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SHOE DESIGN

Mario helps customers FInd

the right FIt STORY AND PHOTO BY SHARON SULLIVAN

648 Main St. 970.243.4777 shoedesigngj.com

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hether you have a foot problem that needs correcting, or you just want to find comfortable shoes that perfectly fit your own unique feet, Shoe Design, 648 Main St., is worth checking out. Owner Mario Calderone is a certified pedorthist, a person specializing in correction and prevention of foot problems. “We’re a fitting shoe store,” Calderone said. “We take five measurements - the arch, ball, length, width and depth.” “As soon as you try on a properly fitted shoe, you’ll feel the difference to the top of the head. Calderone works with 15 different shoe manufacturers. If you don’t see the style you want in his store, he has catalogs with 450 different styles to choose from. Ruth Docter of Glade Park and her husband both wear Z-Coil pain relief footwear from Shoe Design.

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“My husband has a bad back, a pinched nerve,” Docter said. The shoes have “cut his pain level and he can stand now. It’s been a lifesaver for him.” Being fitted for and wearing the correct shoe is the non-medical and affordable way of dealing with foot and leg problems, Calderone said. His customers include runners looking for a shoe that promises ultimate performance, people training

for marathons, and those wanting a good walking shoe before embarking on a trip. He can also fit both feet in what’s called a “mismate” shoe - when feet are not exactly the same size. Calderone has been familiar with corrective shoes all his life. His parents bought him corrective shoes at age 6 because of his flat-footedness. Other foot problems that a correct shoe can help with include plantar fasciitis, athletic injuries, diabetic feet, pronation (where the foot rotates inward), arthritic feet, and feet with callouses and bunions. Shoe Design is the only store of its kind on the Western Slope. Calderone also makes home visits for those who are housebound.

BRICKYARD MASONRY & LANDSCAPE

Job No. 1: Take care of the

1979 Atlasta Solar Center opens.

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if she wanted to run the business or should he sell it, Montgomery EA RS I N BU moved back to Grand Junction with her family and took over managing retail yard in the business in 2004. 2960 I-70 Business-Loop Montrose in 2002. The business is owned by 970.242.5575 Help is available when you Montgomery; her sister, Jenifer www.brickyardcolorado.com walk into Brickyard from staff Lawrence; and their parents, Mike and HOURS: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. that “knows what they’re talking Maureen Johnson. SUMMER HOURS about,” Montgomery said. Montgomery’s grandfather began Saturday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. “I’m always looking making blocks in 1948, and founded for something unique,” Badger Blocks in Los Angeles in 1951. Montgomery said. “I love it when After returning home from Vietnam, Mike Johnson joined his someone comes in here and asks for something I’ve never father in the masonry business. sold before. It’s kind of an adventure to find what they want.” Johnson moved his family to Grand Junction and bought With her father’s 40 years experience in the business, and the building materials store in 1986. In 1991, he bought the contacts he’s made, it’s not difficult for Montgomery to the manufacturing plant at 1100 D Road block pavers and find unique products requested by her customers. retaining wall are made there. The family opened another Y

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t Brickyard Masonry and Landscape Supply it’s easy to find help with tracking down supplies or designing a landscaping project. “Take care of the customer” has been the motto of this locally-owned family business for 26 years. Flagstone, pavers, gravel, boulders, retaining walls, garden walls — they have it all. Brickyard carries a variety of both manufactured and real stone and any kind of veneer. In the Brickyard showroom, 2860 I-70 Business Loop, there are a multitude of different kinds of brick displayed, as well as rock work and landscaping ideas. Brickyard carries five different lines of bricks for a total of over 200 different varieties. Brickyard vice president Jamie Montgomery said it was always in the back of her mind that someday she would follow her father Mike Johnson into the business. She earned a degree in business and marketing from the University of Colorado. When her dad, as he approached retirement, asked her

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The Brickyard has been doing that in the Grand Valley for 26 years

1979 Jane Quimby first woman mayor of Grand Junction.

1980 Mesa Mall opens on the west end of GJ.


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