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ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED NON-PROFIT US POSTAGE

SUMMER 2012

PAID

7811 Consolidated School Rd., Edgerton, WI 53534 • www.wisbc.com

PERMIT NO. 203 EAU CLAIRE, WI

A PUBLICATION OF THE WISCONSIN SHEEP BREEDERS COOPERATIVE

VOLUME 24, NUMBER 3

WISCONSIN SHEEP & WOOL FESTIVAL CELEBRATES 11 YEARS!

Festival Focuses on Education

The 2012 Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival is focusing on education as it heads into its eleventh year at Jefferson Fair Park in Jefferson on September 7-9. There is a kaleidoscope of fiber arts classes, hands-on labs, clinic for beginners and demonstrations that pack the Friday-through-Sunday schedule. For the past several years Sheep 101 has been a popular, all-day clinic taking place on Friday, geared to all experience levels, but primarily directed toward beginning or newer producers. Anyone wishing to participate in Sheep 101 must pre-register www. wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival. com. The registration fee is $60 per person and includes admission. The Shepherd’s Work­ shops offered on Saturday and Sunday are open to anyone attend­ ing the festival, with the exception of the cheese­making class where pre-regis­tration is again required. Students must pre-register online for Wonders of Wool fiber arts classes and enrollments are limited. In addition to over thirty fiber arts instructors from across the nation, the Sheep 101 and Shepherd’s Workshops presenters include: Tom Cadwallader Cadwallader is an Emeritus Professor with the UW-Extension Department of Ag/Agbusiness, Principal of Cadwallader Con­ sulting, LLC, and co-owner and operator, with his wife Pat, of Stony Glen Farm, a diversified farm near Gleason, Wisconsin. Tom began his agricultural career and was first introduced to sheep production when he was a teenager working at Upland Hills Farm near Oxford, Michigan. He went on to earn a B.S. degree in Animal Husbandry from Michigan State University and a M.S. degree in Meat and Animal Science from UW-Madison. While at MSU he worked and lived at the Sheep Research and Teaching Center, famous for their purebred Suffolk and Rambouillet flocks. At UW-Madison Tom did research on selenium deficiencies in sheep and during his tenure lived and worked at Art Pope’s

Some assembly required. There's no better place to gather with family and friends than at the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival September 7-9! Check out the complete program of kids' activities, shows, classes and more at wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com. sheep and beef farm near Middleton. After graduating he took on the position of Assistant Superintendent and Shepherd at the UW Spooner Agricultural Research station where he spent six years researching a variety of production systems, ranging from complete confinement to minimum care pasture lambing. In 2011, after 23 years with UW-Extension, Tom retired as the Agricultural Development Educator for Lincoln and Marathon Counties. During his

career he was very involved in the development of the Wisconsin grazing community, beginning with teaching the basics of managed grazing and eventually spending more time helping farmers and farm organizations manage their businesses. Since retiring he started Cadwallader Consulting, LLC, specializing in agricultural business planning and development. Throughout his career in Extension, Tom and his wife have strived to “practice what they preached” on their

150 acre farm, with a 150 ewe pasture lambing flock as its core enterprise. Tom has also consulted on 20 different agricultural projects in 10 different countries around the globe, from the rain forest in Guyana to the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Cadwallader will talk about matching a sheep production system with resources for Friday’s Sheep 101 clinic and then take listeners on a global tour of sheep operations as part of Saturday’s educational sessions.

Wisconsin Exhibitors • 2012 All-American Junior Sheep Show • Des Moines

Front row L-R: Lindsey Schmoll, Ty Thorson, Hayden Taylor, Jessica Lindow, Justin Taylor, Danielle Robinson. Second row L-R: Hayley Yunker, Jessica Alf, Kelsi Smerchek, Mallory Schmoll, Kailen Smerchek, Carson Lobdell, Courtney Lobdell, Jillian Bingen, Alyssa Baumer, Kelly Vierck. Third row L-R: Connor Schultz, Emily Petzel, John Jones, Dathan Smerchek, Jenna Langer, Trent Kohlman, Kristen Kohlman, Katelyn Schmoll, Carissa Haffenbredl, Jessica Taylor, Hannah Taylor, Casey Lobdell, Clifton McClintock, Alec Baumer. Photo by Jill Alf.

Bob Benson Benson is the District III repre­sentative to ASI (American Sheep Industry Association), which in­ cludes Wisconsin, Illi­ nois, Indiana, Michigan, Minne­ sota and Ohio. He has been in the sheep industry for 36 years and currently has a farm flock of Shrop­shire ewes at his home north of Indianapolis. Benson has been a long-time supporter of the sheep industry at the county, state and national levels, serving on the ASI Legislative Action Council, By-Laws Committee, Financial Review Committee and Nomi­ nating Committee and is active in the Indiana Sheep Association. He has been a tireless proponent of the current expansion program for the industry and on Sunday will talk about what ASI can do for producers and how it relates to state organizations like the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative. Don Van Nostran Don’s experience with sheep began with a 4-H project over fifty years ago and has been a part of his life ever since. After earning his BS Degree in Animal Science and his MS Degree in Ag Education from Ohio State, he spent 19 years in education before joining Mid-States Wool Growers in 1989 as General Manager. In 2008 he retired from Mid-States in order to devote his full attention to a project that he had milling around in the back of his mind for a number of years: Marketing fresh lamb on a yearround basis. The next year WillO-Wood Sheep Farm started a new venture in cooperation with the Kroger grocery store chain, supplying them with fresh lamb year-round. It started with one store in Athens, OH and the first delivery was two lambs. Since that time, the business has expanded to three stores in Athens and Columbus and Don and Meta are currently marketing between 350 and 400 lambs annually. Van Nostran will be giving two presentations asking the question “Are You A Marketer See EDUCATION on Page 3


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THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

NOTES FROM THE PRESIDENT’S PEN As Sue Sees It: Wouldn’t it be great if summer lasted all year? Well, at least the fairs and festivals where we reunite with those we rarely see at other times. To wander the barns of a county fair, eat all the strange foods, and realize that all those youth we mentored just yesterday are now adults with children of their own is one of my favorite parts of summer. It’s also a time to re-evaluate our flocks and make some hard decisions regarding culling, ram selections, and considering the drought that many of us are realizing, feed sources for the coming winter. The Wisconsin State Fair will be upon us shortly. Those of you who have the opportunity to exhibit in the open shows, good luck, swap some stories with old friends and welcome the newcomers. The WSBC will again be providing nourishment in the form of donuts and coffee on show days. If you are there, dig in.

Please return to the fair to encourage the youth of our great state to continue to raise quality animals and to learn the value of competition and sportsmanship. Unfortunately, the WSBC cannot afford to feed donuts to hundreds of hungry teens, but we can let them know our appreciation of them by our presence. Of course while you are at the fair, you will want to say “Hi” to Carol Black and her crew in the Wool Works. As always, you’ll find fabulous gift ideas and items that you will want for yourself. And you just never know who might stop in to make a purchase. During the 2011 Wisconsin State Fair, one of the “Z’s” from ZZ Top made a detour to the wool room and made a sizable purchase. Most importantly, sit back, relax and enjoy the long summer nights with family & friends. Sincerely, Sue Rupnow President, Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative

SUMMER 2012

Jefferson A Major Show for Shetland Breeders The Midwest Shetland Sheep Breeders Association (MSSBA) is proud to announce another year of participation with the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, September 7-9 at Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson, WI. Show Superintendent and MSSBA Vice-President Kelly Bartels of Monroe, WI says that this year’s event again features some favorites such as the Handy Shepherd classes that showcase some breed specific demonstrations from Shetland breeders, knitters, spinners and fiber artists, along with the main event on Saturday, which is the Shetland Sheep Show. “Some of our new activities include the Shetland sheep photo contest, which is an open competition with cash prizes, an expanded Youth Showmanship class that will be split into 3 age groups this year and the Shetland Fleece Show that will have a recently added class for rooed fleeces.” Bartels explained that rooed fleeces are naturally shed or molted from the sheep and may be plucked painlessly from the sheep. There are a good number of Shetland sheep that have retained this primitive trait, which may also be referred to as “the rise.” Bartels is also active as the Secretary to the Green County Sheep Producers group and a founding member of

the Fine Fleece Shetland Sheep Association and its Treasurer. Shetland sheep are originally from the Shetland Islands, located north of Scotland. They are an ancient breed known for their “extra fine and soft texture” wool as well as what producers tout as the breed’s sweet, delicious, high CLA meat. Shetlands are small, fine boned and fine wooled breed and come in a wide variety of colors and patterns. The ewes range from 70100 lbs and the rams are 90-125 lbs. Fleeces average between two to six inches in length, weigh between 2-5 lbs., and average between 20 and 30 microns and have a fine, silky handle. It is a wavy or crimpy, dense fleece that can be easily hand spun or mill spun. Almost all Shetland wool, except for the gossamer lace, was spun by mills in Scotland from the late 1800’s forward. In the hand knitting era, the resulting yarn was then shipped back to Shetland, knitted into finished goods and then sold. Bartels explains the breed’s growing popularity as due largely to their extra fine wool and because Shetlands are regarded as very hardy, good mothers, easy lambers and produce plenty of milk. “When crossed with an early maturing terminal sire the lambs are a good fit

for the commercial market and dress out well,” adding that though they do well on all types of grassland, being ‘browsers’ rather than just ‘grazers,’ Shetlands have also been found highly useful in maintaining conservation areas. MSSBA members encourage all festival goers to stop by the Sheep Barn, visit the sheep, browse the Silent Auction items and talk to Shetland breeders. The organization represents about forty breedermembers in ten states, from New Jersey to Iowa. The 2011 show at Jefferson had over 120 sheep entered, with exhibitors from five states in attendance, making the festival event one of the largest Shetland shows in North America. Breeders often caution visitors that browsing through the sheep pens containing Shetlands may be hazardous, so be forewarned that falling in love with Shetlands and needing to take them home with you is a common problem with these wonderful little sheep. The MSSBA show starts at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 8 in the Sheep Barn and the Shetland Fleece Show will start at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday in the West Exhibit Building. Both shows will be judged by Letty Klein, Kalamazoo, MI.

