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Technical introduction

Technical introduction

REACHING THE AREAS COVERED BY THE GUIDE The Valtellina, Valchiavenna and Engadin valleys see lots of through-traffic since the roads to the Maloja, Spluga and Stelvio passes go along them. For those coming from northern Europe, the Valtellina and Valchiavenna valleys are where you first find the Italian sun, warmth and good food, and are very famous destinations for tourists who come to enjoy their natural beauty, history, and for the almost limitless outdoor sports. If you come from the south (Milan and Lecco), follow the Strada Statale (SS) 36 dello Spluga to reach Colico where you keep going in the Valchiavenna valley until Chiavenna, where the two main roads for the Spluga and Maloja passes branch off. The Maloja pass is the gateway to the Engadin. For the Valtellina Valley, from Colico follow the SS38 Stelvio Pass road, with branches to the Val Gerola valley from Morbegno, to the Valmasino valley from Ardenno and to the Valmalenco valley from Sondrio. Further up, you can go to Aprica from Tresenda, towards the province of Brescia, while from Tirano you go up to the Bernina pass and back to Engadin. If you stay on the SS38 you reach Bormio where you can choose to go up to the Valfurva valley towards the Circo delle 13 Cime and Cevedale or go to Livigno. From the North, when the Spluga pass is closed, is better to go to Como-Chiasso to cross into Italy and then go to Lecco and the SS36. Otherwise you can use the Spluga pass to enter the Valchiavenna Valley or the JulierPass for St. Moritz and the Engadin. The Valle dell’Inn valley from Innsbruk leads to the lower Engadin, then you go up to the Bernina pass and down to Tirano and the Valtellina valley. 14

You can also reach the Valtellina valley from the Resia and Stelvio passes. Whichever route you choose, the road system is good and the traffic free-flowing, except for some stretches of the lower and middle Valtellina valley - from Colico to Sondrio - and of the Valchiavenna valley – up to Chiavenna – where the local traffic is often very intense. GENERAL NOTES ON THE CRAGS AND WALLS DESCRIBED IN THE GUIDE Sport and modern climbing arrived in the Valchiavenna valley and Engadin gradually; it’s difficult to say exactly when. Local climbers such as Hans Peter Kasper and Carlo Pedroni climbed differently from classical mountaneering and sought out routes to free climb both on valleybottom crags and on high altitude walls. As regards crags, it has to be considered that there is no lack of rock in the Valchiavenna valley and Engadin, but, compared to the high altitude walls, the wonderful rock formations of the close-by Val di Mello valley or to the excellent limestone walls of the area around Lecco, these crags seemed of secondary importance. Following on from the important achievements in the surrounding areas, around the end of the 1970’s the Valchiavenna valley as well saw the beginning of the opening of free climbing routes, with a perspective that subsequently would be defined as “sport climbing”. After a first introduction of pure bouldering on the Cimaganda boulders, the first routes were equipped on the Sasso Bianco di Prata, and subsequently on the Placche di Bette and Vho. Only afterwards people looked for more vertical and overhanging routes on the crags of Cranna and Poiatengo, on the upper sector of Vho, and at Mezzera, the Sasso del Drago and Uschione. Multi-pitches routes had their own

Valtellina Valchiavenna Engadina - falesie e vie sportive  
Valtellina Valchiavenna Engadina - falesie e vie sportive  

Tutte le falesie dalla val Chiavenna al Passo dello Stelvio. Cento proposte per questa terza edizione di una guida che copre un territorio v...

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