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7811 Consolidated School Rd., Edgerton, WI 53534 • www.wisbc.com

Permit No. 203 Eau Claire, WI

A Publication of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative

Spring 2013 Volume 25, Number 2

Publishers of Iconic Sheep Wisconsin Sheep Breeder Magazine Honored Breeders Marks

35 Years of Master Shepherd Awards Following a tradition that goes back to 1979, the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative recognized two outstanding producer families during its annual meeting and awards dinner held in conjunction with the Arlington Sheep Day on March 16. The cooperative has held its annual meeting as part of the producer clinic since 2009 and is a co-sponsor of the event with the University of Wisconsin-Madison College of

The cover said it all: “Service to the sheep industry since 1880.” It was history both made and in the making, the bellwether publication for sheep producers for more than a century. Started by the Ewing Family of Columbia, Missouri, as part of Livestock Services, the Sheep Breeder and Sheepman magazine was the must-read for purebred producers until publication ceased in the mid-1990s. The Sheep Breeder and Sheepman was guided through

its final three decades by Larry Mead, assisted by his brother Bud. Larry Mead started with Livestock Services in 1961 as Associate Editor, taking over the publishing responsibilities three years later. That same year, the Meads started the Midwest Stud Ram Sale, which remains, nearly fifty years on, the preeminent sheep sale in the nation. Both Larry and Bud ((Bronald) Mead were recently honored as the recipients of the 2013 Art Pope Award at the recent annual

Agri­culture & Life Sciences and University of Wisconsin Exten­ sion (UWEX). The fifth annual sheep day program drew a record crowd for its educational and youth programs. Held at the Public Events Facility at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station and at the Arlington Sheep Unit, the program featured Dr. Kreg Leymaster, Animal See awards on Page 2

meeting of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative. In making the presentation, WSBC board member Elmer Held referred to the Mead’s accomplishments as “the greatest job of marketing sheep in U.S. history.” Larry Mead could not be present at the recognition program, so the award will be presented to him at the Midwest Stud Ram Sale in late June. Bud Mead passed away on December 8, 2012.

The recipients of the 2013 Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative Master Shepherd Award in the Purebred Meat Division were Gene and Marian Stetzer of Melrose, Wisconsin. Sue Rupnow (l.), President of the WSBC, made the presentation at the annual meeting of the co-op held during the Arlington Sheep Day on March 16.

Diane Christenson, Chippewa Falls, WI, titled this entry to the 2012 Wild & Wolly Photo Contest “A Beautiful Day.” Photographers of all ages are reminded that the deadline for entries for the contest are due August 15. See Photo Contest on page 3.

The 2013 recipient for the Master Shepherd Award for the Purebred Wool Division was Hi-Way C Columbias. Shown are (l-r) Sue Rupnow, President, Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Co-op, Alyssa Baumer, Marie Baumer, Todd Baumer and Alec Baumer. Missing were Paul and Dawn Hoff.


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Notes from the President’s Pen As Sue Sees It: What a difference a year makes! Last year at this time we were enjoying record warmth, early pastures and mowing the lawn as we basked in the eighties. Now it’s hard to think ahead to show season, sales, the festival, fairs and pasture walks while there’s still snow on the ground and more on the way before spring actually creeps back to Wisconsin. But as frustrating as the weather might be, I can say with a great deal of satisfaction that the annual meeting of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders was one of the best attended I’ve seen in a number of years. My special thanks to all of you who made the effort to be part of this important event, first enjoying a wonderful lamb dinner provided by Stoddards Catering and then honoring our 2013 award recipients. Of course, this all was preceded by the Annual Arlington Sheep, another very successful educational event for both young and old alike. Hats off to Dave Thomas and Todd Taylor, and congratulations on putting together a program that drew 190 people to the Arlington Ag Research Station! Thinking back to the annual meeting, I’d like to re-emphasize the importance of members taking part in the decision making process for your cooperative. The Wisconsin

Sheep Breeders Cooperative now has an annual budget of just under a quarter of a million dollars and it’s in every member’s interest to understand how that money is generated and how it is spent. Better yet, it’s in your best interests as a WSBC member to be a part of the process—not only participating but volunteering wherever your time and talents are needed, as many of you already have. And to those who have stepped forward so many times, thank you! To say that we can’t do it without you is a gross understatement. I also want to again say thanks to the 2013 award recipients without whose participation and long hours of commitment to this industry we would not be where we are today. You have made and continue to make the difference! You have set the bar high and led by example: our industry owes you much. Finally, I want to welcome Laura Meyer back for her second term as a WSBC director, Tim Miller as a newly elected to the board and express my appreciation to Bill Keough for the time he has devoted to the co-op as a board member. Sincerely, Sue Rupnow President, Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative

The Wisconsin Shepherd is a quarterly publication of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative, a non-profit organization dedicated to the diverse interests of the Wisconsin sheep industry. Inquiries about WSBC and address changes for WSBC and The Wisconsin Shepherd should be directed to Jill Alf, Executive SecretaryTreasurer, WSBC, 7811 Consolidated School Road, Edgerton, WI 53534; 608-868-2505 or wisbc@centurytel.net. EDITOR Bob Black, 920-623-3536 Advertising Manager Kelli Gunderson, 9726 N. Fork Creek Rd., Shannon, IL 61078; 815-821-5905 or robkelgundy@yahoo.com WSBC officers and directors are: President Sue Rupnow: Wausau, 715-675-6894 Vice President Keith Schultz: Ft. Atkinson, 920-568-0895 Steve Bingen: West Bend, 262-629-4221 Elmer Held: Oakfield, 920-583-3084 Tim Miller: Beloit, 608-879-9567 Gary Klug: Platteville, 920-309-2181 Laura Meyer: Watertown, 920-206-8445 Jeff Nevens: Lodi, 608-592-7842 Alan Thorson: Columbus, 920-344-1235

Can’t wait to see you at The Festival!

spring 2013

Awards Continued from page 1 Research Geneticist at the USDA Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, NE; Dr. Rhonda Gildersleeve, Extension Grazing Specialist, UW-Madison College of Animal Sciences; Dr. Dave Thomas, Professor of Sheep Management & Genetics, Department of Animal Sciences, UW-Madison; Todd Taylor Shepherd, Arlington Sheep Unit, UW-Madison; and Dr. Kay Nelson, D.V.M. Research Animal Resource Center, UW-Madison. The Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative recognized two Master Shepherd categories this year: Master Shepherd – Purebred Meat Division, and Master Shepherd – Purebred Wool Division. Recognized in the Purebred Wool Division were Gene and Marian Stetzer of Melrose, WI. The Stetzers got into the sheep business through their daughters and son, eventually settling on Montadales that they continue to exhibit at shows and fairs around the Midwest and at Louisville during the North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE). Gene is the Postmaster at Black River Falls, while Marian is a floral designer. In making the presentation, Wisconsin Sheep Breeder President Sue Rupnow praised the Stetzers for their involvement and quiet leadership with youth over their many years in the industry, adding that “they are the type of family that makes the sheep industry so special.” In the Master Shepherd – Purebred Wool Division, the honors went to Hi-Way C Columbias and the combined families of Marie and Todd Baumer and Paul and Dawn Hoff, both of Mindoro, WI. Though the flock got its start with Suffolks and eventually included crossbred ewes, Columbias were added in 1995 and Hi-Way C hasn’t looked back since, exhibiting at the National Columbia Show, Wisconsin State Fair, Iowa State Fair, All-American Junior Show, Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, La Crosse Interstate County Fair and Central Wisconsin State Fair. One of the highlights for the families was showing the Champion Columbia Ewe at Louisville in 2011. The Baumers have now taken over the duties of traveling and

Leah Dickson (l.) of Portage, WI, received the 2013 Friend of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative Award from WSBC President Sue Rupnow in recognition for “outstanding service and support to the co-op.” Dickson is co-coordinator of the fleece shows and sales at the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival.

