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Secondary Cycle Two

Year Three

Grammar Activity Book

JARET

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

G R A M M A R

The grammar activity books in the Connecting Through English series are designed to help Secondary Cycle Two students acquire and practise grammar basics.

These activity books focus on useful notions designed to help students reinvest their new learning in oral interactions, as well as reading and

G R A M M A R Benoit Jaret

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

writing activities in class.

YEAR THREE

Grammar Activity Book

YEAR THREE

SECONDARY CYCLE TWO

SECONDARY CYCLE TWO

Maintenir sa dignité.

En voiture, soyons prudents! Assis devant ou derrière, moi, je boucle ma ceinture.

1 800 567-7902

PRODUCT CODE 38 44 ISBN 978-2-7655-0338-5

www.grandducenligne.com Éditions Grand Duc Groupe Éducalivres inc. InfoService : 1 800 567-3671

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Secondary Cycle Two

Year Three

Grammar Benoit Jaret

Grammar Activity Book


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Grammar © 2009, Éditions Grand Duc, a division of Groupe Éducalivres Inc. 955 Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Telephone: 514 334-8466 ■ Fax: 514 334-8387

www.grandduc.com

All rights reserved. ILLUSTRATIONS: Volta Création We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Book Publishing Industry Development Program (BPIDP) for our publishing activities. It is illegal to reproduce this publication, in full or in part, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording, magnetic or other) without first obtaining written permission from the publisher. By respecting this request, you will encourage the authors in the pursuit of their careers.

This publication was printed on 100% recycled, post-consumer paper, thus allowing us to lessen our impact on the environment in the following ways: • Reducing solid waste: 3,479 kg • Reducing water consumption: 329,099 L • Reducing suspended matter in water: 22.0 kg • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions: 7,640 kg • Lowering natural gas requirements: 497 m3 • Conserving the forest: 121 trees spared

PRODUCT CODE 3844 ISBN 978-2-7655-0338-5 Legal deposit Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, 2009 Library and Archives Canada, 2009

Printed in Canada 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 L 14 13 12 11 10 9


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Table of Contents Quick Review

Simple Verb Tenses ............................................................................................................ • Simple Present Tense • Simple Past Tense • Simple Future Tense

2

Get a Grip!

Information Questions ....................................................................................................... 8 • Who? Where? Why? When? What? • Which? • Whose? • How + Adjective? • How + Adverb? Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 14 Following the Yellow Brick Road

Nouns, Pronouns, Articles and Determiners .................................................................. 18 • Nouns • The Plural Form of Nouns • Non-count Nouns • Quantifiers with Count and Non-count Nouns • Indefinite and Definite Articles • Subject and Object Pronouns • There Is, There Are/There Was, There Were • Indefinite Pronouns • Reflexive Pronouns • Relative Pronouns g • Possessive Adjectives and Possessive Pronouns g Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 34 Scared Silly

Adjectives ............................................................................................................................ • The Order of Adjectives • Adjectives with -ing Ending (Present Participles) • Adjectives: Comparatives, Superlatives and Equivalents Active and Passive Voices ................................................................................................. Direct and Indirect Speech ................................................................................................ Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................

38

45 47 49


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It’s About Time…

The Present Perfect Tense ................................................................................................. The Past Perfect Tense ...................................................................................................... The Present Perfect Continuous Tense ............................................................................ .................................................................................. Linking Words and Expressions g Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................

52 54 56 58 61

The Dating Game

The Present, Past and Future Continuous Tenses ......................................................... 64 • How to Form the Continuous Tenses • The Function of the Present and Past Continuous Tenses • The Future Continuous Tense ................................................................................................ 71 Gerunds and Infinitives g Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 74 When Reason Sleeps…

Adverbs and Prepositions .................................................................................................. 76 • Adverbs of Frequency • Adverbs of Time • Adverbs of Intensity and Degree • Adverbs of Manner • Prepositions of Time • Preposition of Location and Direction ..................................................................................................... 84 Subordinate Clauses g Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 86 Freedom of Expression

