Page 1

A View From Above Look Up In The Sky, It’s a Paraglider

Edmond’s Disappearing Circus International Home Away from Home Our Artist in Residence

June 2019


6

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019


Features

If you go to Maui, you must drive The Road to Hana - it’s beautiful. That was the advice I got from everyone who had visited the island.

8

ASK EDMOND

10

YOUR GARAGE: NOT JUST FOR CARS ANYMORE

Making summer memories

Tips on turning your garage into the ultimate space

Last month on our Maui trip, Alison and I took that advice. We rented a convertible and drove the Hana Highway. The scenery, beaches and waterfalls were amazing, but the road was narrow, rutty and barely passable at some points. With over 600 curves, the 50 mile journey took us all day. And it almost derailed the purpose of our trip to Maui. To get married.

12

LOCAL EATS: SALATA SALAD KITCHEN

16

A VIEW FROM ABOVE

No, we didn’t argue about my driving technique or ability. The “incident” happened at a scenic vista at Ke’anae, a “must-see” on our Road to Hana itinerary. We walked down to the shoreline for a better view. It was beautiful. The sun, waves, my bride-to-be and the bluest water I’ve ever seen. We paused for some photos, then I carefully navigated around a tall outcropping of black lava rock and waited for Alison to follow.

Just as Alison set out to join me, the tide washed up on her path, distracting her, and she didn’t see an outcropping of lava rock jutting out right in front of her. I saw it happen. Wham. Oh, this isn’t going to be good - a pre-wedding head wound. As I comforted her and applied pressure to her throbbing forehead, she fought back tears and said, “I’m getting married in two days.” My bride-to-be had one question… How bad is it? My answers could have been better… Yes, it’s starting to swell… It’s only two small scratches, hardly bleeding at all… Maybe you can wear a flower in your hair for the wedding - a big flower. It was not looking good. I quickly located some ice from a tour bus parked nearby, applied it to her forehead and got ahead of most of the swelling. The good news, two days later, it was barely noticeable. At our wedding ceremony, Alison was beautiful and the beach, palm trees and sunset made for an amazing memory. And when the photographer asked us for some big smiles, I was directed to say something that would make Alison laugh - I said “Lava Rock!” She smiled, and it was all good.

18

20

Fresh, fast & healthful food Gliding through Edmond

EDMOND’S DISAPPEARING CIRCUS

Step right up to celebrate the memory of Edmond’s greatest show!

OUR ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

30

INTERNATIONAL HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Oklahoma City’s first Artist in Residence Erica Bonavida

UCO program brings international students and Edmond families together

Business

22

24

DUNFORD POOLS

Stunning & low-maintenance outdoor living PRIMARY HEALTH PARTNERS

Putting patients’ needs first

Columns 28

LOUISE TUCKER JONES

He Called Me “Daughter”

Dave Miller Back40 Design President

ADVERTISING l Laura Beam at 405-301-3926 l laura@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN EDMOND/NORTH OKC 80 East 5th Street, Suite 130, Edmond, OK 73034 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com June 2019 Volume 15, Number 6

l

Edmond Outlook is a publication of Back40 Design, Inc.

l

© 2019 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l ADVERTISING MANAGER Laura Beam l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend, Anne Richardson l PRODUCTION Rachel Morse PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond & North OKC homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


LOCALLOOK

Ask Edmond

What is your favorite thing to do in Edmond during the summer?

Eriech Tapia

Jaydee Knox

Chad Bennett

Denise Shaw

Summertime is for the outdoors. I enjoy everything from running to Heard on Hurd or grilling up delicious food. It is the best season. An interesting thing I enjoy doing during the summer, which few do, is to hang my clothes out on a clothesline. My grandmother did the same thing. The neighbors don’t mind. It’s a ritual that I enjoy, and it saves money along with my clothes lasting longer. Slowing down and watching clothes dry can be one of the best things in the summertime.

Summertime is my favorite because it’s a time I can spend outside with friends and bring my dog along. Anytime the weather is nice, you can find us on a patio with our sweet dog Nala enjoying good food and music. We like to venture out to Bleu Garten during the day and at night time we love going to Pops. Watching the huge Pops bottle change colors while drinking unique and random sodas is the perfect way to spend a summer evening.