Carol Black (r.) received the 2013 Wisconsin Sheep Industry Award from President Sue Rupnow at the annual meeting of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative on March 16 at Arlington. Black helped organize the Wisconsin Wool Works! and has managed the retail arm of the co-op throughout its fourteen year history. showing the Columbias, while the Hoffs have, as daughter Jennifer explains, taken on the role of “advisors, supporters and caretakers of the flock.” Todd Baumer is a Financial Services Credit Manager for Trane Company in La Crosse, while Marie is a Health Information Scanning Application Specialist for Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Skemp. Alyssa Baumer is currently attending UW La Crosse studying Nuclear Medicine, while brother Alec attends Western Technical College in the Wood Tech Program. Paul Hoff works for Majestic Pines Casino & Bingo in Black River Falls, while Dawn is a psychiatric/geriatric nurse for Lakeview Health Center in West

Salem. In addition to daughter Jennifer, the Hoffs have a son, Jason. The Wisconsin Sheep Breeders also recognized Leah Dickson of Portage, WI with the Friend of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative Award for “outstanding service to the co-op.” Dickson, a familiar face at the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, is currently a cocoordinator of the fleece shows and sales at Jefferson and has been the liaison to Alice in Dairyland on her visits to the event. Leah got her start in sheep over twenty years ago after purchasing some ewes to train with her Australian Shepherds and now maintains a See awards on Page 3

September 6-8 2013 Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival


spring 2013

The Wisconsin Shepherd

Changes Announced for Festival Photo Contest The grass is green and the lambs are cute. Spring—finally— has arrived, and it’s the perfect time to take photographs for the Wild and Woolly Photo Contest. Photo entries must be postmarked by August 15, and anyone can enter the contest, regardless of whether they raise sheep or are WSBC members. Photographers may enter any of the following classes: Scenic Photo, Just Lambs, Kids and Sheep, Photo Taken by Youth (for youth 18 and under) and Any other Sheep or Wool Photo. Photographers may enter more than one class, and they may enter more than one photograph in each class. Photos can be either color or black-and-white prints, should not be mounted and should measure approximately 8 x 10 inches. The Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival and Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative has announced changes in the annual Wild and Woolly Photo Contest. This year, a panel of judges will select the winning photos prior to the Festival. Judging will be based on photo clarity, contest, composition and appeal. Photos will be displayed throughout the

Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, which is slated for September 6 through 8 at Jefferson Fair Park. “Many people attending the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival have said they would like to see which photos won the contest, so we’ve opted to forego a ‘shepherd’s choice’ balloting system at the Festival and, instead, we’ll have a panel of judges select the best photos,” explained Jane Metcalf, photo chairman. “We’ll also be displaying all the photos entered in the contest.” There is a $5 per photo entry fee, and premiums will be awarded to the top photos in each class based on the number of contest entries. In addition, each class winner will be awarded a cash or merchandise prize. To date, contest sponsors include Ewesful Gifts, The Country Today, Wisconsin State Farmer, Ewephoric!, and more sponsors will be added at a later date. For more information about the Wild and Woolly Photo Contest, visit www.wisconsin sheepandwoolfestival.com or contact Jane Metcalf at tjmetcalf@ centurytel.net or 608/868-3268.

Plans Set for Sheep Sale at Jefferson Looking for a new way to buy or sell sheep? Plans are being finalized to create a marketing opportunity at the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival. With the thousands of sheep and fiber enthusiasts already attending, the Festival seems like a great place to present sheep for sale. Rather than having a structured auction, which was tried unsuccessfully in the past, the new concept is to create a “market place” where sheep can be displayed and sold by the producer with as few restrictions as possible. The WSBC will simply rent pens to producers and allow them to use the space to market their animals during the Festival. Sellers are in control; they can set up bid boards, sell at a set price, or negotiate with buyers as they please any time between Friday morning and Sunday afternoon. Any kind of sheep can be sold! Sheep can be registered, commercial, wether- type, fibertype, lambs, yearlings, mature, rams or ewes. Sellers could even offer to breed ewes and arrange delivery at a later time. Animals need to be healthy and presentable but do not need to be washed or fitted. If animals originate in

Wisconsin and stay in Wisconsin, they do not need health papers. If sheep sell out of state, exit health papers can be written at the Festival at a cost to the seller. Sheep can arrive or leave anytime during the Festival. Sales will be between the buyer and the seller. If registration papers are to be transferred, it is the responsibility of the seller. The WSBC is required to hold a Class B permit to provide this opportunity and needs to maintain records of all sheep brought to sale and to whom they were sold. Consignors will need to provide this information. The pen fee has not been finalized, but is expected to be about $25.00. When deciding to retire our long standing Bred Ewe Sale, the WSBC board of directors felt very strongly that they needed to provide a venue to help its members market their stock and believe that providing this “market place” concept will provide that venue to its previous consignors and hopefully to many more— both purebred and commercial. Final plans will be announced in the next issue of the Shepherd. Questions or comments can be directed to any WSBC director or Steve Bingen at sbingen@charter. net o 262-629-4221.

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Awards Continued from page 2 small flock of 20 head. In making the presentation, fellow fleece show coordinator Holin Kennen praised Dickson’s “enthusiasm, organizational skills and friendly attitude” noting her willingness to tackle any job, while WSBC Director Jeff Nevens underscored the critical importance of having the leadership of “enthusiastic and energized volunteers.” Receiving the 2013 Wisconsin

Sheep Industry Award was Carol Black of Columbus, WI, who has managed the Wisconsin Wool Works! throughout its fourteenyear history. The retail arm of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Co-op that promotes Wisconsin-based products at the Wisconsin State Fair and the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, the “Wool Works,” as it is often referred to, is supported by consignments from

fiber artists and small businesses and provides a substantial portion of the annual operating budget for the cooperative. Carol has also been the publicity chair for the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival since it began in 2002, operates her own gift business and has been a Medical Technologist at Columbus Community Hospital for 47 years.

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401 Commerce Ave. Baraboo, WI 53913 800-362-3989 www.equitycoop.com


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The Wisconsin Shepherd

WLBA SPRING PREVIEW DEADLINE MAY 1 Entry forms and show information for the Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Associa­ tion’s 33rd Annual Spring Preview Show, to be held June 8, at Jefferson Fair Park, can be found at www. wisconsinlivestockbreeders. com or by contacting WLBA Executive Director, Jill Alf at 608-868-2505. The popular WLBA Spring Preview show offers junior beef, sheep, and swine exhibitors the opportunity to break-in their summer fair projects and sharpen their showmanship skills. Judging at this year’s shows are Frank Kaehler, St. Charles, MN (beef), Shannon Feuerbach, Keystone, IA (market lambs), Craig Beckmeier, Morrisonville, IL (breeding sheep) and Tyler Tonkin, Macomb, IL (swine). A second judge for the beef show is pending. Cash awards will be given to the Supreme/Reserve Champion Heifer & Steer, Supreme/Reserve Ewe, Ram & Market Lamb, and the Supreme/ Reserve Gilt and Barrow. Entries must be postmarked by May 1 to avoid late fees.

Nasco Farm & Ranch Wisconsin Shepherd Spring 2013 WS1305

spring 2013

President’s Budget Would Fund National Bio-Lab President Barack Obama’s proposed budget sent to Congress Wednesday includes $714 million to build the National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) near Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kan. The $1.15 billion lab would be built by the Department of Homeland Security and would replace the current facility on Plum Island, N.Y. The NBAF project has come

under scrutiny due to cost issues, but supporters believe the lab is critical to our national defense and are now happy to see President Obama behind the project. The proposal will require additional financial commitments from Kansas. Governor Sam Brownback has indicated he supports the NBAF project and will work with the Kansas legislature to meet the financial commitment.

