Page 1

June 2018

Side Hustles The Work-after-Work Way to Success!


4

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


6

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


Features

Careful what you put in your online dating profile. That’s what came to me as I began my second hour of bathing suit judging with Alison this weekend. There was the one that showed too much of this and the one didn’t show enough of that; the one that would make funny tan lines, the one that bunched in the wrong places, and the one that ... well, you get the idea. Let me back up – this wasn’t our first date. In fact, I met Alison two years ago. So judging bathing suits at this juncture in our relationship seems appropriate. At least to me.

8

INDIGO ACRES

10

SUMMER STRONG

From IT Director to Organic Farmer 4 Ways to Fitness

14

SIDE HUSTLES

18

WALKING PAST HISTORY

The Work-after-Work Way to Success! History of Edmond’s American Legion Post 111

20

GREEN SHOE FOUNDATION

While sitting in a cruelly upholstered chair just outside the dressing room, patiently waiting for the next doomed ensemble to debut, I suddenly realized I was responsible for bringing this into my life. How? Way back when, I wrote a dating profile and one of my well-crafted lines was… “I am fully capable of holding your purse while you dance or while you shop at Dillards.” I was trying to be funny, not prophetic.

26

RACING WITH RYAN

Ugh, after another failed suit showing, I get back to what any guy would do in this situation: researching performance car parts on my phone. Within a few clicks, I’m good again. Centered. I like car parts. I’ve got this. Until I realize my phone battery is in the single digits. Panic sets in. With the last few minutes of my iPhone’s life, I snap a selfie and post a desperate message – a plea for help (and/or attention).

Epilogue: Alison bought 2 swimsuits that day. Then promptly returned them. Alison and I are still together, but she now shops for bathing suits on her own.

Five-day Retreats for a Better Future Q & A with Local Motorcycle Racer

Business

22

WAGYU JAPANESE BBQ

24

SOONER HVAC

New Concept in Dining for Edmond Three Generations of Family Business

Columns 28

LOUISE TUCKER JONES

30

DR. J. DAVID CHAPMAN

Remembering Pat

Public Art Spurs Downtown Edmond’s Renaissance

Dave Miller Back40 Design President

Cover photography by Marshall Hawkins

ADVERTISING l Laura Beam at 405-301-3926 l laura@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN EDMOND/NORTH OKC 80 East 5th Street, Suite 130, Edmond, OK 73034 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com June 2018 Volume 14, Number 6

l

Edmond Outlook is a publication of Back40 Design, Inc.

l

© 2018 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l ADVERTISING MANAGER Laura Beam l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend and Sable Furrh PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond & North OKC homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