The deadline to enter the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative’s annual Wild and Woolly Photo Contest is quickly approaching. Visitors to the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival—to be held September 7 - 9 at Jefferson Fair Park—will vote for the winning photos in this “shepherd's choice” contest. Support from new contest sponsors is likely to sharpen the competition, organizers report. Blain’s Farm & Fleet is spon­ soring the top prize for the Photo

Taken by Youth class—an Andis Model 68000 Heavy Duty Sheep Shears, with a retail value of $380. Woodman’s Markets will present a $50 gift card good for photodeveloping services to the contest's grand prize winner, and other class winners will receive a $50 cash prize from contest sponsors, including The Country Today and Wisconsin State Farmer. The contest offers five categories: Scenic Photo, Kids and Sheep, Just Lambs, Photo Taken by Youth (for entrants 18 years old and

younger), and Any Other Sheep or Wool Photo. Photographers may enter more than one category, and they may enter more than one photo in each category. Entries must be postmarked by August 20. Detailed entry information is available on the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival’s website, www. wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival. com. For more information, contact Jane Metcalf at 608-868-3268 or tjmetcalf@centurytel.net.

Wisconsin Southdown Breeders Prepare for Jefferson Photo Contest Deadline Approaches The Wisconsin Southdown Association is rolling out the red carpet for the 2012 Midwest Regional Southdown Junior Show, which will be held in conjunction with the Wisconsin Sheep and Wool Festival Junior Show on Sunday, September 9, 2012, at the Jefferson County Fair in Jefferson, Wisconsin. Entry details can be found on the Sheep and Wool Festival website or the Wisconsin Southdown Association website (www.wisconsinsouthdwns.com). The ASBA Midwest Regional Southdown Junior Show is open to all youth 21 years old and younger as of January 1. Premiums will be awarded for all classes. Banners sponsored by Midwest area breeders will be awarded to the Champion Ram, Champion Ewe and Premier Wisconsin Exhibitor. There will also be a “Rookie” award for the highpoint youth who is a first year Southdown breeding sheep exhibitor. The judge for this show will be Dr. F.D. McCarthy of Sycamore, OH. Contact Amy Jones (circlejsouthdowns@ hughes.net or 920-253-5473) for more information.

Groenewold Fur & Wool Co. The Midwest’s #1 Wool Merchant

304 E. Avon Street PO Box 663 Forreston, IL 61030 USA Tel: 815-938-2381 email: office@gfwco.com

web: www.gfwco.com

The Wisconsin Shepherd is a quarterly publication of the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative, a non-profit organization dedicated to the diverse interests of the Wisconsin sheep industry. Inquiries about WSBC and address changes for WSBC and The Wisconsin Shepherd should be directed to Jill Alf, Executive SecretaryTreasurer, WSBC, 7811 Consolidated School Road, Edgerton, WI 53534; 608-868-2505 or wisbc@centurytel.net. EDITOR Bob Black, 920-623-3536 ADVERTISING MANAGER Kelli Gunderson, 9726 N. Fork Creek Rd., Shannon, IL 61078; 815-821-5905 or robkelgundy@yahoo.com WSBC officers and directors are: PRESIDENT S  ue Rupnow: Wausau, 715-675-6894 VICE PRESIDENT K  eith Schultz: Ft. Atkinson, 920-568-0895 Steve Bingen: West Bend, 262-629-4221 Elmer Held: Oakfield, 920-583-3084 Bill Keough: Manawa, 920-596-1931 Gary Klug: Platteville, 920-309-2181 Laura Meyer: Watertown, 920-206-8445 Jeff Nevens: Lodi, 608-592-7842 Alan Thorson: Columbus, 920-344-1235

Langer Wins Wisconsin FFA Sheep Production Award MADISON, WIS., June 12, 2012—Jenna Langer of the De Forest FFA Chapter was named the 2012 winner of the State FFA Sheep Production Proficiency Award. This award recognizes the student who best demonstrates an under­standing of sheep production industry as well as marketing strategies. Her advisors are Gwen Boettcher and Dan Kvalheim. Her parents are Randy and Sue Langer. Jenna raises and shows pure­ bred Southdowns under the name Dairy­land Downs with great support from friends and fellow South­down owners. Langer promotes the consump­ tion of lamb through advertisements, fairs, and demonstrations. Jenna skirts fleeces to remove foreign objects before sale or show of wool. Langer plans to attend college then return to her family farm and further her flock while being active in the Wisconsin Southdown Association. Twenty-Two state finalists in this award area received cash awards made possible by state-level spon­ sorship from Big Sky Suffolks, the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative, Marshfield FFA Alumni and the Wisconsin FFA Foun­dation Annual Fund. Langer will find out this summer if she is selected as one of four national finalists. If selected, Jenna

Jenna Langer, De Forest, WI, received the State FFA Sheep Production Proficiency award for 2012 at the Wisconsin FFA Convention held June 11-14 at the Alliant Energy Exhibition Hall in Madison. Jenna is a member of the De Forest FFA Chapter and raises and shows purebred Southdowns. Her parents are Randy and Sue Langer. will compete at the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind., in October. The four finalists will each receive a plaque and scholarship money thanks to national sponsor­ ship. The Wisconsin FFA Convention celebrates the accomplishments of the students, advisors and sup­ porters. It hosts over 3,000 members, advisors and guests, repre­senting 250 local agricultural educa­ tion programs. This year’s con­ vention was held June 11 to 14 at the Alliant Energy Center Exhibition Hall in Madison, Wis. The Wisconsin Association of FFA is a leading student organi­ za­tion due to the efforts of more

than 18,000 students across that state. With a focus on premier leadership, personal growth and career success, students’ FFA activ­ ities complement agricultural class­ room instruction by giving them an opportunity to apply their skills and knowl­edge while gaining real-world experience. These activ­ ities are dependent on donor fund­ ing through the Wisconsin FFA Foundation. For more information about Wisconsin FFA and the Wisconsin FFA Foundation visit www.wisconsinffa.org or www. w i s c o n s i n ff a f o u n d a t i o n . o rg , become a fan of Wisconsin FFA Foundation on Facebook, or call 715-659-4807.


SUMMER 2012

THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

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EDUCATION continued from page 1 – Or A Seller?” where he will be discussing marketing strategies and opportunities. Mark Shepard The CEO of Forest Agriculture Enterprises, Mark Shepard runs New Forest Farm near Viola, WI. His 106-acre perennial agricultural forest is considered by many to be one of the most ambitious sustainable agriculture projects in the United States. New Forest Farm is a planned conversion of a typical row-crop grain farm into a commercialscale, perennial agricultural ecosystem, using oak savannah, successional brushland and eastern woodlands as the ecological models. The farm is entirely solar and wind powered, and farm equipment is powered with locally produced biofuels that are not taken from the human food chain. Trees, shrubs, vines, canes, perennial plants and fungi are planted in association with one another to produce food for both humans and animals, along with fuel and medicines. Hazelnuts, chestnuts, walnuts and various fruits are the primary woody crops. Livestock, including, sheep, beef cattle and hogs are grazed between the rows of trees to control pests, increase soil fertility, control invasive species, increase economic return, and provide food, creating a sustainable farming system. Among his other higher educational achievements, Mark was certified as a Permaculture Designer in 1993 and received his Diploma of Permaculture design from Bill Mollison, the founder of the international Permaculture movement. Mark now teaches Agroforestry and Permaculture worldwide. He is a farmer mem­ ber of the Organic Valley Coop­ erative, the worlds largest organic farmer’s marketing co-op, and is the founder and chief Cyder­ maker for Shepard’s Hard Cyder Winery in Viola, Wisconsin. A knowledgeable and enter­ taining speaker, Shepard has been invited to speak at some of the world’s most innovative farming organizations and meet­ ings, including: Acres USA Con­ ference; Midwest Organic Farmers Conference; Ohio Eco­ logical Food and Farm Asso­ ciation Conference; Association for Temperate Agroforestry; Biodynamic Farming and Gar­ den­ing Association National Conference; and Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Asso­ ciation. Shepard will be pre­ sent­ ing a two-hour session Permaculture for Grazing on Saturday from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. and is sponsored by Town & Country RC&D. Bob Leder Bob grew up on a dairy farm in north central Wisconsin. He graduated from the University of Minnesota, College of Veter­ inary Medicine in 1982, and then completed a food animal internship at the University of Idaho’s Caine Veterinary Teaching Center in Caldwell, ID. He has been practicing veterinary medicine in Wisconsin