The trained stock dog— your least expensive, hardest working employee! Get training help from the Wisconsin Working Stock Dog Association.

Kansas has agreed to con­ tribute 20 percent of the cost of construction, and the state has already issued $105 million in bonds and $35 million from the Kansas Bioscience authority. Reprinted in part from Drovers CattleNetwork. Source: American Sheep Industry Association

Wisconsin Wool Works!

August 1-11 Wisconsin State Fair Open daily 9:00 to 7:00 in the Sheep Barn

September 6-8 Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival Country Store, booths 707-708 W. See website for hours, www.wisconsinsheepand woolfestival.com

WE SELL SHEEP EVERY DAY IN ZUMBROTA • Monday - Thursday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Friday 8 a.m. to noon

Sheep and Goat auctions on Tuesday at 8 a.m., and a Breeding Sheep & Goat auction on the first Tuesday of every month at 10 a.m.

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Zumbrota Market Phone 877/732-7305 • www.centrallivestock.com Tom Ostlie 612-532-0966

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MGR 7005 was sold to a customer in West Virginia and he has returned to MGR. His sons and daughters are a standout for thickness and have proved it in several ram test stations. 7005 was born on 6 Jan 07 and by 1 June 07 weighed 194 lbs and scanned 4.70 in2 loineye (4.11 in2 adjusted to 135 lbs). 7005 and his twin brother 7006 weighed a combined 374 lbs in 146 days. 7005’s dam 1199 scanned 4.09 adjusted to 135 lbs. 7005’s sire, MGR 4001, scanned 5.01 in2 loin at 181 lbs (4.55 adjusted to 135 lbs). Not only was the scan of 7005 outstanding but his paternal and maternal siblings were our strongest scanning lambs. To my knowledge no pedigree was ever documented to have higher scans on all five generations in its pedigree. His picture here shows him at just over 4 months of age. MGR 2005 is a son of 7005. He was used here as well as a prominent flock in Ohio. We have used 6 rams this year. They and their sons (15) will be photographed and on the website in late May with scan data to follow in early June. 30 ewe lambs and ewes will be sold in late summer. But you need to show interest early. We sold 40 ewes last year. See us for your Suffolk ram and ewe needs. All registered and RR.

MINT GOLD RANCH

Dale & Judy Dobberpuhl 5807 County Road X • De Pere, WI 54115 920-864-7732 • mintgoldranch@gmail.com mintgoldranch.com WS1305

MGR 7005

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spring 2013

The Wisconsin Shepherd

5

R-CALF USA Forms Sheep Committee Billings, Mont. - In response to requests by sheep producers who recently experienced a 50 percent decline in lamb prices, the 15-member board of directors of R-CALF USA voted last week to form an R-CALF USA Sheep Committee. R-CALF USA President George Chambers appointed Mud Butte, S.D. rancher and longtime R-CALF USA member Bill Kluck to serve as the committee’s chairman. “Bill runs both cattle and sheep on his western South Dakota ranch and his ongoing involvement with

R-CALF to preserve competition in our cattle markets makes him the ideal chairman for this new committee,” said Chambers. Chambers said the purpose of the sheep committee is to identify and implement solutions to reverse the exodus of U.S. sheep producers, halt the offshoring of the U.S. sheep industry, and to put an end to price manipulation in the U.S. lamb market. “Many of our members depend on both cattle and sheep to maintain viable, full-time ranching operations,” said Chambers. Chambers explained that

similar biological characteristics make it possible for cattle and sheep to graze the same range­land. But, he added, “While sheep help ranchers diversify their operations, the sheep industry is subject to the same antitrust and anticompetitive issues that we face in the cattle industry.” Kluck said that lamb prices in the latter part of 2012 fell 50 percent below 2011 prices, a drop Kluck said cannot be explained by competitive market fundamentals. “There aren’t many production or manufacturing businesses in the U.S. that can withstand a 50

percent price decline for their annual production, and our sheep industry isn’t one of them. We need to find a lasting solution to our depressed lamb prices and we need to do it quickly,” Kluck commented. Kluck asserted that competi­ tion is the best of all forms of regulation, but the concentration that antitrust regulators allowed to occur in the lamb slaughtering industry has reduced competition to the point where it no longer functions to prevent price manip­ ulation. “Our new committee is going

to have to be creative to determine what mix of new legislation, new regulations, and increased enforcement will be needed to sustain a viable U.S. sheep industry now that competition has been so seriously eroded,” concluded Kluck. R-CALF USA (RanchersCattle­men Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America) is a national, non­profit organization dedicated to ensuring the continued profit­ ability and viability of the U.S. cattle industry. For more infor­mation, visit www.rcalfusa.com or, call 406-252-2516.


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The Wisconsin Shepherd

spring 2013

DATCP Rules for Livestock Movement IMPORTING SHEEP AND GOATS FROM OUTSIDE WISCONSIN These are the requirements for domestic sheep and goats. For import requirements for bighorn sheep and mountain goats, see exotic ruminants. For up to date information, refer to www.datcp. wi.gov. This information is current as of February 25, 2013 Required: • Certificate of veterinary inspec­ tion (CVI) with complete physical destination address • Official identification (one of the following): o Scrapie tag number o Ear tag number – number must begin with state 2-digit code o Breed registration number o  Ear tag with both a unique premises ID and a unique individual ID number •G  oats from Michigan’s Modified Accredited Zone only – TB testing and import permit o Download the import permit application here or call 608224-4874 between 7:45 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. weekdays to request a permit application form by fax or email.

o  Tuberculosis testing require­ ments •  Animal(s) must originate from a herd that has had a negative whole-herd TB test in the last 12 months for all animals one year and older. The date and result of the whole-herd test must be on the certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI). • All individual animals, regardless of age, must have a negative individual TB test within 60 days before import to Wisconsin. •  If the whole-herd TB test was less than 60 days before the import date, and every individual animal being imported was included in the whole-herd test, the whole-herd test can serve as both required tests. Call 608-224-4874 to find out if your test situation qualifies. • If the whole-herd test was more than 60 days before the import date, every individual animal regardless of age imported must have had a negative TB test in the 60 days before import. • If an individual animal being imported to Wisconsin was

not part of the whole-herd test because it was too young at the time of the test, it needs a negative TB test in the 60 days. • Before import. • If an individual animal being imported to Wisconsin was not part of the whole-herd test because it was not part of the herd at the time of the test, please call 608-2244874. • All goats entering Wisconsin from Michigan will be quarantined on arrival and require a TB test between 60 and 90 days after arrival. • If the animals are attending a fair, exhibition or sale, call 608-224-4874. • Import permits for sheep or goats from regions with vesicular stomatitis (this is very rare – consult with your state’s animal health agency to determine if your region is positive for VS and visit our VS page to see the specific import requirements) Not required: • Import permit (except for goats from Michigan’s MA Zone or all animals from areas with VS) • Tests or statements (except for goats from Michigan’s MA Zone or all animals from areas with VS) Importing Directly to Slaughter Sheep and goats going directly to slaughter must have official individual ID but do not need a CVI. However, animals that are designated as slaughter animals but are not being sent directly to a slaughter facility must meet the regular import requirements (see above). MOVING SHEEP AND GOATS WITHIN WISCONSIN Required: • Official individual ID (see brochure) for all sheep and goats except: o Neutered sheep or goats under 12 months old o  Sheep or goats under 12 months old that is shipped directly to a slaughtering establishment for slaughter

