Page 1

Secondary IV

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Student Workbook COMPLIES WITH THE PROGRAM IN THE NEW CURRICULUM

TZINEVRAKIS

CONNECTING

Secondary IV

CONNECTING

Connecting Doors covers the complete Diversified Basic Education program for ESL courses for adult education.

ANG-4102-1

STORIES

FOR THE SECONDARY IV COURSES, THE SERIES INCLUDES THREE WORKBOOKS.

Student Workbook

The collection integrates grammar, vocabulary, listening and speaking tasks in an easy-to-use format.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

The Connecting Doors series is specially designed for the new English as a Second Language program for adult education. This innovative material proposes a variety of well-structured activities that will capture students’ attention and maintain motivation as they progress in English.

GIBBS

oors

ANG-4102-1

ANG-4103-1

Dare to Compare

Stories

Expressing Feelings and Opinions

PRODUCT CODE 4314 ISBN 978-2-7655-1854-9

CONNECTING

ANG-4101-2

www.grandduc.com Éditions Grand Duc

Groupe Éducalivres inc. 955, rue Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Téléphone : 514 334-8466 ■ Télécopie : 514 334-8387 InfoService : 1 800 567-3671

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Stories

ANG-4102-1 Project Supervisor

Charles Gibbs Antonia Tzinevrakis


Secondary IV

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Student Workbook Complies with the program in the new curriculum

CONNECTING

oors

Stories

SCHEDULE

Project Supervisor

Charles Gibbs Antonia Tzinevrakis

Length of course ANG-4102-1: 25 hours

START DATE EXPECTED END DATE STUDENT’S SIGNATURE TEACHER’S SIGNATURE

Éditions Grand Duc

ANG-4102-1

Groupe Éducalivres inc. 955, rue Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Téléphone : 514 334-8466 ■ Télécopie : 514 334-8387 InfoService : 1 800 567-3671


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The publisher wishes to thank the following people for their comments and suggestions during the development of this project: Mrs. Sylvie Anne Croteau, teacher, Centre l’Escale, C.s. des Draveurs Mr. Giuseppe Fiorella, teacher, Centre Louis-Fréchette, C.s. de la Pointe-de-l’Île Mrs. Danielle Gendron, teacher, Centre Odilon-Gauthier, C.s. des Premières-Seigneuries Mrs. Caroline Levasseur, teacher, Centre Odilon-Gauthier, C.s. des Premières-Seigneuries Mrs. Roxanne Roy, teacher, Centre du Nouvel-Envol, C.s. de la Vallée-des-Tisserands

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© 2013, Éditions Grand Duc, a division of Groupe Éducalivres Inc. 955 Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Telephone: 514-334-8466 ■ Fax: 514-334-8387 www.grandduc.com All rights reserved. Cover and Graphic Design: Gisèle H LEGEND: r: right, l: left, t: top, b: bottom, c: centre IMAGE REFERENCES: pages 2 and 3c: © Ron Nickel/Design Pics/Corbis; page 7: © Jean-Christophe Bott/epa/Corbis; page 25: © Bettmann/Corbis; page 32: © Araldo de Luca/Corbis We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund (CBF) for our publishing activities. It is illegal to reproduce this publication, in full or in part, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording, magnetic or other) without first obtaining written permission from the publisher. By respecting this request, you will encourage the authors in the pursuit of their careers. PRODUCT CODE 4314 ISBN 978-2-7655-1854-9 Legal deposit Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, 2013 Library and Archives Canada, 2013

Printed in Canada 1234567890L109876543


Table of Contents Structure of the Student Book..........................................................................

IV

chapter 1 Stories from Here.........................................................

2

Prepositions of Relationship................................................................................. Subordinating Conjunctions of Cause/Effect............................................................. Direct and Indirect Reported Speech....................................................................... Past Progressive Tense........................................................................................ Chapter Review and Self-Evaluation........................................................................

