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March 2021

Edmond’s Officer of the Year: Demetrius Kirk

Ready, Set, Pickleball! Local Eats: Joey’s Cafe VIBES: A New Spin on an Artwalk


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There she goes. Walking around the house with a tape measure, pencil and graph paper. Alison’s consumed too many hours of renovations, improvements and house flipping. She’s all about the HGTV. While our neighbors have been busy with actually doing home improvement projects, my wife and I have to be content with just planning our projects. We’re not doing - we’re discussing… thanks to my recent pesky medical issues. We’ve been stuck at home recovering. So lucky me - there’s no end to plans and upgrades we can discuss. One day it’s a plan to de-wallpaper and paint an accent wall. The next day it’s a plan for a full master bath remodel. I’m a supportive husband, I listen, absorb, offer feedback and ready myself for her next do-it-yourself idea. A few weeks ago, we did undertake a sorta-kinda home improvement project. We put together an entertainment console Alison ordered online. It only took us a year of staring at the router, Apple TV and associated cables tangled up on the floor to decide on a suitable solution. I say “we,” but she actually put the unit together. I was in charge of handing her tools and supervising annoying her. I admire her can-do attitude, it just doesn’t mesh well with my current “I need to sit down” energy level. That adventure led to some more decorating-lite projects. Ordering throw rugs. Hanging some art. And rearranging furniture. We almost overdid it, as she came dangerously close to taking a sledgehammer to the built-in shelves in our living room. “Honey, not just yet, let’s slow our roll.” Can you sense it? I do. There is a pent-up feeling permeating our house. Once I’m back to regular me, it’s time to knock out that honey-do list. Until then, I’ll continue healing and being a good listener.

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Features 8

Ask Edmond

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Joey’s Cafe

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Accidental Stylist

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On Patrol with Officer Kirk

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Ready, Set, Pickleball!

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Amy Dee Stephens: Prosperity Bank Woman of the Year

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VIBES: A New Spin on an Artwalk

Business 22

Clothes Mentor

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Tasha Kinney

Columns Dave Miller Publisher & Back40 Design President

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Louise Tucker Jones

Cover Photography by Marshall Hawkins

ADVERTISING l 405-301-3926 l sales@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN THE EDMOND AREA 1024 W Covell, Edmond, OK 73003 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com March 2021 Volume 17, Number 3

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Edmond Outlook is a publication of Back40 Design, Inc.

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© 2021 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l EDITOR Jennay Wangen l ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Angie Clemens Byers l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend, Anne Richardson PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond area homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


LOCALLOOK

Ask Edmond

What’s the funniest thing a student has ever said?

Katherine Giles Certified Pre K Teacher Charles Haskell Elementary

Heidi Walter Gifted and Talented Teacher John Ross Elementary

Katy McFadden Frontier Elementary Gifted and Talented

Student: Miss Giles, what happened to your face?

One day, I was using an air freshener, and a student came into the room, sniffed the air and declared, “It smells like roses and cheap perfume in here.”

While I was being observed, a student decided to impersonate Forest Gump and loudly proclaimed, “Welp, stupid is as stupid does!” in response to the question I had asked.

Lamonica Gruen Kindergarten Teacher Russell Dougherty Elementary

Eric Dabney, M.Ed. School Librarian Orvis Risner Elementary School

Suzy Foster Library Media Specialist Clegern Elementary

Student: Mrs. Gruen...This didn’t happen on purpose, but because I got frosting on my pencil, I HAD TO lick it... so it wouldn’t get sticky.

I bought a book for our library and couldn’t wait to read it with the kids. I’d enjoyed it as a child and was telling them all about it, admiring the illustrations, etc. Finally, a little girl said, “Just read the book.”

My kindergarten library lesson reinforced a lesson about pilgrims. I asked who remembered the name for these settlers - no answers. I prompted, “It starts with a ‘P’ sound:, puh.” A hand shot into the air and an excited voice exclaimed, “Paleontologists!”

Ms. Giles: I did not wear makeup today. My allergies are bothering me. Student: Oh, you should put some of that on!

Mrs. Gruen: We should really wash it off then. Student: Hmm, I wonder which one it was...