since 1983, working primarily with dairy cow operations, and is currently a partner in a ten doctor practice with offices in Bear Creek and Clintonville. He has served on the Wisconsin Veterinary Medicine Association Executive Board and is currently the chair of the Large Animal Welfare subcommittee. Bob has also served on the Wisconsin Scrapie Board, Wisconsin Sheep Breeder Co-op board, as well as the Governor’s Grow Wisconsin Livestock Initiative Panel. He and his wife Penny operate an 80 acre farm with 90 commercial ewes. Dr. Leder will be a presenter for Friday’s Sheep 101 clinic, and on Saturday discussing basic flock health management in the afternoon and conducting a 2-hour fecal lab on Saturday with Claire Mikolayunas, producer from Hillpoint, WI. Dr. Kathryn Nelson DVM, MS, DACVIM and Assistant Research Animal Veterinarian, Dr. Nelson has a background in biochemistry from UW River Falls, a veteri­ narian degree and masters in Animal Health and Biological Sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She re­ ceived her diplomatic status in large Animal Internal Medicine from the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 1996. Dr. Nelson grew up on a family farm and has been practicing large animal veterinary surgery and medicine in private practice, at the Veterinary Medical School, a large animal referral practice in Washington State and for her family’s farm. She is currently working as the Director of Development and Health at Pharming Healthcare and oversees a herd of genetically engineered cattle. She accepted a part time position as a Research Animal Veterinarian in May of 2011. She replaces Dr. Mike Maroney on the speaker roster and will be discussing Q-fever and its implications for the sheep industry. JoAnn Maedke, EA JoAnn started doing taxes when she and husband, Bill, bought their dairy farm in 1973. Beginning in 1992 she had the opportunity to work for a small tax preparation business and five years later purchased that business. Maedex Tax & Farm Accounting, LLC now serves over 325 tax clients and does records for about thirty more with the help of two employees. The firm serves farm clients as far north as Pound, WI, as far south as Lake Mills and as far west as Sauk City, specializing in farm taxes, small business payrolls, and records. JoAnn is an enrolled agent, licensed to practice before the IRS. She holds a Master’s Certificate in Taxation from the Washington School of Law in Utah. She is a member of the National Association of Tax Professionals, National Association of Enrolled Agents, National Society of Accounts as well as many farm organizations. She has worked with legislators to change tax laws for the farming

community both on the state and federal level. On Saturday afternoon, Maedke will be discuss tax implications for small and hobby farms, as well as the fundamentals of bookkeeping for farmers. Greg and Vicki Brickner The Brickners manage a 200+ ewe farm in Wonewoc, WI. Their ewes are Dorset x commercial ewes and the main product sold off the farm is finished lambs. In addition to the sheep, Greg is a large animal veterinarian and Vicki also works off the farm. They have two daughters: Maggie, 19, and Emma, 14. On Saturday, Greg will talk about critical health issues for farm flocks and how to manage the factors that are central to good disease control. Later in the day, Brickner and his wife Vicki will give listeners some insight on how they both work off the farm but are able to manage a large commercial flock. Bill Keough Keough is the owner of bk Sheep Nutrition, a division of Bear Lake Enterprises, Manawa, WI, and had been in the dairy nutrition consulting and ration balancing for four years prior to developing his own base mineral mix for sheep producers. He had been working for a local feed mill that designed custom mineral blends for dairy farmers to save on production costs and saw a need to provide the same service to sheep producers. He designed his own trace mineral and vitamin package with the advice of university, technical college professionals and knowledgeable sheep pro­ ducers and bk Sheep Base became the first trace mineral and vitamin pre-mix used in the formulation of balanced rations for sheep. Since then, that first product has been re-formulated to help prevent copper toxicity, and deficiencies in Selenium, Vitamin E, Cobalt, and Iodine. In addition to the ration balancing, nutrition consulting and mineral business, Keough and his wife Holly also own Cedar Lane Dorsets. He will be presenting a nutritional guidelines session for the Sheep 101 clinic on Friday, working in conjunction with Rock River Labs, which is offering one free forage sample analysis for participants. Keough and Zachary Meyer of Rock River Labs will discuss sample results at a follow-up session later in the day. On Saturday morning, Keough will talk on how proper nutrition and ration balancing can prevent many of the health issues sheep face on a daily basis. Anyone interested in Sheep 101 is reminded that it is an all-day clinic and there is a registration fee of $60. Participants must pre-register online at www. wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival. com. Bill Berry Bill Berry is a Field Repre­ sentative for the American Farm­ land Trust and a self-employed writer and editor contri­buting to state and national publi­cations. His Capital Times columns cover an array of topics, but he specializes

in conservation, agri­ culture and sustainable land use. A lifelong Wisconsin resi­ dent, Berry has worked as a contractor with state and national conservation and agriculture organizations for more than a decade. He authored the 2007 report, “The Future of Farming and Rural Life in Wisconsin,” the culmination of a two and half year study conducted by the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. He lives in Stevens Point and has covered rural issues in Wisconsin and across the nation for over 30 years. Berry also authored the Wisconsin Academy’s Future of Farming and Rural Life in Wisconsin final report in 2007, and assisted project leaders Stan Gruszynski, Tom Lyon, and Wilda Nilsestuen as a communications specialist throughout the entire Wisconsin Idea study. His presentation on Sunday, sponsored by Town & Country RC&D, will look at innovative stewardship efforts and tools to help prevent loss of vital farmland. Kirsten Jurcek For Kirsten Jurcek, Grazing Education Specialist with Town & Country RC&D, raising livestock on grass is a business that meets the ’triple bottom line’ of economic, social, and environmental bene­ fits. She maintains that grazing offers a profitable, low capital business model that opens new opportunities for livestock pro­ ducers. Town and Country Re­ source Conservation and Devel­ op­ ment, Inc, covers thir­ teen counties in south­ eastern Wis­ consin and supports grass-based live­stock enter­prises through its grazing assis­tance program. Kirsten’s passions in life are clean water, healthy food, and family farm preservation. She manages a 100% grass-fed cow/ calf beef operation near Palmyra and markets her products locally. An experienced hydrogeologist, she can articulate the linkage between permanent pasture and clean lakes and streams. Kirsten directs outreach and education for producers and consumers, promoting the economic, envir­ on­ mental, and human health benefits of grass-fed meats and dairy. Jurcek, along with Grazing Technical Specialist, Mike Gehl, will be talking about implementing managed intensive grazing in a presentation to Sheep 101 students on Friday morning. Mike Gehl Town and Country RC&D develops management-intensive grazing plans for beef, dairy, sheep and goat graziers through­ out south­eastern Wisconsin. Mike Gehl was hired in October, 2010 as Grazing Technical Specialist with Town & Country Resource Conservation and Development, Inc. to provide assistance to farmers wishing to transition to pasture grazing. He has a lifetime of experience in dairy farming, the last 10 years running a certified organic dairy. Mike farms the Gehl Farm in Hartford in Washington County which has been in the family for 162 years.

The farm ownership has now been transferred to his son Adam, allowing Mike time to pursue his second career of educating other farmers about the benefits of grazing. “I’m proud to be on the grazing staff of Town and Country. My focus and dream is to impart the knowledge of grazing to all in need of it,” Mike said. “The passion for grazing only increases as I see the benefits provided to the land, water and farmer.” To date, Town and Country has provided 70 grazing plans covering over 2000 acres and is active in cooperating with UW Extension to provide grazing education workshops and pasture walks across southeast Wisconsin. Gehl and Kirsten Jurcek will be part of the Sheep 101 clinic on Friday of the festival. Sheep 101, the all-day clinic designed primarily for beginning sheep producers, will also feature Kenny Fixmer, Gallagher USA Territory Manager for Wisconsin-Minnesota, who will present a fencing primer, while Dave Thomas, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Sheep Management & Genetics, will discuss why we manage sheep the way we do and why they behave they way they do in “What Is A Sheep?” In addition, Todd Taylor, Shepherd at the Arlington Sheep Unit, will hold a handson, hour and a half management lab on Friday afternoon covering eartagging, flock ID, basic records and basic diagnoses for common health issues. A reminder: Persons interested in participating in the Sheep 101 clinic must pre-register online. The cost is $60 per person for the day, which includes admission. Additional Shepherds’ Work­ shops speakers include Mark Roembke, NSIP Hampshire breeder from Cedarburg, WI, who with Cody Hiemke, NSIP Shropshire producer from Stoughton, WI and Todd Taylor, will talk about flock recordkeeping at 11:00 on Sunday. For anyone interested in selecting fleeces for handspinning or other fiber arts, Fleece Show Coordinator Holin Kennen, Evansville, WI, will talk about choosing a fleece based on breed characteristics, quality and prospective uses. Kennen’s presentation will take place in the West Exhibit Buildings near the fleece show on Sunday morning. Another Sunday program feature will be Chef Jack Kaestner from the Oconomowoc Lake Club, who will do a cooking demonstration using Wisconsin lamb and sheep cheeses in the Activity Center beginning at 12:30. For producers who want to hone their shearing skills, there will be a shearing clinic in the Indoor Arena on Sunday afternoon presented by David Kier, sheep shearer from Eleva, WI. Admission to the festival is $7 per person per day or $12 for weekend pass. Kida 8 and under are free and parking is free. Jefferson is just south of Interstate 94 on Highway 26.


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THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

SUMMER 2012

WSBC presents the

11th Annual Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival September 7-9, 2012 • Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson For complete details, go to www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com Schedule of Events

(P) Pre-registration required for these classes and activities. • Check Map for locations. THURSDAY 8:00 – 8:00 Vendor Setup – Country Store 10:00 – 3:00 Registration Open – Pick-up Camping Permits Lobby – Activity Center 4:00 – 7:00 MSSBA Sheep Check-in – Sheep Barn

Noon Judging - Midwest Shetland Sheep Breeders Show – Sheep Barn

FRIDAY Gate: 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. Admission charged. All Day MSSBA Sheep Check-in – Sheep Barn 7:00 Crook & Whistle Stock Dog Trial – West Field 7:30 Registration Open – Lobby – Activity Center 8:00 Sheep 101 – Beginning Shepherds’ Clinic (P) – W. Exhibit Bldg – Pre-registration Required Photo Contest – Entries open for viewing/ voting – Activity Center Silent Auction (Donations accepted until 9:00 a.m. Sat.) – Activity Center 9:00 – Noon Poster Contest - Entries accepted – Activity Center 9:00 – 4:00 Wonders of Wool Fiber Arts Classes (P)

1:00 – 4:00 “Wool Ewe” Teach Me To Felt? Kids’ Class – Wonders of Wool Building 1

Country Store Open 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Noon – 5:00 MSSBA & Open Skein Contest Entry Check-in Design Challenge Entry Check-in – Wonders of Wool Building 1 3:00 – 8:00 Fleece Show – Check-in – All Entries – West Exhibit Building 6:00 – 8:00 Open & Junior Sheep Check-in – Sale Arena SATURDAY Gate: 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. – Admission charged 7:00 a.m.