Types of Sentences ............................................................................................................. 90 • Writing Effective Sentences Modal Auxiliaries ................................................................................................................ 92 • Using Could (Past Tense of Can) • Using Can and May • Using Must • Using Should • Using Could and Would Yes/No Questions .............................................................................................................. 97 • Yes/No Questions with Do, Does and Did • Yes/No Questions with Modal Auxiliaries • Yes/No Questions with Continuous Tenses Tag Questions ...................................................................................................................... 100 • Tag Questions with the Simple Tenses • Tag Questions with Modal Auxiliaries • Tag Questions with Continuous Tenses Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 103

IV

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Are We Having Fun Yet?

Imperatives (Will/Must) ................................................................................................. 106 • Using Might and Must (Possibility/Deduction) • Using Will and Must: Imperatives and Intentions The Conditional Tense + an “If-clause” ......................................................................... 108 Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 112 Not All Black and White

The Sequence of Verb Tenses ......................................................................................... 116 • Sequencing Simple Verb Tenses • Sequencing Verbs with Continuous Tenses • Sequencing Verbs with Perfect Tenses • Sequencing Verbs with Conditional Tenses g Wrap-up ................................................................................................................................ 124

A. B. C. D. E. F.

g

Punctuation .................................................................................................................... 126 Table of Common Irregular Verbs ............................................................................. 128 Overview of Verb Tenses ............................................................................................ 131 Table of Common Phrasal Verbs ............................................................................... 135 Idiomatic Expressions (Idioms) ................................................................................. 138 Cognates and False Cognates ................................................................................... 140

In the Focus on heading, this pictogram indicates that the subject is covered in the Student Book and where to find it.

Table of Contents


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Quick Review Simple Verb Tenses

The past is the future of the present. Japanese proverb

A sponge to wipe away the past; a rose to sweeten the present; a kiss to greet the future. Arabian proverb

Focus on…

Simple Present Tense The simple present tense is used:

Keywords - in the afternoon - usually - before going to bed - often - on Sundays - normally (Mondays, Fridays, etc…) - in general - every morning

to describe habitual or usual activities. Example: I get up at six every morning. I jog 5 kilometres every day.

to talk about facts. Example: Hockey is Canada’s national sport. Madrid has many bullfight arenas. He lives in Toronto now.

to express likes and dislikes. Example: He prefers golf to bicycling.

How to form it:

Negative form:

The third person singular always ends in “s.”

For the negative form, use doesn’t/don’t + the base form of the verb.

Example: He works very hard to correct his technique.

ACTIVITY

Examples: I don’t play very well. He doesn’t like to lose. We don’t understand the rules of the game.

1

1 Write the following sentences in the negative form. 2 Use the contracted form. Example:

Jason fights mummies.

Jason doesn’t fight mummies.

a) I like creepy ghosts. b) Maureen scares little kids. c) Vampires suck people’s blood. d) Silver bullets kill werewolves. e) A zombie eats brains.

2

Introduction

Quick Review

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ACTIVITY

Group:

2

Write the verbs in the third person singular. Example:

to bark  it barks

a) to punch b) to regret c) to tap

 he

 she  it

d) to conquer  she e) to play

 he

ACTIVITY

3

f) to need g) to do h) to put i) to mope j) to lend

 she  it

 he  he  he

1 Look at the pictures. 2 Describe the images. Example:

He doesn’t like to eat macaroni and cheese.

a) She rides the train every day.

c) She is nervous when she drives in traffic.

b) They study hard the night before important

d) He has a very nice singing voice.

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Focus on…

Simple Past Tense The simple past tense is used when actions that happened in the past are finished in a known or understood moment. That is why past-tense keywords and expressions are often used with the simple past tense. Simple Past Tense Regular Verbs

Irregular Verbs

The simple past tense of regular verbs is formed by adding –ed or –ied to the base form.

The formation of the simple past tense of irregular verbs doesn’t follow any rules. You have to learn the simple past form of irregular verbs by heart or refer to the Table of Common Irregular Verbs on pp. 128-130.