Interested in participating in our Ask Edmond feature? Email us at AskEdmond@EdmondOutlook.com. We’d love to hear from you! 8

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FOODLOOK

Chef Salah Omaira

Joey’s Cafe By Maggie Murdock Nichols Chef Salah Omaira is a mathematician, physicist and biochemist turned chef, entrepreneur and family man. Chef Salah uses his talents to present his guests with a gift at every meal. Chef Salah began his career at the Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club and traveled the world as a troubleshooter for major hotel chains. He has an eye for innovation and has always been a step ahead of the trend. With families in mind, his own and other’s, Chef Salah decided it was time to lay down roots and opened the original Joey’s Cafe in 2006. “Why Joey’s?” Chef Salah says, “It’s catchy and easy to remember! I’m often called Joey by customers. I don’t mind.” He puts a fresh spin on diner food with quality ingredients, scratch recipes and consistency. His food leaves guests feeling satisfied and energized, not dragging. With 18 years experience in fine dining, Chef Salah’s dishes are innovative and thoughtfully plated. He spends time training staff, in the kitchen and front of house, guaranteeing they get it right every time. A Second Home In January 2020, Joey’s Cafe opened off 33rd and Bryant. Chef Salah always had his eye on Edmond for a second location, he 10

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says, “We are so grateful to the community for embracing us and supporting us through the pandemic.” Joey’s Cafe has offered online ordering, take out and curbside pick up. “We’re happy to give a nice experience to our guests, no matter if they choose to dine in or take away,” he says. Joey’s Cafe takes pride in their product and treats their guests like family. “We want Joey’s Cafe to feel like a second home.” Chef Salah has harnessed years of experience in the hotel and country club dining industry and brings all the fine touches to the breakfast, brunch and lunch table. His philosophy is to always work with tomorrow in mind. Joey’s Cafe plans ahead, ensuring that each dish shines. Preparations for the country fried potatoes begin two days in advance. Fruit and veggies are hand chopped, quality oils, spices and seasonings, are incorporated, and each dish is garnished with care. Fine Dining for All Joey’s Cafe is open from 7am to 3pm daily. “We are not open all day, and we are not high priced,” Chef Salah asserts. The hours are appealing to those who value family time. Joey’s Cafe is the perfect place to meet over a meal or to gather as a family on the weekend. Chef Salah handles food for senior living centers in the area and out of state and also runs a thriving catering business. “Everyone deserves beautiful food. A fine experience shouldn’t be limited to dinner time or only found in hotels and country clubs” Visit Joey’s Cafe at 3308 S Bryant Ave Suite 100, Edmond, OK 73013 or order online at www.joeyscafeok.com.


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FEATURELOOK

Accidental Stylist By Maggie Murdock Nichols

Kara Hill Hall is the daughter of Sherri Hill, a selfmade, internationally-known dress designer and native Oklahoman. Sherri desired to build a legacy that would provide opportunity for her family. Her hard work has come to fruition. Kara grew up around fabulous dresses, she laughs when she admits she mostly wears simple, black silhouettes. She recalls her mother designing and sewing away in their garage. She later watched her take a leap of faith when she stopped working for other designers and began her own line. Kara opened Serendipity, a boutique offering a large selection of designer gowns, in 2002. There she outfitted many metro women for weddings, proms, pageants and other special occasions. She would soon take a leap of her own, working for Sherri Hill Designs full time.

