Page 1

Urtext

EP 11406

Maurice Ravel Concerto en sol majeur Edition for 2 Pianos

Urtext Edition by

Roger Nichols


MAURICE RAVEL

Concerto en sol majeur Edition for two Pianos

Edited by / Édition de / Herausgegeben von

Roger Nichols

Urtext

EIGENTUM DES VERLEGERS

·

ALLE RECHTE VORBEHALTEN

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PETERS EDITION LTD A member of the EDITION PETERS GROUP LEIPZIG · LONDON · NEW YORK


Š 2014 by Peters Edition Ltd, London Alle Rechte vorbehalten . All rights reserved Vervielfältigungen jeglicher Art sind gesetzlich verboten. Any unauthorized reproduction is prohibited by law. ISMN 979-0-014-11765-8


Contents / Contenu / Inhalt Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV Préface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VI Vorwort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIII

I. Allegramente . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 II. Adagio assai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 III. Presto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Critical Commentary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Commentaire critique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Kritischer Bericht. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Aufführungsdauer / Duration: ca. 25 Min.


IV

Preface In 1889, the 14-year-old Maurice Ravel gave his first public performance in Paris, playing an excerpt from Moscheles’s third piano concerto, and a few months later gained entry to a preparatory class at the Conservatoire with a further excerpt, from one of the two Chopin concertos. Two years later, in June 1891, he even won a first prize at the preparatory level. But there his piano-playing career stalled. True, he regularly played the simpler pieces of his own in public and was perhaps at his best accompanying his songs. But he was never a virtuoso, or even a pianist in Fauré’s or Debussy’s class: he made a dry sound, and one experienced reviewer during his 1928 American tour wrote that ‘he plays even worse than Johannes Brahms did in his declining years, and Brahms set a mark for all bad pianists to shoot at.’1 However, mediocrity as a keyboard player did nothing to inhibit his prowess as a writer for the instrument. It is not known whether he intended to play the piano part in his first documented idea for a piano concerto – a work in a single movement and seven episodes based on Basque themes, dating from 1906, titled Zaspiak bat (‘[The] Seven [are] One’, referring to the seven Basque provinces). As Domenico de’ Paoli later recalled, he struggled with this for some years, but ultimately found that Basque folk song material resisted development, mirroring Constant Lambert’s remark that ‘the whole trouble with a folk song is that once you have played it through there is nothing much you can do except play it over again and play it rather louder.’2 What sparked off the G major Concerto is unclear. But in this case, from its inception he did intend to play the solo part himself, which could have been simply from a desire to make a little more money than came to him as a composer – while never poor, he became rich only after Boléro –; and/or he might have been intrigued by the technical challenge of writing a musically satisfying solo part that was easy enough for himself to play. We do know that the opening theme of what became the first movement of the concerto came to him on the train taking him to London from Oxford, where he had been made a Doctor of Music in October 1928. Ravel began serious work on the piece in 1929, in parallel with the Concerto for the Left Hand, commissioned by Paul Wittgenstein. Some time that autumn, Koussevitzky sent him a draft contract for the concerto, which Ravel refused to sign, saying on 20 December, that ‘As soon as my Concerto is finished, I’ll be taking it, as I told you, to the five continents of the world. All that I could promise you is to keep for you the first performance “in the Vorld” [sic].’ In any case, the concerto was far from finished and would not be so until the following year. In an interview with his old friend M. D. Calvocoressi, published in the Daily Telegraph on 11 July 1931, having announced that the left hand concerto was finished, he said he was ‘working against time at my other piano concerto, which I must finish by November. I shall play the piano part first in Paris, then start on a tour through Germany, Belgium, Holland, North and South America, Japan and perhaps Java, if… it is possible to recruit there an orchestra for the performance.’ His plans had originally been even more ambitious. But he now ruled out Russia, because ‘artists engaged in that country are compelled by law to spend in it the fees which they receive, and that would mean my having to purchase, say, furs or icons for which I should have no use.’ Ravel goes on to describe publicly for the first time what this new concerto will be like. ‘The one in which I shall appear as the interpreter is a concerto in the truest sense of the word: I mean that it is written very much in the same spirit as those of Mozart and Saint-Saëns. The music of a concerto, in my opinion, should be lighthearted and brilliant,

and not aim at profundity or at dramatic effects. It has been said of certain classics that their concertos were written not “for”, but “against” the piano. This remark I consider entirely true. I had thought at first of entitling my concerto “Divertissement”. Then it occurred to me that there was no need to do so, because the very title “Concerto” should be sufficiently clear in the matter of characterization. In certain respects this concerto is not unrelated to my violin sonata. It has touches of jazz in it, but not many.’3 During the autumn of 1931 Ravel wore himself out practising Chopin and Liszt studies and, it seems, was only slowly brought to realize by his friends that one’s mid-fifties are not the ideal age at which to embark on a career as virtuoso. At some juncture he gave up the unequal struggle and Marguerite Long was invited to play the solo part in what must have been the as yet unfinished concerto, since Ravel, untruthfully, was promising her a concerto ‘ending pianissimo and with trills’.4 She later recalled that on 11 November Ravel brought her the score, for a premiere at the Salle Pleyel in Paris on 14 January 1932, with the composer conducting the Lamoureux Orchestra. This was followed by the European leg of the tour already mentioned, consisting of 17 performances stretching from 18 January in Antwerp to 18 April in Budapest. This tour was not continuous, since both Long and Ravel took part in the recording of the concerto (MLR) in Paris on 14 April. The various organizers took the substitution of Mme Long for Ravel in their stride, with the one exception of Wilhelm Furtwängler, at the head of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, who precipitated a shortlived diplomatic crisis involving the French Ambassador in Berlin and the French Foreign Minister. The premiere in the Salle Pleyel, full to bursting, was a great success, with most of the critics enthusiastic. Ravel’s old friend Florent Schmitt welcomed ‘this mythical concerto that we had heard mentioned for so many years that we had ended up not believing in it. I should say straight away that it is a delightful and charming work, a hundred miles away from all those boléros, past, present and future, a work worthy of the composer of Daphnis, ‘Scarbo’ and Valses nobles…’5 The receptions on tour were, if anything, more enthusiastic still. The Romanian scholar Constantin Brailoiu noted how Ravel had ‘never recognized limits of incompatibility between the things of yesterday and those of tomorrow’6; and the Belgian Maurice Brillant rejoiced in the fact that ‘It’s not a matter (as it sometimes is…) of a concerto that is camouflaged, ashamed of itself; no, [it’s] a true concerto, appearing with its face uncovered, and in which the composer has had the affectation of observing all the rules of the game.’7 The English reviewers of the London premiere on 25 February were rather more nuanced. The anonymous Times critic felt that in the central Adagio Ravel ‘almost seems to be growing staid and even a little sentimental, and to rouse himself with difficulty to throw off quips and cranks and wanton wiles again in the finale.’8 One of the most trenchant notices came, not surprisingly, from Constant Lambert: ‘It is a pleasant and unpretentious little work, more of a concertino than a concerto, and with little of the richness and power that the composer once showed us in Daphnis and the piano trio. The work is concise, but we do not feel that its concision represents any great concentration of musical thought; it seems more likely that the composer had frankly not a great deal to say and was too intelligent to attempt to disguise the fact… Like so much French music, the concerto is in painfully good taste throughout. On one occasion in his life Ravel forgot to be an apostle of French good taste and produced the rich and vigorous Daphnis and Chloë, undoubtedly his finest work.


V This pagan debauch, though, he has more than compensated for by a steady treatment of hock and soda water.’9 Lambert clearly had either not read, or not believed, what Ravel said in his Telegraph interview about the concerto being deliberately ‘light-hearted and brilliant’.

Glen Dillard Gunn, ‘Ravel Lionized in Great Recital Here’, Chicago Herald and Examiner, 20 January 1928

In structure, the concerto follows the classical pattern of a first movement in sonata form, a cantabile middle movement and a festive finale. It is more than possible that Scarlatti’s keyboard sonatas and Falla’s harpsichord concerto fed into the outer movements of the work; the critic Gustave Samazeuilh further suggested that these movements are based on music for a Basque fête from the unfinished Zaspiak bat, with the result that he found the central Adagio incongruous.10 The opening theme of the first movement does indeed have a popular flavour (Ravel’s friend, the violinist Hélène Jourdan-Morhange heard echoes of the txistu, a Basque flute with three finger-holes, played with the left hand alone – or probably of an earlier type, the xirula).11 Whether the Adagio really is incongruous is highly disputable. His admitted model, the slow movement of Mozart’s clarinet quintet, served him for purely aesthetic purposes; the craft, as he told Mme Long, was laborious – ‘That flowing phrase! How I worked over it bar by bar! It nearly killed me!’12

‘M. Ravel Discusses His Own Work; The Boléro Explained’, interview with M. D. Calvocoressi, in A Ravel Reader, compiled and edited by Arbie Orenstein, New York, Columbia University Press, 1990, 476–7

12

Long, op. cit., 41

The fireworks and wit of the finale do not invite analysis. Ravel decorates his structure with the bright colours of jazz and bitonality, and in the central section the energy is such that we no longer have ‘a “development” in the classic sense, but a “hunt” (chasse), the three themes chasing each other so frenetically that the fun and games very nearly turn to panic’.13 All the movement perhaps lacks is length. Here, though, could Ravel have been guilty of low cunning? As at the first performance, this last movement has regularly provoked calls for an encore. Ravel craftily ends with the opening trumpet figure, firmly in the home key as we first heard it. Subconsciously, we imagine the movement starting all over again – hence our furious applause, and our satisfaction when the bis is granted…

13

Christine Prost, ‘Maurice Ravel : Le Concero en Sol’, Analyse musicale, 11, 1988, 81

In an interview published on 5 May 1932, Ravel pronounced himself moderately satisfied with the concerto, which ‘seems to me to be one of the works in which I have got close to achieving the content and the forms I was looking for, in which I’ve been most successful in establishing the dominance of my will.’ At the same time, he was careful to preface this by saying, ‘one never realizes exactly what one wishes.’14 It should be made clear that the present edition is primarily designed as a rehearsal vehicle for intending soloists, and not as a 2-piano performing version. Kington, December 2013

Roger Nichols

1

Letter from de’ Paoli to the editor, 10 November 1974; Constant Lambert, Music Ho !, London, Penguin Books, 1948, 117

2

3

Marguerite Long, At the piano with Ravel, trans. Olive Senior-Ellis, London, Dent, 1973, 39

4

5

Le temps, 30 January 1932

6

Calendarul, 17 Feb 1932

7

L’Aube, 5 April 1932

8

The Times, 26 February 1932

9

Sunday Referee, 28 February 1932

10

‘Ravel en pays basque’, Revue musicale, 1938, special Ravel number, 202

Hélène Jourdan-Morhange, Ravel et nous, Geneva, Éditions du milieu du monde, 1945, 171 11

‘Maurice Ravel Between Two Trains’, interview with Nino Frank, Candide, 5 May 1932, in A Ravel Reader, 496–7 14


VI

Préface En 1889, à l’âge de quatorze ans, le jeune Maurice Ravel se produisit pour la première fois en public à Paris, jouant un extrait du troisième concerto pour piano de Moscheles, avant d’essayer quelque mois plus tard de se faire admettre en classe préparatoire au Conservatoire avec un autre extrait, de l’un des deux concertos pour piano de Chopin. Deux ans plus tard, en juin 1891, il remporta même un premier prix au niveau préparatoire. Mais sa carrière de pianiste s’arrêta là. Il est vrai qu’il joua ensuite régulièrement ses œuvres les plus simples en public et accompagna au mieux ses propres mélodies. Mais il ne fut jamais un virtuose, ni même un pianiste du niveau de Fauré ou de Debussy : il avait une sonorité sèche, et un critique chevronné écrivit, au moment de sa tournée américaine en 1928 : « Il joue encore plus mal que Johannes Brahms dans ses années de déclin, et Brahms est une référence pour tous les mauvais pianistes 1 » Son niveau médiocre de pianiste ne fit cependant rien pour inhiber ses facultés de compositeur pour l’instrument. On ne sait pas s’il avait l’intention de jouer la partie de piano dans son premier projet connu de concerto pour piano – œuvre en un seul mouvement et sept épisodes fondée sur des thèmes basques, datant de 1906 et intitulée Zaspiak bat (« [Les] sept [sont] une », en référence aux sept provinces basques). Comme le rappela par la suite Domenico de’ Paoli, il lutta pendant quelques années pour mener à bien ce projet, mais finit par se rendre compte que le chant populaire basque était rétif au développement, faisant écho à Constant Lambert : « Tout le problème avec une chanson populaire est qu’une fois qu’on l’a jouée, on ne peut pas faire grandchose si ce n’est la rejouer, et la jouer un peu plus fort 2 . » On ne sait pas au juste ce qui incita Ravel à écrire le Concerto en sol majeur. Mais, dès le départ, il avait en l’occurrence l’intention de jouer lui-même la partie soliste, peut-être simplement par désir de gagner un peu plus d’argent qu’en tant que compositeur – s’il ne fut jamais pauvre, il ne devint vraiment riche qu’après le Boléro ; ou alors il se laissa fasciner par le défi technique consistant à écrire une partie soliste musicalement satisfaisante, mais assez facile pour qu’il puisse la jouer lui-même. Nous savons que le thème initial de ce qui devint le premier mouvement du concerto lui vint alors qu’il était dans le train qui le ramenait d’Oxford, où il avait été fait docteur en musique en octobre 1928, à Londres. Ravel commença à travailler sérieusement à l’œuvre en 1929, parallèlement au Concerto pour la main gauche, commandé par Paul Wittgenstein. Au cours de l’automne, Koussevitzky lui envoya une ébauche de contrat pour le concerto, que Ravel refusa de signer, écrivant le 20 décembre : « Aussitôt mon Concerto terminé, je dois le promener comme je vous l’ai dit dans les cinq parties du monde. Tout ce que j’ai pu vous promettre, c’est de vous en réserver la lre audition “in the Vorld” [sic]. » En tout cas, le concerto était loin d’être achevé, et ne le fut que l’année suivante. Dans un entretien avec son vieil ami M. D. Calvocoressi, publié dans le Daily Telegraph le 11 juillet 1931, Ravel déclarait : « Je me bats contre la montre pour achever mon autre concerto pour piano, qui doit être prêt en novembre. Je jouerai la partie soliste d’abord à Paris, puis je partirai en tournée à travers l’Allemagne, la Belgique, les Pays-Bas, les deux Amériques, le Japon et peut-être Java si – il est possible d’y réunir un orchestre pour le jouer. » Ses projets étaient à l’origine encore plus ambitieux. Mais il excluait désormais la Russie, parce que « les artistes engagés dans ce pays sont contraints par la loi d’y dépenser les cachets qu’ils reçoivent, et je serais donc obligé d’acheter des fourrures ou des icônes dont je n’aurais aucun usage. » Ravel évoque ensuite pour la première fois publiquement ce que sera ce nouveau concerto. « Celui dont je serai l’interprète est un concerto au sens le plus vrai du terme. J’entends par là qu’il est écrit dans l’esprit

de ceux de Mozart et de Saint-Saëns. La musique d’un concerto, à mon avis, doit être légère et brillante, et ne pas viser à la profondeur ou aux effets dramatiques. On a dit de certains grands classiques que leurs concertos étaient écrits non pas “pour”, mais “contre” le piano. Cette remarque me paraît parfaitement juste. J’avais d’abord pensé intituler mon concerto “divertissement”. Puis il m’est apparu que ce n’était pas utile, car le titre même de “concerto” doit être suffisamment clair quant au caractère de l’œuvre. À certains égards ce concerto n’est pas sans rapport avec ma Sonate pour violon. Il comporte quelques touches de jazz, mais peu nombreuses 3 . » Au cours de l’automne de 1931, Ravel s’épuisa à travailler des études de Chopin et de Liszt, et il semble que ses amis n’aient réussi que lentement à lui faire comprendre qu’entre cinquante et soixante ans n’était pas l’âge idéal pour se lancer dans une carrière de virtuose. Il finit donc par abandonner cette lutte inégale, et c’est Marguerite Long qui fut invitée à jouer la partie soliste de ce qui devait être le concerto alors inachevé, puisque Ravel lui promettait, à tort, un concerto qui devait se terminer « pianissimo et avec des trilles 4 ». Elle relata par la suite que Ravel lui apporta la partition le 11 novembre, pour une création à la Salle Pleyel à Paris le 14 janvier 1932, avec l’Orchestre Lamoureux sous la direction du compositeur. Celle-ci fut suivie par l’étape européenne de la tournée déjà mentionnée, consistant en dix-sept concerts entre le 18 janvier à Anvers et le 18 avril à Budapest. Cette tournée ne fut pas continue, puisque Long et Ravel prirent tous deux part à l’enregistrement du concerto (MLR) à Paris, le 14 avril. Les divers organisateurs acceptèrent sereinement le remplacement de Ravel par Marguerite Long, à l’exception de Wilhelm Furtwängler, à la tête de l’Orchestre philharmonique de Berlin, qui provoqua une crise diplomatique éphémère impliquant l’Ambassadeur de France à Berlin et le ministre français des Affaires étrangères. La création, devant une Salle Pleyel comble, fut un grand succès, et la plupart des critiques furent enthousiastes. Florent Schmitt, vieil ami de Ravel, salua « ce concerto mythique dont on entendait parler depuis tant d’années qu’on finissait par ne plus y croire. Disons tout de suite que c’est une œuvre aimable et charmante, à cent pics de tous les boléros passés, présents et futurs, une œuvre digne de l’auteur de Daphnis, Scarbo, des Valses nobles...5 . » L’accueil reçu en tournée fut encore plus enthousiaste. Le musicologue roumain Constantin Brailoiu nota que Ravel n’avait « jamais reconnu les limites d’incompatibilité entre les choses d’hier et celles de demain 6 » ; et le Belge Maurice Brillant se réjouit du fait qu’« il ne s’agit pas (chose qui arrive...) d’un concerto camouflé, honteux de lui-même ; non, un vrai concerto, paraissant à visage découvert et où l’auteur a eu la coquetterie d’observer toutes les règles du jeu 7 ». Après la première audition à Londres, le 25 février, les critiques anglais se montrèrent un peu plus nuancés. Le chroniqueur anonyme du Times avait le sentiment que dans l’Adagio central Ravel « semble presque devenir guindé, et même un peu sentimental, et se persuade difficilement de lancer traits, facéties et ruses fantasques de nouveau dans le finale 8 . » L’un des comptes rendus les plus tranchants vint de Constant Lambert, ce qui n’est pas pour surprendre : « C’est une petite œuvre aimable et sans prétentions, plus un concertino qu’un concerto, et avec peu de la richesse et de la puissance que le compositeur nous a autrefois montrées dans Daphnis et le trio avec piano. L’œuvre est concise, mais on n’a pas le sentiment que sa concision représente une grande concentration de la pensée musicale ; il semble plus probable que le compositeur n’ait pas franchement eu beaucoup à dire et qu’il soit trop intelligent pour tenter de masquer le fait [...]. Comme tant


VII de musique française, le concerto est tout du long d’un bon goût laborieux. En une occasion de sa vie Ravel oublia d’être un apôtre du bon goût français et écrivit le riche et vigoureux Daphnis et Chloë, incontestablement sa meilleure œuvre. Il a toutefois plus que compensé cette débauche païenne par un traitement régulier fait de vin du Rhin et d’eau de seltz 9. » Lambert n’avait manifestement pas lu, ou pas cru, ce que Ravel disait dans son entretien du Telegraph, où il affirmait que son concerto était délibérément léger et brillant. Dans sa structure, le concerto suit le moule classique d’un premier mouvement de forme sonate, un mouvement central cantabile et un finale festif. Il est probable que les sonates pour clavier de Scarlatti et le concerto pour clavecin de Falla ont nourri les mouvements extrêmes de l’œuvre ; le critique Gustave Samazeuilh laissa en outre entendre que ces mouvements étaient fondés sur une musique pour une fête basque tirée de la partition inachevée de Zaspiak bat, si bien qu’il trouva l’Adagio central incongru 10 . Le thème initial du premier mouvement a en effet une saveur populaire (la violoniste Hélène Jourdan-Morhange, amie de Ravel, y entendait des échos du txistu, flûte basque à trois trous jouée par la main gauche seulement – ou probablement d’un type de flûte plus ancien, la xirula 11). L’Adagio est-il vraiment incongru ? C’est très contestable. Le modèle avoué, le mouvement lent du quintette avec clarinette de Mozart, servit à des fins purement esthétiques ; Ravel confia à Marguerite Long que le travail de composition fut laborieux : « [Cette phrase] qui coule, cria-t-il, mais je l’ai faite mesure par mesure et j’ai failli en crever 12 ! » Le feu d’artifice et l’esprit du finale n’invitent pas à l’analyse. Ravel orne sa structure des couleurs vives du jazz et de la bitonalité, et dans la section centrale l’énergie est telle que nous n’avons plus « un “développement” au sens classique du terme, mais une “chasse”, les 3 thèmes se poursuivant l’un l’autre si frénétiquement que la fête est tout près de tourner à la panique 13 ». Tout ce qui manque peutêtre au mouvement est la durée. Ici, cependant, Ravel pourrait-il avoir bassement rusé ? Comme lors de la création, le public réclame souvent que ce dernier mouvement soit bissé. Ravel termine habilement avec la figure de trompette initiale, solidement ancrée dans la tonalité principale, telle qu’on l’a entendue au début. Inconsciemment, on imagine le mouvement qui recommence – d’où les applaudissements frénétiques, et la satisfaction quand le bis est accordé... Dans un entretien publié le 5 mai 1932, Ravel se déclara moyennement satisfait du concerto, qui « me paraît l’une des œuvres où j’ai pu serrer de près la matière et les formes que je poursuis, où j’ai pu établir le mieux le règne de ma volonté ». Dans le même temps, il prend soin de dire auparavant : « On ne réalise jamais exactement ce qu’on veut 14 . » La présente édition, disons-le clairement, est avant tout conçue pour permettre aux éventuels solistes de répéter, et non comme une version de concert à deux pianos. Kington, decembre 2013

Roger Nichols (Traduction : Dennis Collins)

Glen Dillard Gunn, « Ravel Lionized in Great Recital Here », Chicago Herald and Examiner, 20 janvier 1928. 1

Communication personnelle, 10 novembre 1974 ; Constant Lambert, Music Ho !, Londres, Penguin Books, 1948, p. 117. 2

3 « M. Ravel parle de son œuvre : le Boléro expliqué », entretien avec M. D. Calvocoressi, reproduit dans Maurice Ravel : Lettres, écrits, entretiens, présentés et annotés par Arbie Orenstein, Paris, Flammarion, 1989, p. 363-365. 4

Marguerite Long, Au piano avec Maurice Ravel, Paris, Julliard, 1971, p. 6.

5

Le Temps, 30 janvier 1932.

6

Calendarul, 17 février 1932.

7

L’Aube, 5 avril 1932.

8

The Times, 26 février 1932.

9

Sunday Referee, 28 février 1932.

10

« Ravel en pays basque », Revue musicale, 1938, numéro spécial Ravel, p. 202.

Hélène Jourdan-Morhange, Ravel et nous, Genève, Éditions du milieu du monde, 1945, p. 171.

11

12

Long, op. cit., p. 61.

Christine Prost, « Maurice Ravel : Le Concerto en Sol », Analyse musicale, 11, 1988, p. 81. 13

« Maurice Ravel entre deux trains », entretien avec Nino Frank, Candide, 5 mai 1932, reproduit dans Maurice Ravel : Lettres, écrits, entretiens, op. cit., p. 371-373.

14


VIII

Vorwort Im Jahr 1889 gab der vierzehnjährige Maurice Ravel mit einem Ausschnitt aus Moscheles’ drittem Klavierkonzert sein erstes öffentliches Konzert in Paris. Wenige Monate später qualifizierte er sich mit einem weiteren Ausschnitt aus einem der beiden Klavierkonzerte Chopins für die Vorbereitungsklasse am Konservatorium. Zwei Jahre später, 1891, gewann er sogar einen Preis auf Vorbereitungsniveau. Damit brach seine Pianistenkarriere jedoch ab. Zwar führte er seine eigenen einfacheren Stücke regelmäßig öffentlich auf und zeigte sich bei der Begleitung seiner eigenen Lieder von seiner wahrscheinlich besten Seite. Doch war er nie ein Virtuose oder auch nur ein Pianist der Klasse Faurés oder Debussys: Ravels Klang war trocken und, wie ein erfahrener Kritiker während seiner USA-Tournee 1928 schrieb, „spielt [er] sogar schlechter als Johannes Brahms in seinen letzten Lebensjahren – und Brahms setzte ein Zeichen, das allen schlechten Pianisten als Zielscheibe dient.“1 Ravels Mittelmäßigkeit am Klavier hat sein Können als Komponist für das Instrument jedoch nicht beeinträchtigt. Es ist nicht bekannt, ob er die Klavierstimme seines ersten dokumentierten Entwurfs für ein Klavierkonzert selbst zu spielen gedachte. Das einsätzige Werk aus dem Jahr 1906 mit dem Titel Zaspiak bat (mit Bezug auf die sieben baskischen Regionen: „[Die] Sieben [sind] Eins“) umfasst sieben Skizzen über baskische Themen. Wie sich Domenico de’ Paoli später erinnerte, mühte sich Ravel damit einige Jahre ab, kam letztlich jedoch zu der Erkenntnis, dass das baskische Volksliedmaterial keine Entwicklung zuließe. So bemerkte auch Constant Lambert: „Die Problematik des Volkslieds ist, dass es nicht viel hergibt, nachdem man es einmal durchgespielt hat. Man kann es einzig nochmal und lauter spielen.“2 Was die Komposition des G-Dur-Konzerts auslöste, ist nicht geklärt. In diesem Fall hatte Ravel jedoch von vornherein geplant, die Solostimme selbst zu spielen, möglicherweise aus dem einfachen Wunsch heraus, etwas mehr zu verdienen als das, was ihm als Komponisten vergönnt war – obwohl nie arm, wurde er erst nach seinem Boléro vermögend. Vielleicht reizte ihn auch die technische Herausforderung, eine musikalisch zufriedenstellende Solostimme zu komponieren, die einfach genug ist, um sie selbst zu spielen. Bekannt ist, dass er die Idee für das Eingangsthema des später auskomponierten ersten Satzes des Konzerts im Zug von Oxford nach London hatte (in Oxford war ihm 1928 die Ehrendoktorwürde für Musik verliehen worden). 1929 begann Ravel ernsthaft an dem Stück zu arbeiten – parallel zum Klavierkonzert für die linke Hand, das Paul Wittgenstein in Auftrag gegeben hatte. Im Laufe des Herbstes sandte ihm Kussewitzki einen Vertragsentwurf für das Konzert zu, den zu unterschreiben sich Ravel weigerte. Am 20. Dezember schrieb er: „Sobald ich mein Konzert fertiggestellt habe, bereise ich damit, wie ich es Ihnen bereits mitgeteilt habe, die fünf Kontinente der Welt. Alles, was ich Ihnen versprechen kann, ist Ihnen die Welturaufführung vorzubehalten.“ So oder so war das Konzert bei weitem noch nicht fertiggestellt – dies sollte erst im folgenden Jahr geschehen. In einem Interview mit seinem alten Freund M. D. Calvocoressi, veröffentlicht am 11. Juli 1931 im Daily Telegraph, verlautete er die Fertigstellung seines Konzerts für die linke Hand und fügte hinzu: „Ich arbeite gegen die Zeit an meinem anderen Klavierkonzert, das ich bis November zu vollenden habe. Ich werde die Klavierstimme erst in Paris spielen und begebe mich sodann auf eine Tournee durch Deutschland, Belgien, Holland, Nordund Südamerika, Japan und vielleicht Java, wenn [...] es möglich ist, dort ein Orchester für die Aufführung heranzuziehen.“ Ursprünglich hegte Ravel sogar noch ehrgeizigere Pläne. Mittlerweile schloss er Russland jedoch aus, da „Künstler, die in diesem Land engagiert

werden, [...] in selbigem per Gesetz ihre dort bezogenen Einkünfte ausgeben [müssen], was bedeuten würde, dass ich beispielsweise Felle oder Ikonen kaufen müsste, für die ich keine Verwendung habe.“ Im zitierten Interview äußerte sich Ravel zudem erstmals öffentlich zum Wesen seines neuen Konzerts. „Jenes, in welchem ich als Interpret auftrete, ist ein Konzert im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes: Damit meine ich, dass es im Geiste Mozarts und Saint-Saëns’ steht. Meiner Meinung nach sollte die Musik eines Konzerts unbeschwert und brillant sein und nicht auf Tiefe oder dramatische Effekte abzielen. Einigen Klassikern wurde nachgesagt, dass sie ihre Konzerte nicht ‚für‘, sondern ‚gegen‘ das Klavier schrieben. Dem stimme ich uneingeschränkt zu. Ich hatte eigentlich die Absicht, mein Konzert mit ‚Divertissement‘ zu betiteln. Doch dann fiel mir auf, dass dafür überhaupt keine Notwendigkeit besteht, weil allein der Titel ‚Concerto‘ hinreichend charakterisierend sein dürfte. Dieses Konzert ist meiner Violinsonate in gewisser Hinsicht nicht unähnlich. Es trägt Züge des Jazz, jedoch nicht sehr viele.“3 Im Herbst 1931 verausgabte sich Ravel mit dem Üben von Chopinund Liszt-Etüden; Hinweise von Freunden brachten ihn scheinbar nur langsam zu der Erkenntnis, dass er mit Mitte Fünfzig nicht mehr das ideale Alter für den Beginn einer Karriere als Klaviervirtuose hatte. An einem gewissen Punkt gab er den ungleichen Kampf auf, und Marguerite Long sollte nun die Solostimme des Konzerts spielen. Da Ravel ihr ein „im Pianissimo und mit Trillern“ endendes Konzert versprach, muss es zu jenem Zeitpunkt noch unvollendet gewesen sein.4 Später erinnerte sich Long, dass Ravel ihr am 11. November die Partitur für eine am 14. Januar 1932 im Salle Pleyel, Paris, stattfindende Premiere brachte, bei der der Komponist das Lamoureux-Orchester dirigieren würde. Es folgte der erwähnte europäische Tourneeabschnitt mit 17 Aufführungen zwischen dem 18. Januar in Antwerpen und 18. April in Budapest. Unterbrochen wurde die Tournee durch die Aufnahme des Konzerts (MLR) am 14. April in Paris, bei der sowohl Long als auch Ravel mitwirkten. Die verschiedenen Organisatoren gingen aufgeschlossen mit der Auswechslung Ravels durch Mme Long um, mit Ausnahme von Wilhelm Furtwängler, Chefdirigent der Berliner Philharmoniker, der kurzzeitig eine diplomatische Krise herbeiführte, in die der französische Botschafter in Berlin und der französischen Außenminister involviert waren. Die Premiere im bis auf den letzten Platz gefüllten Salle Pleyel war ein großer Erfolg, die meisten Kritiker zeigten sich enthusiastisch. Ravels alter Freund Florent Schmitt fand Gefallen an diesem „mystischen Konzert, von dem so lange Zeit die Rede war, dass wir gar nicht mehr daran glaubten. Ich muss bereits vorwegnehmen: Es ist ein wunderbares und bezauberndes Werk, das meilenweit von all den Boléros der Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft entfernt ist, ein Werk, das dem Komponisten von Daphnis, Scarbo und Valses nobles würdig ist…“5 Die Reaktionen während der Tournee fielen womöglich sogar noch enthusiastischer aus. Der rumänische Wissenschaftler Constantin Brailoiu bemerkte, dass Ravel „niemals die Grenzen der Unvereinbarkeit zwischen den Dingen von gestern und heute anerkannt hat“6. Der Belgier Maurice Brillant erfreute sich an der Tatsache, dass „es [...] sich nicht (wie es manchmal der Fall ist [...]) um ein Konzert [handelt], das sich tarnt und seiner selbst schämt; nein, [es ist] ein wahres Konzert, das sein Gesicht zeigt und in welchem der Komponist kokett alle Spielregeln einhält.“7 Die Einschätzungen der englischen Kritiker der Londoner Premiere vom 25. Februar fielen differenzierter aus. Der anonyme Kritiker der Times hatte den Eindruck, als würde Ravel im Mittelsatz, dem Adagio, „fast ernst, gesetzt und sogar ein wenig sentimental. Im Finale


IX rüttelt er sich mühsam wach, um wieder attisches Salz zu streuen und tief in die Trickkiste zu greifen.“8 Wie zu erwarten war, zeigte sich Constant Lambert als einer der schärfsten Kritiker: „Es ist ein angenehmes und bescheidenes kleines Werk, mehr ein Concertino als ein Concerto. Es besitzt wenig von dem Reichtum und der Kraft, die der Komponist in Daphnis und seinem Klaviertrio zum Ausdruck gebracht hat. Das Werk ist präzise, aber man hat nicht den Eindruck, dass diese Präzision eine sonderliche Konzentration des musikalischen Gedankens darstellt. Es scheint eher so, als hätte der Komponist schlichtweg wenig zu sagen gehabt und zu viel Geist besessen, als zu versuchen, darüber hinwegzutäuschen. […] Wie so viele französische Musik zeugt das Konzert durchweg von schrecklich gutem Geschmack. Einmal in seinem Leben hatte Ravel vergessen, sich als Apostel des guten französischen Geschmacks zu geben und schuf das opulente und kraftvolle Daphnis und Chloé, zweifelsohne sein bestes Werk. Diese heidnische Orgie hat er jedoch durch eine kontinuierliche Behandlung mit Rheinwein und Sodawasser mehr als aufgewogen.“9 Offensichtlich hatte Lambert nicht gelesen, oder nicht geglaubt, dass Ravel das Konzert in einem Interview mit dem Telegraph als absichtlich „unbeschwert und brillant“ bezeichnet hatte. In seiner Struktur folgt das Konzert dem klassischen Aufbau mit dem ersten Satz in der Sonatensatzform, einem kantablen Mittelsatz und einem festlich-fröhlichen Finale. Mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit sind Elemente aus Scarlattis Klaviersonaten und de Fallas Cembalokonzert in die Rahmensätze des Werkes eingeflossen. Der Kritiker Gustave Samazeuilh wies zudem darauf hin, dass die Musik für eine Basque fête aus dem unvollendeten Zaspiak bat die Grundlage für die Sätze I und III bildet, weswegen er das in der Mitte stehende Adagio als unpassend empfindet.10 Das Eingangsthema des ersten Satzes hat in der Tat einen populären Einschlag (die mit Ravel befreundete Geigerin Hélène Jourdan-Morhange hörte Anklänge an die Txistu, eine baskische Drei-Finger-Einhandflöte – oder möglicherweise an deren frühere Form, die Xirula).11 Es lässt sich durchaus darüber streiten, ob das Adagio tatsächlich nicht zu den Rahmensätzen passt. Der langsame Satz aus Mozarts Klarinettenkonzert, das Modell, zu dem sich Ravel bekannte, hatte ihm aus rein ästhetischen Gründen gedient. Wie er Mme Long mitteilte, war es ein mühsames Handwerk – „Die fließende Phrase! Wie ich Takt für Takt daran gearbeitet habe! Es hat mich fast umgebracht!“12 Das Feuerwerk und der Esprit des Finales laden nicht unbedingt zur Analyse ein. Ravel schmückt seinen Orchestersatz mit den leuchtenden Farben des Jazz und der Bitonalität. Der Mittelteil ist derart energiegeladen, dass hier nicht mehr eine „Durchführung“ im klassischen Sinne erfolgt, sondern eine „Jagd“ (chasse), bei der sich die drei Themen so wild verfolgen, dass Spaß und Spiel beinahe in Panik ausarten.13 Alles, woran es diesem Satz vielleicht mangelt, ist Dauer. Eine niederträchtige List des Komponisten? Wie zur ersten Aufführung hat der letzte Satz immer wieder für Zugaberufe gesorgt. Ravel beendet ihn gekonnt mit der Eingangsfigur der Trompete, fest verankert in der Grundtonart, wie sie auch zu Beginn erklingt. Unbewusst stellt sich der Hörer vor, dass der Satz von vorn beginnt – daher der frenetische Applaus und die Genugtuung, wenn die Zugabe erklingt … In einem Interview vom 5. Mai 1932 erklärte sich Ravel einigermaßen zufrieden mit seinem Konzert, das „scheinbar eines der Werke ist, in welchem ich nahezu den Inhalt und die Form erreicht habe, nach der ich gesucht habe, in welchem ich am erfolgreichsten meinen dominanten Willen durchsetzen konnte.“ Doch versäumte er nicht, dieser Aussage vorauszuschicken: „Man kann es nie genau so verwirklichen, wie man es wünscht“.14

Der Herausgeber möchte darauf hinweisen, dass die vorliegende Ausgabe in erster Linie als Studienausgabe für Solisten und nicht als Aufführungsfassung für zwei Klaviere konzipiert ist. Kington, Dezember 2013

Roger Nichols (Übersetzung: Lore Horlamus)

Glen Dillard Gunn, Ravel Lionized in Great Recital Here, in: Chicago Herald and Examiner, 20. Januar 1928.

1

Brief von Domenico de’ Paoli an den Herausgeber, 10. November 1974; Constant Lambert, Music Ho !, London: Penguin Books 1948, S. 117. 2

M. Ravel Discusses His Own Work; The Boléro Explained, Interview mit M. D. Calvocoressi, in: A Ravel Reader, zusammengestellt und hrsg. von Arbie Orenstein, New York: Columbia University Press 1990, S. 476f. 3

Marguerite Long, At the piano with Ravel, engl. Übersetzung von Olive SeniorEllis, London: Dent 1973, S. 39.

4

5

Le temps, 30. Januar 1932.

6

Calendarul, 17. Februar 1932.

7

L’Aube, 5. April 1932.

8

The Times, 26. Februar 1932.

9

Sunday Referee, 28. Februar 1932.

10

Ravel en pays basque, in: Revue musicale, spezielle Ravel-Ausgabe (1938), S. 202.

Hélène Jourdan-Morhange, Ravel et nous, Genf: Éditions du milieu du monde 1945, S. 171. 11

12

Marguerite Long, At the piano with Ravel (wie Anm. 4), S. 41.

Christine Prost, Maurice Ravel: Le Concerto en Sol, in: Analyse musicale 11 (1988). S. 81.

13

Maurice Ravel Between Two Trains, Interview mit Nino Frank, Candide, 5. Mai 1932, in: A Ravel Reader (wie Anm. 3), S. 496f. 14


à Marguerite Long

Concerto pour Piano et Orchestre

I

Piano I (Solo)

  

                                

pp 3

   

3

    

Allegramente (h = 116)

Piano II (Reduction of orchestral score)

4

I

II

Edition for 2 pianos by Roger Nichols

                  

Allegramente (h = 116) 

   

Maurice Ravel (1875-1937)

   

sf

   

Picc.

mf

 

fpp

Vl., Va. (pizz.)

                    

    

     

     

Vc. (trem.)



 

 

  

           

                                             

 

 

    

    



    





   



   

 

    

  

                                             

8

I

II

                                           

       

      

      

Edition Peters 11406

 

 

(LH over) 33581

      

    

  

      

© 2014 by C. F. Peters


3 12

I

II

             

                      



  

1

     

       

     +Fl.  

   

   

 

mf

B

 

      

16

I

      

. gliss

 

 

B

I

 

 



 

 

 cresc.

        

 

Edition Peters

 

 

 

 



 

 

    



 

B

 

Picc., Fl.

33581

 

 

 



 

                                         Fl., Cor. i.        cresc. +Archi    Cor. I/II                          Fg.                Ob.

II



 

 

                   Cl. I/II    

B



 

Picc., Fl.

Fg. I/II



 

                    Ob., Cor. i.  mf Fl.                    20

 

Cl.

II



       

   

          


       

4

2

25

I

II

   

Tr.

  

        

 Archi, Arpa            f

   

         

      

                        

30

II

     

 II

 

3                  4 Legni, ff  Archi, Cor.                

       

             

(LH over)

35

     

 

     

      

                                   

 

 

  

f        

[toujours à 2 temps]

 

40

I

II

 

4

Meno vivo

3

[un peu arpégé]

   2 3 4 mp       

              Meno vivo           Cor. i.                     p           Archi                                            Edition Peters

33581


CRITICAL COMMENTARY


58

Critical Commentary Relevant sources

183

A autograph of orchestral score, private collection

216, 220 $ added editorially by analogy with bars 199, 203 (LG omits $ in error in bar 203)

E first edition of orchestral score, Paris, Durand, 1932, D.&F. 12,150 LG 2-piano score transcribed by Lucien Garban, Paris, Durand, 1932, D.&F. 12,143

230

a’’ added editorially to quaver 3 by analogy with previous bars

$ omitted in LG, present in other sources

ML working copy of LG belonging to the pianist Marguerite Long, held in the Médiathèque musicale Gustav Mahler, Paris. Last page missing

239, 240 there is a possibility that the four middle c’s should be sharpened, in line with parallel passages in Ravel’s music. But the semitonal voice leading c’ natural - b’ might be heard as adding to the plaintive quality of this passage. MLR plays c’ natural.

MLR recording of the concerto made on 14 April 1932 by Marguerite Long and the Orchestre Symphonique, conducted by Pedro A. de FreitasBranco, in Ravel’s presence and under his supervision

239–243 there seems to be no authentic source for the idea, tempting though it may be, that gaps between trills should be filled in and that here Ravel was attempting to imitate a musical saw.

MLM Marguerite Long’s memoirs of working with Ravel, published as Au piano avec Maurice Ravel, textes réunis et présentés par Père Pierre Laumonier, Paris, Julliard, 1971; At the Piano with Ravel, trans. Olive Senior Ellis, London, Dent, 1973. References below are to the English translation

245–248 LG marks these 4 bars in Piano 2 to be played in two phrases; present edition reverts to orchestral phrasing (or rather lack of it, but with accents) in A, E.

The following comments are limited to points which are either potentially doubtful or ambiguous, or which are important for a pianist to know. LG has been taken as a basis. Although in general Garban did a careful and intelligent job, there are mistakes and omissions in his edition which have been rectified in the present one, in addition to changes made through editorial taste.

254

diminuendo added editorially to solo part to parallel that in orchestra

255

MLR and many subsequent recordings take new minim as equal to preceding crotchet.

I. Allegramente

267–268 crescendo omitted in LG, present in other sources

Tempo indication: MLR begins faster than marked at N = 128

279

solo figuration in second half of this bar does not match that elsewhere in bars 277–288. Present edition follows MLR in maintaining consistency.

305

f marking in solo part causes problems in hearing bassoon figure. MLR plays p, at most.

253–254 LG follows A, E in printing barline between these bars as a dotted one. No useful purpose seems to be served by this.

259–263 present edition follows MLR in restoring 8va bassa markings missing in A, E, LG.

15

solo part, RH, final quaver, f ’’# in LG; g’’ in other sources

42, 43

unlike many modern recordings, MLR makes no ritardando here.

44

ML: ‘toujours à 2 temps un peu arpégé’. MLR follows ML in playing the RH g’ slightly after the beat; tempo however, if anything, increases…

67

pedal release clearly required

73

ML: ‘sans rit’. Barely any ritardando in MLR. ‘But how often have I seen conductors’ scores with a funereal rallentando marked – usually in red pencil. This used to infuriate Ravel.’ (MLM 50).

Tempo indication: MLR stays close to marked C = 76.

the curious indication in ML [même mvt plus lent] would seem to mean that the basic beat should continue, but with very discreet hesitations that remove any sense of haste.

75

82–83

pp by analogy with bar 78; likewise mf for continuation of melodic line

84

the three crotchets b’, a’ g’# must be triplets. Not notated as such in any source, but played as triplets in MLR

95–96

bass B might more elegantly be tied over the barline.

107

ML: ‘pas trop vite 4 e égales très détachées’

171

ML: ‘long tous les doigts’. MLR markedly increases tempo for this octave passage, despatching the whole in 6 seconds. ‘Ravel said: “Play it like the passage in Liszt’s Mazeppa”.’ (MLM 51; the following page reproduces the Ravel passage with Long’s fingering). ‘Mazeppa’ is the fourth of Liszt’s Douze études d’exécution transcendante. The passage Ravel refers to is clearly the ‘Cadenza ad libitum’ of bar 6. The first (1852) and subsequent editions from Breitkopf und Härtel all indicate ‘Ped’ at the beginning of the cadenza, without stipulating where it should be released. MLR’s heavily pedalled performance of the Ravel passage therefore seems to have followed the composer’s wishes.

II. Adagio assai

1

ML: ‘mg ppp’

19

ML: ‘sans retenir’

46

ML: ‘sans cresc –’

50

ML: ‘un peu plus’

53–54

Piano 2, < mp omitted in LG, present in A, E

62–63

LG embraces whole 2-bar unit within a single phrase; present edition reverts to more active phrasing in A, E.

73

ML: ‘ cédez plus lent’. MLR duly makes broad ritardando here.

74–103

again, present edition follows phrasing of cor anglais and flute solos in A, E.

96–97

wonderful key change into C# major can be a tricky moment for ensemble because of cor anglais trill; MLR takes final two semiquavers exactly in tempo. Long also remembered, ‘For ages I had been suggesting to Ravel gently holding on to the E sharp at figure 9 bar 97] and putting the notes immediately following somewhat into relief. He had always refused. At the rehearsal in Bucharest [in February 1932] I suggested this to Georgescu, who was conducting, and he agreed to try it. Afterwards Ravel said to me, “For weeks I have been telling you to do just this: it’s a wonderul refinement.” I could have hit him!’ (MLM 54-5).


59 106–108 marked diminuendo in solo part makes it clear final b’’ is not concluding act of emphasis, but merely end of trill; obviously conductors will have their own ideas about how loud same b’’ should be as Violin I harmonic. MLR gives slight rallentando in trill over last crotchet of bar 107. III. Presto Tempo: no indication in any source; MLR stays around N = 156. 23

RH chromatic figure is trombone glissando: some smearing with pedal allowed. In LH of solo part, upper note of first dyad is printed as g’ in LG, b’ in other sources; lower note of last dyad is printed as b in E, LG, and is unchanged in ML, MLR; present edition follows A in printing c’, since all surrounding figuration (bars 5–33) is made up of 4ths and 5ths, with a few 3rds but no 6ths.

77

Piano 2, LH chord, f ’’# is correct…

93–94, phrasing added editorially in solo part by analogy with bars 120–123 113–114 and 132–135. 151

in solo part, quaver 3 is given as c’# in A, E, LG; corrected to d’ in ML, MLR, to match Piano 2 (violas).

154–167 phrasing follows A, E. 178–179 present edition of Piano 2 prioritises horn calls, absent from LG 182–214 Piano 2: The need for the soloist in this complex orchestral passage is, firstly, to hear a firm, regular beat, the danger being that they speed up because the piano writing suddenly becomes easier at fig. 16; and secondly, to hear clearly the motifs on woodwind and brass. The semiquavers on cellos and violas, being of no help in orienting the soloist, have been omitted after the first three bars. 198

no dynamic marking for solo part in LG. A: mf. Present text follows E in printing f.

258, 264 quaver 4 in these two bars does not match, as perhaps it should. MLR plays text as printed here. 288–295 LG prints ossia of chromatic scale in simple octaves. This (in the editor’s view) plainly inferior option is omitted in the present edition. 296, 297 A puts crescendo in bar 297, E in bar 296. Present edition follows A, in accordance with Ravel’s known opinion that pianists tended to start his crescendos too early, thus making them less explosive.


60

Commentaire critique Sources utilisées

Ravel fait référence est manifestement la « Cadenza ad libitum » mes. 6. La première édition (1852) et les suivantes chez Breitkopf und Härtel indiquent toutes « Ped » au début de la cadence, sans préciser où elle doit être relevée. L’interprétation du passage de Ravel dans MLR, avec beaucoup de pédale, semble donc répondre aux souhaits du compositeur.

A autographe de la partition d’orchestre, collection particulière. E première édition de la partition d’orchestre, Paris, Durand, 1932, D.&F. 12.150. LG partition pour deux pianos transcrite par Lucien Garban, Paris, Durand, 1932, D.&F. 12.143.

183

ML exemplaire de travail de LG ayant appartenu à Marguerite Long, conservé à la Médiathèque musicale Gustav Mahler, Paris. Manque la dernière page.

216, 220 $ ajouté par l’éditeur par analogie avec mes. 199, 203 (LG omet $ par erreur mes. 203).

MLR enregistrement du concerto réalisé le 14 avril 1932 par Marguerite Long et l’Orchestre symphonique, dirigé par Pedro A. de Freitas-Branco, en présence de Ravel et sous sa supervision. MLM souvenirs de Marguerite Long sur son travail avec Ravel, publiés sous le titre Au piano avec Maurice Ravel, textes réunis et présentés par Père Pierre Laumonier, Paris, Julliard, 1971.

230

la4 ajouté par l’éditeur à la croche 3 par analogie avec les mesures précédentes.

$ omis dans LG, présent dans les autres sources.

239, 240 il est possible que les quatre do du milieu doivent être diésés, en accord avec des passages parallèles dans la musique de Ravel. Mais la progression de demi-ton do3-si3 pourrait s’entendre comme renforçant le caractère plaintif de ce passage. Dans MLR le do est bécarre. 239-243

il ne semble pas y avoir de source authentique pour l’idée, si tentante soit-elle, qu’il faille combler les trous entre les trilles et que Ravel tentait ici d’imiter une scie musicale.

245-248

LG indique que ces quatre mesures du piano 2 doivent se jouer en deux phrases ; la présente édition revient au phrasé orchestral (ou plutôt à l’absence de phrasé orchestral, mais avec des accents) de A, E.

I. Allegramente

253-254

Indication de tempo : MLR commence plus rapidement que l’indication N = 128.

LG suit A, E en imprimant en pointillé la barre de mesure qui sépare ces deux mesures, sans qu’on en voie l’utilité.

254

diminuendo ajouté par l’éditeur à la partie soliste par analogie avec l’orchestre.

255

MLR et beaucoup d’enregistrements ultérieurs prennent la nouvelle blanche comme égale à la noire précédente.

259-263

la présente édition suit MLR en rétablissant les indications 8va bassa qui manquent dans A, E, LG.

267-268

crescendo omis dans LG, présent dans les autres sources.

279

la figuration soliste dans la seconde moitié de cette mesure ne correspond pas à celle de mes. 277-288. La présente édition suit MLR en préservant la cohérence.

305

l’indication f dans la partie soliste rend la figure de basson difficile à entendre. Dans MLR, la pianiste joue p, tout au plus.

Les commentaires qui suivent se limitent aux points potentiellement douteux ou ambigus, ou qu’il est important pour le pianiste de connaître. LG a été pris comme base. Bien qu’en général Garban ait fait un travail soigneux et intelligent, il y a des erreurs et des omissions dans son édition qui ont été corrigées dans la présente version, outre des changements faits par goût de l’éditeur.

15 42, 43 44

67 73

75

82-83 84

95-96 107 171

partie soliste, MD, dernière croche, fa4# dans LG ; sol4 dans autres sources. à la différence de nombreux enregistrements modernes, MLR ne fait pas de ritardando ici. ML : « toujours à 2 temps un peu arpégé ». MLR suit ML en jouant le sol3 MD légèrement après le temps ; le tempo tend plutôt à augmenter... la pédale doit manifestement être relâchée. ML : « sans rit ». À peine de ritardando dans MLR. « Et pourtant, que de fois j’ai vu, ajouté et souligné au crayon rouge, sur la partition du chef d’orchestre, ce ralentissement funeste qui exaspérait Ravel ! » (MLM, p. 75). la curieuse indication dans ML (« même mvt plus lent ») semblerait signifier que la battue de base doit se poursuivre, mais avec de très discrètes hésitations qui ôtent toute impression de hâte. pp par analogie avec mes. 78 ; de même mf pour la continuation de la ligne mélodique. les trois noires si3, la3, sol#3 doivent être des triolets. Elles ne sont notées ainsi dans aucune source, mais sont jouées comme telles dans MLR il serait plus élégant de lier le si basse par-dessus la barre de mesure. ML : « pas trop vite 4 e égales très détachées ». ML : « long tous les doigts ». MLR augmente sensiblement le tempo pour ce passage en octaves, expédiant le tout en six secondes. « Ravel disait : “Jouez-le comme le trait du Mazeppa de Liszt.” » (MLM, p. 76 ; la page suivante reproduit le passage de Ravel avec le doigté de Long). « Mazeppa » est la quatrième des Douze études d’exécution transcendante de Liszt. Le passage auquel

II. Adagio assai Indication de tempo : MLR reste proche de l’indication e = 76. 1

ML : « mg ppp ».

19

ML : « sans retenir ».

46

ML : « sans cresc – ».

50

ML : « un peu plus ».

53-54

piano 2, < mp omis dans LG, présent dans A, E.

62-63

LG englobe toute l’unité de deux mesures en une seule phrase ; la présente édition revient au phrasé plus actif de A, E.

73

ML : « cédez plus lent ». MLR fait ici un ample ritardando.

74-103

de nouveau, la présente édition suit le phrasé des solos de cor anglais et de flûte dans A, E.

96-97

la merveilleuse modulation en ut dièse majeur peut être un moment délicat pour le jeu d’ensemble en raison du trille du


61 cor anglais ; dans MLR, les deux dernières doubles croches sont jouées exactement au tempo. Long rapporte également : « J’avais proposé depuis longtemps à Ravel un léger arrêt sur le mi dièse [mes. 97] et les premières notes suivantes un peu en relief ; il avait toujours refusé. À Bucarest, à la répétition [en février 1932], je fis part de cette idée à Georgesco qui dirigeait et il fut d’avis de l’essayer. Ravel, après, me dit : “Vous voyez bien, il y a des semaines que je vous dis de faire cette nuance, qui est magnifique.” Je l’aurais battu ! » (MLM, p. 80). 106-108

le diminuendo noté dans la partie soliste montre clairement que le si4 final n’est pas un geste d’emphase conclusif, mais simplement la fin d’un trille ; les chefs d’orchestre auront à l’évidence leur propre idée sur l’intensité du même si4 en tant qu’harmonique du violon I. MLR fait un léger rallentando dans le trille sur la dernière noire de mes. 107.

III. Presto Tempo : aucune indication dans aucune source ; MLR reste aux environs de N = 156. 23

la figure chromatique MD est un glissando de trombone : un certain flou avec la pédale est possible. MG de la partie soliste, la note supérieure de la première dyade est sol3 dans LG, si3 dans d’autres sources ; la note inférieure de la dernière dyade est si2 dans E, LG, et inchangée dans ML, MLR ; la présente édition suit A en donnant do2, puisque toute la figuration environnante (mes. 5-33) est composée de quartes et de quintes, avec quelques tierces, mais pas de sixtes.

77

piano 2, accord MG, fa4# est correct…

93-94, 120-123

phrasé ajouté par l’éditeur à la partie soliste par analogie avec mes. 113-114 et 132-135.

151

dans la partie soliste, la croche 3 est do3# dans A, E, LG ; corrigé en ré3 dans ML, MLR, pour correspondre au piano 2 (altos).

154-167

le phrasé suit A, E.

178-179

la présente édition donne la priorité aux sonneries de cor, absentes de LG (pour le piano 2).

182-214

Piano 2: dans ce passage orchestral complexe, le soliste a d’abord besoin d’entendre une battue solide, régulière, le danger étant d’accélérer parce que l’écriture pianistique devient soudain plus facile au chiffre 16 ; et ensuite d’entendre clairement les motifs aux bois et aux cuivres. Les doubles croches aux violoncelles et altos, n’aidant en rien à orienter le soliste, ont été omises après les trois premières mesures.

198

pas de nuance indiquée pour la partie soliste dans LG. A : mf. Le présent texte suit E en indiquant f.

258, 264 les croches 4 de ces deux mesures ne correspondent pas, alors que ce devrait peut-être être le cas. Dans MLR le texte est celui imprimé ici. 288-295 LG donne en ossia une gamme chromatique en simples octaves. Cette option clairement inférieure (de l’avis de l’éditeur) est omise de la présente édition. 296, 297 A met le crescendo mes. 297, E mes. 296. La présente édition suit A, en accord avec l’opinion connue de Ravel, qui pensait que les pianistes tendent à commencer ses crescendos trop tôt, les rendant ainsi moins explosifs.


62

Kritischer Bericht Relevante Quellen

Fingersatz ab). „Mazeppa“ ist die Vierte von Liszts Douze études d’exécution transcendante. Die Passage, auf die sich Ravel bezieht, ist eindeutig die „Cadenza ad libitum“ in Takt 6. Die erste (1852) und die folgenden Ausgaben von Breitkopf und Härtel geben zu Beginn der Kadenz alle $ an, ohne vorzuschreiben, wo es aufzuheben ist. Die mit viel Pedal gespielte Ravel-Passage in MLR scheint daher den Wünschen des Komponisten zu entsprechen.

A Autograph der Orchesterpartitur, private Sammlung. E Erste Ausgabe der Orchesterpartitur, Paris: Durand 1932, D.&F. 12,150. LG Partiturausgabe für 2 Klaviere, Transkription Lucien Garban, Paris: Durand 1932, D.&F. 12,143. ML Der Pianistin Marguerite Long gehörendes Handexemplar von LG, aufbewahrt in der Médiathèque musicale Gustav Mahler, Paris. Die letzte Seite fehlt. MLR Aufnahme des Konzerts vom 14. April 1932 in Ravels Gegenwart und unter dessen Leitung: Marguerite Long und das Orchestre Symphonique, Dirigent Pedro A. de Freitas-Branco. MLM Marguerite Longs Erinnerungen an die Arbeit mit Ravel, veröffentlicht als Au piano avec Maurice Ravel, textes réunis et présentés par Père Pierre Laumonier, Paris: Julliard 1971. At the Piano with Ravel, übers. von Olive Senior Ellis, London: Dent 1973. Unten stehende Verweise beziehen sich auf die englische Übersetzung. Die folgenden Kommentare beschränken sich auf möglicherweise fragliche oder mehrdeutige Punkte bzw. auf für Pianisten wichtige Fragen. Als Grundlage diente LG. Obwohl Garban im Großen und Ganzen sorgfältige und intelligente Arbeit geleistet hat, enthält seine Ausgabe Fehler und Auslassungen, die in der vorliegenden Ausgabe nebst Änderungen, die auf Präferenzen des Herausgebers zurückzuführen sind, korrigiert wurden. I. Allegramente Tempoangabe: MLR beginnt schneller als gekennzeichnet, mit N = 128.

183

drittes Viertel: analog zu den vorangegangenen Takten wurde vom Herausgeber ein a’’ hinzugefügt.

216, 220 $ hinzugefügt, analog zu den Takten 199, 203 (LG irrtümlich ohne $ in Takt 203) 230

ohne $ in LG, in anderen Quellen vorhanden.

239, 240 Möglicherweise müssten die vier c’ in der Mitte analog zu Parallelpassagen in der Musik Ravels um einen Halbton erhöht werden. Die Stimmführung mit Halbtonschritt von c’ zu h’ kann jedoch auch so gehört werden, als dass sie zum klagenden Charakter der Passage beiträgt. In MLR erklingt c’ ohne Vorzeichen. 239–243 So verlockend es auch sein mag: Es scheint keine authentische Quelle für die Auffassung zu geben, dass Tonsprünge zwischen den Trillern zu füllen seien und dass Ravel an dieser Stelle eine singende Säge imitieren wollte. 245–248 In LG sind diese 4 Takte in Klavier 2 als zwei Phrasen gekennzeichnet; die vorliegende Version kehrt zur Orchesterphrasierung in A und E zurück (bzw. vielmehr dem Nichtvorhandensein dieser, jedoch mit Akzenten). 253–254 Mit dem Einfügen eines gepunkteten Taktstrichs zwischen diesen Takten folgt LG A und E. Hierfür ist kein nützlicher Zweck erkennbar. 254

Der Herausgeber hat der Solostimme entsprechend der Orchesterstimme ein diminuendo hinzugefügt. In MLR und vielen späteren Aufnahmen entspricht eine Halbe nun der vorangegangenen Viertel.

15

Solostimme, r. H., letzte Achtel, fis’ in LG; g’’ in anderen Quellen.

42, 43

anders als bei vielen modernen Aufnahmen kein ritardando in MLR an dieser Stelle.

255

44

ML: „toujours à 2 temps un peu arpégé“. MLR folgt ML, indem das g’ der r. H. leicht verzögert erklingt, das Tempo steigt jedoch eher…

259–263 Die vorliegende Ausgabe folgt MLR und notiert das in A, E und LG fehlende 8vabassa. 267–268 ohne crescendo in LG, in anderen Quellen vorhanden.

67

Aufheben des Pedals eindeutig erforderlich.

279

73

ML: „sans rit“. Kaum ritardando in MLR. „Doch wie oft schon habe ich in Dirigentenpartituren ein getragenes rallentando gesehen – üblicherweise mit Rotstift vermerkt. Das machte Ravel wütend.“ (MLM 50).

Solofiguration in der zweiten Takthälfte entspricht nicht jener in den Takten 277–288. Die vorliegende Ausgabe folgt MLR und bleibt einheitlich.

305

Das f in der Solostimme beeinträchtigt das Hören des Fagott-Motivs. In MLR erklingt maximal p.

75

Die seltsame Angabe in ML [même mvt plus lent] scheint darauf hinzuweisen, den Grundschlag beizubehalten, allerdings mit sehr diskreten Verzögerungen, sodass kein Gefühl von Eile entsteht.

82–83

pp analog zu Takt 78; ebenso mf zur Fortführung der Melodielinie.

84

Obwohl in keiner der Quellen notiert, sind die drei Viertelnoten h’, a’, gis’ als eine Triole anzusehen. Dies wird bestätigt durch MLR, wo diese drei Viertel triolisch gespielt werden.

95–96

Es scheint eleganter, das H im Bass über den Taktstrich zu binden.

107

ML: „pas trop vite 4 e égales très détachées“.

171

ML: „long tous les doigts“. In MLR ist das Tempo für diese Oktavpassage deutlich erhöht – sie wird in 6 Sekunden absolviert. „Ravel sagte: ‚Spielen Sie es wie die Passage in Liszts Mazeppa‘.“ (MLM, S. 51; die Folgeseite bildet Ravels Passage mit Longs

II. Adagio assai Tempoangabe: MLR ist nahe an der Angabe e = 76. 1 19 46 50 53–54 62–63

73 74–103

ML: „mg ppp“ ML: „sans retenir“. ML: „sans cresc --“. ML: „un peu plus“. Klavier 2: ohne < mp in LG, vorhanden in A, E. In LG ist die gesamte zweitaktige Einheit als einzige Phrase notiert; die vorliegende Ausgabe kehrt zur regeren Phrasierung in A und E zurück. ML: „ cédez plus lent“. In MLR erklingt hier wie erwartet ein ausgedehntes ritardando. Die vorliegende Ausgabe folgt wieder der Phrasierung der Soli von Englischhorn und Flöte in A und E.


63 96–97

Der wunderbare Tonartenwechsel nach Cis-Dur kann für das Ensemble aufgrund des Englischhorn-Trillers ein heikler Moment sein; in MLR erklingen die letzten beiden Sechzehntel exakt im Tempo. Long erinnerte sich zudem: „Ich hatte Ravel schon lange vorgeschlagen, das Eis [in Ziffer 9, Takt 97] sanft abzusetzen und die unmittelbar folgenden Töne etwas herauszuarbeiten. Er hat es stets abgelehnt. Bei der Probe in Bukarest [im Februar 1932] habe ich dies Georgescu vorgeschlagen, der dirigierte, und er war dafür, es auszuprobieren. Danach sagte Ravel zu mir: ‚Sehen Sie, seit Wochen sage ich, Sie sollen diese Nuance herausarbeiten: sie ist wundervoll.‘ Ich hätte ihn schlagen können!“ (MLM, S. 54f).

106–108 Das angegebene diminuendo in der Solostimme verdeutlicht, dass das letzte h’’ keine abschließende Betonung, sondern nur das Ende des Trillers ist; Dirigenten werden ihre eigene Vorstellung davon haben, wie laut selbiges h’’ in der Harmonie der Violine I erklingen sollte. In MLR leichtes rallentando beim Triller über der letzten Viertel in Takt 107. III. Presto Tempo: in allen Quellen ohne Angabe; in MLR bei etwa N =156. 23

chromatische Figur der r. H. ist ein Posaunenglissando: leichtes Binden mit dem Haltepedal erlaubt. In der l. H. der Solostimme ist die höhere Note des Zweiklangs in LG als g’ notiert, in anderen Quellen als h’. Die tiefere Note des letzten Zweiklangs in E und LG ist als h gedruckt und wurde auch in ML und MLR beibehalten; die vorliegende Ausgabe folgt A und druckt c’, da sämtliche Figurationen in den umliegenden Takten (5–33) aus Quarten, Quinten, wenigen Terzen, jedoch nicht aus Sexten bestehen.

77

Klavier 2, Akkord in der l. H.: fis’’ ist korrekt.

93–94, Phrasierung redaktionell analog zu den Takten 113–114 und 120–123 132–135 hinzugefügt. 151

in der Solostimme ist 3. Achtel in A, E und LG als cis’ notiert; zwecks Anpassung auf Klavier 2 (Violen) korrigiert zu d’ in ML und MLR.

154–167 Phrasierung gemäß A und E. 178–179 In der vorliegenden Ausgabe wird den Hornrufen (Klavier 2) Priorität eingeräumt, nicht so in LG 182–214 Klavier II: In diesen Takten ist es für den Spieler des Soloklaviers vor allem wichtig, in Klavier II die Motive der Holz- und Blechbläser sowie den regelmäßigen Grundschlag zu hören, auch um der Gefahr des Auseinanderdriftens ab Ziffer 16, wo Klavier I den leichteren Part hat, zu begegnen. Da die Sechzehntel in Viola und Cello dem Solisten kaum Orientierung geben, wurden sie ab dem vierten Takt nach Ziffer 16 nicht mehr wiedergegeben. 198

in LG keine Dynamikangaben für die Solostimme. A: mf. Vorliegende Ausgabe folgt E und druckt f.

258, 264 4. Achtel in diesen zwei Takten sollten vermutlich analog sein, was jedoch nicht der Fall ist. Töne in MLR wie hier abgedruckt. 288–295: ossia der chromatischen Skala in LG in einfachen Oktaven abgedruckt. Diese (nach Meinung des Herausgebers) deutlich minderwertigere Option entfällt in der vorliegenden Ausgabe. 296, 297 A mit crescendo in Takt 297, E in Takt 296. Die vorliegende Ausgabe folgt A und berücksichtigt so Ravels Meinung, dass Pianisten dazu neigten, Crescendi zu zeitig anzusetzen, wodurch diese an Explosivität verlieren.

Ravel Piano Concerto EP 11406 (extract)  

New Edition of Ravel's Piano Concerto - EP 11406 (note available in France, US, Japan, Spain and Colombia)