Not required: • A current certificate of veteri­ nary inspection (CVI) EXPORTING SHEEP AND GOATS OUT OF WISCONSIN Except as noted below, Wisconsin does not have specific export requirements for sheep or goats. Please contact the state or nation of destination to learn the import requirements. For goats going to a show or sale in Michigan’s federal TB MA and MAA zones with the intention of returning to Wisconsin, call the Wisconsin Division of Animal Health import coordinator at (608) 224-4874 for more information. Special note: Animal health guidelines can change at any­ time, therefore utilize the DATCP website for updates and changes, www.datcp.wi.gov. Animal Health Regulations for 2013 Fair and Show Season in Wisconsin This information is current as of February 25, 2013 This is a summary of animal health requirements for fairs, shows and exhibitions only. They are not necessarily the same as requirements for importing animals into Wisconsin or mov­ ing them within the state for other purposes. They may change if animal diseases occur in Wisconsin or elsewhere, so you should always check here or contact us for current information. For up to date information, refer to www.datcp.wi.gov. Sheep and Goats Sheep and Goats from within Wisconsin • If sexually intact, need official individual ID at any age • If not sexually intact, need official individual ID if they are 12 months or older • Official ID may be scrapie ear tags, USDA silver ear tag, USDA 840 button ear tag, or breed association tattoo (as long as it is unique to that animal) • Cannot have been exposed to

scrapie if they are sexually intact Sheep and Goats from outside Wisconsin: • Need certificate of veterinary inspection and official individual ID: USDA silver ear tag, USDA 840 button ear tag, or breed association tattoo (as long as it is unique to that animal) • Cannot have been exposed to scrapie Goats from Michigan’s TB Modified Accredited and Modified Accredited Advanced zones: • Need import permits • Need negative whole-herd TB tests within 12 months before arrival in Wisconsin • Need negative individual TB tests within 60 days before entering Wisconsin • Must return directly to the state of origin after the show, and there must be a statement on the CVI that they will be doing so. Llamas, Alpacas, Guanacos Llamas, alpacas and guanacos from within Wisconsin have no requirements. Llamas, alpacas and guanacos from outside Wisconsin must have a certificate of veterinary inspection and official animal ID. Official ID may be: • Approved USDA ear tag number • Microchip number • Breed association registration number • Breed association tattoo. Special note: Animal health guidelines can change at any­ time, therefore utilize the DATCP website for updates and change, www.datcp.wi.gov. For information on obtaining an import permit: • Online • Email DATCPAnimalImports@ wi.gov • Call 608-224-4872

Entry Deadline for

Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival Sheep Shows August 15

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spring 2013

The Wisconsin Shepherd

7

Wisconsin Shepherdess Pays Tribute to Pachy Burns By Wynn Wittkopf, Pewaukee, Wisconsin Anticipation. Excitement. Intrigue. I wondered, “What it would be like working with 3000 ewes alongside Pachy Burns? What would working on the Blue Pines Ranch Lambing Crew entail?” As I flew from Milwaukee to Pasco, Washington, I realized I would soon discover what I was in store for me. In 2010, I had read an article in the ASI Sheep Industry News about Pachy Burns and her “Jam to Lamb” experience. “Jam to Lamb” was a time from March 15 to May 15 where women from across the United States joined Burns on her ranch in Ione, Oregon to work with her during the busy lambing season. “Jam to Lamb” educated hundreds of women (from future vets to reporters) about the sheep industry. It took me a year to research “Jam to Lamb” and then contact Pachy. I was surprised to learn that not only was she a native of Wisconsin, but she also graduated from the same high school as I did (Hartland Arrowhead). Throughout our conversation, I sensed her pas­ sion, enthusiasm, and her strong desire to educate others about the sheep industry. I had so much to learn and felt I could really benefit from spending time with her on Blue Pines ranch. I was practically raised in the sheep barn. Growing up our family had a flock of 200 commercial ewes and I spent hours with my dad, Bob Wiese, in the lambing shed. He often said I was raised on milk replacer as I would finish off any left over bottles I could get my hands on! Over the past forty-plus years, my dad and I have had many great laughs and talks while caring for our family’s flock. We currently have a flock of 40 registered Hampshires and Dorsets, and it seems like lambing time comes and goes so quickly. I eagerly anticipate January and February but before I know it … it’s over. I can’t get enough of it! When Pachy told me they lamb 200 to 300 lambs per day, I knew this was the place for me…! So, let’s talk numbers … • 2600 Bred Ewes • 500 Yearlings

• 100 Rams • 56,000 Acres • 17 Border Collies • 17 Akbash • 7 Full Timers on the Lambing Crew • 1 Boss Jammer • 300 Jugs • 400’ x 80’ Barn • 200 – 300 Lambs per day • 3 Eager Women from Madison, • Seattle, and Pewaukee • 2 4 /7 Lambing = Countless Experiences! Daily Experience Our workday began at 7:00 a.m. The first thing I did each morning when I arrived at the shed was run to the night jugs. I wanted to see how many sets of twins had been born during the night. Our day kicked off by feeding and watering the ewes in the jugs. The mid-morning hours were often spent rearranging the jugs. The singles were in the jugs for 24 hours and then moved to indoor pens (5 ewes & 5 lambs per pen) on one side of the shed. The twins remained in the jugs for 48 hours and then were moved to small groups opposite the singles. We spent the remainder of the morning branding ewes and lambs. The cook always prepared a wonderful meal for lunch and then it was back to work. In the afternoons (1:00 – 7:00 p.m.) we handled the older lambs outside of the shed. We vaccinated, docked, and castrated. We also moved sheep to different pastures and worked on projects around the ranch. Whenever I had a free moment, I would hang around in the Day Drop where 1300 ewes were waiting to give birth or in the process of giving birth. These ewes were moved to the Night Drop shortly before it got dark. This Night Drop was a large pen that was lit up with lights … much like Field of Dreams. Two men on the team were in charge of the birthing area. One worked 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and the other 7:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Our workday concluded around 7:00 p.m. (Although I loved to head back to the Night Drop around midnight to help collect lambs!) After dinner, we usually spent the evening together asking questions and chatting the night away.

Wynn Wittkopf (rt) of Pewaukee with Ione, Oregon sheep producer Pachy Burns after branding the 600th lamb dropped in the 2012 season. Burns' Blue Pine Ranch, with its 2600 ewes, has provided hundreds of women from across the U.S. and abroad an opportunity to experience lambing time on a commercial sheep ranch through "Jam to Lamb, a 16-year effort by Burns to expose people to agriculture. Challenges The most challenging experi­ ence of the trip was the language barrier with the Peruvian Crew. Why did I take German in high school? Most of the dogs didn’t even understand English! We often used hand signals to try to communicate with one another. The lambing shed had posters with lists of words and a Spanish/ English dictionary. I often found myself looking up words that were written on tape and attached to the different jugs. Each of the seven men had different roles and I would try to learn from them by following them around at different parts of the day. But the language barrier was definitely a challenge. And an adventure The most adventurous experi­ ence was walking 300 ewes and their 300 lambs 2 ½ miles down the road to irrigated pastures. Again … the language barrier proved to be challenging but adventurous! Scary moments The scariest experience occurred when one of the crew placed me in the middle of a road and motioned for me to stay there. I gathered from his hand signals he was going over the hillside to gather the sheep and then run them up the road towards

me. I was told by Pachy that we would be weighing animals to sell, so I knew the crew member wanted me to turn them into a large pen which contained the weigh station. I was confident I could do it … until over the ridge came 100 very large rams … and they were on the move! I’m ok with rams one on one, but a hundred of them running at me was a little intimidating! I tried to keep telling myself they were just very large ewes. I was able to get them into the pen and then the fun began … sorting and weighing them. I felt very uncomfortable amongst them, but I continually told myself, “Just big ewes… just big ewes.” Fortunately, Pachy eased my anxiety by her contagious laughter, singing, and dancing.