My wife and I and our four kids love living in Edmond especially during the summer time. My wife actually grew up just around the corner from where we live now. We all enjoy spending time together at Hafer Park. The kids love going to swim at Pelican Bay and my wife and I equally enjoy watching them have a blast. My family also enjoys venturing out to Heard on Hurd occasionally to eat the awesome food.

I like to do yoga -- INSIDE because: bugs and allergies and mud! I also like to lounge at the pool and sit on the back porch with my husband, watching the Oklahoma sky. In the summer I really enjoy eating at restaurants with patios or scarfing down my husband’s excellent steaks cooked on the grill!

Director of Communications at VIP Insurance, Ph.D student at OU

8

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

Stylist & UCO student

President & CEO of Infinity Staffing

Owner & Instructor at You Power Yoga


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

9


HOMELOOK

Your Garage:

Jennifer & Jason Johnson, Garage Innovations

Not Just for Cars Anymore Jennifer and Jason Johnson of Garage Innovations shared tips for turning your garage into the ultimate hang-out space. Do you see many garages that are used at least some of the time for a hang-out space for homeowners? Garages have become an extension of the home. They’re not just for parking cars. We see more and more garages being used for hobbies, a make-shift game room, or a designated workout area. If someone wants to get organized or convert their garage to a multi-purpose room, what’s a good first step? Start with a clean slate. Remove everything from your garage. We suggest using the popular “three pile” system. The first pile is the items you want to keep. The second is for the items you want to sell, give away, or donate. The third pile is items you want to trash. The first pile is the only pile that gets to come back into your garage. It’s helpful to organize the ‘keep’ pile. Separate it into categories - for example, lawn equipment or supplies, cleaning products, tools, keepsakes, labeled totes, pool equipment or supplies. Do you custom design the cabinetry configuration for each garage? Yes, when we meet with potential customers at their home for their free consultation we take all the measurements we need to prepare a computerized 3D drawing of their garage so they have a visual of what their finished garage will look like with the storage systems we propose. Determining dimensions of parked vehicles and how much room they require for opening car doors is important. These questions help determine where would be the best placement for the storage solutions. What are the different types of flooring used in garages? The Terra Chip epoxy flooring is the most popular and what we apply for 10

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

customers most often. Grey seems to be trending in new construction and remodels, but a wide variety of other colors are available. Epoxy is a great flooring option because it is easy to keep clean and it doesn’t stain like concrete does. Epoxy flooring cleans up with just a water hose. Another popular flooring option is interlocking floor tiles. What are the most popular cabinet styles and finishes? The most popular cabinets we sell and manufacture are the Melamine Cabinets. These cabinets have a laminate coating that protects the highdensity wood structures against moisture and allows for easy cleaning. Melamine Cabinets are custom made and come in a variety of depths, widths, heights and color choices. These cabinets are permanently hung on the wall off the floor 6-8” for easier cleaning of your garage. Metal cabinets are also a popular choice. We offer styles from several different manufacturers. What about slatwall systems? Slatwall has become very popular and is a great solution for getting items that may be too big for cabinets off the garage floor onto the wall for easy access, flexibility and space efficiency. What types of organization systems do you offer? It varies depending on the customer’s wants or needs. Some only want suggestions and prefer to do it themselves, but others take advantage of us doing the organizing for them by placing their ‘keep’ pile items in the cabinets once we have installed them or hanging their items on the slatwall we have installed on their wall for them. We offer a wide variety of slatwall accessories to hang their items on and most of them can be seen on display in our showroom along with our cabinet and flooring options. For more information visit www.mycustomgarage.com.


