Page 1


PROJECT INTEGRATION- ARCH 423 TEAM: EDWIN CASTILLO, HENRY CAMACHO, PAMELA COSTABILE CLIENT: CITY OF NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF OF PARKS AND RECREATION LOCATION: MIDTOWN MANHATTAN, WEST WATERFRONT This project is a proposal for a facility connecting park-goers to the Hudson River. The facility is meant to house a river project research center, sailing and kayaking for the community, and a public space for visitors of the Hudson River on Pier 52. The sailing school is meant for use during the seasons warm enough to launch vessels and have sailing lessons. The facilities include a spacious classroom, rigging areas, lockers, restrooms, storage for vessels, and an office. The eco-pier of the facility holds classes and meetings meant to serve a staff of visiting scientists and professional community members. The park feature is meant to engage the community, incite interest, and become a destination for everyone. It should sport picnic areas, areas of recreation, and areas accessible to strollers and fishermen.


ZONING The project falls under the manufacturing district. The pier used to build the facility neighbors the city sanitation department, Chelsea Piers, and Hudson River Park areas. The buildings located closer to the city center permit residential areas to be in proximity with the manufacturing parts allowing for the area to be rich with creative use of the old construction.

Re Vitalize The meat packing district has turned into a sought out location for retail and residential development. Traces of old industrial buildings can be seen. These buildings are repurposed for the community. The term “Revitalize� is seen in many recent projects to renovate and breathe life into the neglected area. One of the most notable projects is the High Line.


STRUCTURE A grid is made using the structural components of the pier and the gate located at the main entrance. Portions of the pier are removed to let light into the water for wildlife and to permit closer views of the river by visitors.


PARTI The structure at the main entrance is also used as an organizing element for the spaces of the room and shape of the building. A wall running through the center of the pier divides the program into appropriate adjacencies. The systems implemented into the building were made to satisfy the spine which causes users to either use the right or left path.

circulation/lobby classroom/classroom service areas offices exhibition area mechanical/restrooms/lockers


L E E D P R O J E CT The facility is intended to save the client money and promote the use of renewable energy. Solar p.v. panels are used to collect solar irradiance and provide electricity through batteries stored in the bearing wall. This facilitates the installation and replacement of the batteries. Its exposure on the wall makes it possible to showcase the environmental systems to the public. The portions of the roof that aren’t solar panels components serve as a roof and a system that harvests algae. Algae can be harvested for food, energy, and biofuel. The roof also acts as a storm water management system using the angled valleys in the roof to direct runoff water into catchment areas. A plumbing system collects rain water to be filtered to be filtered as needed and used as a non potable water resource. Demolition and waste were considered as part of the design process. Sections of the pier taken out to accomodate area requirements for kayaks and water taxis were used to create a showcase area by the entrance. Slabs of concrete are used to direct movement, provide a canvas for local art, showcase the building systems, and display seasonal programs.


HVAC Vents run through the truss system of the roof structure providing ventilation through out the building.

RADIANT HEATING Radiant floor heating is used as an active system using heat produced by algae panels and solar panels.

MECHANICAL ROOM The mechanical room serves as a learning exhibition area for visitors. It houses the boiler for vents, water storage tanks, and filtering sysems for storm water run off.


BEARING WALL As the pier stretches across the water, it brings the visitor closer to the Hudson leaving a space of only two feet of concrete between the visitors feet and the moving waters of the river. The bearing wall built running across the pier serves in the same function separating the spaces of the facility between public and private spaces while serving as a structural spine that holds all of the systems and circulation of the facility. *Cross Sections- Short and Long


Design problems are structured so as to necessitate the resolution of multiple issues simultaneously and interdependently. Emphasis is on the translation and development of a part into spaces capable of being inhabited and constructed.