PAY ATTENTION! When using did not or didn’t, remember to keep your main verb You need the auxiliary verb to do to build the negative form in its base form. of regular and irregular verbs (except for to be ). In the simple Base form only past tense, use did not or its contracted form didn’t. Example:

She loved to watch movies. She did not love to watch movies. Simple past

Example: I was grounded. I was not/wasn’t grounded.

Main verb

ACTIVITY

4

1 Write the correct category of each verb. 2 Use the following code: R = regular verbs and I = irregular verbs. 3 Consult pp. 128–130 to validate your answers. Example:

to exclude: R

a) to throw:

f) to steal:

k) to lose:

b) to push:

g) to type:

l) to bet:

c) to refer:

h) to get:

m) to set:

d) to putt:

i) to gather:

n) to soothe:

e) to put:

4

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I

Quick Review

j) to boot:

R

o) to stand:

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I

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ACTIVITY

Date:

Group:

5

1 Write the verbs using the simple present or the simple past tense. 2 Circle any keywords or expressions that relate to the simple present tense.

Pizza and Your Face: Is There a Connection? was Hey, Pizzaface! You’ve heard it before, though it (to be) assumed to be an makes break out urban legend: junk food (to make) your face (to break out) . knew ate Growing up, I (to know) plenty of people who (to eat) wanted had whatever they (to want) , and (to have) skin like a model’s. knew I also (to know) people whose faces (to look) like the surface of Mars, seemingly no matter what they (to eat) or didn’t eat (to eat, neg.) and despite taking prescription meds that made (to make) them act weird. But now, after 30 years of scientists denying a solid connection between diet and pimples, reports Scientific American (to report) that some fatty foods – particularly dairy – may play a role, but not because ends up the fat in those foods (to end up) in your pores. contain Rather, the hormones they (to contain) can trigger testosterone surges in the body, and testosterone is (to be) a major contributor to acne outbreaks dials up since it (to dial up) the activity of both the sebaceous glands and the lining cells. Testosterone is (to be) also the reason why acne outbreaks (to tend) to be worse in teenage boys than girls, though both sexes (to be) vulnerable. is According to Scientific American, the reason for this (to be) that holds “milk from pregnant cows (to hold) hormones that oil glands can turn into dihydrotestosterone, testosterone’s most potent form.” Doctors who have asked acne-suffering patients to cut out dairy for six months often (to find) has that this change in diet (to have) a isn’t dramatic impact on acne. But dairy (to be, neg.) the only think suspect in this case; researchers also (to think) (but can’t yet prove) that diets high in white flour and processed carbohydrates (to contribute) to acne, and that diets high in “good” fats like Omega-3 can help (to reduce) reduce are pimples, since “good” fats (to be) anti-inflammatory. When is all (to be) said and done, though, it could turn out that pizza – rich in dairy, gives white flour and processed carbohydrates – really (to give) you pizza face. Adapted from “Pizza and your face: Is there a connection?” by Ransom Riggs, Mental Floss Magazine, [online].

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Quick Review

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Focus on…

Simple Future Tense Use the simple future tense for events or actions that will take place in the future. The simple future tense is also helpful for making predictions. There are two ways of expressing future events: Will You need the modal auxiliary will to build the simple future tense of all verbs. Use will in the affirmative form. Use will not or its contracted form won’t in the negative form. When using will, will not or won’t, remember to keep you main verb in its base form. Examples: The dog will bark all night! will not bark won’t bark To be going to To be going to is often used instead of will. When using to be going to to express the simple future tense, you can use contractions of the verb to be in the simple present tense. Examples: I am going to travel across Canada next summer. I’m going to travel across Canada next summer.

He is not going to join the club. He’s not / He isn’t going to join the club.