Stylist Kara Hill Hall

Kara and Victoria Justice

LA Momma “I refer to myself as an accidental stylist,” Kara says. She moved from Edmond to LA with her son Justin Dwayne Hall as he pursued his acting career at age 14. Justin made fast friends with a handful of celebrity teens. Kara says the wild Hollywood parties weren’t what they experienced. “These kids like to do the same things other kids do. They bowl, swim, watch movies… the moms were all there. We would chat while the kids hung out.” Kara says her initial connection with the group of moms was based on the fact her son wasn’t a threat to their daughters; they weren’t competing for the same roles. The first celebrity she dressed was Bella Thorne, a favor for a friend of her son’s. As time progressed, Kara became known as the “LA Momma.” Celebrities would show up at her door with their hair piled on top of their heads wearing sweats. “No one left my house hungry. We’d find a dress, eat and hang out.” After her son got older, Kara moved back home. She misses LA, her son and spending time with her clients, but she can do her work from anywhere. “I know my clients well enough that an email, text or facetime works. After a quick chat, I can get dresses ready to send their way the same day.” Initially, my connections were through my son, but my network of styling clients has grown beyond that. Connections are Key Her clients have become her greatest referral source. Kara laughs, “I have no idea how many times my cell phone number has been given out at parties.” Kara has styled Raini Rodriguez, Madison Pettis, Corinne Foxx (Jamie Foxx’s daughter), Miss America Cara Mund, Halima Aden, Victoria Justice, Bella Thorne, Olivia Holt, Ariana Grande, Debby Ryan, Nathalie Emmanuel, Brittney Aldean and her entire wedding party. Kara continues to work with her mother, planning events and displaying dresses for wholesale buyers in various markets. Kara’s personality exudes her desire to take care of others. She’s content to be in the background and make others look really good.

Kara and Jamie Foxx


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FEATURELOOK

On Patrol with Officer Kirk By Amy Dee Stephens Edmond Police officer Demetrius Kirk has seen the worst of crimes, but he finds the best in people. Following a deep desire to improve the lives of troubled youths, he eagerly sought the job of the School Resource Officer at Boulevard Academy. Now, he’s been recognized as Edmond’s Officer of the Year. “The overall goal is the safety and security of everyone in the building, both kids and staff,” said Officer Kirk, “but I rarely do law enforcement. I spend more time building relationships with the kids.” Officer Kirk’s approach toward working with high schoolers at the alternative school is inspired by his prior career as a counselor. He believes that his influence is stronger if he first gets to know students one-on-one. “I want these students to be better people, so I sit and talk to them about life, not laws,” Officer Kirk said. “Once we have rapport and trust, I can shoot them straight about policing. I firmly believe in holding people accountable. Even if they mess up and I have to correct them, they know I care. So, I write them a ticket, and then we can respectfully have a conversation about what happened.” Originally from Tulsa, Officer Kirk first worked as a counselor at Oklahoma’s only maximum-security institution for juveniles. “I’ve always had a passion for working with youth in the community, 16

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and these kids were dealing with serious crimes, like armed robbery and murder,” said Officer Kirk. “When that facility closed down, I moved into traditional probation and parole work at the Oklahoma City Department of Corrections. Then I became an investigator, covering rape and murder cases, but it was unfulfilling. I felt like I could make a bigger difference working with people.” Six years ago, Officer Kirk joined the Edmond Police Department so that he could have more community involvement, but his true calling came two years ago when he was selected to work in the school system. “I love my job! I wake up with a smile on my face. Boulevard has amazing teachers and an administration that really cares. I’m having a great time.” Off the clock, Officer Kirk initiated the Law Enforcement Athletics Program, a volunteer service project focused on teaching discipline to young people through boxing. “Boxing is about being disciplined. If you talk to any professional boxer, they are peaceful and calm people; they aren’t wild fighters when they leave the gym. Boxing isn’t a hobby, it’s a lifestyle that requires dedication, health and training. The Fraternal Order of Police has supported the project, and hopefully after COVID, we can begin a summer youth police academy, too.” According to Police Chief JD Younger, “If anyone ever doubts how contagious kindness can be, they need to spend time with Demetrius Kirk. His positive, empathetic approach to life adds tremendous value to the culture of the Edmond Police Department and the lives of the citizens he serves. In a time when it is easy to get distracted with all that is wrong in the world, Demetrius helps me see all that is good in Edmond.” “Proactive community-action projects cultivate human beings,” said Officer Kirk. “You don’t write kids a ticket, tell them to sign, and send them down the road. You talk! It’s what I do because young people mean that much to me.”