4 8 10 15 22

chapter 2 Stories from Elsewhere............................................... 24 Reflexive Pronouns............................................................................................. Indefinite Singular Pronouns................................................................................. Indefinite Plural Pronouns.................................................................................... Reciprocal Pronouns........................................................................................... Compound Adjectives ......................................................................................... Phrasal Verbs with Get. ....................................................................................... Be + Used To + Verb(ing)...................................................................................... Repeated Past (Used to).. ..................................................................................... Double Comparatives.......................................................................................... Chapter Review and Self-Evaluation........................................................................

26 27 28 33 34 38 41 42 43 44

chapter 3 Urban Legends and Tall Tales.. .................................. 46 Emphasizing..................................................................................................... Separable Phrasal Verbs...................................................................................... Placement of Adverbs ......................................................................................... Chapter Review and Self-Evaluation........................................................................

50 55 60 64

Final Review.. .................................................................................................... 66 Grammar.......................................................................................................... 72 Glossary........................................................................................................... 78


Structure of the Student Book Learning a new language can be fun. We hope you will find the activities in this book interesting and that you enjoy learning English. In this course, you will read and listen to a variety of stories from close to home and from around the world. Some of the stories are dramatic or funny, while others will make you think or may even scare you. Whatever your reaction, we hope you will enjoy experiencing and sharing your opinion on the stories. As you progress in the course, you will increase your vocabulary and feel more comfortable speaking English and listening to English. Good luck!

Chapter Structure At the beginning of each chapter, you will find two pages with illustrations or pictures. These pages will allow you to talk about the theme with your teacher and classmates. This will help you remember what you already know about the theme. Each chapter has pages for learning activities, grammar and vocabulary. The grammar and vocabulary pages will help you complete the activities that follow.

Activities The activities have one or more symbols that show what you have to do in that activity: interacting

reading

listening

writing

The instructions for each activity are clearly numbered (1, 2, 3…). You should follow the instructions in the correct order so you can maximize the benefit of each activity. The activities are divided into three sections:

A Plan In the Plan section, you will think about the situation, try to remember past experiences, give your opinion and practise the vocabulary you need for the activity.

IV

B Use In the Use section, you will complete the activity using strategies and resources.

C Reinvest In the Reinvest section, you will apply what you learned to a new situation. You may have to answer a question or complete a small task. You will see that you have progressed in English.

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The chapters have the following features:

Ways to Say It The Ways to Say It box helps you complete a speaking activity. This will give you ideas for how to say something.

Strategies Used Learning strategies will help you learn better and faster. Each activity has suggestions for the learning strategies you could use in that activity.

Word Bank The Word Bank is a short list of words that are useful to complete an activity, such as talking with someone on a certain topic. You can follow the structure in the examples and replace some words from the Word Bank or with different words you know.

Parts of Speech The Parts of Speech box is placed where you start learning a new aspect of English grammar. It will help you compare the different parts of speech so you can see how they all work together to form sentences.

This text is simply for you to learn unique aspects of culture in Québec and around the world.

iCT Challenge These are activities that will require you to use Information and Communication Technologies, such as computers or recording equipment. Ready for the challenge?

self-evaluatioN At the end of each chapter, there is a page where you can evaluate your own progress. You can also give your opinion about what you liked or did not like about the chapter.

The end of the book has the following sections:

Grammar and Final Review

Glossary

These sections are for practice and reference. Not only will they help you increase your vocabulary, they will also help you find the correct word when you need it. The Final Review section provides a review of all of the grammar notions covered in the course.

Most of the difficult words in the book are explained in French in the glossary. This will help you understand the instructions and texts. Words that are the same in English and French (cognates) are not included in the glossary.

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V


chapter

1 Stories from Here

In this chapter,

you will… •

read and enjoy stories from Québec and other places in North America

identify the main idea, characters and conflicts of stories

share your opinion on stories, including films

recount personal experiences and incidents

use the Past Progressive verb tense

use the prepositions about and on

express cause and effect with subordinating conjunctions

practise reported speech


Chapter Scenario Victoria hasn’t seen many movies lately. She has to do a movie review for her French class. She asks Cedric to recommend some films. Cedric has been trying to think of new ideas for his new book series. He has recently been inspired by the legends of First Nations peoples. Mario recounts a story about something that happened to him. a) Do you think stories are important? Why or why not? b) What are some ways stories are communicated? Which ways do you prefer? c) Where can you go if you’re looking for a good story?