FOODLOOK

Indigo Acres: Growing Organic By Amy Dee Stephens

Kevin and Robin Marshall are so convinced that organic foods heal diseases that they started their own farm and donate a portion of the food to needy families with dire health issues. The opening of Indigo Acres was the result of an “inner calling.” Kevin spent 35 years as a computer consultant, but he was ready for a change. Taking a leap of faith, he resigned, sold the house, and bought property in north Edmond—but he and Robin still felt unclear about their new lifestyle. Kevin pondered as he worked in the garden. His favorite hobby, after all, was growing food. He’d had a small garden as a child, and as an adult, he’d escaped the stress of the corporate world by “playing in the dirt.” While digging, Kevin recalled a dream he’d had early on--to own a small acreage and give food away. A seminar he and and Robin had attended years ago, also came to mind. The speaker talked about the health risks of mainstream foods. “He said things that sounded crazy at the time, like how diet soda caused weight gain. Now many of his statements have been proven true.” “We know food has healing properties, but one healthy meal isn’t enough. Many people with medical needs, such as cancer or autism, can’t afford organic foods, so we provide free produce to a few select families for a 26week period,” Kevin said. As their three-year-old farm continues to expand, they hope to sponsor up to 35 families per year. Kevin grows the food while Robin grows the business. Robin runs the marketing end of things, such as emailing customers, publishing recipes and managing promotions. Kevin focuses on soil management. “Dirt is a living ecosystem, and if you take care of the dirt, it takes care of the plants,” Kevin said. He starts each day with a morning walk-thru of the garden to determine what course of action is needed, whether it be weeding, seeding, or organic pest control. The first time the Marshalls ran a booth at the Edmond Farmer’s Market, they knew they’d made the right decision when their first customer happily purchased their food. “Knowing people value our food makes the hard work worth it. They are shocked that organic, pesticide-free food tastes better. Kids say that our carrots taste great. We proudly tell our customers that our food is chemical free. Farmers who use chemicals don’t put up a sign saying, ‘We use chemicals.’” Kevin believes that his many years in business have allowed him to apply the proper financial principles to making Indigo Acres successful. He plans to soon teach other farmers how to be profitable so that fewer family farms fail. “We are following a crop technique called Market Gardening, which is a small-scale production of food that has high yield on about an acre of land. Yes, you can earn a living this way! We’ve also invested in high-tunnel greenhouses, which allow us to grow food in the earth, not on raised tables, during the winter,” Kevin said. “We’ll be able to sell produce to customers and maybe even to restaurants during the cold season.” Ultimately, the Marshalls are proud to make a living doing something they believe in—educating others on how to eat healthier. They delight in introducing families to new, healthy foods. Many customers are hesitant to try less-traditional produce, such as beets. “They are almost scared, but then they try it and are shocked to find that it is wonderful.” For more information go to: www.facebook.com/IndigoAcres

Kevin and Robin Marshall Photo credit: jennerphoto.com

8

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

9


FEATURELOOK

Summer Strong! By Mustafa Kujo

For anyone looking to trim up as the temps go up, finding the right fitness plan can be a daunting task. Here are four great Edmond gyms to help you get fit and stay long-term strong.

Prevail Strength and Fitness

Marine veteran, Sean Sharon, grew up loving gyms. He studied kinesiology while deployed to Iraq in 2004 and 2009. In 2014 he realized his dream, opening up Prevail Strength and Fitness where his vision is, “To do as much personal training inside of a group setting as possible, with maximum individual attention.” He limits his class sizes to 10 people, with most classes averaging six to eight. “Strength training is the foundation of our work, everything is layered on top of that. After an initial assessment, I tailor variations of exercises for each individual until they own it and can move on.” He splits his day between early morning classes, personal training in the afternoon, then more group classes in the evening, where the focus is on quality over quantity, building what he calls, “good human strength.” 920 Northwest 150th St., Edmond, OK, 73013 405-249-6195 • prevailstrengthandfitness.com

(em)POWERHOUSE

Coach Stephanie Fowler wants to build an army of strong women and men, empowering as many people as she can in a tight community focused on strength, not just burning calories. Coach Fowler is open and transparent about how much strength training helped her overcome body image and weight loss issues. When she freelanced a program called “Bootcamp to Brunch,” her students told her that if she built her own gym, they would come. In 2015, she did and they did. Today (em)POWERHOUSE has over 110 students in a tight-knit community with the motto, “Engage, Empower, Elevate.” The friendships and bonds in the gym are unmistakable as each member of the “EEE-Tribe” supports one another before, during, and after group classes, getting strong and empowered. 1361 Fretz Dr. #130, Edmond, OK 73003 405-694-0399 • empowerhousegym.com

Mercy Fitness Center

Mercy Fitness Center’s Membership Manager, Traci Wheeler, has one major challenge—“getting people to know that we’re here.” Mercy built a highly integrated medical health and fitness center to service the local community. It caters not just to those coming out of injuries and doctors visits, but for all its members to increase strength, build muscle, and enhance performance to regain strength and quality of life. The staff of 50+ are highly trained to assist young and old achieve their fitness goals. Additionally, Mercy Fitness Performance offers health and performance plans for those wanting to up their game, from high school, college, and professional athletes, to all adults wishing to achieve higher levels of success. 2017 W I-35 Frontage Rd., Edmond, OK 73013 405-757-3300 • mercyfitness.net