January 6, 2013, marked a sad day for the sheep & wool industry. Pachy Burns, 63, died in a car accident near her ranch in Ione, Oregon. Pachy will be deeply missed. She spent her life inspiring and educating people throughout the world. Some of her accomplishments include: Actively involvement with the Montana Wool Growers since 1984 and the Montana Agri-Women (Vice President 2005); current Chairman and National Representative of the Montana Farm Bureau Sheep Committee; Traveled to remote areas of Russia representing the American Agriculture Industry for CFNA (Citizens Network for Foreign Affairs); member of the Montana Management as early as 1986 by grazing sheep on leafy spurge; member Montana Noxious Weed Advisory Council and the Advisory Committee for the Skeen Institute for Rangeland Restoration; conducted Jam to Lamb since 1994 and in October 2005 traveled to Japan with Farm Bureau delegation; Statewide Noxious Weed Awareness Campaign Advisory Committee member; involved with the programs developed for integrated weed control concerning BSE issues to regain Japanese trust in U.S. meat industries; and most recently, President of Mountain Plains and Chairperson for the Wolf Advisory Board.

UWEX Seeks Input on Composting Jonathan Rivin, PhD, Waste Management Specialist at the UWEX Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center, UW-Stevens Point, is requesting input to determine if the farming community needs assistance with composting operations. The on-line survey takes about five minutes to complete. If participants would like a hard copy, Rivin may be contacted at jonathon.rivin@uwsp.edu. To take the on-line survey use the following link: https://uwex. qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_GeRsRTJJVnxulqp.

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8

The Wisconsin Shepherd

spring 2013

Grant County Tops WISCONSIN LIVESTOCK SHOW Senior Division in 4-H CAMP DEADLINE APPROACHING livestock exhibitors Wisconsin Livestock Breeders parents are welcome to participate Meats Judging Contest andJunior their families interested Association (WLBA) and the and accompany their child. The team from Grant County took top honors in the senior division of the State 4-H meats Contest held Feb 16 at University of Wisconsin Madison Meat Laboratory. Team members were Lena Frank, Amber Patterson, Cordt Esser and Charlie Connelly. They were coached by Dennis Patterson. These 4-H members will represent Wisconsin at the National 4-H Meats Judging Contest to be held this fall in Kansas City. The second place senior team, which will represent Wisconsin at a contest in Denver, Colorado, was from Columbia Co. Team members included Lea Parker, Becky Starkenburg, Chase Richards, Chance Richards. The team was coached by Todd Taylor. The State Contest consisted of evaluating classes of hams, beef, pork and lamb carcasses, and 2 retail cut classes. The youth also identified 40 retail cuts of beef, pork or lamb and graded 5 beef carcasses. The top ten senior individual’s judges, in order, were: Lena Frank, Grant; Rylee Black, Polk; Cordt Esser, Grant; Ashley Zimmerman, Marathon; Lea Parker, Columbia; Amber Patterson, Grant; Jessica Taylor, Columbia; Becky Starken­ burg, Columbia; Chase Richards, Columbia; Charlie Connolly, Grant. The top junior team was from Marathon County. Team members were: Katelyn Zimmerman, Emma Walters, Emilie Pauls and Cortney Zimmerman. The team is coached by Mark Zimmerman. The second place junior team was from Columbia County. Team members were: Emily Taylor, Max Ripp, Zach Mickelson and Justin Taylor. The team is coached by Todd Taylor.

WCLA News and Notes The second annual Wisconsin Club Lamb Association online sale successfully concluded on April 8th, 2013. 13 Lots sold into 5 states, with the top Seller being a wether consigned by Steva Robinson Show Stock of Belmont, WI., followed by a wether consigned by Jason Johnson Club Lambs of Delavan, WI. The 2013 Show season is just around the corner, with the first show being May 4th. There are 8 sanctioned shows for the 2013 show season, with 5 of those being double headers, having two shows with two different judges back to back on the same day. For more information on the WCLA shows, a list of the breeders who are members of the Wisconsin Club Lamb Asso­ ciation, and more information about the Wisconsin Club Lamb Asso­ ciation, please visit our website www.wisconsinclublamb association.com or find us on Facebook.

The top ten junior individual judges, in order, were: Katelyn Zimmerman, Marathon; Paul Connolly, Grant; Dillin Meier, Grant; Emily Taylor, Columbia; Emma Walters, Marathon; Max Ripp, Columbia; Zach Mickelson, Columbia; Justin Taylor, Colum­ bia; Sam Black, Polk and Medora Richards, Columbia. Results and photos are avail­ able at: http://fyi.uwex.edu/youth livestock/programs/4hmeats contest/. Sponsors for the State 4-H Meats contest include The Wisconsin 4-H Foundation and UW-Extension. The contest is organized annually by Extension Meats Specialist, Jeff Sindelar, Extension Youth Livestock Specialist, Bernie O’Rourke and Interim 4-H Youth Development Specialist Pam Hobson.

in gaining knowledge of the livestock industry, expanding project management skills, and learning new fitting and showing techniques, should consider add­ ing the 15th Wisconsin Junior Live­ stock Show Camp to your calendar of summer events! This year’s camp is scheduled for June 15-16 and will be held at Wisconsin State Fair Park. The camp is sponsored by the

Blue Ribbon Sale of Champions Foundation. This year’s camp presenters will be Lori Shroyer from Shroyer Club Lambs, DeGraff, OH for sheep, Troy Polyock & Erika Boehmer, Zenda, WI for beef, and Devan Brugger, of Brugger Family Show Pigs, Monroe, WI, for swine. The Wisconsin Junior Live­ stock Show Camp is also open to out of state participants, and

Discounted rates are available for multi-family registrations. Additional camp information and the registration application can be found on the WLBA website at www.wisconsinlivestockbreeders. com or by contacting Executive Director Jill Alf at 608/8682505 or alfhamp@centurytel.net. Deadline for registration is May 15th; late registrations may be accepted if room is available.

PLAN NOW! 2013 USED EQUIPMENT AUCTION Saturday, September 7 2:00 p.m. Jefferson Park, Jefferson, WI Consigning is easy! Go to www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com and download a consignment form or consign the day of the sale.

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spring 2013

The Wisconsin Shepherd

9

Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Recognize Master Stockman Award Recipients Arlington: The Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Association honored three Master Stockman winners at its Annual Meeting & Recognition Program on March 23, where each Master Stockman winner was awarded a $750 scholarship. This year’s Sheep Master Stockman award went to Jenna

Langer, daughter of Randy and Sue Langer of Deforest. Jenna is a student at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville majoring in Animal Science. She owns 20 purebred registered Southdowns, has been very involved in the sheep industry, and plans to return home to work on her family’s farm following graduation from

college. Earning the Beef Master Stockman award was Nick Colle of Luxemburg. The son of Susan and Michael Colle, Nick is a student at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. The winner of the Swine Master Stockman award was Brian Wehrle, New London. He is the

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Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Association President Andy Mindemann (l.) presented the 2013 WLBA Sheep Honoree Award to Shelly and Dan Smercheck of Rosholt. The WLBA held its annual meeting on March 23 in Arlington.