3


Parts of Speech

Grammar

Prepositions of Relationship

Pronoun

a word that replaces a name or thing

Verb

a word that shows an action or state

Adverb

a word that describes a verb

Article

a word that identifies a noun

Noun

a person, place, thing or idea

Modal auxiliary Adjective

Preposition/ Conjunction

a word that adds meaning to a verb a word that describes a noun

words that show the relationship between nouns or sentences

The prepositions about and on are used to ask for or give the main idea of the subject of a sentence. They have the same meaning. We use about more often to explain ideas, such as a storyline. We often use on for short (one- or two-word) topics. The course is on what topic? It is on volcanoes. My essay is on world trade.

What’s yours on?

What is the movie about? It’s about a Brazilian man who moves to Paris.

Grammar Practice Circle the preposition on or about, and then complete the sentences with original answers.

Example: I recently read an article on /about nuclear power . .

2 Many songs are on/about

.

3 A TV show I watch is on/about

.

4 My last oral presentation was on/about

.

5 I love the story on/about

.

6 I recently saw a news report on/about

.

7 I don’t like movies on/about

.

8 Magazine articles are often on/about

.

4

1 My favourite movie is on/about

Chapter 1 – Stories from Here

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NAME:

DATE:

Activity 1

Obtaining Information Related to Stories Victoria’s French teacher has asked the students to watch a Québécois film this weekend and then write a movie review about it. Victoria is asking Cedric’s opinion on which movies might be interesting to consider.

A Plan

Word Bank

1 Look at the Word Bank. What kinds of movies do you enjoy watching

Types of films

the most? Why?

Comedy Romantic comedy Drama Action

2 Look at the Vocabulary Box. Think about an interesting film you have seen

Fantasy

recently. Fill in the information you know about this film.

Horror

Title of film:

Country of origin:

Suspense/Thriller

Type of film:

Director:

Actors: Language:

Rating (10 = excellent, 1 = very poor):

Plot:

B Use

Science fiction

Vocabulary Box moviegoer person who goes to the cinema regularly director person who gives direction to actors

Track 10 1 Listen to the conversation between Victoria and Cedric. 2 Answer the following questions. a) What did Cedric do on his birthday?

b) Which movie did they see?

c) What kind of movie is it?

rating personal evaluation movie theatre cinema convincing realistic acting the actor’s art plot/storyline main elements of a story character fictional person in a story

d) What is the movie about?

theme central idea entertaining fun, amusing

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Stories from Here – Chapter 1

5


e) What does Cedric think about the acting?

f) Does he think that Victoria should see the movie?

g) What four things does Victoria’s French teacher want them to include in their film report?

h) What film does Cedric recommend?

i) Who is the main character of the film?

j) What is this film about?

k) What does Cedric find impressive about Sophie Nélisse?

C Reinvest 1 Find a partner. Ask your partner if he or she has seen a movie recently. 2 Ask him or her to explain the story. Fill in the following information about the film as you listen to your partner talk about it. Ask questions if necessary. Title of film:

Country of origin:

Type of film:

Director:

My New Words

Actors: Language:

Rating (10 = excellent, 1 = very poor):

Plot:

Strategies Used Asking for repetition/clarification Rephrasing Summarizing

3 Tell your partner about a film you’ve seen recently.

6

Chapter 1 – Stories from Here

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NAME:

DATE:

Philippe Falardeau Philippe Falardeau is a film director and screenwriter born in Hull, Québec. His first feature film, translated into English as The Left-Hand Side of the Fridge, won Best Canadian First Feature at the Toronto International Film Festival as well as the Claude Jutra Award for the best Canadian film by a first-time director. The film is about two roommates, Christophe and Stéphane, who share an apartment in Montreal. Christophe is an unemployed engineer, while Stéphane is a documentary filmmaker who begins filming Christophe’s search for work.