Athletic Recovery Center & Greenstrength Training Greenstrength owner, Luke Tirey, wants his students to build “basic human strength and general physical preparedness.” Through group and personal training classes, he and his team of trainers “build strength and enhance performance, getting people to master the basics of movement patterns, preparing people to live with vitality for the 23 hours of the day they’re not in the gym.” In a unique partnership with Shawn Smith, owner of the ARC, the facility offers strength training and physical therapy for athletic recovery, including; cryosaunas, float therapy, infrared saunas, whole body vibration sessions and a host of treatments for high end or just weekend warrior athletes. 336 NE 145th Pl., Edmond, OK, 73013 405-697-0860 • arcrecoveryok.com • greenstrengthhq.com

What we do in the gym translates to every area of life. Today’s finetuned facilities get it, with an approach to fitness and health as much as to community and personal empowerment. 10

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

11


12

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

13


FEATURELOOK

Side Hustle Success! By Heide Brandes

Every day, ambitious workers are finding ways to make extra money outside of their regular day job, and in central Oklahoma, those side hustles can range from selling items on the internet to freelancing a particular skill. According to a new study from Bankrate, 44 million Americans report having a side hustle which helps make ends meet or helps save for a special purchase. In addition, the study shows that 36 percent of those reporting a side job make $500 or more a month doing so. Can a side hustle be both lucrative and rewarding? According to these four locals, the answer is yes.

Building Savings By Delivering

Emily Brashier of Edmond spends her working days as a reporter for the Guthrie News Leader newspaper, but in the past several months, she’s been able to meet a financial goal through delivering food. Brashier drives for Postmates, which is on-demand delivery service of food, groceries and more. She got the idea in January after reading an article on how to start saving money. “I read this article that was about how to start saving, and it was geared toward people who had no savings,” she said. “My goal for the new year was to start saving more, and the article had information about how you could save $1,000 in a year. One of the tips was to earn extra income on the side.” When Brashier signed up for Postmates and saw how much she could earn, she changed her goal. Instead of making an extra $1,000 in a year, she wanted to make an extra $1,000 a month. “I have made that extra $1,000 a month since I started,” she said. “What sets me apart, I think, is having the drive to do it. You have to have a real goal that you’re working toward. I constantly ask myself, ‘What do I want?’ Do I want savings or to go on vacation or to not always stress about money?” Brashier says she works between 20 and 30 hours a week doing her side hustle on nights and weekends, but she gives herself a weekend a month off.

“I like doing this because my kids come with me while I deliver food,” she said. “It works for me. I think it’s also important to allow yourself some time off so you don’t get burned out.” For more information about Postmates, go to: www.postmates.com

Business Meets Bellydancing

Jennifer LeBlond of Edmond works production, purchasing and customer relations at a promotional product distributor in Edmond, but in the evenings and on weekends, she becomes Jahara Amar, an award-winning bellydancer with the Aalim Dance Academy of Oklahoma City. Although LeBlond is a highdemand and national awardwinning bellydancer, she had to be dragged kicking and screaming to her first dance class. “I was 18, and my mother decided she wanted to take a class,” LeBlond said. “She dragged me along. I didn’t want to go. But it just kind of clicked, and I’ve stuck with it ever since.” LeBlond teaches at the Aalim studios, but also teaches the professional competition bellydance troupe Aalim Najim. The troupe has won at competitions in Las Vegas and Dallas, and LeBlond has personally taken top titles in competitions in Dallas and California. LeBlond, along with other bellydancers at the Aalim Dance Academy, also performs at local restaurants, hookah lounges and venues across Oklahoma. “What I like most is teaching and seeing my students transform in class as they become more connected to themselves, their feminine energy and confidence,” she said. “I also love performing as well and brightening people’s day when we dance at local venues.” For more information on learning how to bellydance, go to: www.aalimdanceworld.com Continued on Page 16

14

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

15


FEATURELOOK

Continued from Page 14

Fighting the Good Fight

Jon Hill used a lifetime of trouble-making and fighting to create not only a successful security business, but a career as a Mixed Martial Arts competitor as well. Owner of One Hill Security, Hill is a professional MMA fighter who has competed in events like Rage in the Cage, King of the Cage and more. Although successful, he was working for other people and spending money when he earned it. “One of my mentors asked me what I was doing with my money, and I said ‘spending it.’ He said, ‘You’re a big guy. What about doing security?’” Hill said. “I had bounced around since I was 16 and had done odd security jobs since I got my CLEET license, and I was tired of working for other guys and making them money.” Although his mentor helped him with the initial steps of forming his LLC, Hill created his business on his own in 2014. One Hill Security provides personal and private security throughout the metro area.