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

11


FOODLOOK FEATURELOOK

Salata Salad Kitchen

Next-level nourishment By Laura Beam

(left) Jeff Conner, Director of Business Development, (right) Chuck Smith, Director of Operations

Whatever taste you crave, there’s a salad for that. At least there is at Salata Salad Kitchen where an amazing spread of fresh ingredients gives you unlimited flavors to create your perfect feast. No need to ditch your diet for a fast food fix when this cool spot is serving up the delicious, nutritious foods you love in a convenient fast-casual setting. Select from five lettuces, 55 toppings, 10 proteins and 10 house-made dressings, and watch as your masterpiece is tossed-to-order in a salad or wrap. Then pat yourself on the back--don’t you just feel better when you choose healthier eating? Cool to Customize As you pass by each section of the immaculate counter behind glass, your appetite is stirred by an irresistible array of veggies, cheeses, nuts, sprouts, fruits, seeds and lean proteins. It’s like the freshness of summer is before you for the picking--and someone else did all the work, meticulously cleaning the veggies with an antimicrobial wash and hand-cutting everything fresh daily. Toppings are unlimited at one fixed price for either a small or large salad, then proteins can be added to further customize your creation. Choose from four chicken varieties--herbgrilled, Asian BBQ, Chipotle and pesto--along with pit-smoked turkey, salmon, shrimp, baked tofu, quinoa, falafel and more. Top it Off Salata takes their handcrafted approach to food seriously, ensuring each item is top-notch and tasty. Even Salata’s croutons are prepared in-house. But nowhere does their handiwork shine more than their 10 proprietary dressings. “The founder’s brother-in-law spent a year formulating the dressings,” says Chuck Smith, Director of Operations. “Today they are still house-made in small batches with freshly-picked herbs and no preservatives.” There is a dressing for every food mood you have--tangy, creamy, citrusy, spicy, earthy, sweet--and mixing them is encouraged. It’s just another way to

12

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

make it all your own. Try up to four different dressings, like the buttermilk ranch with delicate hints of dill or the tangy balsamic vinaigrette that pairs deliciously with the Asian BBQ chicken. Other top picks are the fresh herb vinaigrette, honey mustard, chipotle ranch, ginger lime and fat-free mango. Do the Diet Today’s growing health and fitness trends are feeding Salata’s popularity. “Generations have shifted from a diet of meat and potatoes to healthier eating,” says Jeff Conner, Director of Business Development. Salata’s straightforward menu makes it a hit with those following a keto, low-carb, vegan, vegetarian or pritikin heart diet. “There is a lot more public awareness about which foods benefit our bodies and Salata provides a healthier dining option,” adds Smith. “You can come here and feel good about it. You don’t have to wonder or worry about what you are eating.” It’s a Wrap Salata’s wraps are another highlight, with their creative tortilla flavors stealing the show. Choose from wheat, cool cucumber (how’d they get that in a wrap?), TX BBQ, Thai ginger and southwest. And don’t forget to try Salata’s house-made soups and refreshing organic teas, lemonades and limeades. And everything you love in the restaurant is equally great for catering. Your office will thank you. Visit www.salata.com or dine at Bryant Square, Edmond; Quail Springs (May & Memorial), OKC; Oak Grove (122nd & MacArthur), OKC; or two Tulsa locations and more coming!

Laura Beam is a writer and advertising manager with 25 years in radio, newspaper and magazines. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Facebook.


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

13


14

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019


FEATURELOOK

A View from Above By Amy Dee Stephens

Remember wanting to fly like a bird? Paragliding is making that experience more possible than ever. In fact, paragliders are an increasingly common sight. And it’s not as scary as you might think! Justin Booher, paragliding instructor in Edmond, describes his time in the sky like this: “There’s freedom to look around. You feel, see and smell everything around you because you’re flying low and slow.” According to Justin, many of his students are pilots who want the thrill of flying from outside a cockpit. The sport, however, is growing among non-pilots. “Not everyone can afford an airplane, hangar and fuel costs, so this is less expensive. The equipment fits into the back of your car, your garage is your hangar, and you can go whenever,” Justin said. The equipment consists of an engine for thrust, much like one used in a weed eater, and a parachute-type balloon for gliding. “The motor gets you up, but if it breaks or runs out of gas, you glide down--no big deal,” Justin said. “The landing is pretty soft and easy, like stepping off a stepstool. Paragliding is one of the safest aviation sports, but it’s as safe as you make it. Studies place paragliding as safer than riding a motorcycle. Just like driving a car, if you make wrong decisions, you can get hurt. I’ve flown over 300 times without an incident.” The convenience of paragliding is what lured Justin to the sport. As a skydiver for 25 years, he had to drive an hour to the nearest drop zone. With paragliding, “you find a field and launch. It takes about 15 minutes.” Justin and his paragliding buddies and students often fly out of Mitch Park. It’s their tradition to land behind a breakfast diner, eat, and fly back to the park. “One time, two workers were eating when we landed. They thought we 16