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FEATURELOOK

Linda Piatt demonstrates serving technique By Cale Michael

Ready, Set, Pickleball! Pickleball has been touted as one of the fastest-growing sports in the United States for years, and the tennis, badminton, and ping-pong hybrid thrived in 2020. The game was created in 1965 by former Washington Congressman Joel Pritchard and his friends Bill Bell and Barney McCallum as the trio tried to entertain their kids but couldn’t find the right equipment to play a proper game of badminton. Pickleball paddles are close to the size of a tennis racquet while resembling a ping-pong paddle in shape and handle length, and the net is lower like in badminton. The game follows a simple set of rules: the ball must remain within the marked area and can only bounce once per side. The goal of the game is to get to 11 points, and only the serving players can score. With tennis activities moving to the new Edmond Center Court facility, the Kickingbird Center has been rebranded as the Kickingbird Pickleball Center and features 32 dedicated outdoor pickleball courts. Linda Piatt is just one of several Edmond locals to pick up pickleball. “I knew I was going to retire, and I thought I needed something else to keep me busy,” Piatt said. “I’d heard about pickleball, saw a few YouTube videos, and then one day just kind of went to one of the locations and played.” She praises the game for being beginner friendly while also having a lot of depth. “It’s particularly easy to pick up, but it is a game that requires a long time to master,” Piatt said. “The 20

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community is great and almost everybody’s very happy to help somebody who is new or wants to improve. It is a wonderful thing to see—but you do have to put in the work if you want to get better.” The pickleball community in Edmond and Oklahoma has grown quickly since there are so many places to play, whether it be at an established court or by chalking lines and setting up a portable net. Piatt said since Kickingbird opened its pickleball courts, they’ve added “more than 300 members” to the Greater OKC Pickleball Club. “The hallmark of pickleball is that it’s a very social game. Everyone gets to rotate in, and you’re constantly playing with new people,” Piatt said. “It’s also multigenerational, which means you’ve got people who are teenagers that love to play, all the way up to people in their 80s and early 90s. That’s really nice.” Because players are separated on the court when playing singles, they are always socially distancing. Piatt says she has never felt uncomfortable while playing the game during lockdown because the game’s conduct naturally keeps people safer, and the activity helps her stay healthy. “If you keep moving, you can really stay sharp, and I’ve been very conscious of keeping my body healthy every day to mitigate some of those concerns,” Piatt said. “Pickleball is a great way to exercise without feeling like you are in the doldrums of an exercise routine. You’re just out there, having fun.” To learn more, go to www.gopb.club.


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BIZLOOK

Clothes Mentor

By Maria Veres

The fashion industry has changed drastically in the past year. But Clothes Mentor’s mission remains the same-to provide Edmond women with top-quality, affordable, and beautiful wardrobe options for every need. Fashions for Changing Times “People are becoming aware that cheaper fast fashion is not enduring,” says owner Melanie Harris. “They want to invest in high-quality items that will last.” Comfortable, Zoom-friendly styles are in demand, and so is athletic wear. You won’t find cheap or vintage styles at Clothes Mentor. The store carries only

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recent clothing items from premium labels, as well as a rich variety of designer accessories. For women who want to sell their clothing and accessories, Clothes Mentor pays cash on the spot. Clothing items must be less than three years old. “All our merchandise comes from local residents,” says Melanie. “We don’t import anything.” Low Contact Shopping Options Like many businesses, Clothes Mentor has increased its online presence. They’re part of a virtual network of more than 80 Clothes Mentor franchises. Online shoppers have the satisfaction of knowing their purchases promote sustainability and support small, local businesses. For those who prefer to shop in person, Clothes Mentor follows all local and state Covid-19 safety regulations. Their popular personal shopper program is a great option for anyone who

Owner Melanie Harris and Manager Jennifer Nou

needs to limit their time in the store. A shopper chooses items based on the customer’s preferences and budget. “All they have to do is come in and try on,” says Melanie. The program is free for all customers. “We’re not driving trends based on platform and runway fashions,” says Melanie. “We’re focused on meeting the needs of local customers.” Visit Clothes Mentor at 3208 S Broadway and edmondok.clothesmentor.com. View a selection of new items for sale on Facebook or Instagram (cm.edmond).