“I’d say fighting is my side hustle now,” Hill said. “It’s not as consistent as security work is.” For more information about Jon Hill, go to: www.facebook.com/jon.hill.946

Building and Carving

When it comes to building and working with wood, Dusty Hutchison of Edmond knows his stuff. After working for 10 years for his father’s company, Hutchison Custom Homes and Hutchison Construction, Dusty formed his own custom home company, Alder Fine Homes, in 2008. “It was a natural step for me,” Dusty said. “We create custom homes.” Throughout his life, Dusty also worked with his hands, creating his own custom furniture out of reclaimed wood and scrap wood from the build sites. “I’ve always made furniture for myself, but 18 months ago, my wife told me to get a hobby,” Dusty said. “Instead of just building furniture for myself, I started building furniture and custom pieces.” Dusty’s side business, Archaic Provisions, specializes in custom-created furniture made from reclaimed wood. He creates everything from dining tables and barn doors to bookshelves and benches. Archaic Provisions has a booth at Broadway Antiques and Market in Edmond, but Dusty said he really just enjoys watching a piece of wood transform into something beautiful. “I know it will never eclipse Alder Fine Homes, but when people notice you creating something, they reach out,” he said. “I’ve always used reclaimed lumber. It’s one of those things you hate to waste, and that’s how my parents raised me. It’s nice to make extra money, but I love to see the transformation of reclaimed wood into furniture.” For more info about Archaic Provisions, go to www.facebook.com/archaicprovisions

Whether begun as a way to manage debt, boost a savings account or test a new interest (or skill), side hustles often open doors of opportunity not only for monetary gain but personal growth as well.

16

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018


Our mission is to help people experience deeper, more meaningful relationships with God and others through counseling, coaching, and training. Bruce Walker, PhD, LPC, LMFT

3324 French Park Dr, Suite B, Edmond, OK 73034 (405) 882-5544

www.relationalcareok.com JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

17


FEATURELOOK

Walking Past History By Mustafa Kujo

It’s easy to walk out of a great concert at the UCO Jazz Lab or a delicious dinner at Hideaway Pizza, reach for your keys as you look for your car, and not notice that you’re walking past history. Located on the corner of 5th and Littler, at the southwest corner of Stephenson Park, is rough-hewn building of uncut, red sandstone. It is the Frank H. Collings American Legion Post 111. Corporal Collings died in action on July 1, 1918 defending the American lines in Vaux, France. He was the first resident of Edmond killed in World War I. Congress chartered The American Legion on Sept 16, 1919 and Edmond’s American Legion Post was chartered three months later on Dec 19th. Records on its history are sparse until 1935 when, in the midst of the depression and years-long drought, the Edmond City Council submitted a proposal to the Works Projects Administration to build a “community meeting place” to house the Frank Collings Post. Legionnaires themselves raised $2000, while the city donated the land, and the WPA paid for the labor, employing dozens of drought-ravaged local farmers. The building went up in record time, along with many other WPA projects throughout Edmond and in Stephenson Park. When completed in 1936, the city leased the building to the American Legion for $1/year in 5-year increments. That agreement, and price, are still in force today. The Legion is still very active in community activities. Their historic hall, full of photos of past commanders and Frank Collings himself, is in demand as various groups rent it for meetings and even to cook meals in its full kitchen. Members of Post 111 provide annual scholarships to eligible Edmond high school students to attend a week-long intensive leadership development program at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College 18