TOBACCO WAREHOUSE BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK TYPE: Community Project CLIENT: City of New York LOCATION: Dumbo, Brooklyn

Brooklyn bridge park is seeking to redevelop the former Tobacco Warehouse in the ferrry park section. The purpose is to create a facility in the park which provides educational, cultural, and community uses. The facility is intended to become a destination for visitors and house a new arts organization providing public programming.


CONTINUOUS WALL The most dominant feature around the immediate area of the warehouse is the wall that wraps around the block. This concept explores an idea that the wall continues to come from the sides in a monolithic manner and creates other spaces as it continues to fold.

OPENINGS AS VOIDS/SOLIDS The character of the wall is given by the repitiion of openings. This concept explores an idea that has the openings become solid and manipulates their lengths and extrusions to create spaces.

FRAMING THE OPENINGS The walls of the facility can be given a grid relating to the arrangement that regulates the openings in the present wall. Inside the created grid, certain portions can be covered by panels of varying sizes to frame the openings and change the experience of the visitor once inside the facility.

ROOF SEPARATE FROM WALL The sense of open space in the warehouse is due to the lack of a roof. To keep this experience, the roof houses programs where needed while the walls supports it for necessary structure. Although, the roof has a different direction and connection to circulation.


THE FACILITY At the entrance of the project, gridded partitions with panels serve as a screen to filter visitors to come in through one entrance while still keeping the experience an open partition in which one can move through. The locations of these panels not only screen walkways for visitors but also serves to frame the exterior openings of the preexisting wall. Like the area of Brooklyn Heights which enlarges its programs when reaching closer to the edge of the water, the programmatic spaces in the facility also change in height to add an effect of change in proportion. Zoning regulations keep industry sectors located at the edge, commercial sectors close to the edge, and residential sectors farthest away from the edge of the water. The program in this project imitate this general orientation.

*outside cafe (top), terraces (bottom)


THEATRE

COMMUNITY

CAFE

GALLERY

PUBLIC/ ENTRANCE


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

B

A

SECTION A


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

SECTION B


FEUERWACHE (FIREHOUSE) ARCHITECT: Peter Kulka TYPE: ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS CLIENT: CITY OF HEIDELBURG LOCATION: HEIDELBERG, GERMANY

3RD FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

The analysis for this building served as a case study for the students to follow the steps of previous architects in designing for sustainability and function and how that shapes a building. Peter Kulka’s feuerwache was built for the city’s professional fire brigade. The apparatus bays enfold the core of the facility making openings for vehicles accessible on all three sides of the building. The vertical supports serve as partitioned space for outdoor training and added aesthetics. The facade of the building also contains PV panels diminishing energy consumption.

1ST FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR


PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION

3RD FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

1ST FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

FIRETRUCK GRID


SITE AXONOMETRIC

VIEW POINTS


COLORS ARE CHOSEN USING COLORS FOR PROGRAM DISTRIBUTION DIAGRAM. LIGHTER COLORS REPRESENT ACTIVE AND BUSY PROGRAMS WHILE DARKER COLORS REPRESENT SEDENTARY PROGRAMS

PROGRAM TURNS AT AXIS POINTS


R

ST

EA

EW

D

O

C

K

T

ET

WA

TE

RE R ST

DO CK STRE ET ET

RE T ST

ON

FR

A

Due to Brooklyn Heights being an area of rapid growth, students are asked to design a new fire station as commisioned by fire department of the city of New York.

ET

ST

RE E

B

C

OLD FULTON STREET

A EXISTING 5-STORY BUILDING

EVERIT STREET

A

FURMAN STREET

D

TYPE: Public Government Building CLIENT: FDNY LOCATION: Brooklyn Heights, Brooklyn

RE ST

N

IN

BRIDG E

ET STRE

KLYN

MA

BROO

CK D DO OL

BROOKLYN HEIGHTS FIREHOUSE

RIVE

SITE

D

B

B

DOUGHTY STREET D

C

C


Scanned by CamScanner

Scanned by CamScanner

Scanned by CamScanner

LAYERS Each building had dominating features with layers of glazing or brick framing those features or concealing them.