Crook & Whistle Stock Dog Trial – West Field

7:00 – 8:30 Fleece Show – MSSBA Entries – Check-in – West Exhibit Building 7:00 – 9:00 Open Sheep Check-in – Sale Arena 7:00 – 9:30 Fleece Show – Open, Junior Entries – Check-in – West Exhibit Building 7:30

Registration Open – Lobby – Activity Center

1:00 Consignments Close – Used Equipment Auction – Warm-up Arena 1:00 – 3:00 Skillathon! – West Exhibit Building (south end)

2:00

Used Equipment Auction – Warm-up Arena

2:15 MIWW Best of Wisconsin Style Show – Activity Center 3:15 Awards Presentation – Make It With Wool – Activity Center 4:00

Shepherds’ Auction – Activity Center

6:00

Lead Class Competition – Sale Arena

6:00 – 7:00 Silent Auction of Fleeces – West Exhibit Building SUNDAY Gate: 7:00 a.m. – Admission charged 7:00 – 8:45 Weigh-in - Market Lambs – Sheep Barn 7:30 a.m.

Crook & Whistle Stock Dog Trial – West Field

7:30

Registration Open – Lobby – Activity Center

7:45 Judging Contest – Youth Sweepstakes Activity – Beef Barn 8:00 – 9:00 Check-in - Junior Sheep Show – Sale Arena 8:00 – 3:30 Hall of Breeds – Indoor Arena

Newborn Lambs! – Indoor Arena

8:30 – 3:00 Fleece Sale (Private Treaty) West Exhibit Building 8:30 – 4:00 Wonders of Wool Fiber Arts Classes (P)

“Art Under Foot” Hooked Rug Exhibit – Activity Center

“Wonderful Wisconsin Wool” Wool Quilts & Wall Hangings Activity Center

8:00 Shepherds’ Workshops (unless otherwise noted) – East Exhibit Building

Shepherds’ Workshops (Unless otherwise noted) – East Exhibit Building

Hall of Breeds – Indoor Arena

9:00

Newborn Lambs! – Indoor Arena

Judging - Open & MSSBA Skein Competition – Wonders of Wool Building 1

8:00 – 9:00 Make It With Wool – Registration & Hospitality – Lobby – Activity Center

 Judging - Design Challenge – Wonders of Wool Building 1

8:00 – 10:00 MSSBA Sheep Entries Check-in – Sheep Barn

9:00 – Noon Check-in, MSSBA Handmade Wool Competition – Sheep Barn

8:00 – 11:00 Skillathon! – West Exhibit Building (south end) 8:00 – 1:00 MSSBA & Open Skein Entry Check-in Design Challenge Entry Check-in – Wonders of Wool Building 1 Country Store Open 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. 9:00

“Art Under Foot” Hooked Rug Exhibit Open Activity Center

 “Wonderful Wisconsin Wool” Wool Quilts & Wall Hangings – Activity Center Silent Auction – Deadline for donations! – Activity Center 9:00 – 11:00 Judging - Make It With Wool – Activity Center 9:00 – Noon “Wool Ewe” Teach Me to Knit? Kids’ Class Wonders of Wool Building 1 9:00 – 3:00 Silent Auction – Bidding! – Activity Center 9:00 – 4:00 Wonders of Wool Fiber Arts Classes (P) 9:30

Judging - MSSBA Shetland Fleece Show – West Exhibit Building

10:00

Judging – Open Sheep Shows – Meat & Wool Breeds – Sale Arena

Judging – Open & Junior Fleece Shows – West Exhibit Building

9:30  Judging - Junior Showmanship Junior Breeding Sheep Show to follow ASBA Midwest Regional Junior Southdown Show – Sale Arena

Judging – Market Lamb Showmanship Open Market Lamb Show to follow – Sheep Barn

9:30 & 11:00 Shearing Demonstrations – Indoor Arena 10:00 – 3:00 Fiber Arts Demonstrations – Wonders of Wool Building 1 Country Store Open 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. 12:30

Cooking With the Chefs! – Activity Center

1:00

Shearing Workshop – Indoor Arena

Judging – MSSBA Handmade Shetland Wool Competition – Sheep Barn 3:00 Wisconsin Club Lamb Association Annual Meeting/Awards Presentation – Sheep Barn 3:30 Festival Closes

10:00 & 1:00 Shearing Demonstrations – Indoor Arena & 3:00

Mark your calendars for 2013 – September 6-8

Wonders of Wool Class Schedule & Instructors Register Online by August 20! www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com FRIDAY – ALL DAY CLASSES 901 So You Want To Make A Colorway..................................................Stefania Isaacson 902 Woven Knit Bag................................................................................... Cheryl Stegert 903 Basic Broom Making..............................................................“Little John” Holzwart 904 Wild, Wonderful, Wooly-Felt Bird Yurt...............................................Suzanne Higgs 905 Beginning Spinning (Repeated as Classes 805 and 703)........................... Deb Jones 906 Rug Hooking...................................................................................... Linda Harwood 907 Quick Novelty Yarns.........................................................................Patsy Zawistoski 908 Know That Fleece................................................................................Carol Rhoades 909 Spinning With Locks.................................................................................. Amy Tyler 910 The Shepherds Rug................................................................................... Letty Klein FRIDAY – MORNING CLASSES 921 Your Favorite Things: Cut & Sew Warm Woolen Mittens.....................Tracey Schuh 922 Introduction to Felting: An Exercise..................................................... Mary Wallace 923 Knitting – Beyond the Basics.................................................................Kathy Krause 924 Beginning Triangle Loom Weaving..........................................................Pat Herman 925 Spin the Colors of Shetland.................................................................. Nancy Barnett 926 Flax Seed to Spinning Linen Thread.....................................................Luci Williams FRIDAY – AFTERNOON CLASSES 931 Sock & Roll Dye Class..........................................................................Tracey Schuh 932 Wet Felted Flower.......................................................................................... Jan Falk 933 Llama & Alpaca Fiber Preparation........................................................Kathy Krause 934 Beginning Rectangle Loom Weaving........................................................Pat Herman 935 Spinning For Lace....................................................................................Kate Larson 936 Thrummed Mittens Off the Cuff..................................................................Liz Sutter SATURDAY – ALL DAY CLASSES 801 Faroese Shawl Workshop......................................................................Cheryl Oberle 802 Weave An Origami Sweater/Jacket...................................................... Cheryl Stegert 803 Making Sheep Cheese........................................................................... Linda Conroy 804 Bent Willow Chair (2-Day Class)........................................................John Rezachek 805 Beginning Spinning (Repeated as Classes 905 & 703).............................. Deb Jones 806 Lined Mittens....................................................... Mary Germain & Sandy DeMaster 807 Spinning Loveable Llama & Alpaca: Fiber of the King...................Patsy Zawistoski 808 Spinning Textured Yarns......................................................................Carol Rhoades 809 Spinning Super Stretchy Wools.................................................................. Amy Tyler SATURDAY – MORNING CLASSES 821 Portuguese Style Knitting................................................................... Mary Jo Harris 822 Beaded Knit Necklace Purse..........................................................Nancy VanDerPuy 823 Simple Puff Novelty Yarn...........................................................................Chris Vuco 824 Beginning Viking Knitting........................................................................ Barb Heike 825 Spinning Handpainted Fibers...................................................................Kate Larson 826 Sari Silk Safari..................................................................................... Nancy Barnett 827 Not Just For Socks: Sock Blank Dyeing.................................... Melissa (Mo) Brown SATURDAY – AFTERNOON CLASSES 831 Spoons, Scoops & Spreaders........................................................... Lynn Bergschultz 832 Hop To It!.............................................................................................. Donna Towell 833 Beaded Crochet Necklace Purse – “The Sierra”............................Nancy VanDerPuy 834 Advanced Viking Knitting......................................................................... Barb Heike 835 Basic Sock On A Circular Sock Knitting Machine...........................John Loeffelholz 836 Felted Bracelet..................................................................................... Sandy Bulgrin SUNDAY – ALL DAY CLASSES 701 Miniature Nazo Workshop....................................................................Cheryl Oberle 702 Elegant Sculpted Felted Hat.................................................................Suzanne Higgs 703 Beginning Spinning (Repeated as Classes 805 & 905).............................. Deb Jones 704 Irish Knitting Basket................................................................................. Bev Larson 705 Recycled Yarns 101...........................................................................John Loeffelholz 706 Spinning Boucle Yarns......................................................................Patsy Zawistoski 707 Chair Caning 101................................................................................. Sandy Bulgrin 708 Nuno Felt Scarf..................................................................................... Mary Wallace 804 Bent Willow Chair (Second day of 2-day class. Starts on Saturday) SUNDAY – MORNING CLASSES 721 Exploring the Long Draw.................................................................Stefania Isaacson 722 Twist & Core Yarns..........................................................................Susan McFarland 723 Beginning Double Knitting.................................................................. Cheryl Stegert 724 Pretty Polymer Pins........................................................................Lynne Bergschultz 725 Plying Balanced Yarns................................................................................ Amy Tyler 726 Handcarding With Less Stress & More Fun!.......................................Carol Rhoades 727 Soap Making Fun! (4-hour class – Starts at 8:00 a.m)...................... Linda Conroy 728 Needle Felted “Chicken Little & Rhode Island Red” (4-hour class – Starts at 8:00 a.m.)....................................................Danita Doerre 729 Handspinning – Orenburg Style.......................................................Galina Khmeleva Who’s Afraid of Virgin-ia Wool-f How to Select A Fleece Without Getting Really Tangled................ Holin Kennen (This is a FREE, 1-hour class, registration not required. See class description for time and location.) SUNDAY – AFTERNOON CLASSES 740 Fiber In A Cloud................................................................................... Cheryl Stegert 741 Paper Is Fiber Too!.........................................................................Lynne Bergschultz 742 Plying Textured Yarns................................................................................ Amy Tyler 743 A Taste of Pine Needle Basketry – Make A Mini-Basket!......“Little John” Holzwart (4-hour class – Starts at 11:30 am; runs until 3:30 pm)