PAY ATTENTION! Future-tense keywords and key expressions: • in five minutes • next week • next weekend • tomorrow • next month • in three days, etc. ACTIVITY

6

1 Write the verbs in the simple future tense with will. 2 Use the following code: A = affirmative and Ncf = negative contracted form. Example:

Soon we will drive hydrogen-powered cars. to drive (A)

a) Hydrogen cars

more than gasoline cars. to cost (Ncf)

b) They

power cells to mix hydrogen with oxygen. to use (A)

c) Hydrogen tanks

more space than gasoline tanks. to take (A)

d) I

a hydrogen car when they become available. to buy (A)

e) Hydrogen cars

as much as gasoline cars. to pollute (Ncf)

6

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Quick Review

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ACTIVITY

Group:

7

1 Write the verbs in the simple future tense with to be going to. 2 Use the following code: A = affirmative and Ncf = negative contracted form. Example:

Hydrogen is going to replace gasoline in cars. to replace (A)

a) Hydrogen cars

water vapour into the atmosphere. to emit (A)

b) Hydrogen

electricity in the race for new power sources. to beat (A)

c) Hydrogen cars

more dangerous than gasoline cars. to be (Ncf)

d) The price of hydrogen cars

on mass production. to depend (A)

e) Hydrogen

any more than gasoline. to explode (Ncf)

ACTIVITY

8

1 Circle the mistakes in the sentences. 2 Rewrite the sentence appropriately. Example:

This car willn’t cost me a fortune in gas!

This car won’t cost me a fortune in gas!

a) Gary is going to gets his new car soon. Gary is going to get his new car soon.

b) Those cars aren’t not going to be ready. Those cars aren’t going to be ready.

c) He’s will borrow money from the bank. He will borrow money from the bank.

d) This isnt’ going to work at all. This isn’t going to work at all.

e) They’ll will not get their new car. They will not get their new car.

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Get a Grip! Information Questions

What is the use of running when we are on the wrong road? Bavarian proverb

If every day were a sunny day, who would not wish for rain? Japanese proverb

Focus on…

Information Questions What? What are you doing? I’m reading a novel. About things, objects, animals, actions, etc.

Who?

When?

Who is this man? He is a police officer.

When are we leaving? We’re leaving in two hours.

About people

About time About choices

About possession

Which?

Whose? Whose laptop is this? It is Jonathan’s laptop.

Asking Questions…

Which movie do you want to watch? We want to watch the comedy.

About reasons

About places

Why?

Where?

Why are you laughing? I’m laughing because it’s funny!

About ways or manner How?

Where is my car? It is parked farther away.

How did she figure it out? She paid attention to details.

8

How + adjective?

How + adverb?

How long is the Great Wall of China? It is 6,352 km long.

How simply did he explain it? He explained it very plainly.

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Focus on…

Who? Where? Why? When? What? These five question words are commonly used when communicating. When answering these questions, always provide a piece of information about people (who), places (where), reasons (why), time (when) or things (what).

ACTIVITY

1

1 Write down the appropriate question word. 2 Use the answer to guide yourself. Example:

What is she doing here?

She’s helping us out.

a)

is coming tonight?

Sam and Robert are coming.

b)

is your name?

My name is Joan Smith.

c)

are you closing up?

At nine o’clock.

d)

is he shouting so much?

I suppose because he is angry.

e)

did you hide my wallet?

I hid it somewhere safe.

f)

is that guy?

That’s Henry Holmes.

g)

did you see?

I saw a very ugly pigeon.

h)

will you return?

I will return on August 5.

i)

did you break his cup?

I broke it because it was disgusting.

j)

will you go now?

We will go where the wind takes us.

ACTIVITY

2

1 Write down questions about stress that you could ask another student. 2 Use the vocabulary related to stress. Look at p. 7 in the Student Book. Example:

How do you usually cope with school-related stress?

a) What

?

b) When

?

c) Where

?

d) How

?

e) Why

?

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Focus on…

Which? To get information about limited choices, use the question word which.

ACTIVITY

3

1 Look at the pictures. 2 Answer the questions. Example:

Which room would you sleep in?

I would sleep in the nice cozy one on the right.

a) Which car would you like to drive?

b) Which water would you drink?

c) Which show would you like to go to?