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10

The Wisconsin Shepherd

spring 2013

Common Poisonous Plants of Concern for Wisconsin’s Livestock Anders Gurda and Mark Renz Research Assistant and Extension Weed Scientist, University of Wisconsin-Madison While most plants are safe for consumption by livestock, a few plant species can sicken or even kill animals. This publication overviews what poisonous plants are and under what conditions they can be toxic to livestock. A detailed list of common poisonous plants found in Wisconsin along with a description of the level of toxicity and resulting symptoms of ingestion is also included as a reference. If plant poisoning is suspected contact a veterinarian or other specialist immediately, as a rapid response is often required to prevent serious injury or death. What Makes a Plant Poisonous? The level of poisoning is determined by the amount of the toxic plant consumed, size and species of the animal, general health of the animal, and concentration of the toxin in the plant part. Symptoms may vary from the inability to perform to fullest potential to more serious manifestations, including slobbering, tremors, lack of coordi­nation, erratic behavior, con­ vulsions, or even sudden death. The level of toxicity in animals can vary over time due to the irregularity in animal ingestion, but also can be due to the variability in the amount of the toxic compound present in a plant. The presence of a toxic compound can vary dramatically depending on environmental condi­tions, management of the pasture, and even can be depen­dent on the plant part that is eaten (e.g. leaves, stems, roots, fruit, and even seeds). Thus toxicity is the result of many factors that can make diagnosis and determination of the level of seriousness difficult to determine. For simplicity we separate poisonous plants common to the upper Midwest into three categories: 1. Highly toxic—small amounts (<5% of feed) can result in serious injury/death. 2. Moderately toxic—moderate amounts (>5% - 25%) can result in injury/death. 3. Mildly toxic—under certain environmental or management conditions these plants can be toxic. When Should I Be Cautious Fortunately the concern about toxicity is often a result of specific situations. Understanding what conditions can lead to plant poisoning can help reduce the risk of harm or death in susceptible herds. If any of these issues apply to you we recommend management practices to alleviate poisonous plants of concern. First grazing in the spring. When animals are put onto pasture for the first time in spring, poisonous plant tissue is young and more palatable. Livestock can feed on these plants at this time, especially if other desirable forage (e.g. forage grasses) hasn’t started to grow. To avoid this scenario we recommend controlling poisonous plants or not allowing animals into these areas until ample desirable forage is present to reduce the risk of animals feeding on poisonous plants. Limited desirable forage avail­able. When animals are hungry, for any number of reasons, their selectivity decreases and they may eat plants they’d otherwise avoid. Make sure adequate forage is available, especially when poison­ous plants are present. This is common especially under drought conditions, in the fall, or when pastures are overgrazed. After an herbicide application. Many weeds are not palatable and are avoided, but after an herbicide application their palatability can increase dramatically. If poi­sonous plants are treated with an herbicide we recommend not grazing for at least a 14-day period to avoid this occurrence. Read the product label for more specific recommendations and always follow label directions. After application of nitrogen. Fields with an abundance of ni­ trate-accumulating plants includ­ing pigweeds, common lamb’s quarters, and common rag­weed can become toxic after fields are fertilized or following drought conditions. These com­mon weeds take up excessive nitrogen and convert it to nitrate. If enough of these weeds are eaten this can result in nitrate toxicity. If these weeds are present and consist of at least 20% of the feed in a fertilized field, they should be controlled before allowing animals to graze. Yard waste/clippings. Many or­namental shrubs and plants are both highly toxic and palatable to live­stock. Avoid feeding or dump­ing yard waste/clippings into pas­tures or animal holding areas, as this is one of the most common scenarios for livestock poisoning in the Upper Midwest. Animals unfamiliar to a pas­ture or other area. Animals that are being boarded at a new location are often susceptible to poisoning. When grazing a new area or newly seeded pasture, introduce animals gradually and monitor for any physical changes or change in behavior. Toxic plants in harvested for­ ages. Few options exist for preventing the presence of poison­ous plants in purchased hay. To make matters worse it is difficult for animals to avoid poisonous plants when they are dried and mixed with desirable forage. Knowledge of the source of the hay is the only realistic way to prevent this situation.

Common Poisonous Plants in Wisconsin Prevention is always the best policy and the purpose of this paper is to point out some of the plants that are potentially harmful to livestock so that measures to avoid or at least minimize animal exposure. If control measures are needed, contact your county agricultural extension educator for assistance. If animals exhibit unusual symptoms, call a veterinarian. Table 1:Highly Poisonous plants common to Wisconsin ( <5% of feed can result in serious injury/death). Plant

Cattle

Pigs

Choke-Cherry (Prunus spp.)

X

X

Black locust

X

Cocklebur

X

Jimson-weed

X

Milkweed spp.

X

Poison hemlock

X

Red maple

White snakeroot

Symptoms

Amount necessary for poisoning/Comments

Sudden death is the most common symptom. Live animals may exhibit rapid breathing, frothing at the mouth, dilated pupils, tremors and convulsions. Irregular heart rate, pale mucous membranes, light breathing, depression, abdominal pain, diarrhea, death is not uncommon.

0.25% of body weight consumed in green, wilted, or dead leaves will likely lead to death, in as little as 30 minutes.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Convulsions, depression, reluctance to move, hunched back, blindness, recumbancy, death.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Decreased respiratory and heart rates, muscle weakness, dilated pupils, colic, watery diarrhea. Rupture of stomach in horses. Respiratory paralysis and death. Depression, slowed respiratory rate, pain and inability to stand, tremors, staggering gate, weak and rapid pulse, colic, dilated pupils. Salivation, abdominal pain, muscle tremors, incoordination, labored breathing, weak pulse, frequent evacuation, death. Weakness, increased respiratory and heart rates, red-brown colored urine, fever, death. (hemolytic anemia). Mares may abort even without symptoms of anemia. Listlessness, depression, lethargic, hesitant to move, muscle tremors (especially in cattle).

X

Sheep Horses

X

X

X

X

As little as 0.1% of body weight eaten in bark can poison horses. Cattle less susceptible. Bark and seeds are most poisonous, but all parts can be toxic. 0.75% to 3% of body weight eaten when plants are young (seedlings) can result in death. Young leaves and seeds are most poisonous. 0.1% to 0.3% of body weight eaten in green plants results in poisoning. Larger amounts can be fatal. 0.05% to 5% of body weight eaten in green plants can be fatal. Toxicity varies with species, but all have the potential to be fatal. As little as 0.5% of body weight of hemlock can be fatal. Can cause skeletal defects in fetal calves if grazed by pregnant cows. As little as 1.5 kg of dried or wilted leaves eaten over 1-5 days can be fatal. Bark also poisonous. 0.5% to 1.5% of body weight in green plant. If livestock exhibit “trembles”, death is likely. Toxin secreted in milk; can poison calves and humans.

Table 2: Moderately poisonous plants common to Wisconsin (>5% - 25% of feed can result in injury/death). Plant

Cattle

Pigs

Sheep Horses

Horsetail

X

X

Eastern black nightshade

X

X

X

X

Horsenettle

X

X

X

X

Climbing nightshade

X

X

X

Oaks

X

X

X

X

St. Johnswort

X

X

X

X

Symptoms

Amount necessary for poisoning/Comments

Diarrhea, weight loss, hind leg incoordination, Hay that is 20% horsetail can cause symptoms. Continued ingestion for 1-2 months can decreased milk production. cause death. Toxicity varies with plant parts, but is Depression, decreased heart and respiratory rate, muscle weakness, watery diarrhea, concentrated in berries. Immature plants considerably more poisonous with toxic paralysis of hind legs (“sitting dog”). alkaloids remaining active in dry hay. Can range from 1-3 days of illness to death. Depression, decreased heart and respiratory rate, Toxicity varies with plant parts, but is muscle weakness, watery diarrhea, paralysis of concentrated in berries with unripe berries hind legs (“sitting dog”). being more toxic. Can range from 1-3 days of illness to sudden death. Depression, decreased heart and respiratory rate, Toxicity varies with plant parts, but is muscle weakness, watery diarrhea, paralysis of concentrated in green, unripe berries though hind legs (“sitting dog”). vegetation is also toxic. Can range from 1-3 days of illness to sudden death. Lack of appetite, depression, abdominal pain Assumed that large quantities over time cause (teeth grinding and hunched back), black and poisoning though some cases report death tarry diarrhea, liver and kidney damage, after only hours of ingestion. All parts of plant are toxic, young leaves and acorns primarily. death in some cases. Calves born to cows feeding on acorns can exhibit defects. Severe sunburn (photosensitivity), intense Toxic dose unknown. All parts of the plant itching, swollen eyelids, blindness, starvation, that bear black dots are poisonous. Death is fever, increased heart rate and respiration, unlikely unless by secondary infection. diarrhea, shade seeking.