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WSBC presents the

11th Annual Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival September 7-9, 2012 • Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson For complete details, go to www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com

Shepherds Workshops Saturday, September 8

Shepherd’s Workshops sessions are open to all, no pre-registration required and take place in the East Exhibit Building unless otherwise noted. 8:00 a.m. Hospitality Hour  Sponsored by: Mid-States Wool Growers, Equity Cooperative Livestock Sales Association and the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival 8:00 a.m. Making Sheep Cheese Making cheese at home is easy and fun! Join veteran cheese maker Linda Conroy and explore the lost art of home cheese making. This is a comprehensive class that will provide students with vast knowledge about how to make cheese in their own kitchens. Class includes instruction, inspiration, samples, cheese to take home, recipes, a cheese culture to get you started and a light lunch of bread and salad, which will include cheese and homemade cultured butter. Linda Conroy, Moonwise Herbs and founder of Wild Eats: A Movement, Sheboygan, WI. (NOTE: This is a full day, 6-hour class (8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.) and you must Pre-Register online at www. wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com. Go to Fiber Arts Classes and register for Class 803. The registration fee is $90, with a materials fee of $15. The number of students is limited, first come basis.)

D E S

O L C

9:00 a.m. Are You A Marketer – Or A Seller? As sheep producers with over 50 years of experience, Don and Meta Van Nostran, Will-O-Wood Sheep Farm, Athens, OH, currently lamb out 125 Polypay ewes, feed 400 market lambs annually and have developed a successful business delivering lamb carcasses to several Ohio Kroger stores on a year round basis. Don will go through several marketing opportunities and explain why he settled on the marketing plan he has chosen. 9:00 a.m.  Getting It Right! Basic Nutritional Guidelines for Sheep Producers Using feed tests and properly balanced rations for any given flock of sheep, whether focused on producing wool or meat, can prevent many of the problems new producers often experience. Examples are ketosis, poor reproductive performance, lambing problems due to under/ over conditioning of ewes, poor lamb survival, retained placentas, selenium-vitamin E issues – the list is lengthy. Balancing nutritional needs, especially utilizing forages, is crucial to optimum flock health and production. Bill Keough, bk Sheep Nutrition, Manawa, WI. 10:00 a.m.  Important Sheep Health Issues for the Farm Flock This talk will try to simplify the sometimes overwhelming lists of sheep diseases that are published. Planning and controlling a few important factors on the sheep farm will eliminate most of the common health problems seen and give the shepherd a sense of control rather than dread. Greg Brickner, DVM & Producer, Wonewoc, WI. 10:00 a.m. A Global Tour of Sheep Operations For 20 years Tom Cadwallader has traveled the world working with shepherds, farmers and farm organizations in developing countries as they try to find their place in the rapidly changing global economy. In many of these countries sheep have been the backbone of their livestock sectors with cultural roots going back thousands of years. This presentation will take a look at how sheep have been a part of the various cultures Tom has worked with and the challenges that shepherds face as they try to remain a viable part of their society. 11:00 a.m. Q Fever Q-fever is a zoonotic disease of farm animals with world wide distribution. In domestic ruminants, Q-fever is associated with abortions and dead or weak offspring. In humans the most common presentation is expressed in flu-like symptoms, however more serious complications including endocarditis or abortions occur. This talk will focus on the history of the disease, flock presentations, current testing options and precautions for people working with sheep. Dr. Kathryn M. Nelson, Asst. Research Animal Veterinarian, Graduate School, Research Animal Resources center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

11:00 – 12:30 Fecal Lab One of the biggest challenges facing sheep producers is how to effectively control internal parasites in their flocks. Gastro-intestinal parasites are especially a problem in warm, moist conditions common to the Midwest and it is critical for producers to be able to easily identify which parasites are a problem and then develop economical controls. Learn to do fecal floats and to identify common parasites in this practical, hands-on lab with Bob Leder, DVM & Producer, Bear Creek, WI, and Claire Mikolayunas, Producer, Hillpoint, WI. This is an hour and a half session. 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Permaculture for Grazing Mark Shepard, CEO, Forest Agriculture Enter­prises & New Forest Farm, Richland Center, WI, will discuss how to establish a multi-story cropping system which improves nutrient cycling in pastures and creates additional income; and how to convert underutilized, overgrown areas into grazing savannahs. Mark will explain how one acre of land can be transformed into 2 acres through lateral photosynthesis and how planned and managed livestock intentionally combined with woody crops interact. You will learn how to create a sustainable, financially productive, multi species, long term farming system on your farm. Sponsored by: Town & Country Resource Conservation & Development. This is a two-hour session.

national efforts to prevent the loss of America’s farmland. Once you’ve made the commitment to land stewardship, what tools are available to practice conservation of your farm’s resources? This session sponsored by Town & Country Resource Conservation & Development. 11:00 a.m. Production Records: From Simple to Strategic Many shepherds keep a baseline of information on their flock; this might be as simple as number of lambs born or weaned per ewe. Production records can provide a storyline to help understand a flock’s profitability – or lack thereof. This session will include very basic record keeping strategies as well as some advanced strategies. Included in this session will be information about the National Sheep Improvement Program (NSIP), how the program can be beneficial to production-minded purebred breeders, and how the commercial sheep person can benefit from those improved genetics. Todd Taylor, University of Wisconsin Arlington Shepherd, Arlington, WI; Mark Roembke, NSIP Hampshire Breeder, Cedarburg, WI; and Cody Hiemke, NSIP Shropshire Breeder and NSIP Board Member, Stoughton, WI.

2:00 p.m.  Managing a 200 Ewe Flock with an Off-Farm Job Greg and Vicki Brickner, Wonewoc, WI, have a 200+ ewe farm while both have off-farm jobs. This is a commercial ewe flock and lambs are fed out and sold off the farm as finished lambs. All of the feed is produced on the farm as well. They will talk about some of the management techniques they feel make their farm run with a minimum of labor.

12:30 p.m. Cooking With the Chefs! ACTIVITY CENTER Get ready for a taste of Indian spiced lamb ragout, handmade ravioli with sheep cheese and sheep kefir! It’s all in a day’s work for Oconomowoc Lake Club Executive Chef Jack Kaestner, as he prepares his favorite recipes using Wisconsin lamb! A supporter of Buy Local, Chef Jack and his staff prepare the finest menus using the highest quality, locally and sustainably grown ingredients. As a special feature this year, Chef Kaestner will be integrating Wisconsin sheep cheeses into this year’s demonstration of easily crafted lamb recipes.

3:00 p.m. Basic Flock Health Management Bob will go over basic flock health programs including vaccin­ations programs, parasite control, and nutritional considerations to maintain a healthy and productive flock. Bob Leder, DVM & Sheep Producer, Bear Creek Sheep Station, Bear Creek, WI.

1:00 p.m. What Can ASI Do for You? More than you might expect… The sheep industry’s national organization has a significant role to play in the activities of state producer groups, including the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Co-op. Bob Benson, Producer; Director, American Sheep Industry Association, Westfield, IN.

3:00 p.m. Out of the Shoe Box in 60 Minutes Organizing your ‘shoe box’ is not a daunting task. This seminar will address organizing your records, what records to keep and for how long. Tax implications of hobby farming and farm bookkeeping will be discussed. JoAnn Maedke, EA, Maedex Tax & Farm Accounting, LLC, Eden, WI.

1:00 p.m. Shearing Workshop INDOOR ARENA This is a free workshop for anyone interested in shearing standing sheep. Persons inexperienced in standard shearing positions, who have an occasional hardto-handle animal, or who cannot physically handle their sheep will be interested in this workshop. This method will work effectively with trimming stands or other means of restraining a standing animal. Learn basic maintenance such as handpiece setup and adjustment, comb selection, tension, oiling and sharpening blades, as well as how to avoid skin nicks. Breed differences will also be discussed. Anyone, young or old welcome. Bring a camcorder, or pen and notebook! No pre-registration required. David Kier, Eleva, WI.

Sunday, September 9 10:00 a.m. The Dollars & Cents of Lamb Marketing As sheep producers with over 50 years of experience, Don and Meta Van Nostran, Will-O-Wood Sheep Farm, Athens, OH, currently lamb out 125 Polypay ewes, feed 400 market lambs annually and have developed a successful business delivering lamb carcasses to several Ohio Kroger stores on a year-round basis. Don will go through several marketing options and explain why he settled on the marketing plan he has chosen. 10:00 a.m. Who’s Afraid of Virgin-ia Wool-f How to select a fleece without getting really tangled WEST EXHIBIT BUILDING Terrified of choosing a raw fleece on your own? Afraid of getting "fleeced" by bad fiber? Come learn the basics of choosing a fleece based on breed characteristics, quality and desired yarn. It's not just fine wools out there, folks! Fleece show volunteer and 25+ year award-winning spinner, Holin Kennen, Evansville, WI. (Will take place in the Fleece Show judging area.) 11:00 a.m.  Wisconsin’s Farmland: Preserving Agriculture’s 401(K) Bill Berry, Field Representative, American Farmland Trust, Stevens Point, WI, looks at innovative stewardship approaches used by livestock producers and reviews local, state and

WE SELL SHEEP EVERY DAY IN ZUMBROTA • Monday - Thursday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Friday 8 a.m. to noon

Sheep and Goat auctions on Tuesday at 8 a.m., and a Breeding Sheep & Goat auction on the first Tuesday of every month at 10 a.m.