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

in Miami, OK where they study Oklahoma government, law, and emergency management. The Post is always open Monday mornings from 8-10 am for a weekly “coffee call” where members and visitors can come in for coffee and donuts, trade war stories, and meet some incredible Edmondites. LTC (R) Oren Peters is a veteran of both WWII and Korea, a past Post Commander, and an inductee of the Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame. He’s as well aged as the building itself and still active at the Post, telling stories of all the faces adorning the walls, to include how pictures of people with last names of Rankin and Bryant have streets named after them in Edmond today. The American Legion Hut is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and much of its structure is still original construction. Any renovations to it requires detailed planning. Stephenson Park, however, is due for a number of renovations over the coming years. Edmond Parks & Recreation Director, Craig Dishman is coordinating a Preliminary Design Concept of the park’s future which Edmond’s Advisory Board will make final decisions on over the coming months. The goal is to create an urban landscape park, more conducive to families and outdoor recreation, especially as development groups begin construction of retail, restaurant, and residential buildings around Littler Ave. and 4th street surrounding the park. The Legionnaires have seen many changes in Edmond over the years, yet continue their traditions of selfless service to the community. Says Ken Wyatt, Post 111 Adjutant and Vietnam Veteran, “We were recently at the IOOF cemetery by Lake Arcadia before Memorial Day placing flags on the graves of Veterans. We enjoy doing our part.” Visit www.edmondpost111.org for more information.


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

19


FEATURELOOK

5 Days to a

Better Future

By Ian Jayne

Green Shoe Foundation offers five-day retreats for participants to address past experiences and create better futures Sometimes, you need a fresh start, a time to hit the pause button and reassess. Green Shoe Foundation, founded in Oct. 2015, provides a space to safely explore and work through past events in order to break destructive cycles and pave a better path for the future. “My goal was to deal with some of my trauma that I didn’t even realize, and how I still lived in that cycle,” said a local business owner and participant.

it can sometimes be difficult to see how past events have shaped behavior, but that the week provides a lot of “a-ha” moments for participants. “You actually go through the process of confronting it and having a perspective and a connection in your mind that you are now an adult,” said the participant, whose therapist had suggested the retreat. The participant found that stress from work could negatively affect relationships with family, but the Green Shoe retreat provided ways to break this cycle.

Located at 609 S. Kelly Ave., Suite B2, Green Shoe Foundation offers a fiveday retreat program led by professional counselors and therapists, for those “When I start recognizing that I’m going through a stressful experience, I 21 and older. The retreats run from Mon. – Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., and a start to put myself in a realization that this is not life-ending; it’s real, but you returnable $475 deposit is required. All materials are included; participants can deal with this,” the participant said. “It’s quite an amazing place to give can bring their own lunch or order from Green you a sense of tools, and that’s what I really have Shoe’s menu. been looking for.” Whether it’s a divorce, struggling “We really want to overcome any barriers or burdens that people might have to attending a Green Shoe retreat, because we feel like it could benefit almost everybody to do this,” said Jeanean South, Executive Director.

family member, death or loss, or difficulty reconciling past issues, the retreat aims to work through all kinds of past trauma.

Essential to Green Shoe’s transformative process is its definition of trauma as “anything less than nurturing.” Whether it’s a divorce, struggling family member, death or loss, or difficulty reconciling past issues, the retreat aims to work through all kinds of past trauma. Green Shoe retreats draw from family systems theory to help individuals recognize patterns and cycles of behavior that have shaped their lives. Such self-awareness can help participants do healing work and make healthier choices in the future, South said. “A lot of times, when something significant happens in our life… it triggers back to those earlier experiences,” South said. “By addressing the earlier experiences, we create a lot more solid foundation going forward to increase the probability of having much more successful, joyful lives.” South said that 20

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

Since its first retreat in the summer of 2016, Green Shoe has had more than 300 participants come through its program, according to South. Among the most transformative program elements are improved communication and parenting skills, a stronger feeling of self-worth and the ability to set healthy boundaries, said South. In order to more effectively serve the community, Green Shoe Foundation has recently purchased land on 63rd St. and Broadway Extension to build a new retreat center. Green Shoe aims to create the conditions for both personal and collective transformation. “The goal for the future is really to be able to share this model and experience, even outside of Oklahoma,” South said. Visit www.greenshoe.org for more information.


BIZLOOK

Wagyu Japanese BBQ By Ian Jayne

Wagyu Japanese BBQ opened in December 2017, but it’s already revolutionized the lunch or dinner table. At Wagyu, tables are outfitted with high-tech, ventilated grills perfect for cooking everything from bell peppers to the delicious cuts of extra-marbled, flavorful beef for which it’s named.

Unlike hibachi restaurants, Wagyu highlights the Japanese practice of yakiniku, or grilling food at the table. “It’s a unique dining experience,” said Jade Chen, who co-owns Wagyu Japanese BBQ with her husband Li. The tapas-style course options include cuts of Wagyu or Angus prime beef, as well as chicken, duck and seafood. Vegetarians rejoice, because Wagyu also offers a mushroom medley, kabocha (Japanese sweet squash), asparagus and more. Traditional Japanese dishes, such as ramen, are also available, as are salads, appetizers and desserts.

22

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

“You just grill. We do all the hard work,” said Li Chen. All cuts of meat are trimmed, marinated and bite-size.

At Wagyu, yakiniku offers the best of both worlds, as patrons can cook their food exactly to their desired levels of doneness while also enjoying good conversation and time with friends Wagyu might also introduce diners to new flavor profiles and new cuts of meat, such as cow tongue. Li said these cuts might intimidate people—until they try them. Part of the Chens’ mission is also dispelling myths about Wagyu beef being only an expensive delicacy.“We want to bring this culture in, and we want to introduce Wagyu to everybody,” Li said.

Li and Jade first began working on what would become Wagyu Japanese BBQ about two years ago. They traveled frequently, and noticed that many coastal cities had yakiniku-style restaurants. They decided to bring the concept to Oklahoma, focusing on high-quality meats in an innovative and unique atmosphere. Over the following two years, the Chens researched diligently in order to realize their dream of owning their first restaurant. They spoke

with chefs in Japan, contacted grill manufacturers and traveled to different cities in order to test out equipment, said Jade.

The restaurant, located at 3000 W. Memorial Road, Suite 105, has all the sleekness of an upscale steak restaurant but without the stuffiness. Backlit wall décor evokes a blue-green-black mountain range, while the burnished brass grills set into the center of each table are focal without being obtrusive. Soon to come are even more specials, additions to the menu and alterations based on customer feedback. Visit www.wagyujapanesebbqokc.com or call (405) 285-9796 for more information.


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

23


BIZLOOK

Sooner HVAC By Ian Jayne

There’s family business, and then there’s three generations of family business. Sooner HVACR, located at 4200 E. Wilshire Blvd., is a heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration company that definitely falls into the latter. “We’re carrying on the tradition,” said Curtis Vaughn, Sooner HVAC owner. “Both of my sons are in the heat and air business, and they’re both licensed contractors, and so we’re a third generation company.” Vaughn said he initially started working for his late father-in-law at a different company, but now he and his sons all work together. Sooner HVAC works on commercial and residential projects, and new and old buildings. Current projects include work at Remington Park and Othello’s of Norman, while past projects include everything from the American Fidelity Tower to the Oklahoma City Thunder Practice Facility. Whether it’s a restaurant, retail store, office or medical site, Sooner HVAC strives to achieve its goal of customer satisfaction.

24

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

“All of our customers have different needs, whether it’s a residential customer or a commercial customer,” Vaughn said. In order to assess new projects, Sooner HVAC examines space, square footage, windows, doors and insulation factors, as well as heat loss and heat gain. Recent technological advances are continually revolutionizing the heating and air landscape, Vaughn said. “It’s an ever-changing, evolving business.” The new hot-ticket technology is the inverter compressor, which can regulate temperature on a persistent basis. “They’re coming out on the market now with inverted systems that are for the residential market, and that’s a highly technological field,” said Vaughn. As new advances disrupt traditional geothermal systems, Vaughn said A/C systems will work in different ways, with new voltages and designs. The inverter compressor requires less amperage, and operates at high-efficiency, which Vaughn said is the direction of the future. “We’re excited for the future, especially with technology changing, that we’re able to evolve,” Vaughn said. In order to remain on the cutting