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

Photos by Brad Stone Photography

were filming a movie. They couldn’t believe it when we said, ‘No, just flying in for breakfast.’” Justin’s first encounter with paragliding happened ten years ago when he kept seeing paragliding equipment mounted to a vehicle near his office. “When I finally encountered the driver walking downtown, I introduced myself to Aaron Butler.” Aaron became Justin’s friend and paragliding instructor. Justin became a trainer as well, and now, each of the men own paragliding businesses—but they aren’t competitors. In fact, they often conduct trainings together. For paragliding, there is no age limit or license required, but students are required to have six months of training and follow FAA regulations. Much like scuba-diving, a national non-profit is dedicated to overseeing regulations and instructor training. Although cheaper than owning an airplane, the sport still comes with a price tag of $12,000 to $15,000 for the equipment. For Justin, who has done nearly every sport where his feet can leave the ground, the price is worth it. Flying is in his genes. His father was an aviator who flew helicopters in Vietnam and was also a skydiver. Like his father, Justin enjoys seeing the world from above. “I have a student who describes paragliding as being a superhero flying around. For me, I enjoy seeing all the wildlife and buildings tucked into places you can’t see from the road. My favorite is flying at sunset when all the lights start to pop up around the city. Paragliding is a hobby, but it’s totally unique. Having the freedom of flight is very different than driving a vehicle. You feel like a bird.” To learn more, visit www.apexppg.com or www.epicppg.com.


FEATURELOOK

Edmond’s Disappearing Circus By Amy Dee Stephens

Hurry, hurry, hurry—you don’t want to miss the closing act of this amazing show, right here in Edmond, Oklahoma! Between 1943 and 1976, it wasn’t uncommon to see giraffes and llamas grazing in the fields along Kelly. Edmond was the off-season sheltering grounds for two traveling circuses. Both were managed by Edmond college graduate, Howard Suesz. He first started the Clyde Brothers Circus, featuring indoor acts, and he later added the Hagen Brothers Circus as an outdoor tent act. Something about being a circus town seems oddly out of sync with the perceptions of early Edmond—the pioneer town focused upon religion and collegelevel education. Perhaps Edmond’s obscure role as a circus town is fascinating because circuses have fallen out of favor. Or maybe it’s the knowledge that hidden remnants of the circus yard still exist along a heavily-trafficked street in Edmond.

When researcher, Derek Lee, first started working at Edmond Historical Society, he was surprised by how frequently he received inquiries about the Edmond circus. “Many people have memories of seeing the animals as they

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

Because winter was not the ideal time to travel or to attract crowds to a tent, circuses used the down-season to repair road-worn vehicles, work on new acts, and rest. Oklahoma was an ideal resting ground because of its central location in the United States and its mild winters. Another key factor for Edmond was the railroad running through town and a highway nearby, which undoubtedly provided easier access to materials, performers and animals from around the world. I direct your attention to the disappearing act in Ring 3…

But truly, why wouldn’t Edmond--a place that hosted a circuit of famous opera singers in the 1920s and was home to an Olympic gymnast in the 1980s--also be an entertainment hub? If you’ve read Sam Anderson’s bestselling book, Boom Town, you know that Oklahoma City and its surrounding communities have defied logic since day one; that day being April 22, 1889. So, of course, Edmond was a circus town.