Central Livestock Association A Company of Genex Cooperative, Inc.

Zumbrota Market Phone 877/732-7305 • www.centrallivestock.com Tom Ostlie 612-532-0966

©2012 CRI

A3242-072


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WLBA Spring Preview Show The Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Association (WLBA) Spring Preview Show attracted young beef, hog and sheep exhibitors from across the state to Jefferson Fair Park on June 9 for the annual Spring Preview Show. Sixty eight sheep exhibitors entered 215 head. Sheep Breeding Stock Show Champion Commercial Ewe R. Champion Commercial Ewe Champion AOB Meat Ewe R. Champion AOB Meat Ewe Champion AOB Meat Ram Champion AOB Wool Ewe R. Champion AOB Wool Ewe Champion AOB Wool Ram R. Champion AOB Wool Ram Champion Hampshire Ewe R. Champion Hampshire Ewe Champion Hampshire Ram R. Champion Hampshire Ram Best Hampshire Lamb – Ram/Ewe Champion Suffolk Ewe R. Champion Suffolk Ewe Champion Suffolk Ram Champion Southdown Ewe R. Champion Southdown Ewe Champion Southdown Ram R. Champion Southdown Ram Supreme Champion Ewe R. Supreme Champion Ewe Supreme Champion Ram R. Supreme Champion Ram

Bracen Brandt, Rock Springs Jenna Crayton, Oak Creek Jillian Bingen, West Bend Dylan Klug, Grafton Emily Petzel, Centuria Justin Taylor, Arlington Jessica Taylor, Arlington Auretta Wittkopf, Pewaukee Justin Taylor, Arlington Jessica Alf, Edgerton Aubrie Seeger, Ogdensberg Jessica Alf, Edgerton Katelyn Schmoll, Hatley Jessica Alf, Edgerton Mariah Richardson, Dousman Mariah Richardson, Dousman Bracen Brandt, Rock Springs Kelsi Smerchek, Rosholt Clifton McClintock, Bangor Dathan Smerchek, Bangor Casey Lobdell, Darlington Mariah Richardson, Dousman Kelsi Smerchek, Rosholt Jessica Alf, Edgerton Dathan Smerchek, Rosholt

Prospect Lamb Show Champion AOB Champion Hampshire R. Champion Hampshire Champion Nat. Color R. Champion Nat. Color Champion Suffolk R. Champion Suffolk Champion Crossbred R. Champion Crossbred

Kirtsen Kohlman, Plymouth Kirsten Kohlman, Plymouth Jed Dallas, Shawano McKenna Kent, Bonduel Kailen Smerchek, Rosholt Bracen Brandt, Rock Springs Ellie Johnson, Mineral Point Sara Johnson, Delavan Rachel Bugenhagen, Mukwonago

Market Lamb Show Champion AOB R. Champion AOB Champion Hampshire R. Champion Hampshire Champion Nat. Color R. Champion Nat. Color Champion Suffolk R. Champion Suffolk Champion Crossbred R. Champion Crossbred Grand Champion Market Lamb R. Grand Champion Market Lamb

Jenna Crayton, Oak Creek Rachel McCoy, Mineral Point Samantha Bohm, Shawano Katelyn Schmoll, Hately Shania Etta, Kewaskum Jenna Crayton, Oak Creek Rachel McCoy, Mineral Point McKenna Kent, Bonduel Sara Johnson, Delavan Jed Dallas, Shawano Rachel McCoy, Mineral Point Samantha Bohm, Shawano

Rachel McCoy, Mineral Point, took home the grand champion market lamb honors with her Suffolk. Ninety four head of market and prospect lambs competed at the June 9 show held at Jefferson Fair Park.

The grand champion prospect lamb at the 2012 WLBA Spring Preview Show in Jefferson was a crossbred shown by Sara Johnson of Delavan. The market and prospect lambs were judged by Adam Marx of Columbia, MO.

Showmanship Age 18-19 Age 16-17 Age 13-15 Age 11-12 Age 9-10 Age 8 – Under

Champion Jenna Langer, DeForest Kelsi Smerchek, Rosholt Casey Lobdell, Darlington Malorie Schmoll, Hately Carson Lobdell, Darlington Connor Treml, Mauston

R. Champion Jenna Crayton, Oak Creek Dathan Smerchek, Rosholt Katelyn Schmoll, Hatley Jillian Bingen, West Bend Justin Taylor, Arlington Bracen Brandt, Rock Springs

Lead Class Junior Intermediate Senior

Champion Dylan Klug, Grafton Mariah Richardson, Dousman Jessica Alf, Edgerton

R. Champion Auretta Wittkopf, Pewaukee

Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival September 7-9, 2012

www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com

The WLBA Spring Preview Show attracted almost seventy junior sheep exhibitors from across the state including Mariah Richardson of Dousman. who took home the supreme champion ewe ribbon for her Suffolk yearling. Over 120 head of breeding sheep were shown at the 2012 Spring Preview Show, an annual event for the Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Association.

Supreme champion ram honors went to Jessica Alf of Edgerton with her Hampshire yearling. Tony Weber, Dousman, WI, judged the breeding sheep show. The annual show also drew over 230 head of beef cattle and over 40 swine entries.


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SHEEP 101 – A Clinic for Beginning Shepherds! Friday, September 7 – Pre-registration Required Full-day clinic for shepherds of all experience levels! Pre-registration required. Register online at www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com, $60 per person. If you have difficulty with website registration or do not have access to a computer, please contact wisbc@centurytel.net or call 608 868-2505. Thank you! 8:00 a.m. Hospitality Hour Sponsored by: Mid-States Wool Growers, Equity Cooperative Livestock Sales Association and the Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival 9:00 a.m.  Getting It Right! Basic Nutritional Guidelines for Sheep Producers – Part I Using feed tests and properly balanced rations for any given flock of sheep, whether focused on producing wool or meat, can prevent many of the problems new producers often experience. Examples are ketosis, poor reproductive performance, lambing problems due to under/over conditioning of ewes, poor lamb survival, retained placentas, selenium-vitamin E issues—the list is lengthy. Balancing nutritional needs, especially utilizing forages, is crucial to optimum flock health and production. Bill Keough, bk Sheep Nutrition, Manawa, WI, and Zachery Meyer, Rock River Labs, Watertown, WI. This session will include one free forage sample analysis per farm through Rock River Labs, Watertown, WI. Students registered for Sheep 101 will receive instructions on how to sample fresh pasture or stored hay when they are mailed a gate pass. Samples must be received by 8:30 a.m. Friday morning, September 7. Sample results will be available by 5:00 p.m. at which time students may discuss their forage analyses with the instructors. 10:00 a.m. What Is A Sheep? The basic genetics, physiology, anatomy, and biology of a sheep will be presented. This presentation will allow us to better understand why we manage sheep the way we do and why sheep behave the way they do. Dave Thomas, Professor of Sheep Management & Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

11:00 a.m. G  rass Works! Implementing Managed Intensive Grazing on Your Farm The basics of pasture planning and management, including what is Managed Intensive Grazing (MIG); MIG versus contin­ uous grazing; paddock sizes; what forage species to plant and where and why; seeding methods, grazing heights, pros and cons of water systems and more! Kirsten Jurcek, Grazing Education Specialist and Mike Gehl, Grazing Technical Specialist, Town & Country Resource Conservation & Development, Inc.

3:00 p.m. A Fencing Primer Fencing is a critical—and often frustrating and expensive —component of pasture management. Find out what you need to build an effective electric fencing system; what type of fencer and fencing system best suits your needs; how an electric fencer works, energizers and proper grounding techniques; how to renovate existing fences and sub-divide your pasture quickly and easily. Kenny Fixmer, Gallagher USA Territory Manager, Wisconsin & Minnesota.

Lunch on your own

4:00 – 5:30 Hands-on Flock Management Lab The successful day-to-day management of a flock of sheep requires basic skills and knowledge. This lab will cover eartagging, flock ID, basic records, what to look for when purchasing sheep, firewalling the health of your flock, the signs of sickness, what to do before calling the vet, basic diagnosis and more! Todd Taylor, Shepherd, Arlington Sheep Unit. Please dress appropriately including wearing gloves. (Lab will run an hour and a half to help accommodate those students who wish to discuss forage their sample results as a follow-up to the morning session.)

1:00 p.m.  The Shepherd’s Cabinet: The Right Tools for the Job What are the must-haves—drugs, tools and supplies—for dayto-day management of a flock of sheep? Bob Leder, DVM/Sheep Producer, Bear Creek Sheep Station, Bear Creek, WI. 2:00 p.m. Different Routes to Profitability Renowned sheep specialist and shepherd Art Pope often said that sheep are one of the most adaptable animals in the world; it’s the shepherds who often have trouble adapting. In this session beginning shepherds will be led through a decisionmaking process to create a sheep production system that fits their environment and resources. They will be introduced to the variety of sheep production systems that have been used successfully in Wisconsin and then provided with simple, time-tested tools for setting realistic goals and measuring the performance of their sheep enterprises. Tom Cadwallader, Emeritus Professor, UWExtension Department of Ag/Agbusiness Principal, Cadwallader Consulting, LLC.

Used Equipment Auction!

5:00 p.m.  Getting It Right! Part 2 - Forage Sampling Results Analyses of forage samples submitted in the morning will be available at this follow up session. Bill Keough and Zachery Meyer will be available to continue discussion of individual sample results, along with nutritional guidelines based on feed analyses.