Falardeau’s second feature film, Congorama, won him a Genie Award in 2007 for Best Original Screenplay and five Jutra Awards, including Best Film, Best Director and Best Screenplay. This film features the main character Michel, a Belgian inventor. At 41, he discovers that he was adopted and that he was born in SainteCécile, Québec. He travels to Québec on a near-impossible quest to find his birth family in the town where he was born. In 2008, Falardeau directed the comedy It’s Not Me, I Swear, a film about a 10-year-old boy

who adopts unusual ways to deal with his problems. The screenplay was adapted from Bruno Hébert’s novels C’est pas moi, je le jure ! and Alice court avec René. His 2011 film Monsieur Lazhar was nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 84th Academy Awards and won many other awards.

iCT Challenge Find out and share information about the films of a different local film director.

1 Choose one of the following film directors: Denys Arcand, Frédéric Back, Micheline Lanctôt, Robert Lepage, Xavier Dolan or Sarah Polley.

2 Do an Internet search to find out the titles of three movies they have directed. 3 Find a movie trailer or a review for each film. Write the information below. Film Title + Year

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Characters

Subject

Stories from Here – Chapter 1

7


Parts of Speech

Grammar

Subordinating Conjunctions of Cause/Effect

Pronoun

a word that replaces a name or thing

Verb

a word that shows an action or state

Adverb

a word that describes a verb

Article

a word that identifies a noun

Noun

a person, place, thing or idea

Modal auxiliary Adjective

Preposition/ Conjunction

a word that adds meaning to a verb a word that describes a noun

words that show the relationship between nouns or sentences

A subordinating conjunction is a word that connects a main clause to a subordinate clause. A main clause is an independent clause. It does not need extra information to be a short sentence. He felt great. A subordinate clause is a dependent clause that adds information to the main clause. It has a subject and a verb, but it is not a sentence by itself. because he finished reading a very interesting story When we combine these two clauses using the conjunction because, we make a complete sentence. He felt great because he finished reading a very interesting story. main clause

subordinate clause

Examples of some subordinating conjunctions that show cause/effect (something happens as a result of something else) are: because

now that

since

if

The conjunctions because, now that and since are similar in meaning. Because gives a reason: I couldn’t write my composition because I forgot my dictionary at home.

8

Chapter 1 – Stories from Here

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NAME:

DATE:

Grammar

Subordinating Conjunctions of Cause/Effect (continued ) Now that is related to time: Now that you are here, we can leave. Since is related to logic:

NOTE

Since you don’t like fish, what will you eat in Japan? The conjunction if has a different meaning. It shows something is conditional on something else. Please take a message if Mr. Harrison calls. The adverb so means “as a result.”

The word since has two meanings: me, I will ➜ Since you asked do it. (= because) since ➜ I have lived here elementary school. rted) (= when the action sta

They haven’t travelled for many years so they decided to take a trip this year. The adverb so that means “as a result” and “with the purpose of.” You should go home so that you can get some rest.

Grammar Practice Create logical sentences by matching a subordinate clause on the right side with a main clause on the left. Write the letter of the subordinate clause in the appropriate box. Then add a subordinating conjunction of cause/effect (because, now that, since, if ) or an adverb of purpose (so, so that). The first one has been done for you. 1. Harry was tired…

e

a)

he wouldn’t be alone.

2. I can’t go out as much…

b)

there was a lot of suspense.

3. We asked him to come with us…

c)

it was a wrong number.

4. We will buy a new dishwasher…

d)

I have a second job.

5. I hung up…

e)

6. The concert was cancelled…

f)

it was raining too hard.

7. The phone was too expensive…

g)

I didn’t buy it.

8. The organization collected money…

h)

9. I didn’t want to miss a minute of the movie…

i)

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so

he decided not to go out.

it could continue to offer the same level of service. they go on sale soon.

Stories from Here – Chapter 1

9


Grammar

Direct and Indirect Reported Speech

Reported speech is the form used when we speak about what others tell us. Think about your day at school or at work. You come home and often tell someone what another person at work told you earlier. Therefore, you report what that person said. We can report the words of the speaker in two ways: direct speech and indirect speech. Direct speech: We can quote the exact words of the speaker. I’m going to change jobs.

Martin said, “I’m going to change jobs.”

Martin said that he was going to change jobs.

Indirect speech: We can report what the speaker said without quoting the exact words.

In indirect speech, we often use the conjunction that before the indirect statement, but it isn’t necessary. Direct: Adam said, “The test is a little difficult.” Indirect: Adam said that the test was a little difficult. Adam said the test was a little difficult.

Rules for changing direct speech into indirect speech

NOTE

ch, When reporting spee anges: ch the pronoun often I ➜ he/she pronouns) you ➜ I/we (direct s/them you ➜ me/him/her/u (indirect pronouns)

1. The Simple Present tense changes to the Simple Past tense.

Affirmative Direct Indirect

10

Negative

He said, “I am okay.”

He said, “I am not okay.”

He said that he was okay.

He said that he wasn’t okay.

Chapter 1 – Stories from Here

we ➜ they

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NAME:

Direct and Indirect Reported Speech (continued )

DATE:

Grammar

2. The Simple Past tense changes to the Past Perfect tense. We form the Past Perfect tense by using had + verb (past participle).

Affirmative Direct Indirect

Negative

They said, “We liked that book.”

They said, “We didn’t like that book.”

They said that they had liked that book.

They said that they hadn’t liked that book.

3. The Present Perfect tense also changes to the Past Perfect tense. We form the Past Perfect tense by using had + verb (past participle).

Affirmative Direct Indirect

Negative

He said, “I have seen that movie.”

He said, “I haven’t seen that movie.”

He said that he had seen that movie.

He said that he hadn’t seen that movie.

4. The Present Perfect Progressive tense changes to the Past Perfect Progressive. We form the Past Perfect Progressive tense by using had + been + verb (+ ing).

Affirmative Direct Indirect

Negative

She said, “I have been studying all day.”

She said, “I haven’t been studying all day.”

She said that she had been studying all day.

She said that she hadn’t been studying all day.

5. The Future “going to” changes to the Past Progressive tense.

Affirmative

Negative

Direct

Fahid said, “I’m going to present my book report next week.”

Fahid said, “I’m not going to present my book report next week.”

Indirect

Fahid said that he was going to present his book report next week.

Fahid said that he wasn’t going to present his book report next week.

6. The Future modals will or won’t change to would or wouldn’t.

Affirmative Direct Indirect

Negative

Jonathan said, “I will see you tomorrow.”

Jonathan said, “I won’t see you tomorrow.”

Jonathan said that he would see me tomorrow.

Jonathan said that he wouldn’t see me tomorrow.

7. The modal can changes to could.

Affirmative

Negative

Direct

She said, “I can speak three languages.”

She said, “I can’t speak three languages.”

Indirect

She said that she could speak three languages.

She said that she couldn’t speak three languages.

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11


Grammar

Direct and Indirect Reported Speech (continued )

8. The verb have to changes to had to.

Affirmative Direct Indirect

Negative

NOTE

He said, “I have to go.”

He said, “I don’t have to go.”

He said that he had to go.

He said that he didn’t have to go.

9. Some modals do not change when reporting: would, could, might, should.

Affirmative

Negative

en We use the word if wh tion. es qu /no reporting a yes o you Direct: He asked, “D ” need help? Indirect: He asked if I needed help.

Direct

My mom said, “You should read more.”

My mom said, “You shouldn’t read so much.”

Indirect

My mom said that I should read more.

My mom said that I shouldn’t read so much.

Grammar Practice Change the following sentences from direct speech to indirect speech.

Example: He said, “It’s warm out today.” He said that it was warm out today.

1 She said, “I have finished.” 2 Rena asked, “Do you play soccer?” 3 Victor said, “Omar isn’t home.” 4 Fabrice said, “I’m going to Alaska.” 5 The doctor said, “You should exercise.” 6 Meriem said, “I’m so busy today!” 7 Wilfred said, “I feel sick today.” 8 Tomas asked Jenna, “Where do you live?” 9 Kevin asked Fanny, “Why did you leave the party?”  They said, “We’ll call you tomorrow.”  Chloé said, “We have to hand in the report tomorrow.”

 Ihssan asked her, “How often do you go to the movies?”

12

Chapter 1 – Stories from Here

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CHAPTER R EVIEW

Grammar 1 Subordinating conjunctions and adverbs of purpose. Connect the two sentences together by choosing from the following conjunctions and adverbs: because, since, now that, if, so, so that. There may be more than one logical answer. a) He might play basketball today

he’s feeling better.

b) She reads books in English

she can learn more words.

c) Did you see the movie

you read the book?

d) The student asked for an extension the assignment on time.

he knew that he couldn’t finish

e) They have a lot more responsibilities

they are parents of young children.

2 Past Progressive/Simple Past tenses. Fill in the blanks with the Past Progressive or Simple Past form of the verb in parentheses. a) Antoine

(to read) when he

b) Who c)

you the tap

d) They

(to hear) a knock on the door. (to talk) to when I

(to call)?

(to drip) this morning when you

(to wake up)?

(to film) when the thunderstorm

e) What

you

(to cut) when you

(to begin). (to slice) your finger?

3 Reported speech. Change the following from direct to indirect reported speech. a) She said, “It’s cold today.” b) My sister asked me, “Are you leaving tomorrow?”

c) She asked, “Will you be home early?” d) Meriem said, “I’m trying to finish my last course.”

4 Past Progressive or Simple Past tenses. Complete the following paragraph by changing the verb in parentheses to the correct verb tense. Kelly

(to go) out for dinner with a few people after work last night.

She

(to leave) the restaurant at 9 p.m. She

when she suddenly

(to see) something strange ahead of her. The object

(to get) closer and closer. The wind her heart

(to beat) very fast. She

to call the police. As she more than a large garbage bag

22

Chapter 1 – Stories from Here

(to walk) home

(to call), she

(to blow) very hard and (to take) her cellphone out (to realize) that nothing

(to roll) in her direction.

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NAME:

DATE:

Giving Personal Information Recount a personal experience or incident. It could be something funny, strange, surprising or frightening.

Speaking Listen to a classmate or your teacher recount a personal experience or incident. Tell the story again using reported speech.

self-evaluatioN 1 How much progress have you made during this chapter? Read the following statements. Check the box that shows how you feel.

Yes

No

a) I can understand short stories in English. ...............................................

b) I can identify the main idea of stories. .....................................................

c) I can give my opinion on stories. ..............................................................

d) I can use the Past Progressive verb tense. .............................................

e) I can recount personal experiences and incidents. ................................

f) I can use reported speech. ........................................................................

Maybe

2 What do you like best about this chapter? Why?

3 What do you not like about this chapter? Why?

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23


Secondary IV

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Student Workbook COMPLIES WITH THE PROGRAM IN THE NEW CURRICULUM

TZINEVRAKIS

CONNECTING

Secondary IV

CONNECTING

Connecting Doors covers the complete Diversified Basic Education program for ESL courses for adult education.

ANG-4102-1

STORIES

FOR THE SECONDARY IV COURSES, THE SERIES INCLUDES THREE WORKBOOKS.

Student Workbook

The collection integrates grammar, vocabulary, listening and speaking tasks in an easy-to-use format.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

The Connecting Doors series is specially designed for the new English as a Second Language program for adult education. This innovative material proposes a variety of well-structured activities that will capture students’ attention and maintain motivation as they progress in English.

GIBBS

oors

ANG-4102-1

ANG-4103-1

Dare to Compare

Stories

Expressing Feelings and Opinions

PRODUCT CODE 4314 ISBN 978-2-7655-1854-9

CONNECTING

ANG-4101-2

www.grandduc.com Éditions Grand Duc

Groupe Éducalivres inc. 955, rue Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Téléphone : 514 334-8466 ■ Télécopie : 514 334-8387 InfoService : 1 800 567-3671

oors

Stories

ANG-4102-1 Project Supervisor

Charles Gibbs Antonia Tzinevrakis

Profile for Éditions Grand Duc

Cd4 stories feuilleteur  

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