edge of new advances, Vaughn said that Sooner HVAc pursues current, relevant information. “We’ve had lots of training with special equipment to be able to do anything that a customer needs, whether it’s a boiler, a chiller, a refrigeration system, a cooling tower, an inverted air conditioning system,” Vaughn said. Even as some components of the HVACR business change, Vaughn said he couldn’t be prouder of his sons and how their technical backgrounds prepared them for their careers. “One of our main goals is to take care of our customers, 100 percent, and make sure they’re ecstatic, excited about what we’ve done for them. We like to keep those relationships long-term,” Vaughn said. Visit www.soonerhvacinc.com for more information.


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

25


FEATURELOOK

Racing with Ryan

Ryan and Chelsea Kilburn and the Ducati Panigale 1299s

Racing with Ryan

Photo credit: Chaun Goins

By Heide Brandes

When it comes to motorcycle racing, Ryan Kilburn of Edmond gets a little excited. A member of the EuroTek OKC store and team, Kilburn is a track racer, speeding his Italian-made Ducati Panigale 1299s around the curves at Hallett Motor Racing Circuit in Jennings, OK. And while he came to the sport of motorcycle track racing a little later in life, it’s a passion for him. Teaching and inspiring others to take up the sport is also a passion, but at first, motorcycles didn’t seem to be in Kilburn’s future. We sat down for a quick question and answer with Kilburn about his racing career, his motorcycle and how others can join in the fun too. Q: Were you a “motocross kid?” No, not at all. My parents weren’t big into motorized things. In fact, my parents forbid me to have a motorcycle, but I loved watching the races and followed all the racing events. At 23, I bought my first bike. Q: How did you get into racing? I was always told that I didn’t have the skills, and at the time, I didn’t. But I just wouldn’t let it go. In 2010, I hooked up with a former road racing champion out of Tulsa, Sam McDonald. He worked with me to get me up to speed and I got my racing license and that was in 2010. I’ve been doing it ever since. Q: Tell me about your first race. I did really well, by the end of the day. I finished one of my races in sixth place, which I thought was fantastic. Q: What do you love about motorcycle racing? You see the machine and the person working together. I always liked that. In other forms of racing like auto racing, you don’t see the driver so you don’t get a sense of what the driver’s doing. Plus, I like the competition. You

26

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

ride very close to the other riders, sometimes in a pack. You get to know everybody and understand their riding style - their personality and you can use that against them. You know what move you can make that would make them back off. It’s strategy. Q: Are you an adrenaline junkie? Not at all. Honestly, this not an adrenaline sport, it’s a very physical sport and adrenaline exhausts you. You’re piloting a 400-plus pound motorcycle pushing 1000 degree exhaust, maybe you are racing in 110 degree heat and the asphast is over 130 - you want all the energy you have to go toward winning. Q: Tell me about your bike you have now and what you’ve done to it. My Panigale 1299s weighs 400 pounds and produces over 200 horsepower. Most of what I’ve done are modifications to make it safe for track ridingbesides the racing bodywork and tuning - it’s basically a few steps away from a stock showroom bike. Q: Why did you go with a Ducati? It was the opportunity to own - and race - the bike of my dreams. When I started at EuroTek OKC, they wanted me racing one of their other brands. We had everything set up for a BMW, but at the last second, I was just like, ‘I want a Ducati.’ I can’t pass up this opportunity. It’s an amazing bike. Q: What would your advice be to others interested in racing? Come to one of our workshops that I help put on at EuroTek OKC. We go over everything you’d need to know to get started with track riding and road racing. We’ve had a lot of our customers get started that way. I would say don’t just think about it, just do it. Visit www.bmwmcofokc.com for more information.