18

drove by or hearing lions roar in the distance,” Lee said. “I think there is a certain nostalgia about a circus that is intriguing. Until I started looking into it, I’d never thought about what happens to a circus when it isn’t on the road.”

l

JUNE 2019

In 1976, the aging Suesz sold his Edmond-based circuses. The land, which still has remnants of old caging, a bus and a house, was abandoned over time. An unfortunate string of trespassers has crossed the fence to sneak around the circus graveyard, pluck souvenirs and leave graffiti. However, the land recently went up for sale. It’s unlikely that giraffes and a big tent are going to be part of Edmond’s landscape again. Is it possible that the purchaser might feel nostalgic about preserving Edmond’s unique circus history or artifacts in some way? If not, Edmond’s circus is about to become an obscure memory indeed, left only to those who remember hearing lions roar in Edmond. So, step right up folks! Celebrate the memory of Edmond’s greatest show on earth!


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

19


FEATURELOOK

Our Artist in Residence By Lea Terry

As the City of Oklahoma City’s first artist-in-residence, Erica Bonavida is bringing art directly to the community through outreach programs and by working out of a studio in City Hall. For most of her childhood, however, the Edmond resident was adamantly against art as a career. This stemmed partly from a need for perfection and a feeling that she didn’t have a talent for it. Then everything changed after she took a painting class in high school. “I got to play around with oil paints and really get a feel for the brush and what I could do with it,” Bonavida said. This ignited a passion for art that led Bonavida to the University of Central Oklahoma, where she graduated with degrees in painting and French. After college, she launched a professional career as an artist, exhibiting her work at venues like Science Museum Oklahoma. In February, the City of Oklahoma City named her its first Artist in Residence and through the end of the year, she will work out of her studio at City Hall for at least 12 hours a week. She’ll also organize three public outreach events, and hopes to do one of those in conjunction with a downtown-area elementary school. “The thing I’m most looking forward to is getting to interact with people in a way that I haven’t before,” Bonavida said. “As artists, we’re kind of stuck in our studios and doing our own thing.” Bonavida describes herself as a realist painter. Her primary subject is fabrics, ranging from ballet shoes to bedding. She discovered the subject as a passion during one of her painting classes at UCO, where her assignment was to paint a still life of something she was obsessed with. “Eventually I figured out I was really obsessed with fabric because of all of the textures and the colors, and the fact that it was kind of a puzzle to solve, to figure out how you could paint it,” she said. Bonavida was considered for the Artist in Residence program because she belonged to the city’s prequalified pool of artists, with whom she competed for the opportunity. Though the selection process was somewhat intimidating, it was also an opportunity to be part of something groundbreaking. “It was exciting and fun to be a pioneer for something that hasn’t been done in Oklahoma City before,” she said. The city hopes to make the program permanent, based on how successful it is during the first couple of years. Bonavida sees interest in art growing all around the metro area, citing the popularity of events like monthly art walks and an increasing number of thriving arts districts. “It’s definitely showing that the arts are increasing in importance to us, and it’s bringing a lot more diversity into the community,” Bonavida said. Bonavida believes this growing interest in public art makes the metro area more interesting but also prompts people to explore things they aren’t familiar with or don’t understand. “It brings out a side that we kind of push away, where we focus on the things that have to get done: the daily grind, and money and bills and things like that,” Bonavida said. “This provides an element of beauty and gives you a moment to pause and think about something a little bit different.” To learn more about Bonavida’s work, visit www.ericabonavida.com.

20

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019


BIZLOOK

Dunford Pools By Maria Veres

David Dunford loves a challenge. He’s been the owner of Dunford Pools for 16 years, and he never hesitates when a customer asks for something special. His usual answer is, “Wow! Let’s make that happen.” Then he looks at the existing space and the customer’s needs to come up with a design they’ll love. To give one example of his creativity, right now he’s working on a pool in the shape of a dog’s paw print. The decking areas around the pool will be shaped like a puppy’s floppy ears. The pool itself is a simple one, but the whimsical design is perfect for the homeowners, who are dog lovers. Dunford Pools are not only eye-catching, they’re also low maintenance. David says, “I try to make

