat wounds. She can even guide you in losing weight or making an advance directive.

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When she’s not on a call, you might find Kara driving a specially equipped medical bus. She makes the rounds of outdoor events, offering IV hydration and other first aid services. Headache Cures and More “I get a lot of patients who need migraine treatments,” says Kara. She gives IV saline therapy and prescription medication for quick relief. Not all clinics offer saline therapy, so Kara’s service can spare patients an ER visit. Kara also offers IV hydration for hangover cures, or combined with vitamin therapy to meet patients’ individual needs.

Kara de la Pena, APRN-CNP

A Lifetime of Caregiving Kara was drawn to health care after her grandmother suffered a stroke when she was sixteen. “I’ve always liked caring for people,” she says.

Not many health providers make house calls, but Kara sees herself as part of a new trend. “We’re getting everything else delivered,” she says. “It makes sense to have someone come to your home for health care.”

She’s a born entrepreneur who used to get in trouble for selling seashells and other trinkets from her school desk. Channeling her nursing experience into a business was a perfect fit. “I feel lucky to use my spiritual gifts to help others,” she says.

Kara offers extended hours and travels to whatever metro area location is convenient for her patients. “It doesn’t feel like work when I’m doing what I love,” she says. Visit NP 2 Go at thenp2go.com.


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BIZLOOK

Spanish Cove Retirement Village By Maria Veres

Dragon boat regattas aren’t the first thing that comes to mind when most people think about senior living. But members of Spanish Cove Retirement Village not only field a team every year, they even won a silver medal in this year’s competition against teams with younger crews. It’s one of the many points of pride for this unique community. An Oklahoma Original Unlike many senior communities, Spanish Cove is run by a local board of directors, not a management company. “Spanish Cove is fully independent,” says Marketing Director Jill Huff. It has non-profit status, allowing it to offer lower costs to members.

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Spanish Cove was founded in 1976 by a group of teachers, and it later expanded to serve other seniors as well. Located in Yukon, it attracts residents from across the state and beyond. Along with dragon boating, members enjoy a huge range of other activities, including outof-state trips and innovative problem-solving collaborations with college students. Care for Every Stage of Life Spanish Cove is a Continuing Care Retirement Community. Seniors who join at the independent living level are guaranteed higher levels of care for as long as they need it, at prices below standard rates.

Spanish Cove’s Dragon Boat Team

Care levels range from independent living and home health care all the way up to skilled nursing and memory care. To keep costs low, residents pay a one-time entry fee, as well as monthly rent.

living apartments will open in 2022, complete with its own dining rooms, storm shelter, and wellness center. Seniors who opt in as charter members will get first choice of apartments and floorplans.

New Apartments Coming Soon By 2030, one in five Americans will be 65 or older. The need for senior communities is increasing, and Spanish Cove is growing to meet the demand.

Jill invites anyone who’s interested in Spanish Cove to contact her for more information. Already 350 members strong, the community looks forward to serving seniors for many years to come.

They recently expanded the assisted living section. Another addition with 45 independent

Spanish Cove is located at 11 Palm Street in Yukon and online at spanishcove.com.


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FEATURELOOK

By Amy Dee Stephens

Talkin’ Trash in Edmond When you weren’t looking, the trash disposal industry went seriously high-tech. The fleet of 12 trucks in Edmond cost $300,000 each, including multiple cameras, robotic arms, up to 22 miles of wiring, and GPS tracking systems. The crew is an educated group of men, many with college degrees, who take pride in what they do, removing 535,000 pounds of trash per day. You’ll be surprised by the complication and even the danger involved in driving a trash truck. You may not know the man who services your neighborhood—but he knows you. As he pulls up to your trash bin, he notices where you’ve placed it and if you placed it. If it’s too far away, too close to the mailbox, or turned backward, he has to get out and fix it, costing both time and money. “Getting out puts the driver at risk of getting hit,” said Bob Masterson, who oversees Edmond’s operation. “Safety is our priority, but even with all of our cameras, there are blind spots. When you drive by a trash truck, please wait for it to be fully stopped. We don’t want people to drive behind us through the whole neighborhood, of course, but pass slowly and pay attention.”

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One more tip to save you from embarrassment: If you forgot to put your bin out one week—just chalk it up to your mistake, because a camera took a time-stamped, GPS pinpointed photo of your location, minus your bin, and sent it to a computer as proof that the driver did not skip your house.

Close your trash bins when it rains. Wet trash weighs more, and trash is charged by the pound. Rinse food containers before you recycle. Biological waste contaminates the whole load, which sends it to the landfill after all. If you have any doubt if something is recyclable, like extension cords or PVC pipes—just put it in the trash.

“It’s serious business because these items can combust and catch on fire,” Masterson said. “About six times each year, the trash does catch on fire! There’s a guy in a $300,000 truck about to burn to the ground, so he follows procedure: he dumps all 38,000 pounds of trash wherever he’s located, maybe into your street, and calls the fire department to hose it down.”

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Clearly, it’s safer (and less embarrassing) to take advantage of the city’s household hazardous waste programs, which offer various disposal options, including one free pick-up each year per residence.

Trash Tips:

As your trash or recycling bin dumps into the truck, the driver is looking at the contents for anything dangerous or illegal. If you think nobody noticed the paint cans, swimming pool chemicals, motor oil, ammunition or an old propane tank in your bin, you’ll be surprised when the trash company calls to alert you.