PROGRAM AS RIBBON: The ribbon is expressed through each program. The language of the ribbon is carried through out the facility by the glazing. The glazing also hold appendages determined by the appropriate proportion of each program. Apparatus bay programs would have larger proportioned ribbons and appendages as opposed to residential programs.

TEXTURE Main roads had asphault while narrow street ways were paved in cladded stone. The park around the pier was furnished with smalls pebbles and boardwalk that provided pedestrians with walkways.

JUXTAPOSITION The borderes between these textures and the variety between them made it easy to realize their juxtaposition. The contrasts made the area interesting and spatially stimulating.


LEFT ELEVATION

REAR ELEVATION

SECTION 1


RIGHT ELEVATION

FRONT ELEVATION

SECTION 2


Students are asked to explore architectural ideas directly through space. Volume modeling explores spatial intersections, tartan grid, light, circulation, materials and structure, as aspects of plastic design at human scale.


GRID AND SURFACE:

A.

Exercise A.1

This exercise challenged the student to explore imagining three dimensional masses using only a two dimensional grid. The three dimensional masses implied the formation of a surface or site. The mass was designed to be monolithic and continuous.

B.


A.

B.


MORNING SPACE

AFTERNOON SPACE

EVENING SPACE


ENVIRONMENT AND SITE EXERCISE A.2

Exercise 2 required students to use half of the models created in exercise A.1 to be placed alongside another half-model in the class. A morning space, afternoon space, and evening space are designed to fit inside the half-model and consider the other half-model and its spaces to design a fluid entity. Model B was chosen to continue as a large scale site for the inhabited spaces of exercise A.2. The spatial properties of the spaces were designed to coincide with the site. The designed spaces are pulled and molded to satisfy spatial requirements, aesthetics, and optimal locations for light and circulation. The facades for the spaces were required to cover a certain percentage of the mass with the intent to create interesting spaces.


MUSEUM OF IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE Students were asked to design a new museum of the immigrant experience. Manhattan’s lower east side is historically known for the influx of immigrants that formed the culture of that area and the New York experience. The museum is intended to be a cultural hub for visitors to learn about the area and evoke a sense of the immigrant experience through the design.

CONSTRAINT AND FREEDOM During the late 1800’s and early 1900’s the arrival of the massive amount of immigrants helped shape national identity and what it meant to be American. Most of them were of working class who came to create a better life for themselves and their families. Their arrival marked a step of a turbulent journey whose ultimate goal was “the American Dream.” Promises of opportunity and prosperity were not an easy prize readily available once the arrival to America was acheived. While it did not house doctrines of divine “rights of birth” in monarchies, inequality, restriction of religion, and was built on the ideas of freedom from tyranny, work was still needed. Many immigrants were constrained by a lack of knowledge of the language, connection to relatives, space to have a habitable place to live, and time as there was the need to work long hard hours. Families of fifteen were forced into single apartments. The perseverance and work produced by these immigrants would be their tool to prosperity. The immigrant experience is one that resonates with many Americans today where their success lies on their merits and who with limited means were able to achieve freedom. This design intends to bring the visitor through levels of constraint ultimately leading to open and unrestricted spaces.


Museum shop/ Ticket Sale

Small Theatre

Or

Orchard St.

Lobby Artifact Gallery

Outdoor Space Photo Gallery

Canal st. Canal st.

FIRST FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

Outdoor Space

Outdoor Space

Library

Orchard St. Orchard St.

Archive

Photo Gallery

Memorial Room

Canal st.

FOURTH FLOOR

Canal st.

FIFTH FLOOR


ORCHARD ST

CANAL ST


Transverse Section longitudinal Section

LONGITUDINAL SECTION (ORCHARD ST)

TRANSVERSE SECTION (CANAL ST)


THANK YOU.

Edwin C portfolio  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you