JUNE 2018

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

27


ALOOKBACK

Remembering

Pat

Pat also tolerated my fear of flying—Dallas, Atlanta, and California, where I was a guest at Dr. Robert Schuller’s Crystal Cathedral. Talk about nervous. At 2:00 am I was still studying my notes in the hotel room. Pat woke up and sleepily acknowledged, “You mean you’re still up?” Then right back to sleep. No advice or criticism.

During a recent visit with my 101-year-old mother, she received a call from her sister-in-law, my 98-year-old aunt. Imagine that conversation! It was fun, and eventually, Mama handed the phone to me. Aunt Pauline and I talked about her daughter and my sweet cousin, Pat, who was like a sister to me. Some years back, when I was doing a lot of public speaking, Pat was my travel companion.

28

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

We also shared our daily ups and downs. Always just a phone call away, I can’t say how much I miss this sister-cousin who died two years ago. So many times I’ve almost grabbed the phone to call her, forgetting for the moment that she is in heaven. And funny? Always! As I was getting ready to leave town for her Celebration of Life service, my hair just wouldn’t do what I wanted. Suddenly, it was like I heard Pat speak to my late husband in heaven. “Carl, look at Louise. Just like always, messing with her hair. She’s going to be late for my service!” I smiled as I almost heard Carl answer, “Oh, no, Pat. She will make it.” And I did.

By Louise Tucker Jones

Not an easy job. There were times when we got to a hotel and the room was not what I reserved. Pat would stand to the side and pray silently while I held my ground with a clerk. Suddenly, that “totally booked” hotel had an opening that was exactly what I had reserved in the first place.

making a presentation, meeting a publisher or doing a radio interview, Pat was my encourager.

We talked about everything imaginable and enjoyed each other’s company. We griped about buses with no AC on hot city streets then reveled in cool event centers. When I was nervous about

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


CITYLOOK

200 and Counting By Dr. J. David Chapman

A developer in OKC named Steve Mason called me and asked me to define the time and event that started the renaissance in downtown Edmond. Without even thinking I said it was the city’s commitment to public art. As I write this I am watching contractors block off our finelystreetscaped section of downtown’s Broadway for our 40th Annual Edmond Arts Festival. This is one of the best arts festivals in the state of Oklahoma and we can be proud, however the game-changer for Edmond is the City and stakeholder’s commitment to public art. Today’s architecture, with its glass and steel, can lack the unique qualities needed to interact with the public realm. Art invigorates public spaces and humanizes the built environment. No one understands the role art plays in the public realm like Edmond attorney and previous Mayor Randel Shadid. I called Randel and asked if he had time

30

l

EDMONDOUTLOOK.COM

l

JUNE 2018

to talk about art and its impact on the built environment. He replied “I always have time to talk about art and Edmond.” Randel has made a considerable financial investment in public art in Edmond, but it’s the emotional investment that has caused the renaissance. The idea of using public art as a differentiator and unique selling proposition for our city started with Randel’s love for art. As a member of the Edmond Urban Board, Randel had his first opportunity to give this artas-economic-tool a try. He convinced the board and City Council to spend $100,000 on public art promising to negotiate the biggest impact possible. He turned that investment into 5 pieces of public art giving the city the “critical mass” necessary to make an impact. During Saundra Naifeh’s time in office as Mayor the city raised the stakes and invested $200,000 per year developing a matching public/private partnership coordinated by the Visual Arts Committee. Today, with the public/private public art ordinance still in place, Edmond just placed their 200th piece of public art. The city is definitely recognized around the country as leveraging

public art and can be seen in such magazines as Southern Living, Southwest Art, and Art of the West. Randel has served on the City Council, been Mayor, and served on the Edmond Urban Board. All of these are major commitments and accomplishments, however when talking to Randel it’s the art that sparks his interest. If you ask him to choose this favorite piece of art, he will say “the last piece I purchased.” If you are looking to find the impact that public art can have on economic development and building community, look no further than Edmond, OK! Dr. J. David Chapman is an Associate Professor of Finance & Real Estate at UCO. jchapman7@uco.edu


80 East 5th St., Ste. 130 Edmond, OK 73034

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - June 2018  

Edmond Outlook - June 2018  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded