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EXTRAIT


EXTRAIT UNIT 14 x H2O – Source of Life Sommaire Unit Presentation Quick Unit Planning Connections and Related Content Quick Project Planning Preparation Carrying Out Grammar Extra Carrying Out Integration/Reinvestment Suggested Procedures for Projects Audio CD Script

100A 100B 100C 100D 100 106 116 118 123 123A-F 123G

© 2011, Éditions Grand Duc, une division du Groupe Éducalivres Inc. 955, rue Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Téléphone : 514 334-8466 ႛ Télécopie : 514 334-8387 www.grandducenligne.com Tous droits réservés. Nous reconnaissons l’aide financière du gouvernement du Canada par l’entremise du Fonds du livre du Canada (FLC) pour nos activités d’édition. Gouvernement du Québec – Programme de crédit d’impôt pour l’édition de livres – Gestion SODEC L'usager qui a acquitté les frais de ce document À reproduire se voit accorder par les Éditions Grand Duc l’autorisation d’adapter le présent document et de le reproduire sous sa forme originale ou adaptée un nombre de fois qui ne dépasse pas le nombre d'élèves dans sa classe, et ce, seulement aux fins d'utilisation dans sa classe. CODE PRODUIT 70143508 ISBN 978-2-7655-1078-9 Dépôt légal –2006 Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, 2006 Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, 2006


EXTRAIT Comment utiliser le PDF enrichi

Ce PDF enrichi est un document reproductible.

Contenu du document PDF •

1re partie : Teacher’s Book En cliquant sur le symbole du microphone, vous démarrez la lecture de la capsule sonore. Pour fermer la fenêtre de lecture, cliquez sur son coin supérieur droit.

2e partie : Handouts – Units and Projects Dans cette seconde partie du PDF, vous trouverez l’intégralité des fiches reproductibles se rapportant à ce chapitre ainsi que les corrigés.


EXTRAIT

Activity 2, Facts About Earth’s Oceans ESL COMPETENCIES 2 2

30 min.

Reproducible document: Activity 2, p. 14-5

The purpose of this activity is to make the students reflect on the importance of the oceans to the life of our planet. It is another step in building a critical approach to thinking about the theme of water. Students must be made aware of the fact that the oceans are meteorological regulators, since the hot and cold surface and deep currents moderate the weather. Biologically, they are home to very important ecosystems and, geochemically, they collect and recycle various sediments. These texts should trigger the students’ curiosity and provide a framework for discussing some of the facts that the students already know about the oceans. 1. and 2. Ask the students to look at the pictures on pp.104-105. Interact with the students and ask them preliminary questions to focus their attention on these pages. Where do you think this picture was taken? Why is there a picture r of a mountain here? r Why should people be asked to keep away from the beach? What are some of the species found in the oceans? What continent is depicted in this picture? The answers to these questions are not as important as the students’ focus on this task, and the reactivation of knowledge.

3. Ask the students to form teams of three or four. They may work as a whole team, or the students may split up the articles within the team. Use article A as an example to show the students how to find keywords in a text. Keep in mind that answers may vary (see the Answer Key on the next page.) Use the optional Activity 2, 2 p. 14-5, to allow students to highlight or underline the keywords in the articles more easily. y 4. Ask the students to look at the keywords they have found. Using these words, ask the students to think of possible subtitles for the articles. Use article A again as a model to help the students find the proper subtitles. The students will be using the Recombine strategy. y This strategy consists of using the words that the students have highlighted and putting them back together in a new and meaningful way to form the subtitles for the articles.

Humour Tell the students that when people wave (verb – to wave), e they usually shake their hand or arm to say hello or goodbye. However, an ocean wave (noun) is the movement of currents or winds on water.

104

Unit 14 • H 2 O – Source of Life


EXTRAIT

Evaluation Cues Teacher’s Observations Reinvests understanding of texts 2

2 Use of knowledge from texts appropriate to the task Students adequately identify keywords in the articles and recombine those keywords to write down the appropriate subtitles.

Answer Key Answers may vary. In the following examples, the keywords are underlined.

Le corrigé des activités est réservé aux enseignants et n'est pas visible sur le feuilleteur.

3. Article A - Only 2.5% of water on Earth is fresh; the remaining 97.5% is salt water. Most of the fresh water is frozen in the polar p ice caps p . Most of the salt in the oceans comes from land. Rain washes salt into the rivers, which carry it to the sea. Article B - Some par p ts of the oceans are deeper p than Mount Everest is high. The Pacific Ocean has abysses y as deepp as 11,033 , metres below sea level. If you dropped a 1 kilogram steel ball into such a deep hole, it would take 63 minutes to reach the bottom. Article C - You might think that the bottom of the sea is smooth and flat, but it isn’t. The bottom of the sea has mountains,, plains p and deepp valleys y . It even has volcanoes. Article D - Did you know that just 1 litre of gasoline g is enough to contaminate 2 million litres of water? Human activities are a very serious threat to life in the oceans. Chemical pollutants p from industry and agriculture and overfishing have probably affected oceans for centuries to come, if not longer. Article E - The oceans are enormous. The largest ocean is the Pacific, then the Atlantic, the Indian and lastly the Arctic. These oceans are interconnected and form one bigg sea that covers 70% of our planet p . Article F - Seaweed and plankton p are primary producers. They are at the first level of the oceanic food pyramid py . Many of the thousands of species living in the oceans feed on this basic material. Yet the supply is endanger g ed by the effects of gglobal warmingg and pollution p . Guess who is at the top of that same food chain? Article G - A coral reef lies in warm, shallow seas. It looks dead and stony, but in fact it’s alive and has taken thousands of years y to form. It is a habitat for thousands of species p and is now in gr g eat environmental danger g . The biggest coral reef is in Australia. It is called the Great Barrier Reef. It is so big that astronauts can see it when orbiting in space. 4. Answers may vary. Examples: Article A - Fresh water vs. salt water; Article B – The Pacific Ocean: 11 km deep; Article C – At the bottom of the sea; Article D – Oceans affected for centuries; Article E – One big sea covers 70% of Earth; Article F – Seaweed and plankton endangered; Article G – Coral reefs in great environmental danger.

Unit 14 • H 2 O – Source of Life

105


EXTRAIT

Secondary Cycle ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

BRUNO GATTUSO BENOIT JARET MARIA LEE-ARPINO ISABELLE SAUVÉ PROJECT DIRECTION: VIRGINIE KRYSZTOFIAK PAUL STE-MARIE

•••••••••

Handouts – Units and Projects • Handouts • Optional handouts • Project handouts • Competency observation grid

Éditions Grand Duc Groupe Éducalivres inc. 955, rue Bergar, Laval (Québec) H7L 4Z6 Téléphone : 514 334-8466 ■ Télécopie: 514 334-8387 InfoService : 1 800 567-3671

1


EXTRAIT

Name:

KICK-OFF IN ENGLISH

Date:

Language

Unit 14, pp. 102-103

Group:

Which and What [OPTIONAL HANDOUT ]

ABOUT

Which and What Use which when asking about an item when there is a limited number of answers (a choice to make). > Example: Look at the pictures on p. 103. Which picture matches caption 3? Which caption matches picture E. Use what when there are many, or an unlimited number of, possible answers. > Example: What do you think of this picture? What do you think about my answer?

1. Read the sentences below. 2. Write which or what in the appropriate space. a) I have a science fiction book and a biography.

one do you want?

b) My favourite painting is the Mona Lisa.

is your favourite painting?

c) There are six apartments in this building.

is your apartment?

d) There are three boys by the swimming pool. e) I like to get up early.

is your brother? At

time do you get up?

f) I enjoy fresh orange juice.

is your favourite drink?

g) My favourite colour is red.

is your favourite colour?

h) I bought a blue and a yellow T-shirt. i) I love sci-fi and scary movies.

©©grandducenligne.com Éditions Grand Duc

HRW

Reproduction authorized Reproduction authorized

one do you prefer? kind of movies do you like?

Unit Handout

14-3


EXTRAIT

Pedagogical Notes and Answer Key

KICK-OFF IN ENGLISH

Unit 14, pp. 102-103

Presentation This optional handout can be used to help students practise the correct use of which and what when asking questions. It is intended to make students aware of the correct use of these forms in a given context, and help them recognize them when they read or listen to texts.

Procedure • Distribute the handout on p. 14-3. • Review the explanation in the Talk About It! box on top of p. 14-3 or at the bottom of p. 103 in the Student Book whith the students. • Ask students to choose their answers by judging the context of each question.

Name:

KICK-OFF IN ENGLISH

Date:

Unit 14, pp. 102-103

Group:

Le corrigé des ABOUT activités est réservé aux enseignants et n'est pas visible sur le feuilleteur. Language

Which and What

[OPTIONAL HANDOUT]

Which and What

Use which when asking about an item when there is a limited number of answers (a choice to make). > Example: Look at the pictures on p. 103. Which picture matches caption 3? Which caption matches picture E. Use what when there are many, or an unlimited number of, possible answers.

> Example: What do you think of this picture? What do you think about my answer?

1. Read the sentences below.

2. Write which or what in the appropriate space.

Which

a) I have a science fiction book and a biography. b) My favourite painting is the Mona Lisa.

What

Which

c) There are six apartments in this building.

what

At

f) I enjoy fresh orange juice. g) My favourite colour is red.

© Éditions Grand Duc ■ HRW

14-4

Reproduction authorized

©Thank grandducenligne.com you for not photocopying

is your favourite drink? is your favourite colour?

Which What

is your brother? time do you get up?

What What

h) I bought a blue and a yellow T-shirt. i) I love sci-fi and scary movies.

is your apartment?

Which

d) There are three boys by the swimming pool. e) I like to get up early.

one do you want?

is your favourite painting?

one do you prefer?

kind of movies do you like?

Unit Handout

14-3

Reproduction authorized ■ HRW © Éditions Grand Duc


EXTRAIT

Name:

KICK-OFF IN ENGLISH

Date:

Activity

Group:

2

Unit 14, pp. 104-105

Facts About Earth’s Oceans [OPTIONAL HANDOUT ]

1. a) Read the articles in your Student Book on pp. 104-105. b) Highlight or underline the keywords in each article. 2. Recombine the keywords in order to write down a subtitle for each article.

Subtitle A) Only 2.5% of water on Earth is fresh; the remaining 97.5% is salt water. Most of the fresh water is frozen in the polar ice caps. Most of the salt in the oceans comes from the land. Rain washes salt into the rivers, which carry it to the sea. Subtitle B) Some parts of the oceans are deeper than Mount Everest is high. The Pacific Ocean has abysses as deep as 11,033 metres below sea level. If you dropped a 1 kilogram steel ball into such a deep hole, it would take 63 minutes to reach the bottom. Subtitle C) You might think that the bottom of the sea is smooth and flat, but it isn’t. The bottom of the sea has mountains, plains and deep valleys. It even has volcanoes. Subtitle D) Did you know that just 1 litre of gasoline is enough to contaminate 2 million litres of water? Human activities are a very serious threat to life in the oceans. Chemical pollutants from industry and agriculture and overfishing have probably affected oceans for centuries to come, if not longer.

©©grandducenligne.com Éditions Grand Duc

HRW

Reproduction authorized Reproduction authorized

Unit Handout

14-5


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