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Focus on…

Whose? To get information about the possessor of something, use the question word whose. ACTIVITY

4

1 Look at the pictures. 2 Make up questions to go with the answers or answers to go with the questions.

Jerome

Heather

Brian

Dr. Richards

Betty

Mark

Clara

Robert

Example:

Whose cellphone is this?

It is Jerome’s cellphone.

a) Whose rabbit is that?

The rabbit belongs to Clara.

b) Whose ugly suit is that?

The ugly suit belongs to Brian.

c) Whose laptop is that?

That is Betty’s laptop.

d) Whose stethoscope is that?

The stethoscope belongs to Dr. Richards.

e) Whose screwdriver is this?

This is Robert’s screwdriver.

f) Whose video game is that?

The video game belongs to Heather.

g)

The magnifying glass belongs to Mark.

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Focus on…

How + Adjective? To get specific information about the characteristics of people or things, use the question word how + an adjective.

ACTIVITY

5

1 Fill in the questions with an appropriate adjective. 2 Read the answer for clues and use the Word Bank. Word Bank •

bad

good

rich

dark

handsome

stressed

disastrous

hot

high

colourful

interesting

Example:

12

How good was the movie?

It was excellent.

a) How

is the speaker?

He isn’t very remarkable.

b) How

is Henry?

He is very good-looking.

c) How

was the score?

It was super close.

d) How

do you want it?

I don’t want it multicoloured.

e) How

were you?

I was very tense.

f) How

was the room?

It was very gloomy.

g) How

is she?

She is quite wealthy.

h) How

was the show?

Yuck! It was dreadful.

i) How

was the water?

It was very comfortable.

j) How

was the presentation?

It was absolutely catastrophic!

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Focus on…

How + Adverb? To get specific information about the characteristics of an action, use the question word how + an adverb.

ACTIVITY

6

1 Fill in the questions with an appropriate adverb. 2 Read the answer for clues and use the Word Bank. Word Bank •

carefully

far

regularly

clearly

often

soon

deeply

poorly

well

easily

quickly

Example:

How often was he sick?

He was rarely sick.

a) How

can you be here?

I can be there in 30 minutes.

b) How

do they know each other?

Not that much actually.

c) How

did she win?

She won without any problem.

d) How

can you type?

I write and type pretty fast.

e) How

did they do?

They did very badly.

f) How

is your house?

My house is quite close.

g) How

in trouble am I?

You’re in over your head.

h) How

did you approach it?

I was very quiet.

i) How

do you shower?

I wash every day!

j) How

does she understand Chinese?

She understands it very well.

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Wrap-up ACTIVITY

A

Example:

I want the green scooter.

Reason

Way or manner

Place

People or animals

Time

Possessor

Choices

People, things or an action’s characteristic

Match each item with the appropriate category.

a) He drove recklessly. b) He is in China. c) Let’s meet again very soon. d) She moved beautifully. e) The building is massive. f) This pen is Keith’s. g) Put your hand in the hole. h) Because I hate salami. i) That’s the neighbour’s dog Gizmo. j) This car belongs to my mom. k) An answer to a which question. l) An answer to a how + adverb question. m) An answer to a whose question. n) An answer to a when question. o) An answer to a why question. p) An answer to a where question.

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ACTIVITY

Group:

B

1 Read each statement. 2 Use the information in the statements to create questions.

Statements Most of our body heat escapes through our heads and that is why people often flip their pillow to find the “cool side” before going to sleep.

A lightning bolt is a lot hotter than the sun.

The small “You Are Here” sticker that indicates your position on a map has a name: it’s called an ideo locator.

Apple seeds and cherry pits are poisonous; they emit cyanide gas in your stomach.

Dimples might be cute, but they are a hereditary genetic flaw. They are caused by a fibrous band of tissue that connects the skin to an underlying bone.

You can get nicotine poisoning from wet tobacco leaves through your skin. The phenomenon is known as Green Tobacco Sickness.

Example:

What is hotter than the sun?

A lightning bolt.

a)

It’s a very useful little point on a map.

b)

Because of a genetic flaw.

c)

Wet tobacco leaves can poison you through your skin.

d)

To put their head on the cooler side.

e)

If you eat them, they can make you sick.