Table 3: Mildly poisonous plants common to Wisconsin (moderate amounts mildly toxic or plants toxic under certain conditions). Plant

Cattle

Pigs

Buttercup spp.

X

X

X

X

Bracken fern

X

X

X

X

Hoary alyssum Horseweed Lambs-quarter

Sheep Horses

X

X

X

X

X

Pigweed spp.

X

X

X

Wild parsnip

X

X

Symptoms

Amount necessary for poisoning/Comments

Variable toxicity in plants. Reddening of oral mucous membrane, salivation, Can be fatal in sheep. diarrhea. Bitter milk or blood in milk. Cattle need to eat their body weight over Hemorrhaging from nose, mouth, or other several months. Young plants (“fiddle heads”) mucous membrane; blood in urine or feces; high temperature, cancer. up to five times as poisonous as mature plants and are attractive especially to cattle. All parts poisonous. Lameness, stiffness, limb swelling, fever, Not yet determined. All parts toxic, green and diarrhea, abortion. dried. Mucosal and skin irritation. Unknown. Kidney damage (Perirenal edema), drowsiness, Dose dependent on nitrate level. Results from weakness, muscular tremors, staggering gate, ingesting plants that uptake nitrate from nitrate recumbancy, abortion. Sudden death. fertilizers or some herbicides (2, 4-D). Stems most poisonous. Most potent at night/early morning and overcast days. Kidney damage (Perirenal edema), drowsiness, Dose dependent on nitrate level. Results from weakness, muscular tremors, staggering gate, ingesting plants that uptake nitrate from nitrate recumbancy, abortion. Sudden death. fertilizers or some herbicides (2, 4-D). Stems most poisonous. Most potent at night/early morning and overcast days. Severe Sunburn (photosensitivity). Toxic dose not yet determined, but large amounts need to be ingested to cause a response.

Coming to a Lamb Chop Near You? Don’t know your pork butts from your rump roasts? It may be getting a little easier. The American meat industry is rolling out a refresh of the often confusing 40-year-old system used for naming the various cuts of beef, pork, lamb and veal. That’s because the system—the Uniform Retail Meat Identification Standards (URMIS)—was designed more for the needs of retailers and butchers than for the convenience of harried shoppers. The bottom line is that meat counter confusion isn’t good for sales. So after nearly two years of consumer research, the National

Pork Board, the Beef Checkoff Program and federal agriculture officials have signed off on an updated labeling system that should hit stores just in time for prime grilling season. In all, more than 350 cuts of pork and beef (lamb and veal updates are coming later) will sport the new labels, which will include not only simplified names, but also detailed characteristics of the meat and cooking guidelines. So what once was called pork butt will now be called a Boston roast and be described as a bone-in pork shoulder. Where appropriate, the new

labels also will use universal terms across species—a bone-in loin cut will be called a T-bone whether it’s pork or beef. Meat labels are federally regulated. Although the URMIS system is a voluntary one, nearly 85 percent of food retailers use it. The new names may catch on, yet already published cookbooks and recipes could call for meats by different names. Will people know to buy a New York chop if a pork recipe calls for a top loin chop? Source: American Sheep Industry Association. Reprinted in part from Northern Ag Network


spring 2013

The Wisconsin Shepherd

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Using Technology to Canada Threatens Sanctions Reach Producers over U.S. Meat Labeling A recent series of educational workshops held online by Ohio State University (OSU) Extension experts geared toward sheep and goat farmers has drawn more than 1,300 views so far from farmers in Ohio, Indiana and West Virginia, OSU Extension educator, Jeff McCutcheon, says. The 2013 Sheep and Goat WebEx Program Series was presented over four days at 18 sites statewide in February using a WebEx online format as part of an ongoing effort to reach as many producers as possible on issues relevant to growing and enhancing their operations. “The need is there for this kind of programing, and based on feedback that we’ve gotten thus far, the program is a success,” McCutcheon said. “A majority of participants, 93 percent, said they gained knowledge from viewing

the program; and 63 percent said they planned to make a change to their operation based on the information learned through the program.” Topics for the series included: • Vaccination Programs for Sheep and Goat Operations; • Artificial Insemination Tech­ niques of Sheep and Goats; • Managing Pastures and Hay Fields after a Drought; and • Use of EAZI-BREED CIDR for Sheep and Goat Operations. The series is sponsored by the Ohio Sheep Improvement Asso­ ciation (OSIA), OSU Exten­sion and the OSU Sheep Team and can be viewed online at http://sheep. osu.edu/presentation-library/. Reprinted in part from www. limaohio.com Source: American Sheep Industry Association

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Canada is considering impos­ ing sanctions of up to $980 million a year against the United States unless it complies with a World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling requiring changes in how it labels meat, according to media reports. Canadian Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz said on Tuesday the country would consider “extensive retaliatory measures” against the United States over country-of-origin labels (COOL) introduced in 2009, Reuters reported. Speaking to reporters after a

meeting with U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, Ritz said the rules are costing Canadian beef and pork producers C$1 billion ($980 million) a year in lost sales, and Canada would look to recoup that amount. Mexico and Canada success­ fully argued before the World Trade Organization last year that the labels are discriminatory, and the WTO gave the United States until May 23 to change them. The new labels, which identify where beef, pork, chicken and lamb sold in the United States come from, sharply reduced U.S. imports

of foreign-raised pigs and cattle because they required U.S. packers to segregate imported animals from U.S.-grown livestock. The U.S. Department of Agri­ culture on March 12 proposed a rule to alter country-of-origin labeling in an attempt to bring the United States into com­ pliance with its obligations under the WTO. The American Sheep Industry Association filed comments in support of these changes in an effort to keep labeling mandatory for American lamb. Source: American Sheep Industry Association