22

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

sure the customer is enjoying the pool rather than spending hours maintaining it.’” He makes careful design and equipment choices to keep his customers’ pools safe and clean. Dunford pools use a low amount of chlorine and other chemicals. All the work is fully warrantied. “People won’t be disappointed,” he says. To ensure high-quality construction, David stays fully involved in every project, from start to finish. When additional contractors are hired, he’s often out there working right alongside them. “We are a small, customer service oriented company,” says David. It’s also very much a family business. David’s wife Johnni manages the office, his youngest daughter is the secretary, and his other daughters and son have also worked with them at Dunford Pools. David’s advice to anyone considering a pool installation is, “Don’t wait for the perfect time. Go ahead and put it in.” The building process takes several weeks, so customers who begin a pool now won’t get to swim in it every day this summer. But they’ll reap the rewards of their new landscape all year long, even if they aren’t into polar swims. “You can still get out there and enjoy the sight and sound of it,” says David. “Most of our pools stay

Owner, David Dunford

open all winter.” Many of David’s designs include landscaping features that give pleasure through all four seasons, such as fire pits and fireplaces, outdoor kitchens, pergolas, spas, and waterfalls. Most people look at a backyard and see a patch of grass. David sees a blank canvas. “It’s exciting to create a design and then see the design come to reality,” he says. “We’re taking a space most people don’t use and turning it into a functional living area they can enjoy every day. We love to cater to customers’ needs.” Dunford Pools is located at 616 Enterprise Drive, #136. Visit them online at www.dunfordpools.com.


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

23


BIZLOOK

Primary Health Partners By Maria Veres

Mike Eskew has always had a passion for making a difference. He’s been a teacher, a coach, and an emergency room nurse. Now he’s helping people take charge of their health as an Advanced Nurse Practitioner with Primary Health Partners. “My patients pay a set monthly fee, and they get unlimited access to me,” says Mike. “The focus is on the patient, not on billable hours or what insurance wants us to do.” Primary Health Partners uses a direct primary care model. Patients can call or come in whenever they need care, without paying extra fees. “Most medical business models are based on volume, not quality or value,” says Mike. “We try to bring more value to our patients.”

24

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

Mike didn’t expect his nursing career to take this turn. Until a few years ago, he had never heard of direct primary care. Then he served a rotation with Dr. Kyle Ridner, who was getting ready to open the first Primary Health Partners clinic in Yukon along with Dr. Robert Lockwood. Mike loved the concept, and he asked if he could join as a patient. “My family and I have been involved since the beginning,” he says. Three years later Dr. Ridner offered him a position at Primary Health Partners’ newest clinic in Northwest Oklahoma City. Mike was thrilled to say yes. Patients always come first at Primary Health Partners, and that’s just the way Mike wants it. “There have been several studies showing direct primary care patients do better than patients in the traditional system,” he says. “They know we care about them, so they begin to care about their own health.” The clinic can fill many prescriptions and do basic lab work at cost, so patients end up saving money as well as getting more consistent care. To cover other expenses such as hospital visits and preventive screenings, Mike encourages his to patients to carry a high-deductible insurance policy and have a Health Savings Account.

When Mike isn’t caring for patients, he enjoys improving his woodworking skills. “It’s very therapeutic to have a creative outlet,” he says. He understands the importance of time off and good self-care, but he’s quick to admit he isn’t a perfect role model for his patients. “The best way to be a role model is to be transparent in your own struggles,” he says. The Edmond and NW OKC Clinics are accepting new patients. Mike Eskew looks forward to many more years working in direct primary care. “I know the difference it makes in our patients’ lives,” he says. “I feel very fortunate to be a part of that.” Primary Health Partners Northwest OKC Clinic is located at 14100 Parkway Commons Drive and the Edmond Clinic is located at 1265 E 33rd Street. To learn more, visit www.Primary-Healthpartners.com.