Saturday, September 8 • 2 p.m.

WI Sheep & Wool Festival • Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson, WI To Consign contact Lynnette Taylor - Sales Manager, at 608-846-9536


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SUMMER 2012

55th Biennial Spooner Sheep Day

The 55th Biennial Spooner Sheep Day will be held at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station on Saturday, August18, 2012. This year will mark the 60th consecutive year for an annual sheep field day at the Spooner Station. The sheep field days alternate between a Biennial Spooner Sheep Day in even-numbered years and a Biennial Spooner Dairy Sheep Day in odd-numbered years. The sheep field days have a long tradition of providing useful information to the state’s sheep producers and are the longest-running agricultural field days of the many held each year by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Registration will begin at the station headquarters at 8:30 a.m. with the program ending at approximately 3:15 p.m. Two presentations this year will be on sheep grazing systems with Otto Wiegand, Area Livestock Agent, Spooner, presenting “Keys to a Successful Intensive Grazing System” and Laura Paine, Grazing Specialist, WI Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, Madison, presenting “Resources for Starting Grazing or Improving Your System.” Justin Luther, UW-River Falls, will provide information on “Ewe and Ram Management for a Successful Breeding Season,” and Yves Berger, recently retired Sheep Researcher from the Spooner Station, will present highlights from his 24 years of sheep research at the station. The afternoon program will be spent on the pastures and at the sheep barn with discussions and demonstrations. The complete program can be viewed at http://fyi.uwex.edu/wisheepandgoat/. A delicious lamb lunch will be served at noon at a cost of $8.00 per adult, $5.00 for children ages 5 to 11, and free for children under 5. Advanced reservations are not required. For more information, contact Lorraine Toman at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station (715635-3735, lltoman@wisc.edu). The Spooner Sheep Day is sponsored by the Department of Animal Sciences and the Agricultural Research Stations of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and Cooperative Extension of the University of Wisconsin-Extension.

Spooner Agricultural Research Station of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Spooner, Wisconsin

Saturday, August 18, 2012 8:30 a.m. Registration - Station Headquarters 9:00 Welcome and CALS and Station Updates – Administrator, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences(CALS), UW-Madison and Philip Holman, Superintendent, Spooner Agricultural Research Station, CALS, UW-Madison 9:10 Keys to a Successful Intensive Grazing System – Richard “Otto” Wiegand, Area Livestock Agent, UW-Extension, Spooner, WI 9:45 Resources for Starting Grazing or Improving Your System – Laura Paine, Grazing Specialist, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection, Madison, WI 10:25 Break 10:40 Ewe and Ram Management for a Successful Breeding Season—Justin Luther, Assistant Professor, Department of Animal and Food Science, UW-River Falls, River Falls, WI 11:25 Highlights from 24 Years of Sheep Research at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station – Yves Berger, Sheep Researcher (Retired), Spooner Agricultural Research Station, CALS, UW-Madison Noon Presentation of Sheep Industry Award – Rudy Erickson, Producer, Wilson, Wisconsin 12:15 p.m. Lamb Barbecue Lunch – $8.00/adult, $5.00/child under 12, Free/child 5 and under 1:15 Demonstrations and Presentations at the Sheep Facilities and Pastures: • Establishment, Longevity and Use of Kura Clover-Orchardgrass Pastures – Phil Holman, Agronomist, Spooner Agricultural Research Station • Ram Breeding Soundness Exam, Semen Collection and Evaluation – Justin Luther, UW-River Falls • Condition Scoring of Ewes Prior to Breeding – David Thomas, UW-Madison 3:15 Adjourn Attendance at the educational sessions of the Spooner Sheep Day is free. There is a charge for the lamb barbecue lunch. Spooner Sheep Day is sponsored by the Agricultural Research Stations and Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Cooperative Extension, University of Wisconsin-Extension. For more information, contact Lorraine Toman at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station (phone: 715/635-3735, email: lltoman@facstaff.wisc.edu).

SUFFOLK RAMS THAT HAVE “THE LOOK”

GRANDPA’S SHOW CAMP One week of intensive show training for first time showmen (Grandkids). Grand finale was the Interstate Livestock Show, Polk Co. Champion Suffolk Ram Champion and Res. Suffolk Ewe Res Ch wether ram Supreme Champion Wether Type Ram over all breeds. Res. Champion Ewe over all breeds.

If your lambs don’t have this width you need to contact us. We can add rear leg and loineye muscle to your flock. We have scanned loineyes for 12 years and have 20 plus ram lambs to select from. All are registered, RR,NN. Contact us early for more information. See our website for pictures and info. SUFFOLK EWES of similar quality will be for sale. We also have 2 DORSET RAMS of grass based genetics that will be sold. Don’t wait until fall and be disappointed. They move fast.

MINT GOLD RANCH

Dale & Judy Dobberpuhl 5807 County Road X • De Pere, WI 54115 Phone: 920-864-7732 Email: mintgoldranch@gmail.com Website: www. mintgoldranch.com

Supreme Champion Ram at the 2010 Interstate Livestock Show. His full and half brothers available this year.

© 2012 Badgerland Financial, ACA

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SUMMER 2012

THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

9

14th Wisconsin Livestock Show Camp

The Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Association and the Wisconsin State Fair Blue Ribbon Sale of Champions Foundation co-sponsored the 14th Annual Wisconsin Livestock Show Camp on June 16-17 at Wisconsin State Fair Park. Shown here are the participants and assisting parents for the sheep portion of the event headed up by clinicians Mark and Amy Johnson (front row) Sandwich, Illinois. Over sixty young livestock exhibitors representing three species attended the 14th annual Wisconsin Livestock Show Camp on June 16-17 at Wisconsin State Fair Park. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Livestock Breeders Association, Wisconsin State Fair Blue Ribbon Sale of Champions Foundation and the Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Cooperative, the camp focuses on developing character in the show ring and building knowledge of the livestock industry, as well as educating youth in management skills and techniques, showmanship and evaluation strategies. The 2012 Show Camp sheep participants included Anna and Andrew Boschert, Beaver Dam; Lauren Christensen, Twin Lakes; Tyler Cross, Poynette; Cody, Geoff and Tanner Depies, Merrill; Kaylynn and Tim Dickson, Suring: Joi Linneman, Genoa City; Pat Nicolaus, Plymouth; Jeffrey and Lindsey Roloff, Shawano; Hannah, Hayden, Jessica and Justin Taylor, Arlington; Dallas Seubert, Dorchester; Jillian Bingen, West Bend; Dylan Klug, Grafton; Ambrose and Anatole Wiering, Two Rivers and Seth Zimdars, Ripon. The clinicians for the sheep portion of the camp were Mark and Amy Johnson, Sandwich, Illinois.

Shepherd’s Auction Saturday, September 8 4:00 p.m. Activity Center Jefferson Fair Park To Contribute Contact: Jordan Alf alfjo@uwplatt.edu 608 449-1459 Proceeds benefit the WI Sheep Breeders Co-op youth & education programming

Over thirty producers gathered on June 19 at the farm of Harland and Delight Walker for a tour of the couple’s 120 ewe sheep operation and intensively managed pasture system. The pasture walk was one of a series offered this year by Town & Country RC&D. Photo by Kirsten Jurcek.

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Youth Judging Contest: 11:00 Sale: 1:00

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For information, contact Steve Bingen, Sale Chair 262 388-3324 • Email sbingen@charter.net

FIFTH ANNUAL

Badger Production Sale FEATURING THE UW-MADISON SHEEP PROGRAM

Sunday, September 23, 2012 UW RESEARCH FARMS’ PUBLIC EVENTS FACILITY ARLINGTON, WI Striving to produce high quality, sound and high performing sheep that will work in any facet of the sheep industry!

UW 09-425 RR Sons for sale at the farm, Many daughters will sell in this years sale!!!

Featured Breeds: Hampshire, Polypay, Rambouillet (no Targhees this year) Selling Approx. 60-70 Ewes & 8-10 Rams NSIP Performance data will be available on all sale animals Sale organized by UW-Madison Animal Science Students Questions? Like to be added to our mailing list? Contact: Todd Taylor toddtaylor@wiscmail.wisc.edu 608-846-5858

www.badgerproductionsale.com

Double F 1283 QR Will have ewe lambs out of him again this year!!!

Like us on Facebook: UW Sheep Program


10

THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

SUMMER 2012

2013 GrassWorks Grazing Conference to Go “Cutting Edge”

Visit www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com for complete Festival info.

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This year’s 21st annual Grass­ Works Grazing Conference will be held January 17-19, 2013 at The Patriot Center in Wausau, WI. A variety of local & nationally known speakers will be invited to do 20+ workshops on soils, farm financials, marketing, new grazing/ fencing practices and the use of cutting edge technology to help producers farm more efficiently. Sessions will be geared to all levels of grazing experience— from beginners to veterans. Attendees can enjoy a grazingrelated tradeshow ThursdaySaturday, silent and live auction, social time, delicious locally raised grass-fed foods, and numerous networking and community building opportunities. Visit www.grassworks.org for conference updates or contact Conference Planner, Lanice Szomi: 715-965-8324 or at grazingrocks@gmail.com.