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BIZLOOK

Tasha Kinney

By Maria Veres

In the middle of a pandemic, real estate isn’t the first thing on many people’s minds. But both home buyers and sellers have unique opportunities right now, and Tasha Kinney is committed to helping all her clients achieve their dreams. A Great Time to Buy or Sell The inventory of homes for sale in the Edmond/OKC area is low, so sellers are in an ideal position to get the most out of their investments. Many homes attract multiple offers. As COVID-19 conditions improve and more homeowners list their properties, the market will probably shift. Now is a perfect time to list. There’s excellent news for buyers, too. Interest rates are at phenomenal lows.

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“It’s a great time to buy because you can afford so much more,” says Tasha. “You can also build equity much faster at these low rates.” Expert Guidance for the Edmond Market Whether you want a brand-new home or a charming older property, Tasha is well equipped to help you find your perfect match. She’s lived in the Edmond area ever since she moved here to attend the University of Central Oklahoma. “I love that we have such a mix of new construction and older homes,” she says. “Edmond has a great real estate culture.” Tasha has been fascinated by houses all her life, and she bought her first home at just twenty-one. She worked as a graphic designer until her love for houses led her to transition to a real estate career. “I love every aspect of real estate-

Tasha Kinney

-houses, architecture, design,” says Tasha. But her greatest passion is serving her clients. “To help someone find a property that is home to them is an honor,” she says. Tasha Kinney is part of the ERA Courtyard Real Estate team. Visit her at www.tashakinney.com.


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FEATURELOOK FRESHLOOK

Amy Dee Stephens: Prosperity Bank Woman of the Year By Maggie Murdock Nichols

The Edmond Chamber of Commerce has recognized Amy Dee Stephens as 2020 Prosperity Bank’s Woman of the Year. Amy’s influence reaches far beyond Edmond, and her legacy will stand the test of time. Her work is housed in museums, on plaques, in books, on film and in magazines. Her reverence toward her vocation is evident, and her contributions are numerous and significant. Storytelling as a Mission Amy’s mission is to connect people to stories through stories. She honors the contributions of men, women, children, places, artifacts and animals, giving them each a voice. Amy says, “Stories help, heal and reveal. I think that this has become my role--to be a conduit. It’s not a big, splashy accomplishment to have words sitting on paper, but upon reading, those words can be powerful to individuals in ways I will never know. ” Amy graduated from Oklahoma Christian University and began her career as a kindergarten teacher. She’s lived in Edmond for 28 years and has more than 300 articles published, 200 of which have been published in Edmond Outlook Magazine. She considers writing for the magazine an avenue to record Edmond’s modern history. Amy has served as Executive Director of the Edmond Historical Museum and Society since 2018. She has lent her expertise for museum curation, storytelling, and has found a way to deepen the community’s connection to its history and encourages Edmond citizens to record their own history. A Zoo Historian In her 20 year career at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Amy’s role evolved over time as education supervisor and historian. A most notable contribution, Amy built a museum, from scratch. The Patricia and Byron J. Gambulos ZooZeum opened in 2011 and was added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 2017. Amy realized she had more than a century of zoo history rattling around in her head. Oklahoma City Zoo: Now and Then was a collaborative effort among zoo staff members to celebrate the zoo’s centennial. Amy’s participation in this book led her to go on to write two, full form and award winning books. Oklahoma City Zoo 1902-1959, documents the zoo’s inception and early days. Oklahoma City Zoo 1960-2013 records the modernization of the zoo and its climb to one of the best in the country.

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Advocate for Women’s History Amy has ensured the impact of local women will be remembered. Amy highlights the early days of Edmond through the stories of women at the museum. For modern women, she has created events and archives around Gayla Peevey (known for singing “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas’’), Darcy Lynne (the singer and ventriloquist), and Sandi Patty (Christian music singer). She has encouraged women to document their everyday experiences and current struggles. Amy says, “During 2020, it was more evident than ever that people seek stories from history to help them cope with hard times. It’s gratifying to know that years after I am gone, the articles and books I’ve written might still be read and used.” To learn more about Edmond Historical Society & Museum, go to www.edmondhistory.org


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ALOOKBACK

I Choose Love!

Naturally, I gave a huge “Yes!” to the question, even though I had no idea how it would happen with only three days to prepare. After I got off the phone, my dormitory girlfriends helped me make plans and by Thursday, my sister-in-law had loaned me her gorgeous wedding gown and my mother picked me up for By Louise Tucker Jones the trip to Missouri. On Friday, God gave us a beautiful wedding, complete with Ten years ago this month, my late flowers, organ music and a Chaplain husband, Carl and I celebrated our last officiating as I walked down the aisle wedding anniversary together—45 years. of that little Army chapel to wed my Neither of us had any way of knowing that handsome husband in dress uniform. exactly three months from that date, I Less than 12 hours later, we said our would be attending his memorial service. goodbyes and didn’t see each other So today, I celebrate my 55th anniversary again for 15 months. That year-plus alone. But since Carl and I spent the first separation was one of the hardest year and half of our marriage apart, I things we had to go through, but those have beautiful love letters from that time love letters from long ago have been to keep me company. a lifesaver since my husband’s death. It was March 1966, when Carl called When I miss him so much I don’t think I me at college on a Tuesday evening and can make it another day, I read a letter quickly announced, “I just got my orders that tells me how deep and tender his and have to ship out on Saturday. Can love for me was, and I push forward. you come to Fort Leonard Wood on Friday In these almost ten years that Carl has and get married?” Wow! Talk about shock. been in heaven, I’ve found there is much

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to mourn but also much to cherish. There is still an abundance of love, life and hope to share. And sometimes we have to make a choice as to what we carry forward into our future. I’m choosing love! I think that’s what Carl would want! ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


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FEATURELOOK

EDMOND’S FIRST THURSDAYS April - October 2021 in Downtown Edmond

By Maggie Murdock Nichols VIBES is a free, open air event to be held in downtown Edmond on the first Thursday of each month from 5pm to 9pm beginning in April and continuing through October. A creative collaboration, businesses will pair with artists and performers, offering an invitation to explore Edmond’s growing downtown district alongside the sounds and sights of local creatives. Former mayor, Patrice Douglas says, “I’ve visited art walks across the country and was inspired to put a new spin on the concept for Edmond.” VIBES is the product of a committee made up of city leaders, art enthusiasts and downtown business owners. Edmond Fine Arts Institute will facilitate the event, making the connection between local artists and their neighboring businesses. Program Director Savannah Whitehead says, “It’s our hope to highlight the energy in downtown Edmond. We’re excited to see the community connect with both visual and performing artists as they explore downtown.” A Hub for Creativity The Downtown Edmond area is home to nearly 100 permanent art pieces featuring modern and historic murals, newly installed interactive art pieces, bronze, stone and steel sculptures. The addition of live art will complement the existing pieces and perhaps draw attention to the creativity that exists in downtown Edmond everyday. The owners of the diverse retail, restaurant, and experience businesses are excited to welcome the community inside to showcase what they have to offer. The event will appeal to all tastes and offer something fresh each month.

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Blocworks Climbing Gym owner Evan Small is thrilled at the idea of VIBES. “The overall vibe of the event is how I want downtown Edmond to feel,” he says. He also added that many of his staff members are artists, musicians, potters, and painters. VIBES is a perfect fit for the vibrantly colored climbing gym. They look forward to hosting a different artist each month and to welcome new faces. Experience Edmond In a time of travel limitations, it’s time to get creative. Jennifer Seaton, Executive Director of Visit Edmond, says, “Tourism is about getting out of your bubble and discovering unexpected treasures. These treasures are waiting for you in your own hometown.” A leading sponsor of the event, Mercy Hospital has worked alongside the committee to ensure the event is as safe as possible. Downtown allows ample room to social distance; city and state mandates will be upheld. The event was created in the midst of the pandemic as a way to bring connection through creativity. The downtown community is well positioned for an event like VIBES. Those who have not been downtown in a while will be delighted by the vibrant new look. Artists have jumped at the opportunity to participate in VIBES. Visual artists like Amanda Cole, Reian Williams, and Brad McNeill will be featured in addition to dancers, aerial performers, and musical performers like Nick Massey, Edgar Cruz, and Poetry and Chill. A full list of participating businesses, artists, and performers can be found at www.edmondvibes.org.


1024 W Covell Rd., Edmond, OK 73003

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - March 2021  

Edmond Outlook - March 2021