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12

The Wisconsin Shepherd

spring 2013

Calendar of Events

April 26 —State FFA Livestock Judging Contest, Contact: Bernie O’Rourke at 608 263-4304 or borourke2@ansci.wisc.edu. April 30—Deadline – Catalog Ads Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival Catalog. Contact: Kelli Gunderson, robkelgundy@yahoo.com or 815 821-5905 May 1—Pasture Fertilization Pasture Walk, R & G Miller & Sons, Organic Farm, 1706 County Road V, Columbus, WI. Contact George Koepp, UW-Extension, Columbia County, 608 742-9683. george.koepp@ces.uwex.edu for times and registration. May 3—The Year In the Life of Your Flock: Health & Welfare of Your Flock. 1:004:00 p.m. Michael Fields Institute, East Troy, WI. For information or to register: Jodie at 262 642-3303 Ext 128, or farmandfood@michaelfields.org May 4—UW-River Falls Prospect Show, Ellsworth, WI Information: http://site. uwrfbnb.com/ May 4-5—40th Annual Maryland Sheep & Wool Festival www.SheepAndWool.org May 5—Badger Bonanza Lamb Show, Arlington Research Station Public Events Center, N695 Hopkins Road, Arlington, WI. Information: Mackenzie Nickels, 608 9311711, www.wisconsinclublambassociation.com May 8—Using Annuals to Thicken Pasture Swards, Fencing Demo & Silviculture Planting Preparation, Brattset Family Farm, N2437 Brattset Lane, Jefferson, WI. Free, but please register. Contact: Kirsten Jurcek, Town & Country RC&D, 920 342-9504 or kjurcek1@centurytel.net May 10-12—16th Annual Shepherd’s Harvest Sheep & Wool Festival, Lake Elmo, MN. www.ShepherdsHarvestFestival.org May 17-18—Wisconsin Quilt Museum University Days. Fiber arts classes and work shops. N50W5050 Portland Road, Cedarburg, WI For schedule and Registration information: www.wiquiltmuseum.com, 262 546-0300. Registration deadline – April 30. May 25-26—Great Lakes Fiber Show, Wayne County Fairgrounds, Wooster, OH. www. greatlakesfibershow.com May 31-June 1—Hoosier Hills Fiber Festival, Johnson County Fairgrounds, Franklin, IN. www.hoosierhillsfiberfestival.com June —Wisconsin County Fairs www.wifairs.com June 1—Dust ‘Em Off Show, St. Croix County Fairgrounds, Glenwood City, WI Showmanship clinic at 9:00 a.m. Master Stockman competition 11:00 – 12:00, shows beginning at 12:30 p.m. Information: www.stcroixbreedingstock.com or Lori/Warren at wldfarms@gmail.com June 5—Seeding Demonstration Follow-up, Pasturing Swine & Forage Calculations, Sue & Dennis Mengeling Farm, N4754 County Road V, Poynette, WI. Contact: George Koepp, UW-Extension, Columbia County, 608 742-9683, george.koepp@ces.uwex.edu for times and registration. June 8—WLBA Spring Preview Show, Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson, WI Information: www.wisconsinlivestockbreeders.com June 15-16—WLBA Wisconsin Livestock Show Camp, Wisconsin State Fair Park, West Allis, WI. Information: www.wisconsinlivestockbreeders.com June 15—Deadline – Scholarship Applications, (postmarked June 15) Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Co-op For application/information: www.wisbc.com Youth Activities or contact wisbc@centurytel.com or WSBC, 7811 Consolidated School Road, Edgerton, WI 53534. (Late applications will not be accepted) June 15—Midwest Junior Preview Show, Sedalia, MO. Information: http://www. midwestjuniorpreviewshow.com/ June 21—NW Region Chippewa County Area Animal Science Day. Information: Bernie O’Rourke, borourke2@ansci.wisc.edu or 608 263-4304. June 21-22—Interstate Livestock Show, St. Croix Falls, WI Contact: Charlene Strabel, Secretary, 715 349-5935 strabel@sirennet.net July 4-7—All-American Junior Show, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI www.countrylovin.com/AAJSS/index.html or info@allamericanjuniorshow.com 641 942-6402 July 4-7—UJSSA National Junior Suffolk Show, East Lansing, MI Tayler Wolff wolff. tayler@gmail.com

HIDDEN VALLEY FARM & WOOLEN MILL Clothing, jewelry, Christmas cards, stationery, stuffed animals, books, figurines and calendars for the sheep enthusiast.

Ewesful Gifts

7868 State Road 73 Columbus, WI 53925 Order Toll Free 877 393-7385 or 920 623-3536 www.ewesfulgifts.com - free catalog

Registered C.S.S.N.A.

• Custom Carding • Roving & batts for spinning • Quilting batts & reconditioning • Hand-tied quilts • Registered Coopworth Sheep

Paul & Carol Wagner 14804 Newton Rd., Valders, WI 54245

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July 5—Copy/Ad Deadline – Wisconsin Shepherd Summer Issue. Ad Contact: Kelli Gunderson robkelgundy@yahoo.com 815 821-5905. Copy Contact: Bob Black rbblack@powercom.net 920 623-3536 June 8-9—9th Annual Iowa Sheep & Wool Festival, Dallas County Fairgrounds, Adel, IA. Contact: info@iowasheep.com or 712 790-6303. www.iowasheep.com July 9-11—2013 Farm Technology Days, Alex and Mary Olson Farm, Dallas, WI. Contact: Exec. Secretary, Tim Jergenson 715 537-6252 or tim.jergenson@co.barron. wi.us or www.barronfarmtech.com July 10—Summer Slump & Grazing Alfalfa Pasture Walk, Ron Schoepp Farm, N2007 E. Harmon Road, Lodi, WI. Contact: George Koepp, UW-Extension, Columbia County, 608 742-9683, george.koepp@ces.uwex.edu for times and registration. July 12-13—Northern Wisconsin State Fair. Information: http://www.norwisstatefair. com/ July 14-17—Howard Wyman Sheep Industry Leadership School, San Angelo, TX. Information: www.nlfa-sheep.org July 19-20—2013 National Targhee Show, Public Events Facility, UW-Arlington Research Farm, Arlington, WI. Information: www.ustargheesheep.org or email, Todd & Lynnette Taylor, TaylorSheep@yahoo.com or Leslie & Jeff Nevens, AandJLivestock@ frontier.com July 22—State 4-H Livestock Judging Contest, Arlington, WI Contact: Bernie O’Rourke, borourke2@ansci.wisc.edu or 608 263-4304. July 23—Grazing Herbs to Enhance Immune Systems, Pasture Establishment & Pasture seeding Methods on an Organic Farm Dairy Farm, Adam Gehl Farm, 6541 Cty Road K, Hartford, WI. Contact: Kirsten Jurcek, Town & Country RC&D, 920 3429504, kjurcek1@centurytel.net for times and registration information. August 1-11—Wisconsin State Fair, www.wistatefair.com August 7—Water Supply Systems, Todd Rietmann Farm, N4860 Owen Park Road, Merrimac, WI. Contact: George Koepp, UW-Extension, Columbia County, 608 7429683, george.koepp@ces.uwex.edu for times and registration. August 15—Entry Deadline – Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival www. wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com August 17—61st Annual Spooner Sheep Day, Spooner Agricultural Research Station, Spooner, WI. Contact: Michel Baldin, baldin@wisc.edu, 715 635-3735. August 17—WLBA Summer Spectacular Show, Marathon Fair Park, Wausau, WI. Information: www.wisconsinlivestockbreeders.com September 6-8­—2013 Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson, WI. www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com September 7—2013 Make It With Wool Competition, Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson, WI. Entry deadline, August 15. For information: Wynn Wittkopf 262 367-6192 jwwittkopf@core.com. Entry form/info online at www. wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com September 8—Annual Meeting – Wisconsin Club Lamb Association, Follow­ ing Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival Market Lamb Show. www.wisconsinclub lambassociation.com or www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com September 18—Pasture Walk, Bill & Laura Paine Farm, N893 Kranz Road, Columbus, WI. Contact: George Koepp, UW-Extension, Columbia County, 608 742-9683, george. koepp@ces.uwex.edu for times and registration. September 20—Copy/Ad Deadline – Wisconsin Shepherd Fall Issue. Ad Contact: Kelli Gunderson robkelgundy@yahoo.com 815 821-5905. Copy Contact: Bob Black rbblack@powercom.net 920 623-3536 September 21—Indianhead Sheep Breeders Association Fall Shearing School, Duane Klindworth Farm, Augusta, WI. For information: 715 286-4157, drklindworth@ aol.com September 22—6th Badger Production Sale, Public Events Facility, Arlington Agricultural Research Station, Arlington, WI. Contact: Todd Taylor, 608 332-4914 or 608 846-5858, toddtaylor@wiscmail.wisc.edu

Erdman Texel Sheep Texels – to put the MEAT back in your sheep! OPP Negative • Scrapie Certified

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Jones Shearing

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For Your Advertising Needs, for Subscription Rates or to Receive a 4-week Complimentary Paper Contact:

The Country Today PO Box 570 Eau Claire WI 54702 715-833-9276 • 800-236-4004 joann.utphall@ecpc.com sue.bauer@ecpc.com www.thecountrytoday.com

The Business Directory Published by The Wisconsin Shepherd

3696 Country Aire Drive Cedarburg, WI 53012 262-377-1491 • Dick 262-375-0814 • Mark rsrmke@att.net 4 Miles East of Jackson on SE Corner of Hwy. 60 and Country Aire Drive (Hwy. M)

“Ewe” too can join The Business Directory Members pay $110 for 4 issues or $40/issue; non-members $140 for 4 issues or $50/issue. Call Kelli at 815-821-5905.

The Wisconsin Shepherd, Spring 2013  

Volume 25, Number 2 A Publication of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative 7811 Consolidated School Rd., Edgerton, WI 53534 • www.wisbc....

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