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ACTIVITY

Group:

C

1 Read the text.

Surviving Stress – Part 1 – What Is Stress? Anyone can tell you that at one point or another, we have all felt besieged by everything that we had to do in a day, a week or even a month. Stress affects everybody, from little kids to the elderly. Stress is normal because it is actually a protective response to danger.a There are two types of stress:b positive and negative.c You might experience positive stress if you’re excited about an upcoming event like having your driver’s license or the end of your secondary school years or perhaps a party.d Of course, all these examples could act as negative stress for another person. Negative stress is a lot more serious than positive stress.e That is why you need to learn to control or manage your negative stress. Negative stress – or anxiety – can make your heart race, make you worry too much, stop you from sleeping, etc. Eventually, if you can’t regulate your stress, you might become stressed out. If stressed out, you might feel depressed or tired. You might have headaches or stomach aches. You might start crying or laughing for no apparent reason. You might even start blaming other people about everything or feeling guilty. One thing is certain: it quickly becomes overwhelming and sometimes you panic! Remember that nobody is invulnerable to stress!

2 Make up five questions using five different types of information questions. 3 Use the underlined parts of the text as answers to your questions. Example:

(who) Who does stress affect?

a) (why) b) (how + adverb) c) (what) d) (when) e) (which) Which stress is the most serious?

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D

1 Read the text.

Surviving Stress – Part 2 – How Can I Manage Stress? Before you snap from the pressure of stress, take a look at simple things you can do to lower your negative stress before it gets worse. Now, don’t start telling yourself that you don’t need this and already know what to do. Granted, the following tips are common knowledge, but if we didn’t need reminders we wouldn’t be stressed out, would we? 1. First, you need to identify what’s stressing you out so much. It might be one big thing or it might be an accumulation of several factors. Whatever it is, you need to make a list and divide it in two sections: controllable and uncontrollable factors. 2. Then you need to work on the sources of stress over which you actually have control. For example, the number of hours that you spend working on weekends might have to be cut if you need extra time to study. As for the uncontrollable ones... well, sometimes it’s better to simply let it go. 3. Don’t beat yourself up over it. You simply cannot make everyone happy and you only have a certain amount of time and energy. You need to prioritize what needs to be done and cut yourself some slack. 4. Make time to exercise and relax. Combine the things you like to do to create excellent anti-stress activities. Do as many as you like. 5. Get some sleep. If you have a TV or computer in your room, get it out of there. 6. Find somebody to talk to. Communicating your problems to someone you trust can make a world of difference. It might sound tacky, but your friends and family are often the best ones to help you out. If not, talk to any other adult you trust. The bottom line is: don’t keep it inside! If you still feel pressure, seek out professional help, like from a doctor.

2 Make up five questions using five different forms of information questions. Example:

What do I need to identify?

a) Which type of stress should we let go of? b) What must I prioritize? c) How much exercise and relaxation should I do? d) Where should I go for extra help if I need it? e) Who should I see if I’m still stressed out? © Éditions Grand Duc

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Unit 1

Get a Grip!

17


3844-45_CONNECTING_Cahier_Corrige(final).qxp:REFERENCE

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Page 1

Secondary Cycle Two

Year Three

Grammar Activity Book

JARET

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

G R A M M A R

The grammar activity books in the Connecting Through English series are designed to help Secondary Cycle Two students acquire and practise grammar basics.

These activity books focus on useful notions designed to help students reinvest their new learning in oral interactions, as well as reading and

G R A M M A R Benoit Jaret

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

writing activities in class.

YEAR THREE

Grammar Activity Book

YEAR THREE

SECONDARY CYCLE TWO

SECONDARY CYCLE TWO

Maintenir sa dignité.

En voiture, soyons prudents! Assis devant ou derrière, moi, je boucle ma ceinture.

1 800 567-7902

PRODUCT CODE 38 44 ISBN 978-2-7655-0338-5

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ConnectingThroughEnglish5_Extrait.pdf  

ConnectingThroughEnglish5_Extrait.pdf