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SUMMER 2012

THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

11

Starter Flock Winner The Wisconsin Junior Targhee Sheep Association would like to welcome a new member to the U.S. Targhee Sheep Aassociation (USTSA) – Darcie Rodeback of Iola, Wisconsin. Darcie, the daughter of Dean & Cindy Rodeback, grew up with her two older brothers showing Dorsets and market lambs in northern Illinois. Now a senior in high school, Darcie owns 3 cross-bred ewes and is mentoring 2 other young 4-H members in sheep projects. She has put many hours into showing her sheep at the Portage County Fair. She also plans on showing her new flock at the Wisconsin State Fair

open wool show, the Wisconsin Junior State Fair, and the WLBA Summer Spectacular. Darcie is a very active FFA member, and has held numerous officer positions in addition to taking part in activities at the chapter, county and state levels. She was recently awarded the Top Senior FFA member for the Rosholt Chapter. Darcie plans to have sheep in her life for a long time, just as her family has. She hopes to be able to raise lambs for other 4-H and FFA members, and looks forward to becoming an active member within the Targhee community.

WCLA Show Season

Darcie Rodeback of Iola, WI, is the recipient of the Wisconsin Junior Targhee Sheep Association Starter Flock. (l-r) Andy, Joelle, and Leslie Nevens of Lodi, WI, and Darcie with parents Dean and Cindy Rodeback.

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    

Tough competition during the Junior Showmanship class at the UW-Madison Saddle and Sirloin Lamb Bonanza with: (l to r) Kailen Smerchek, Elsa Blad, Malorie Schmoll, Ty Thorson, Brady Muedt, Jacee Johnson, Regan Suddeth and Sara Johnson. The 2012 Wisconsin Club Lamb Association (WCLA) show season is winding down but the participation and enthusiasm level has been increasing. Youth members had the chance to show in 13 WCLA sanctioned shows this summer. Two shows remain on the calendar – the WLBA Summer Spectacular will be held on August 18 in Wausau, Wis. And the Wisconsin Sheep and Wool Festival will be the site of the last show of the season on September 9 in Jefferson, Wis. The WCLA annual meeting and awards presentation will follow the September 9 show at 3:00 p.m. in the Sheep Barn Ring. Currently, 35 WCLA youth mem­ bers are competing for show­manship, sweepstakes and breed awards. Youth members are divided into three age groups: Junior – ages 11 and under, Intermediate – ages 12 to 15 and

Senior – 16 to 19. All age groups are very competitive this year with 17 competing in the Junior division, 6 competing in the Intermediate division and 9 in the Senior division. Current standings are available at www.wisconsinclublambassociation. com/points.html. A big thanks to the hosts of the 11 shows that have already been held. UW-River Falls Block & Bridle hosted a doubleheader on May 5 in Ellsworth, Wis. On May 6, UWMadison Saddle and Sirloin Lamb Bonanza held two shows in Arlington, Wis. Dodge Point Lamb and Pig Extravaganza hosted two shows on May 12 in Mineral Point, Wis. The UW-Platteville Block & Bridle Pioneer Showdown shows were held on May 20 in Lancaster, WI and the WLBA Spring Preview show was held on June 9 in Jefferson, Wis.

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12

THE WISCONSIN SHEPHERD

SUMMER 2012

For More Information…

Calendar of Events

July 27-28—National Sheep Improvement Program Center of the Nation Sale & Symposium, Spencer, IA. Micky Burch, 712 7906303, info@iowasheep.com July 30 - August 5—Midwest Felting Symposium, Alliant Center, Madison, WI www.midwestfeltingsymposium.com, 920 623-4237. July 31—Entry Deadline—WLBA Summer Spectacular Show. 608 868-2505 Entry form online: www.wisconsinlivestockbreeders .com August 2-12—Wisconsin State Fair, Wisconsin State Fair Park, West Allis. Open sheep show begins August 1. www.wistatefair.com August 2-12—Wisconsin Wool Works! Sheep & Goat Barn, Wisconsin State Fair, West Allis. Contact Manager Carol Black for consignment information, carol@ewesfulgifts.com or 920 623-3536. August 15-19—Michigan Fiber Festival, Allegan County Fair­ grounds, Allegan, MI. www.michiganfiberfestival.info August 16—3rd Annual National Hand & Machine Shearing Contest, Genesee County Fair, Mount Morris, MI 810 653-1436 www.gcf.org

WISCONSIN SHEEP & WOOL FESTIVAL CONTACTS General Festival Information www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com

Hall of Breeds Email: sheep@maplewoodnorth.com

Catalog (See website)

Crook & Whistle Stock Dog Trial Email: john@bigyellowboots.net

Vendor Space (See website) Class Registrations Sheep 101 Wonders of Wool Fiber Arts 608 868-2505 Email: wisbc@centurytel.net

Camping Permits 920 674-7148 (7:00 – 3:30 weekdays)

Make It With Wool 262 367-6192 Email: jwwittkopf@core.com

Shepherd’s & Silent Auctions 608 449-1459 Email: alfjo@uwplatt.edu

Used Equipment Auction 608 846-9536 Email: taylorsheep@yahoo.com

Handspun Skein Contest – Open & MSSBA Email: shuppian@charter.net Design Challenge Email: shuppian@charter.net

Lead Class 608 345-9296 Email: knels68@yahoo.com Sheep Show Entries 920 344-1235 Email: metrohamps@hotmail.com

August 18—WLBA Summer Spectacular Show, Marathon Fair Park, Wausau. Entry information: www.wisconsinlivestockbreeders. com or WLBA Executive Director Jill Alf, 608 868-2505 or alfhamp@ centurytel.net

Fleece Shows & Sales General: 608 882-0267 Email: toholin@gmail.com Entries: 608 566-3504 Email: dicksonleah7@gmail.com

August 18—55th Biennial Spooner Sheep Day, Spooner Agricultural Research Station, Spooner, WI. Contact: Lorraine Toman, 715 6353735 or ltoman@wisc.edu

Photo Contest 608 868-3268 Email: tjmetcalf@centurytel.net

August 20—Entry Deadline – Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival. MIWW Competition, Sheep Shows, Wonders of Wool Class Registrations, Photo Contest. www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival. com, 608 868-2505 or wisbc@centurytel.net

Poster Contest 715 584-1093 Email: nzernicke@granitewave.com

Midwest Shetland Sheep Breeders Association Show Email: okacres@hotmail.com ASBA Midwest Regional Junior Southdown Show 920 253-5473 Email: circlejsouthdowns@hughes.net 920 992-6183 Email: Barbara@mbgenetics.com

September 7-9—2012 Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Festival, Jefferson Fair Park, Jefferson, WI. www.wisconsinsheepandwoolfestival.com September 8—Wisconsin Make It With Wool Competition. Contact Wynn Wittkopf, State MIWW Director, jwwittkopf@core.com, 262 367-6192

Pipestone Veterinary Supply

September 21—Deadline: Copy and Ads, FALL Issue, Wisconsin Shepherd. Ads: Kelli Gunderson robkelgundy@yahoo.com 815 8215905. Copy: Bob Black rbblack@powercom.net 920 623-3536 September 23—Badger Production Sale, Public Events Facility, Arlington Ag Research Station, Arlington, WI. Contact: Todd Taylor, toddtaylor@wisc.edu, 608 846-5858.

We are the answer people!

September 29-30—Northern Michigan Lamb and Wool Festival, Ogemaw County Fairgrounds, West Branch, MI. 989 685-3045 www.lambandwoolfestival.com September 29-30—Mt. Bruce Station Sheep and Wool Festival, Romeo, MI. 810 798-2568 uhlianuk@sheepstuff.com October 1—Entry deadline, Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Co-op Bred Ewe Sale. Contact Steve Bingen, Sale Chair, 262 388-3324 email sbingen@charter.net

To Order Call: 800-658-2523 Fax: 507-825-3140 Ask-A-Vet: gkennedy@pipevet.com Website: www.pipevet.com

October 27—Wisconsin Sheep Breeders Co-op Bred Ewe Sale. Rock County Fairgrounds, Janesville, WI. www.wisbc.com 608 8682505

HIDDEN VALLEY FARM & WOOLEN MILL Clothing, jewelry, Christmas cards, stationery, stuffed animals, books, figurines and calendars for the sheep enthusiast.

Ewesful Gifts

7868 State Road 73 Columbus, WI 53925 Order Toll Free 877 393-7385 or 920 623-3536 www.ewesfulgifts.com - free catalog

Registered C.S.S.N.A.

• Custom Carding • Roving & batts for spinning • Quilting batts & reconditioning • Hand-tied quilts • Registered Coopworth Sheep

Paul & Carol Wagner 14804 Newton Rd., Valders, WI 54245

920-758-2803

Erdman Texel Sheep Texels – to put the MEAT back in your sheep! OPP Negative • Scrapie Certified

RON ERDMAN

4362 So. Lake Fern Rd., Polo, IL 61064 815-564-7149 www.erdmantexel.com

Jones Shearing

Experienced and dependable Shearing sheep, goats, alpacas, and llamas. Covering Wisconsin, Northern Illinois, and Eastern Iowa jonesshearing@gmail.com 715-424-1023 www.facebook.com search: jonesshearing

The Business Directory Published by The Wisconsin Shepherd

3696 Country Aire Drive Cedarburg, WI 53012 262-377-1491 • Dick 262-375-0814 • Mark rsrmke@att.net 4 Miles East of Jackson on SE Corner of Hwy. 60 and Country Aire Drive (Hwy. M)

“Ewe” too can join The Business Directory Members pay $110 for 4 issues or $40/issue; non-members $140 for 4 issues or $50/issue. Call Kelli at 815-821-5905.

For Your Advertising Needs, for Subscription Rates or to Receive a 4-week Complimentary Paper Contact:

The Country Today PO Box 570 Eau Claire WI 54702 715-833-9276 • 800-236-4004 joann.utphall@ecpc.com www.thecountrytoday.com

Got something to sell? Have an announcement to make? PUT IT HERE AND GET RESULTS!

The Wisconsin Shepherd  

A PUBLICATION OF THE WISCONSIN SHEEP BREEDERS COOPERATIVE 7811 Consolidated School Rd., Edgerton, WI 53534 • www.wisbc.com

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