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Bob Masterson and Edmond’s Solid Waste Team

Edmond’s waste removal system is a $9 million operation each year. The men who work in this field are very aware that every piece of trash comes with an environmental cost, a land cost and a financial cost. Masterson, himself, has changed his whole outlook on shopping. “I’ve stopped buying things I don’t need, and I avoid products with over-packaging,” he said. “We should all consume less.” As it is, an average household generates 33 pounds of trash per week, and some generate up to 500 pounds, which is how much weight the truck’s arms can lift. The trucks that empty the commercial-size bins outside of businesses have arms that the drivers vibrate and shake for seconds before lifting the dumpster. Why? To alert any homeless people who might be digging or sleeping inside.

“Several times a year, someone pops their head out when the dumpster starts shaking. We stop so they can get out, otherwise, they would be dumped and crushed,” Masterson said. “As you can see, our drivers have to pay attention every second to keep their routes safe. We take our job very seriously because trash removal keeps Edmond cleaner and makes our community a better place to live.” For more information on Edmond’s trash services visit www.edmondok.com


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ALOOKBACK

Season of

Family By Louise Tucker Jones

I like to think of November as the season of family. October’s beautiful autumn colors and fun, fall festivals have ended. Winter is yet to come and Thanksgiving is on the horizon. A time for family. As a young girl, I remember my grandparents and other relatives gathering around our dinner

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table at Thanksgiving and it wasn’t followed by a football game on TV. We didn’t even have a TV. For us, Thanksgiving was a day for exactly that— giving thanks. Thankful for a home, no matter how small or humble. Thankful for the food we ate, much of which was grown on our farm. Thankful for family, friends and neighbors. As a married couple my husband, Carl and I were blessed with family reunions from both sides on Thanksgiving Day. Parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles, cousins and more. Yes, there was always a bounty of food but most of all, there was a community of family. It was a time to catch up with loved ones that we sometimes saw only once a year because of distance. A time to reminisce. To laugh, love and offer thanks to the Lord for our blessings. As elders passed, those reunions ceased, and I missed them, but I also loved our new tradition of Thanksgiving in our own home. Carl and I worked as a team to put the meal together and were blessed to have our kids and grandkids at our table. We expected that to last forever. Then life changed again. Eight years ago, Carl was

suddenly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and was carried to heaven just seventeen days later. I miss him. Every. Single. Day. In these eight years without Carl, my son, Jay, and I have spent Thanksgiving in different places and with different people and I have enjoyed each one. But wherever I go, I celebrate the legacy of those who have already left this earth but remain in my heart forever. They leave a rich heritage of faith and love, reminding us that “family” should always be cherished and celebrated—even revered. Happy Thanksgiving!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


FEATURELOOK

In the Nick of Time Nick Massey, City of Edmond Ward 4 Councilman and president of Massey Financial Services visited with the Edmond Outlook about music, local performances and his upcoming album. How long have you been involved with City of Edmond politics? I became the Ward 4 City Councilman 7 1/2 years ago. I ran for office because I wanted to serve my community and promote growth and economic development in Edmond. I enjoy being a part of this great community. Does serving on the city council have anything in common with performing your music? I enjoy the interaction with people that happens with my music and with serving the community. And, well...they are both entertaining at times. What first got you into music? I grew up playing classical piano, but always wanted to play the guitar and sing. When I was 20 and in the army, I went to a pawn shop in Monterey, CA and bought a cheap guitar and a chord book and taught myself how to play. I recently wrote a song, “Pawn Shop Guitar,” which describes that experience. It is on my upcoming album. What inspired you to get back into playing music? My granddaughter. About three years ago she got interested in the guitar and I started teaching her. About that time, I played at Open Mic venue and got the bug after that. It just kind of took off and turned into a side gig. How would you describe the music that you typically create? I lean toward country and folk, but also like various rock and roll songs. I like taking famous rock songs and slowing them down to create an entirely different feel. I did that with the Rolling Stones “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction” and the Beatles “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” Those are a couple of my most requested songs and they are on the album.

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What is your favorite track on your new album? “Wicked Game” by Chris Isaak. I sped it up and added a heavy beat. I convinced my young friend Ashten Vincent to do it as a duet with me and it turned out really great. She’s an incredible singer. Who would you most like to collaborate with? Johnny Cash or Willie Nelson, although obviously it’s too late for Cash. I’ve been told many times that I sound like a cross between the two of them. I’ve never tried to sound like them, but it just worked out that way. You have an album coming out, can you tell us about that experience? It’s been an incredible experience and so much fun. I worked with Tyler Garcia of 33rd Street Studios in Edmond. He’s a great recording engineer and very creative. We made a great team. I was also very surprised at how a song is recorded and how an album is done in a studio. It’s a methodical stepby-step and piece-by-piece process, not just capturing a live performance. Do you have any upcoming shows? I play a monthly two hour show at Ellis Island & Wine Lounge. I’ve been doing that for over a year now and it’s becoming quite popular and we’re getting a good following. I really enjoy having my own show because I can get more creative throughout the show and try to interact with the audience. What is one message you would like to give to your fans? It’s never too late to do something you have always dreamed of. I just turned 72 and I never would have thought that I would be doing this at my age or that anyone would even want to hear me. That’s why the title of the album is “In the Nick of Time.”

Photo by Gina Gross, @gina.chong on Instagram


80 East 5th St., Ste. 130 Edmond, OK 73034

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - November 2019  

Edmond Outlook - November 2019  

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