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

25


26

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019


JUNE 2019

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

27


ALOOKBACK

He Called Me

“ Daughter” By Louise Tucker Jones

My father-in-law often called me “Daughter.” I never asked why, I simply assumed he thought of me as such. Having only one child—my husband—I prefer to think he loved me because of my love for his son. When my brand new husband was overseas in the U.S. Army, Carl’s dad took care of any car problems I had since I was doing student teaching and no one got paid for that. In later years, Dad was not good at monitoring his health, having diabetes and heart disease. Living alone, long after my sweet mother-in-law died at

28

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

just 44 years of age, friends often dropped off pies or other goodies that were just too tasty for him to pass up. All too soon, Dad would be in the hospital for a few days to regulate his blood sugar. He would then come spend a couple of weeks with us so I could adjust his diet and give his insulin injections. We loved his company. Dad was a born storyteller and he would often sit at the kitchen counter while I cooked and start a tale with, “Lou, you might not believe this but I swear it’s true…” Then he would weave a story like no other. Some of my favorite times were when it was just the two of us and Dad would tell about his childhood. How he had to drop out of school to run a farm and help take care of younger siblings after his own father died. He was “Pa-Pa” to my children and shared a special relationship with our son, Jay, who has a speech articulation disorder. However, Pa-Pa swore he understood every word. I don’t remember Dad ever saying “I love you,” but he showed it in a myriad of ways. He loved my

cooking. Loved my teasing. Loved my precious children and knew that I loved him like a second dad. No wonder he called me “Daughter.” PS~Jay’s surgery has been rescheduled for June 7th. Thank you a million times over for your prayers. Trusting the Lord for peace, protection, strength and miraculous healing! ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


FEATURELOOK

International Home Away from Home

Every school year hundreds of students from all over the world move to Edmond to broaden their education at the University of Central Oklahoma and experience American life. The UCO Community Responding to International Students Program (CRISP) is designed to make this transition easier for international students so they can get the most out of their time in Edmond. The program pairs international students with American families to give the students a home away from home and Edmond families the opportunity to learn more about other cultures. Outlook visited with CRISP volunteer Ali Clark to learn more about the program and her experience. Why did you get involved in this program? We wanted to expose our kids to students from other countries to give them different cultural experiences. We also wanted to give students from other countries a look into the lives of an Oklahoma family. How many students are you usually paired with? We usually sign up to take two or three students. This semester, not enough families signed up, so we took eight! The students really look forward to building relationships with Americans, so they are sad if they don’t get paired with a family. What countries are they usually from? There are quite a few from South Korea that attend UCO but we have had students from Malaysia, Vietnam, China and Taiwan. What is the biggest challenge for the students? It would be the language. Sometimes they don’t understand me because I talk too fast! A majority of these students come here for more than the American college experience. They want to be immersed in the English language and 30

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2019

most of them speak it very well. But no matter how well they speak our language, catching on to Oklahoma twang can be challenging for them. There are a lot of sayings and words they have never heard. What is your favorite memory in the program? At Christmas time, we have our students come and help us decorate our Christmas tree. They don’t do that in their home country, so explaining our traditions and listening to theirs is always a special moment. One year, I explained to one of my students how every Christmas, my kids pick out an ornament and how fun it is seeing all the ornaments from past Christmases and talking about the memories behind each one. This student was touched by our family’s tradition and said, “When I have kids, I want to do this tradition.” What do you want your students to take away from this experience? We want them to have a positive experience with their time in Oklahoma. While it is a great opportunity for them to experience American life, it’s also overwhelming for them to move to a different country with a different language. Some students get homesick and like to be able to have a “mom” they can reach out to and ask questions. Sadly, there have been instances when not everyone is friendly to the international students, so my family likes to help them make the most out of their time here. What special connections have you formed? We have stayed in contact through social media with multiple students after they go back to their home country. Some students return back to the states and contact us to meet up. For example, one of the students came back to the states for her master’s degree and attended a college in Dallas. After she moved back, she drove up to see us and we also drove to Dallas to see her. She still reaches out to my family on social media. What have you learned from the CRISP experience? They have taught us to be open to all people, even those who are different from us. We have found never to judge a book by its cover because these students are more like us than you’d expect. To learn more about the UCO CRISP program or to get involved visit their facebook page or https://sites.uco.edu/student-affairs/cgc/


80 East 5th St., Ste. 130 Edmond, OK 73034

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - June 2019  

Edmond Outlook - June 2019  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded