Page 1

edible

ISSUE 36 • WINTER 18

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Bringing the Homestead

Home

Cookbooks: Culinary Journeys Teach Kids to Cook Blue Sky Center in Cuyama L O YA L T O L O C A L


Now Selling Brand New Homes in the Foothills of Santa Barbara County

NOW SELLING WITH MODELS OPEN

COMING SOON

Mela

Pera

Limone

Amarena

Contemporary Triplex Homes From the low $800,000s Up to 1,943 Sq Ft 3 Bedrooms Mela@CalAtl.com

Courtyard-Style Homes From the low $900,000s Up to 2,143 Sq Ft 3 Bedrooms Pera@CalAtl.com

Single-Family Luxury Homes From the mid $1 Millions Up to 3,239 Sq Ft 4 Bedrooms Limone@CalAtl.com

Single-Family Luxury Homes From the high $1 Millions Up to 3,906 Sq Ft 6 Bedrooms Amarena@CalAtl.com

4 New Home Neighborhoods | From the low $800,000s to high $1 Millions | Community Pool and Clubhouse Visit our sales center today at 5489 Tree Farm Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 | 805.220.0926

No view is promised. Views may also be altered by subsequent development, construction and landscaping growth. Square footage/acreage shown is only an estimate and actual square footage/acreage will differ. Buyer should rely on his or her own evaluation of useable area. Plans to build out this neighborhood as proposed are subject to change without notice. The estimated completion date of the community clubhouse and pool is summer 2017. The date of actual completion could substantially differ from the estimated date. Prices, plans and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary. CalAtlantic Group, Inc. California Real Estate License No. 01138346. 1.1 CASCA051


edible

SANTA BAR BAR A

®

page 20

WIL FERNANDE Z

STE VEN BROWN

winter

Departments 6 Food for Thought

26 Global Local Cuisine

by Krista Harris

A Taste of Greece by Laura Booras

8 Small Bites 11 In Season 12 Seasonal Recipes Quick Pickled Beets Raisin Bran Muffins

16 Edible Garden Spindly Specimens:

Bare-Root Fruit Trees

78 Event Calendar 80 Eat Drink Local Guide and Maps 88 The Last Bite Winter’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder

by Joan S. Bolton

20 Drinkable Landscape Blushing for Blood Orange Love by George Yatchisin

22 Edible Nation

page 14 2 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

JOSHUA CURRY

In Defense of Food Illustration by Wendy MacNaughton

page 26


edible

SANTA BAR BAR A

®

winter Features 30 Bringing the Homestead Home 54 Teach Kids to Cook and They Can Feast for a Lifetime by Janice Cook Knight

60 This is How Harvest Feels

page 37

by Sonja Magdevski

64 Blue Sky Sustainable Living Center Placemaking in Cuyama Valley by Rachel Hommel

72 Culinary Journeys Discovering the World through Cookbook Collections

by Pascale Beale

Recipes in This Issue Appetizers 28 Hortopeta 37 Skillet Liver Pâté

Salads and Side Dishes 37 Little Gem Salad with Citrus Vinaigrette 12 Quick Pickled Beets

Main Dishes Edible Santa Barbara Wedding Guide 41 Special Advertising Section

38 Grilled Sweetbreads with Rosemary Chimichurri

Desserts and Baked Goods 38 Buttermilk Pumpkin Panna Cotta 38 Quinoa Pumpkin Seed Brittle 14 Raisin Bran Muffins

ABOUT THE COVER

June Malloy at home on the homestead. Photo by Erin Feinblatt.

4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Beverages 21 Begin the Sanguine Cocktail

ERIN FEINBL AT T

by Leslie Westbrook


EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 5


ERIN FEINBL AT T

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Home is where the homestead is. In this issue I joined our writer Leslie Westbrook and photographer Erin Feinblatt on the photo shoot for the article “Bringing the Homestead Home.” Lauren and Keith Malloy welcomed us to a vibrant gathering of friends, children and the place they call home. Their approach to modern-day homesteading includes raising animals, growing vegetables and rediscovering many of the heritage activities and crafts that are seeing a resurgence—milking a cow, anyone? In the days after the photo shoot I found myself telling everyone I ran into how enjoyable the day had been. The Malloys’ stories, the camaraderie in the kitchen and the beautiful setting amongst the oak trees made it one of those memorable days—and articles. The place we call home is not always a homestead, but for many of us it is our safe haven. As I write this letter, the devastating Thomas Fire is making its way through Ventura and Santa Barbara County. The air is full of smoke and ash, and almost 100,000 people have evacuated their homes. Many farms and ranches have burned. Fire at this time of year is a new and disturbing phenomenon. We are usually hoping for rain; this year we are praying just to get the fires under control and get everyone back to their homes. I hope everyone gets safely back into their houses and we start off the New Year with appreciation for all the firefighters and for everyone in our community who has stepped up to help. People have strong feelings about their home, and it’s not about saving the material things—those can be replaced. It’s the safe haven that is threatened. As I’ve seen the extreme weather patterns intensify over the years, it’s become clear that we need to pressure our elected officials to acknowledge and address climate change. In the wake of this fire, just as we protect our lungs with N95 masks, we need to protect our homes by supporting environmental policies and legislation to reduce greenhouse gasses. And one of the best ways to adapt to extreme weather is to build resilient communities. Lately I’ve seen that spirit of resiliency alive and well in Santa Barbara County and Ventura County—neighbors looking out for each other and people coming together to share information or a meal or a home. Home is where your heart is. And where your community is. I’m grateful for this place I call home.

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

Visit our website EdibleSantaBarbara.com Sign up for our email newsletter. You can also find a link to our YouTube channel at EdibleSantaBarbara.com. Please consider subscribing to our channel and leaving your comments about the videos.

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

edible

SANTA BAR BAR A Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHERS

Steven Brown & Krista Harris EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson DESIGNER

Steven Brown ADVERTISING & EVENTS

Katie Hershfelt ads@ediblesantabarbara.com SOCIAL MEDIA

Jill Johnson

Contributors Pascale Beale Joan S. Bolton Linda Blue Laura Booras Joshua Curry Liz Dodder Erin Feinblatt Wil Fernandez Chuck Graham Rachel Hommel Janice Cook Knight Wendy MacNaughton Sonja Magdevski Nancy Oster Carole Topalian Leslie A. Westbrook George Yatchisin Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

®


Visit us online to see our complete line of

An employee-owned B Corporation

organic mattresses, sofas & bedding

Find a Savvy Rest dealer near you at savvyrest.com Savvy Rest and our three production facilities have all been certified to the rigorous GOTS standard

Savvy Rest has achieved GREENGUARD GOLD certification for our organic mattresses, pillows, EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 and mattress toppers.

| 7


Small Bites by Nancy Oster

Fish Fillet Station Saturday Fishermen’s Market

A fish fillet booth has recently been added to the weekly fishermen’s market, held at the Harbor on the City Pier (across from Brophy Bros.). Market hours are 6am to 11am every Saturday—rain or shine. Purchase your freshly caught fish directly from the fishermen, then ask the fish cutters for handling and cooking tips while you watch them work. Prices are $3 to have a fish cleaned (gilled, gutted and de-scaled) and $3 to have it filleted. Coolers are available to store your purchase if you’d prefer to take a walk and come back later. Carry-home bags with ice are provided. For more information: Contact Kim Selkoe at kim@cfsb.info; 805 259-7576; CFSB.info/sat.

Making Produce More Accessible Farming for Life Sansum Diabetes Research Institute

Santa Barbara’s healthy abundance of local agriculture provides the background for Sansum Clinic’s new pilot program, which features “food as medicine” for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Program participants receive prescriptions, written by their physicians, for 12 weeks of fresh vegetables. The prescriptions will be filled at the Unity Shoppe of Santa Barbara grocery store, located at 110 W. Sola St. The prescribed fresh organic vegetables are provided free to participants, thanks to collaboration with The Center for Urban Agriculture at Fairview Gardens and members of our local farming community. For more information: Contact Ben York, project director, at byork@sansum.org.

Market Match Program at the Farmers Market

The Market Match incentive program allows CalFresh and WIC recipients to double their fruit and vegetable purchasing power at our local farmers markets. Each CalFresh or WIC shopper who uses a CalFresh EBT card to purchase at least $10 in farmers market tokens at the market information booth will receive $10 in Market Match bonus tokens for fruits and vegetables. Market Match funds are limited to $10 per family per day. However, a family who goes to all six weekly markets can bring home an additional $60 in fresh healthy fruits and vegetables each week. For more information: Contact Sam Edelman at SBCFMA@rain.org.

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


SAN YSIDRO RANCH SAN YSIDRO RANCH

More awards than any other hotel/resort in the United States. More awards than any other hotel/resort in the United States.

#1 Favorite Leisure Hotel Anywhere in the world ... Forbes #1 Favorite Leisure Hotel Anywhere in the world ... Forbes

#1#1Resort in the United States ... Travel + Leisure Resort in the United States ... Travel + Leisure #1#1Top ...Andrew AndrewHarper Harper Top20 20U.S. U.S. Hideaways Hideaways ... #1#1America’s Wine Restaurants Restaurants......Wine WineEnthusiast Enthusiast America’s 100 100 Best Best Wine #1#1Top Resorts......Andrew AndrewHarper Harper Top20 20Food Food ++ Wine Resorts MostRomantic Romantic Restaurant Restaurant ......Santa #1#1Most SantaBarbara BarbaraNews-Press News-Press Diner’sChoice Choice ... Open #1#1Diner’s Open Table Table GrandAward Award -- Stonehouse Stonehouse Restaurant Grand Restaurant......Wine WineSpectator Spectator HallofofFame Fame Award Award ... ... TripAdvisor Hall TripAdvisor 900 SAN YSIDRO LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA

900 SAN YSIDRO805-565-1700 LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 805-565-1700


in Season this winter Winter Produce

Year-Round Produce

Winter Seafood

Artichokes Avocados Basil Blood oranges Broccoli rabe (rapini) Brussels sprouts Cabbage Celery Celery root Chanterelle mushrooms Cherimoya Cilantro Citron Collards Dill Escarole Fava beans Fennel Grapefruit Green garlic Kiwi Kohlrabi Kumquats Limes Mustard greens Onions, green bunching Papayas Parsnips Pea greens Peas, snap Persimmon Pineapple guava Pomelos Radicchio Romanesco Rutabagas Sapote Strawberries Sunchokes Sweet potatoes Tangerines/Mandarins Tomatoes, hothouse Turnips

Almonds, almond butter

Halibut Mussels Ridgeback shrimp Rock fish Sardines Spiny lobster Spot prawns White seabass

(harvested Aug/Sept)

Apples Arugula Beans, dried Beets Bok choy Broccoli Carrots Cauliflower Chard Dandelion Dates

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Edible flowers Garlic

(harvested May/June)

Herbs

(Bay leaf, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Kale Leeks Lemons Lettuce Mushrooms Onions, bulb

(harvested May/June)

Oranges Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Potatoes Radishes Raisins

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Shallots Spinach Sprouts Squash, winter

Year-Round Seafood Abalone (farmed) Black cod Clams Oysters Rock crab Sanddabs Urchin

Other Year-Round Coffee (limited availability) Dairy

(Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Eggs Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil Meat

(Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork)

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat

(Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

(harvested July/Oct)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Yams

(harvested Aug/Sept)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 11


seasonal

Recipes

Quick Pickled Beets This makes a fresh, tangy ingredient for sandwiches or salads. You can also substitute fennel for the beets and use them in the Little Gem Salad with Citrus Vinaigrette on page 37. When using beets, you can also branch out and use golden orange beets or the pink-and-white-striped Chioggia beets. Makes about 1 cup 1 large beet or 1 large fennel bulb, trimmed and cored 1

⁄ 4 cup white or red wine vinegar

1

⁄ 2 cup water

1 tablespoon honey or sugar Salt and pepper, to taste

If you are using the beet, cut off the top and tail and peel or scrub off any rough skin. Then grate it on a box grater. If you are using fennel, cut it in quarters and thinly slice, using a mandoline if you have one. Combine the beet (or fennel) with the vinegar, water, honey or sugar, salt and pepper in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Cook for 1–2 minutes and then remove from heat; let sit for at least 10 minutes, or until cool. Taste and adjust seasoning. Use at room temperature or chill.

Egg Salad Sandwich

– Krista Harris

What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche Salt and pepper, to taste

Additions: • A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion • A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro, chervil or tarragon • A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash of white wine vinegar Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but with 12 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018a still chunky texture. Taste and add more seasoning or additions if needed.

JOSHUA CURRY

Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional)


Locally family owned and operated.

24 W Figueroa St 805 962-6611 TheSavoyCafe.com

Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Santa Barbara’s Premier Destination Wine Shop.

18 W Anapamu St 805 962-5353 SavoyWines.com

“Plenty of space for wine, no room for snobbery.”

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 13


seasonal

Recipes

Raisin Bran Muffins This recipe is cobbled together from handwritten notes in a notebook that I inherited from my great-grandmother, Hannah Arp. What I found in the notebook wasn’t a complete recipe, so I used the Bran Muffin recipe from Pastries from La Brea Bakery by Nancy Silverton to get the technique down. The result is my best approximation of what I remember my great-grandmother’s bran muffins tasting like: moist and full of plump raisins. Makes 18 2 cups wheat bran 1 cup, plus 3 ⁄ 4 cup raisins 1 orange 1 cup whole milk or buttermilk 1

⁄ 2 cup packed brown sugar

1

⁄ 4 cup honey or molasses

1

⁄ 2 cup grapeseed or other mild oil

1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3

⁄ 4 cup flour

1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1

⁄ 2 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 400°. Line a muffin tin (or 2) with paper liners. Spread the wheat bran on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for 6–8 minutes, stirring a few times so it cooks evenly. Let cool. While the bran is toasting, zest and then juice the orange. Set the zest aside. Put ½ cup of the juice (add water if your orange doesn’t yield quite enough juice) in a small saucepan and add the raisins. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until the liquid is absorbed. Purée the raisins in a food processor or blender until smooth. In a large bowl, mix together the toasted bran and milk, then mix in the raisin purée, brown sugar and honey. Stir in the oil, egg and vanilla extract. Mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, and sift directly into the wet ingredients. Stir until the ingredients are just combined, then mix in the remaining ¾ cup raisins and orange zest. Spoon the batter into the muffin tins. Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the muffins look set in the center.

JOSHUA CURRY

– Krista Harris

14 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 15


EDIBLE GARDEN

Spindly Specimens Bare-Root Fruit Trees by Joan S. Bolton

Miracle on a stick. At its essence, that’s the promise of a young, bare-root fruit tree. Within just a few years, the seemingly lifeless, leafless, skinny stub of a trunk, with just a handful of hairy roots attached, will come to life, then mature into a full-fledged, bearing tree. But first, the beauty of bare-root begins in late fall or early winter at the growing grounds. There, dormant, deciduous, 1- or 2-year-old trees suffer no ill effects when growers dig them up, strip the soil from their roots and ship them to a nursery or directly to your home. In the garden, your trees may snooze a bit longer. But nudged by the warmth of spring, their new roots will push into the surrounding native soil and fresh new growth will appear above. Prospects include both stone fruit (think pits) like apricots, nectarines, peaches and plums; and pome fruit (think little clusters of seeds) like apples and pears. Far more varieties are available now than at any other time of year. Plus, the spindly 16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

specimens are easier to plant and less expensive than full-sized, container-grown trees.

Chill Hours Bare-root fruit trees require a certain amount of cold for their flowers and leaf buds to set and grow properly. That cold is measured in “chill hours,” defined as the number of hours the temperature drops below 45° between November 1 and February 28. The number is important because many bare-root fruit trees do best with much colder winters than what much of Santa Barbara County offers. For example, some apples, apricots and peaches require at least 800 chill hours. If you live in the Santa Ynez Valley, where most years exceed 1,000 chill hours, you’re in luck. But if you live along the coast, where many neighborhoods barely reach 300 hours, the selection may be limited and you’ll need to read the labels closely.


ChocolateMaya.com 15 West Gutierrez Street • Santa Barbara, California 93101 Phone: (805) 965-5956 Fax: (805) 563-1263

Monday–Friday 10am–6pm, Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am– 4pm

A Truly Tasteful Experience!

Real

FOOD you f e e l

that makes

GOOD Goleta

5668 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117 805.770.2730

Next to Panino, Across from Trader Joe’s

Downtown

331 Motor Way Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.845.5379 Corner of State and Gutierrez

La Cumbre

3849 State St. Suite i157 Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805.569.0011 In La Cumbre Plaza, next to Vons

San Roque Plaza 3401 State St., Santa Barbara M–F 11am–6pm, Sat 11am–5pm

888 798-4740

Santa Barbara Public Market 38 West Victoria St., Santa Barbara Daily 10am–8pm

ilfustino.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 17


A Healthy Start At the nursery, look for roots that are plump, hairy, evenly spaced like spokes on a wheel and smell earthy and fresh. The bud union— where the root stock is grafted to the bearing wood that forms the trunk— should be smooth. The trunk should measure about ½ to 5/8 inch in diameter. The branches should flex. If they’re brittle, the tree may have died during transport. Last—and contrary to evaluating a container-grown tree — don’t be too concerned about the branching structure, as you’ll prune most of the limbs. Be sure to ask for trimming instructions for your specific variety at your point of purchase. Plant your tree as soon as you bring it home. Indeed, age-old advice calls for digging your hole before you go to the nursery. If that’s not possible, park the roots in moist sand, sawdust or very loose soil.

C AROLE TOPALIAN

In the Garden

Fruit trees such as peaches and apples are ideal for bare-root planting.

Planting Techniques Conventional thought calls for planting one tree per hole, with ample spacing between trees. But three or four varieties can also share the same, albeit wider, hole. This may be three or four different apple trees, or two peaches and two nectarines. This concept is called Backyard Orchard Culture and the idea is to conserve space, boost pollination and extend the harvest by selecting trees that bear early-, mid- and late-season fruit. Santa Barbara City College embraced the concept in its Lifescape Garden years ago and a number of combinations are on display. Bay Laurel Nursery in Atascadero and Dave Wilson Nursery, a wholesale supplier to many Central Coast nurseries, also promote the idea on their websites.

18 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Select a sunny spot with good drainage. For a single tree in a single hole, dig down about a foot and two to three feet wide. For a shared hole, go down a foot, but dig four to five feet wide. Break up the excavated soil. Adding vast quantities of amendment is not wise. But if your soil is heavy clay or super sandy, it’s OK to mix in up to a third as much planting mix, soil amendment or compost. Hold your tree over the hole with the faint soil line on its trunk one to two inches above the ground, which should put the bud union three to five inches above the ground. Gently fill the void beneath the dangling roots. Or create a soil cone at the bottom of the hole, fan the spidery roots over the top, then fill the hole with soil. Shape a watering basin around your new tree. Mulch the basin, keeping any material away from the trunk. Water thoroughly, but hold off on fertilizer. There’s plenty of energy stored in the tissue to break dormancy and any salt in the fertilizer might burn the new roots. Trim the trunk and any branches. Don’t be surprised if instructions for your particular tree call for cutting it down to a knee-high stick. Plan to deep-soak your tree once or twice a week as winter rains fade. Warm temperatures in spring will prompt new growth both below and above ground, soon revealing your own garden miracle. Joan S. Bolton is a freelance writer, garden coach and garden designer who confesses to a lifelong love affair with plants. She and her husband, Tom, have filled their four-acre property in western Goleta with natives and other colorful, water-conserving plants. They also maintain avocado, citrus and fruit trees and grow vegetables and herbs year-round. SantaBarbaraGardens.com


LAMA DOG

TAP ROOM + BOTTLE SHOP ONLY GOOD BEER • CRAFT BEER + WINE VOTED BY SANTA BARBARA AS:

BEST FUNK ZONE SPOT + BEST BEER SELECTION ON TAP

BEER CLASSES ARE BACK! For upcoming class info + signup go to: www.lamadog.com/beer-education-classes

we have gift cards

FOOD FROM THE NOOK

116 SANTA BARBARA ST 805.880.3364 • LamaDog.com • @LamaDogTaproom

1 1 0 1 stat e

5 2 8 anacapa

2 5 0 stor ke R D

d u n eco f f e e r oast e rs.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 19


DRINKABLE LANDSCAPE

Blushing for

Blood Orange Love

STE VEN BROWN

by George Yatchisin

W

inter means citrus in Santa Barbara, and there’s none more delightful than the blood orange. While the rind of a blood orange doesn’t always hint at the maroon hues inside (although some varietals do have lovely red streaks and flecks on their skin), that darker flesh signals the intensity you’ll sense in the scent and flavor. Think of blood oranges as a way to orange up, bigger and better and bolder and redder. That means their juice stars in cocktails. So what could be better than a red-going-to-pink cocktail for Valentine’s Day?

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Yes, it’s my second year in a row for a winter cocktail honoring February 14, but if you try one of these the day you pick up this issue, you’ll be making them all season, for if you’re not in love with a particular person, you will be head over heels for the drink. The Begin the Sanguine Cocktail gets to nod to Cole Porter, more sophisticated times—ones with proper drinks—and the sanguinary citrus at its heart. This is a very easy preparation, too, so you’ll have plenty of time left over to do more important things—maybe whip up some swordfish or double-cut pork chops bathed in a blood orange reduction, maybe be a witty conversationalist, maybe gaze into your lover’s eyes—instead of fussing over drinkmaking. Because, if you care to be reductive, this drink is sort of just a glorified Margarita (tequila, citrus, orange-ish liqueur). Of course, that’s being reductive like calling the Mona Lisa a painting or Frank Sinatra a crooner or the Bradbury Building in LA an office complex. First, there’s the fresh-squeezed blood orange juice, and here’s hoping you or your neighbor has a tree or you can score some at the farmers market. Warning: That red color likes to find your clothes, so wear an apron, squeeze carefully and wash down wherever you get the juice on—unless you were planning on dying your kitchen counter crimson. As for why you do need to bother with the bit of lime juice, too, it helps balance and add some sour to the drink, so don’t omit it. More layers = more flavors. Second, it’s fun to use a joven tequila for the drink. Most of the tequila we consume—and, of course, only imbibe the ones that are 100% agave; look out for mixtos —tend to be aged reposados and anejos. Joven, which means young in Spanish, is just that: kind of the white lightning of agave as it’s seen no barrel time. Although, to cut their sassiness a bit, producers tend to blend a bit of aged tequila, too. For instance, LA’s new Viva XXXII makes a vivid, affordable joven that has some of their anejo blended in. Instead of vanilla and caramel from aging, you get a stronger pepper attack, plus more citrus—perfect for this drink that’s an homage to all things orange-lemon-lime. Even better, XXXII donates 10% from each bottle to fight animal cruelty, and that will win you points with your Valentine, especially if their name is Fido or Muffy. Third, you’re getting to use ITALICUS Rosolio di Bergamotto, which won the “Best New Spirit/Cocktail Ingredient” Spirited Award at the 2017 Tales of the Cocktail conference. (That they use all caps for something with italic


Begin the Sanguine Cocktail

A Trip to Italy , without the Jet Lag…

Makes 2 cocktails 4 ounces joven tequila (or a silver—work with a clear one to keep the overall drink color red) 2 ounces ITALICUS Rosolio di Bergamotto 1½ ounces fresh blood orange juice ½ ounces fresh lime juice 2 thin strips from the blood orange peel

Add the tequila, ITALICUS and fresh juice into a shaker with ice. Shake thoroughly. Double strain into 2 chilled cocktail glasses. Adorn each with a tied blood orange strip.

in its name might drive your proofreader friends crazy, by the way.) How hip are you, cool Valentine date, pouring a brand new liqueur, lauded by the highest judges in the land, and it’s from cosí romantico Italia? It’s important to note that while the liqueur is a rosolio, it strays pretty far from the traditional rose-based category, and the bergamot is much more the highlighted flavor. Bergamot, a green-skinned orange, famed from Calabria, packs a pungent kick used in everything from Earl Grey tea to many perfumes and colognes. Some bitterness lingers in the finish, but it’s mostly sweet and citrusy— a perfect addition to add further citrus complexity to the drink. Plus, Italian style points —the column-shaped bottle is a knockout. Show your Valentine what good taste and style you have! Finally, to garnish the drink it’s time to break out your channel peeler. That’s the one that comes on the zester, the single little tooth that allows you to carve what ends up looking like a heavy shoelace of skin from your fruit. This is easiest to do by putting the blood orange on a surface and slowly turning it so the peeler does its job— go slowly or you’ll end up with a bunch of little nubs. The goal is to get two 3-inch pieces or so. Then take each one and gently tie one knot in it. It’s an attractive presentation, and perhaps, just perhaps, you need to suggest something to your Valentine’s date. George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

Delighting Customers Since 2007 2014 Certificate of Excellence Winner from Trip Advisor Offering Gluten-Free Pasta Weekdays: Lunch 11am – 3pm; Dinner 5–9pm Weekends: Lunch 12– 3pm; Dinner 5– 9:30pm Closed Tuesday 666 Linden Ave., Downtown Carpinteria 805 684-0720 • Giannfrancos.com Follow us on Facebook at Giannfranco’s Trattoria

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 21


E D I B L E N AT I O N

In Defense of

Food Illustration by Wendy M acNaughton

T

hese days, most cookbooks are filled cover to cover with lush, spectacular, highly produced photographs intended to inspire the reader and present a goal for the home cook to achieve. However beautiful these photos are, they can also feel intimidating and unattainable–almost too perfect. Immaculately arranged and styled, these cookbook photos often feel more like they’re about lighting, digital pixels, and Photoshop than about making something with your hands in a home kitchen. Cooking is something you do with your eyes, your ears, your nose. You use all your senses to prepare a delicious dish. Given the personal, tactile nature of preparing food, you’d think a cookbook

22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

would visually convey how it looks, feels and tastes to make something–how it feels to you know, cook. Illustrations can convey a love of food and aesthetic in a deeply personal, sensual, accessible way that other mediums just cannot. It’s what Cipe Pineles did in her cookbook in the 1940s. And its what many people are getting back to doing now. To some this might feel like the introduction of a new style. It’s not. Illustration and hand-lettering have been used in cookbooks as far back as the seventeenth century. It was terribly time consuming and expensive to create these pictures back then, so the black-and-white step-by-step instructions


E AT W E L L .

LIVE WELL.

Your Neighborhood Grocery Store Open 365 days a year 7:00 A.M. – 8:00 P.M. 1482 E. Valley Rd. Montecito, CA. 93108 805.969.1112 www.montecitogrocery.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 23


were a rare treat to find tucked in between the hand-set pages. As printing processes improved, so did cookbook illustrations. Simple black-and-white cross sections of how to carve meat, fish, and chicken became lush hand-colored etchings, then eventually four-color lithography. The first full-color cookbook was printed around the late eighteenth century, and the illustrations were as much about depicting a lifelike, beautiful dish as they were about showing the reader how to make it. Then photography came along and replaced drawing as the way to represent reality. In case of the cookbooks, this meant finished dishes and table setting started to be demonstrated through photographs, and illustration as the primary language of cookbooks. Think of all those 1960s cookbooks with their pages packed with photos, by then illustration had been nearly 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

pushed completely off the page. Then digital photography was introduced. Then the Internet. Enter food porn and websites filled with food photography. Then Instagram. You get where I’m going. And that pretty much takes us up to today. Cipe’s Leave Me Alone With the Recipes and other illustrated cookbooks in its genre (yes, let’s state it— this is a genre!) takes us back to a time when there were no computers. There were no microwaves or fast food. There was no Photoshop. Instead, there was a long tradition of drawing and painting. There was attention, care and play. There was time and there was practice. And you could see that in every cookbook illustration–in Cipe’s and beyond. In our automated tech-filled, efficient lives, hand-drawn illustration gets us to think about process. To remember the things that only humans can create–in art, in design, and in the kitchen. Hand-drawn illustration in cookbooks brings us back to our most basic senses. And it does what Cipe’s cookbook does for me as an illustrator–it helps us remember from where we came. Reprinted with permission from Leave Me Alone With the Recipes: The Life, Art, and Cookbook of Cipe Pineles edited by Sarah Rich and Wendy MacNaughton, with Maria Popova and Debbie Millman, copyright © 2017. Published by Bloomsbury.


EXPERIENCE OUR VINEYARD IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA

Farm to Table Estate Wines, Jams, Olive Oils, Honey, Tea & more Tasting Room Open Daily – Private Events – Visit Our Farm & Vineyard 805-451-2570 – 714-448-9908 sandy@cebadawine.com

CebadaWine.com

B E L M O N D E L E N C A N TO, SA N TA B A R B A RA

JOIN US TO CELEBRATE OUR 100-YEAR ANNIVERSARY El Encanto first opened its doors to welcome visitors and locals in 1918. In commemoration of this historic event, we’ve put together a year-long celebration that includes exclusive offers, special events and community activities that pay tribute to the past, present and future of our enchanting resort. For more information and reservations, please call 805 845 5800 or visit belmond.com/elencanto

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800 EE Edible SB halfpage F&B 100-Year Anniversary ad 1217.indd 1

12/11/17 3:00 PM EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 25


GLOBAL LOCAL CUISINE

A Taste of Greece by Laura Booras PHOTOGRAPHY BY WIL FERNANDEZ

Hortopeta made with Swiss chard.

I

n the 1920s my great-grandmother and her new husband came to this country from Greece. As a young woman, my proyiayia spoke no English and carried very little to start her new life. A few dear possessions, like her Greek coffeepots and cuttings from her treasured fig tree, were all she had to begin life in America. That and her recipes, which she knew from memory. Thank goodness for that, because she was an amazing cook and talented gardener. I remember as a small child watching her roll phyllo —the paper-thin pastry used in baklava and peta —by hand, making bread from scratch and preparing hearty and delicious meals for our family. She taught herself English over the years, and I in turn learned Greek from her little schoolbook,

26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

brought across the ocean. When she finally wrote down her recipes they were a mixture of Greek and English, which my grandmother (yiayia) and I deciphered over the years. She was a strong, brave woman who valued family, and she is one of the reasons I so love cooking and working with food today. I have always felt that Santa Barbara’s fresh produce, seafood, citrus, olive oil and wine lends itself to Greek cuisine. On the Greek islands, seafood is obviously very prominent, and in the mountains of Karpenisi, where my family originates, heartier food such as lamb and cheese is prevalent. I love both cuisines, but for the purposes of this article I’ve focused on my family’s recipes, which are perfect for cooler weather.


In Greece, peta is a staple on the mainland and it is found in many different forms: rolls, sheets and made into hand pies. In my travels I’ve seen all different shapes and sizes, so when I visited our family’s village for the first time, I was thrilled to see it served the way my proyiayia did it: beautiful, thick, buttery sheets. To this day it is my family’s comfort food, and it is the perfect side dish to any Greek meal. Working with phyllo can be a challenge, but it is absolutely worth it for the mouthwatering result. I have made peta using yellow squash, spinach or mixed greens and the result is fantastic each time. Certainly, you can’t talk about Greek cuisine without the essential ingredient that is in every dish: olive oil. Luckily, here in Santa Barbara County we have a fantastic local source: Theo Stephan’s farm stand in Los Olivos carries quite a variety, including Koureiki, a type of olive brought over by Theo from Greece decades ago. She is the only one who grows this type of olive locally, and therefore the only one who can produce this bright and vibrant oil here in California. Greeks love to eat, so our meals are hearty. They say that the Mediterranean diet is the key to a long life, and that the healthiest component is actually the abundance of dark leafy greens. Horta, which are mixed greens that grow wild all over Greece, are great for salads but are my favorite in hortopeta.

Greek Cuisine Menu

S

Hortopeta Horiatiki (Peasant’s Salad) Keftethes (Meatballs) Yiayia’s Greek Sweet Bread

WINE NOTES 2014 A Tribute to Grace Grenache— Bright cherry and an earthy component makes this a great match for meatier dishes. 2014 Tatomer Riesling — Minerality and apricot blend on the palate with those intricate spices, creating a lovely match. 2015 Stirm Riesling, “Kick-On Ranch”— Dry and full of stone fruit and minerals, this wine is a fantastic partner to the complexities of the meal.

For recipes mentioned in this article, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com/global

Theo Stephan and Laura Booras at Global Gardens tasting a variety of olive oils.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 27


Hortopeta This dish is like spanakopita, but made with other types of greens. You can really use anything: spinach, chard or even kale. Mix it up! It’s a great way to use up a bumper crop of any dark greens you have in your garden. If the phyllo seems intimidating, keep playing with it. If it tears, it’s easy to piece back together and no one will be the wiser. Makes 6–8 servings 3 pounds fresh greens, washed 1 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, mashed Salt and pepper 1 pound feta cheese 3 large eggs 2 sticks butter 1 package phyllo dough

You know this as spanakopita in the United States. Instead of spinach I used Swiss chard, so it’s a little more robust and perfect for cooler weather. I could eat this dish every single day: the salty cheese, buttery crispy phyllo and rich greens are a wonderful combination. I am certain that every Greek grandmother has her own version of our family’s meatballs, called keftethes. I use a combination of lamb and beef for maximum flavor, and I finish them with a little red wine and spritz of lemon. The secret here is the grated onion, which makes sure the onion flavor and juice are distributed throughout. It keeps the meat really tender, too. Lastly, one of the first recipes I learned to make was my proyiayia’s sweet bread. She kept the recipe in her head, and we didn’t write it down until a few years ago. I’m so glad we did. This bread is served at Easter, and its slightly sweet flavor makes it perfect for morning coffee, dessert or just a treat any time of day. My family adores this bread and once you make it you’ll understand why. It’s just a lovely blend of sweetness, yeast and a hint of orange. Toasted or plain, its flavor always reminds me of my grandmother and great-grandmother The Greek culture is warm, hospitable and welcoming, just like Santa Barbara County. Perhaps that’s why I felt so at home when I moved to Santa Barbara 13 years ago. Laura Booras is the general manager at Riverbench Vineyard & Winery in the Santa Maria Valley. She lives on the vineyard, where she regularly hosts food writers, celebrity chefs and wine critics for unique meals prepared with locally sourced ingredients.

Remove any tough stems or stalks from your greens and roughly chop. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium-high heat and add the garlic and greens. Stir frequently until cooked through and all moisture evaporates. Add salt and pepper to taste. Let cool slightly. In a large bowl, crumble the feta cheese and stir in the eggs. Add the greens and stir to combine. In a small saucepan, melt the butter. Unroll the phyllo dough and lay flat. Cover with damp (not wet) paper towels. Butter a 9- by 11-inch baking dish. Then—carefully, so that it doesn’t tear—put a layer of phyllo into the buttered baking dish. Gently brush butter onto the phyllo, then lay another piece of phyllo on top. Keep covering the remaining phyllo with the damp paper towels if you don’t work quickly—this will keep them from drying out. Repeat until you have about 8 layers in the pan for your base. Sprinkle about a third of the greens mixture on top of the phyllo. Don’t cover the whole thing, but distribute it evenly. Cover with another sheet of phyllo, and repeat your butter and phyllo layering until you have 4 layers of phyllo. Sprinkle another layer of greens, and repeat with 4 sheets of phyllo and butter. Do one more layer of greens and cover with the remaining butter and phyllo layering. You will end up with 1 base layer of 8 phyllo sheets, 3 filling layers of greens and 3 middle layers of 4 phyllo sheets. I love a thick crispy top, so this is why I do it this way, but you can definitely add more layers in between if you like. Bake at 375° for 1 hour, until beautifully browned on top, then cut into square sections and serve. This freezes beautifully.

28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


! N EW

BU E L LTO N W I N E RY

D OW N TOW N TA S T I N G R O O M S

sat & sun 11-5 59 industrial way, buellton

m-w 12-5 / th-sun 12-6 813 anacapa st. santa barbara 805-845-8435

(behind figueroa mtn. brew)

805-686-8500

Dinner from 5 pm Daily Weekend Lunch and Brunch 9-2:30

WINE IS GOOD LIVING®

www.margerumwines.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 29


Bringing the Homestead

Home

by Leslie Andrea Westbrook P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y E R I N F E I N B L AT T

30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


Once upon a time, three women—Emma, Lauren and Ashley—connected through their children, gathered up their husbands and kids for a group family vacation and an idea was born. Well, many ideas. Now these “Heritage Women” are brewing up a storm and in full bloom. Opposite left to right: Ashley Moore, Lauren Malloy and Emma Moore. Above: Their children are off to see the animals on the homestead.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 31


Emma Moore with the children in the kitchen.

This is the story of Annie, a gaggle of friends and family and one very special meal.

A

nnie was her name. She was a fine heifer—a female calf born with a male twin brother, which meant she didn’t have a uterus. “Freemartinism” is the term for a sterile female twin—one can thank the father bull’s testosterone for that anomaly. Annie’s future was limited, since she wouldn’t be able to bear a calf or provide milk. Rejected by her mother, Annie (named for Little Orphan Annie) was raised with an ending as intentional as a family could provide. She was nursed and accepted by a miniature Jersey cow named Truly, and grass fed. Annie was honored and bid adieu by her human family at a ceremony before she met her fate at butcher Mike Santoro’s Shadow Creek Farm in Solvang. That’s life on the farm, or in this case the cycles of life at the Gaviota ranch where Keith and Lauren Malloy and their children raised Annie and recently, joined by friends and their families, respectfully consumed her. Lauren grew up in Vermont, worked at a dairy farm in her youth, studied animal science and worked in animal conservation before moving to Santa Barbara when she married Keith. Lauren met and became friends with two other fine women: Emma Rollin Moore, who grew up on a dairy farm in Burrel, California, and Ashley Moore (no relation), a Southern California native. They connected through their children at the Waldorf School in Goleta. All three young mothers were exploring how to “consciously” raise their families when a concept to share their knowledge and curiosities began to germinate. Lauren, with her animal husbandry knowledge; Emma, the cookery person of the trio; 32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

and Ashley, an herbalist and artist with retail knowhow, made for the perfect storm. In January of 2016, the three families— including Lauren’s husband, pro surfer/Patagonia surf ambassador/filmmaker Keith Malloy; Ashley’s better half Ryan Moore, a Carpinteria business owner (Lucky Llama Coffee shop and, soon to open, Sunburst wine bar); and Emma’s mate, architect Kevin Moore, along with eight kids and a pile of snow gear—went on a ski trip to the Sierras and became snowbound during a blizzard. Having fun, but stuck inside their rented vacation house, Emma’s homemade fermented foods sparked their conversation, while Ashley’s herbal medicine baskets expanded the idea that all three wanted to teach classes and spread a back-to-nature message. An idea was organically born and they came up with the name “Heritage Women.” The women created an Instagram account and posted their first class on how to make a sourdough starter and ginger buck (a healthy soda). The workshop sold out in just two hours. Soon after, a blog and website were born. In August 2017, the women morphed their concept into a very cool retail store in Carpinteria—compete with baby chicks ($8 each) and workshop space. It’s fitting, and seemingly a match made in homespun heaven, that “home base” is Carpinteria, a semi-rural town of 15,000 with early agricultural roots in lima beans and ongoing avocado, citrus, veggie and flower operations. “It began by wanting to share knowledge with our community,” Emma told me. “We are inspired by each other and love working and creating together.” Case in point: the collaborative dinner honoring Annie that took place in late October at Kevin and Lauren’s ranch. Emma created the menu, which began with her addictive sourdough crackers (available at the store) with fresh ricotta cheese. The table was graced with a huge skillet of pâté de Annie, boiled tongue, an offal stew and rice and tasty green salad. There was sourdough bread, of course, which Emma fashioned into delectable open-face sandwiches stacked with tongue and topped with Flora Vista Farms microgreens. Ashley concocted herbal cocktails for the grown-ups: rosemary-infused vodka with fresh-squeezed orange juice and rose hip syrup decorated with sprigs of rosemary and dried blood orange slices. The kids slurped fresh-squeezed OJ mixed with the syrup and fizzy water. Keith manned the outdoor grill, roasting delicious wild boar jalapeño sausages with a kick, and slices of Annie’s succulent liver, heart and delicate sweetbreads. While preparations took place—which included the men hauling the large pine farm dining table from the house to a Opposite: Emma’s homemade sourdough bread; Ashley preparing herbal cocktails; Lauren and Keith roasting wild boar sausages and sweetbreads; garlic and herb-braised tongue on sourdough toast with Flora Vista Farms microgreens.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 33


34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


Opposite: Milly Lou Malloy and June Malloy with one of the chickens. Above: Family and friends gather for the celebratory dinner honoring Annie.

sweet outdoor spot near the grill—the gaggle of kids had a fine time. Emma and Kevin’s offspring Olivia, 9, and Liam, 6; Ashley and Ryan’s trio Isla, 9, Lyra, 7, and Jupiter, 3; and Keith and Lauren’s Milly, 6, and 3-year-old June—ran free, explored, swung from a rope, chased chickens and mussed up their darling pinafores and shirts (sold at their mothers’ emporium).

A Gathering Place: Heritage Goods & Supply The tale of these three women and their journey is about community connection and how important it is in our lives. The team envisioned their emporium, Heritage Goods & Supply, much like Oleson’s Mercantile from Little House on the Prairie —a vintage-style general store and gathering place for urban homesteaders in need of seed packets, beekeeping, jam and fermenting supplies, as well as cool clothing, boots and accessories for men, women and children. The back to the land movement, homesteading, farming, getting back to nature—call it what you will—and knowing

where your food is grown and knowing your farmers has inspired many across the country, and is strong here in Santa Barbara. As is growing one’s own food. Their goal is to gather people together and create connections around food, herbs, animals and making sure all senses are alive—especially in this age of technology. It’s not often that one walks into a cool new shop and spots a gaggle of baby chicks in one corner. But Heritage Goods & Supply is not your typical emporium. There’s a whole lot more than meets the eye on first glance, thanks to these creative, industrious women owners. This spring, you can purchase heritage-breed chicks and ducklings and the gals are considering selling turkeys. No calves, sheep or goats; you can, however, learn how to raise goats. Ashley and hubby Ryan are urban farmers who raise turkeys, chickens and hopefully sheep along with pet dogs at their Carpinteria spread. “Animals are just a part of bringing the homestead home,” is part of their motto. EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 35


Left to right: Olivia Moore holding one of the chickens; Milly Lou Malloy with one of the pigs; Lauren Malloy milking a cow.

The store shelves stock ingredients for making jam, packets of heirloom seeds to plant a garden, natural dyes for weaving and all the tools to get started with beekeeping. The “lifestyle” emporium also carries vintage clothing (recycled); clothing from local designers includes linen frocks from Kara Thoms of Santa Barbara; Garment Farmer smocks made by Kourtney Morgan of Ojai; natural hemp clothing made in the United States from Jungnaven and plenty of artisan goods. Patrons can make their own skincare products and purchase the ingredients here—or buy those made by others. There are handmade whittling tools from Orcas Island (there’s even an instructional book on how to whittle) if you want to carve your own spoons; otherwise, there are lovely wooden spoons and spatulas from Ojai’s Four Leaf Woodshop. Magnolia & Oak’s hand-dyed alpaca yarn from Los Osos is perfect for a thoughtful hand-knit baby bonnet project. When I popped in to a Saturday afternoon workshop last October, a group of 10 jovial women filled with camaraderie were all smearing on organic herbal clay masks they’d made under herbalist Ashley Moore’s tutelage. Ashley has her own organic skincare line, Women’s Heritage Beautyshare. She also teaches tea blending, among other classes. Emma’s cooking classes include lessons in fermenting and how to make coconut yogurt. Have you ever wanted to cruise up the coast to Gaviota and milk a Jersey cow and then make kefir cheese? Laura and Emma taught that sold-out class last spring and hope to repeat it in 2018. Ashley’s “Little Women” mother/child foraging class was also a sellout. Emma, in collaborative style, made elderberry soda and dandelion fritters. In a natural dyeing class, where Ashley used fennel and eucalyptus, Emma was inspired to pickle fennel and make berry popsicles. 36 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Many workshops and events are free, like the talk on how barn owls can help control the rodent population around your home; others have a fee, like Ashley’s Natural Beauty Class. “We are a gathering place, we want people to come and see it, not YouTube it. Face-to-face is so beautiful, as is learning from each other,” said Emma. Back at the farm, when Emma was tasked with preparing the cow parts, she noted, “There is something for everyone and every part is revered,” while boiling up Annie’s tongue and thoughtfully slicing it for the shared meal. Her daughter Olivia wasn’t so sure. “I’m sure it’s going to be good since you are cooking it,” the third-grader told her mom, while helping make fresh corn tortillas, “but it’s kind of weird!” Finally at the table, the group thanked Annie for her life, her parts and for “all she has given us.” Having been honored with a seat at their table, I felt the connection. The meal, the kids, the camaraderie all ended with hugs and heartfelt thanks—not only to Annie, for sacrificing her life for this meal, but for the fact that we could all gather together and give thanks. Oh, and there was a sweet ending with the almost forgotten dessert of Buttermilk Pumpkin Panna Cotta topped with tasty quinoa brittle. Annie had a good life and, while these good families carry on with many more adventures and sharings ahead fueled by their enthusiasm and creativity, we all carried a wee bit of Annie home in our tummies and our hearts. Leslie Westbrook does not eat “the holy cow” but did partake in a few bites of Annie for this story. When not covering travel, design and food for regional and national publications and reviewing restaurants for the VC Reporter, she works as a fine art and antiques broker helping clients sell via auction. She can be reached at LeslieAWestbrook@gmail.com


Emma’s Recipes Little Gem Salad with Citrus Vinaigrette Makes 8 servings 3 heads of Little Gem lettuce, chopped or torn apart Handful of Flora Vista Farms pea tendrils 2 tablespoons mint, torn into small pieces 1

⁄ 2 cup pickled fennel (see recipe on page 12)

2 oranges, peeled and sliced 1

⁄ 4 cup toasted hazelnuts

1

⁄ 3 cup ricotta

Citrus Vinaigrette (see below)

Combine lettuce, pea tendrils, mint, pickled fennel and orange slices in large salad bowl or platter. Top with hazelnuts, ricotta and Citrus Vinaigrette.

CITRUS VINAIGRETTE 1 shallot, finely chopped 3

⁄ 4 cup olive oil

1

⁄ 4 cup white wine vinegar

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice 1

⁄ 4 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

Salt and pepper to taste

Combine first six ingredients in a vessel with a lid. Shake well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Skillet Liver Pâté This pâté is baked and served in a large cast-iron skillet. Transfer any leftovers to a separate container. Makes 10 servings 1 onion, sautéed Olive oil 2 pounds pork fat 2 pounds beef liver 1 cup Parmesan cheese 1

⁄ 2 dozen eggs

1 tablespoon cumin 1 tablespoon paprika 1 teaspoon oregano Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350°. Sauté the onion in a little bit of olive oil. Set aside. Using a meat grinder process the pork fat and beef liver. Add cheese, eggs, onion and spices. Transfer mixture to large cast-iron skillet and bake for 60 minutes.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 37


Grilled Sweetbreads with Rosemary Chimichurri Makes 4 servings 1 pound sweetbreads 1 gallon cold water 1 cup distilled white vinegar 2 teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Flora Vista Farms rosemary flower petals

Rinse sweetbreads then transfer to a 6-quart pot and add water, vinegar and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat and simmer gently 10 minutes. Drain sweetbreads in a colander, and then transfer to a bowl of icecold water to cool. While sweetbreads are cooling, prepare grill for cooking. Drain sweetbreads, then pat dry gently and separate into roughly 1½-inch pieces. Toss sweetbread pieces with oil in a bowl, then thread onto skewers (about 5 pieces on each). Season with salt and pepper. Grill sweetbreads on lightly oiled grill rack (covered only if using a gas grill), turning occasionally, until golden brown, approximately 5 to 7 minutes total. Transfer to a platter and let stand, loosely covered with foil, 5 minutes. Top with Rosemary Chimichuri and rosemary flower petals. Enjoy.

Buttermilk Pumpkin Panna Cotta with Quinoa Pumpkin Seed Brittle.

Rosemary Chimichurri

Bake for 10 minutes. Then check every 5 minutes until mixture has hardened. Take out of the oven and let cool. Crumble into bite-sized pieces.

1

⁄ 4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons fresh rosemary

Buttermilk Pumpkin Panna Cotta

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

Makes 8 servings

2 cloves garlic

3

⁄ 4 cup heavy whipping cream

1

⁄ 2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley

11

1

⁄ 2 cup fresh cilantro

1 teaspoon vanilla

1

⁄ 4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1

⁄ 4 cup sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

1

⁄ 4 teaspoon salt

In a food processor combine the oil, rosemary, parsley, cilantro, garlic, white wine vinegar, crushed red pepper, salt and pepper to taste.

3

⁄ 4 cup pumpkin purée

Quinoa Pumpkin Seed Brittle

1

⁄ 2 teaspoon ground ginger

1

⁄ 4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1

⁄ 2 teaspoons gelatin powder (Emma uses Vital Proteins)

1

⁄ 4 cup cold water

This is a healthy (and delicious) twist on traditional brittle. Makes 8 servings 1 cup mixed sprouted pumpkin seeds, chopped (or a combo of other seeds and nuts such as sunflower, pecans, chia, walnuts, etc.) 1

⁄ 3 cup uncooked quinoa

1

⁄ 3 cup sesame seeds

Pinch sea salt 1

⁄ 2 cup maple syrup or sweetener of choice (agave, honey, etc.)

⁄ 4 cups buttermilk

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Whipped topping of choice (optional) Quinoa Pumpkin Seed Brittle (optional)

In a large saucepan combine whipping cream, buttermilk, vanilla, sugar, salt, pumpkin and spices. Stirring constantly, bring to a slight boil, making sure that mixture does not boil over.

Preheat oven to 325°. Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix well.

In a medium-size bowl add gelatin and cold water. Whisk well, making sure that gelatin and water are completely combined. Whisk in the hot buttermilk mixture, stirring well to make sure that all of the gelatin is dissolved.

Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper and pour mixture into the center of the cookie sheet. Spread the mixture out. Don’t worry about thickness. When the brittle bakes the brittle will spread out even more.

Pour panna cotta into ½-pint Mason jars or vessel of choice. Refrigerate for at least 3–5 hours, until set. Top with whipped cream, if desired, and quinoa brittle (recipe at left).

2 tablespoons coconut oil

38 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


JEFFREY BLOOM PHOTOGRAPHY

Elevated Central Coast Comfort Food Extensive Santa Barbara County Beer + Wine List Winemaker Dinners • Private Events • Catering

Tuesday–Sunday Breakfast and Lunch 8am–3pm Dinner Friday Only 5:30–8:00pm Closed Monday 508 Bell Street • Los Alamos, CA 93440 Tel: 805-344-3020 • plentyonbell@gmail.com www.plentyonbell.com

FOXEN

®

V I N E YA R D & W I N E R Y

Wines of Elegance & Balance Since 1985 Solar powered. Sustainable wine growers. OPEN DAILY 11– 4 |

7200 & 7600 FOXEN CANYON ROAD 805.937.4251 |

FOXENVINEYARD.COM

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 39


40 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA W E D D I N G G U I D E


edible

SANTA BARBAR A

Wedding Guide

MIKE L ARSON

A planning guide to help you find the wedding resources you seek in Santa Barbara County.

A S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N | 41


The Wedding of JILL & GOKHAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKE LARSON

J

ill La Fleur of La Fleur Weddings & Events has been a local wedding planner and event designer for the past 16 years and was recently named one of the top wedding planners in the world by Martha Stewart Weddings magazine. Although she has planned large and lavish weddings here in Santa Barbara and her home of Santa Ynez as well as around the world, when it came to her own wedding she preferred to keep it local and intimate. She and her husband Gokhan, the personal trainer at Recovery Ranch and the manager and trainer of Ranch Gym in Santa Ynez, met years ago and became very good friends before eventually falling madly in love and realizing they were soul mates.

Wedding cake by Christine Dahl.

42 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA W E D D I N G G U I D E

The couple also served Turkish Delight by Seven Hills Turkish Imports.


For their family rehearsal dinner the night prior, they decided to stay in and cook homemade pizzas and serve them with a local cheese and charcuterie board, local and organic salad (much of which was organically grown in Jill and Gokhan’s own home garden) and local Santa Ynez Valley wines. Jill and her sister, Colleen La Fleur of Atelier de La Fleur, recently teamed up to provide both planning and floral design services locally and worldwide. The design elements they came up with included a romantic, organic display of locally sourced plants and floral in a soft, romantic palette of grey, ivory, champagne and gold mixed with touches of soft peach and greenery. The meal was important to them as well. They brought in Luca Crestanelli, of SY Kitchen, to prepare their favorite dishes and the wines came from Sunstone Winery. The two-tier wedding cake was created by Christine Dahl and served with Turkish Delight and Turkish coffee from a local Santa Barbara shop, Seven Hills Turkish Imports. The custom paper goods were created by Honey Paper in Los Olivos using the design of the Turkish rug that Jill and Gokhan said their vows on during the ceremony and the Fleur-de-Lis family emblem. All of this was photographed beautifully by the talented Mike Larson, someone Jill has worked with for many years.

Wedding Guide Contributor Zohe Felici Zohe’s career has included stints overseeing all aspects of special events as the wedding and special events manager for some of the top luxury resorts in the world and event management companies in the country. Fearlessly producing over 300 flawless and memorable experiences for her clients, Zohe scaled her business beyond event production by acquiring Santa Barbara Wedding Style, a digital media platform publishing company. Zohe is delighted to showcase her knowledge and experience in special events, serving both engaged couples and the local wedding professionals she respects. “I care deeply about our community and I love sharing what I’ve learned. I get excited about mentoring the next generation and co-creating with my exceptional peers.” SantaBarbaraWedding.com A S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N | 43


At S.Y. Kitchen, we marry our passion for food and handcrafted cocktails with our gracious, friendly and professional service to bring a distinct warmth and sophisticated flavor to your special day. Using age-old regional methods, Chef Luca Crestanelli and Mixologist Alberto Battaglini, of Verona, Italy, delight in curating food & drink that reflect each client’s unique personality.

S.Y. Kitchen 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez 805 691-9794 events@sykitchen.com SYKitchen.com

Overlooking the endless greens of the River Course at Alisal and the beautiful Santa Ynez Mountains, Alisal River Terrace offers a setting that is second to none, with the same legendary hospitality and service as the Ranch.

Feast & Fest caters memorable meals that people rave about for weddings and special events in the Santa Barbara area. We carefully compose each dish that leaves our kitchen using only the freshest and most flavorful ingredients.

Alisal River Terrace

Feast & Fest

150 Alisal Rd., Solvang 805 686-7619 • catering@alisal.com • Alisal.com

805 618-1535 Jessica@FeastandFestSB.com • FeastandFestSB.com

44 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA W E D D I N G G U I D E


Nestled in the vast, rolling hills of Santa Ynez Valley, Zaca Mesa Winery & Vineyards offers the ideal landscape for an intimate wedding ceremony and reception. No matter the season, bring a timeless feel to your big day by exchanging your vows amidst the historic 100-year-old oak trees. From our Grenache Blanc Vineyard to our rustic courtyard, there are a variety of locations where you and up to 200 guests can enjoy the scenic views and delicious food. With a reputation of fine wine, great service, and beautiful events, Zaca Mesa is partnered with K’Syrah catering to ensure an amazing wedding. K’Syrah is the premier farm-to-table caterer serving season-driven dishes to California’s Central Coast. They specialize in crafting unique, custom menus showcasing only the freshest, most sustainable, locally sourced ingredients. Photos: Sid & Ali Photography | Tenley Fohl Photography.

Zaca Mesa Winery & Vineyards 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd.,Los Olivos Kori at Zaca Mesa: 805 688-9339 x314 | kori@zacamesa.com Danielle at K’Syrah: 805 245-9564 | danielle@kscateringandevents.com ZacaMesa.com

A S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N | 45


The Wedding of LYNEE & BRAD PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHERRY PHOTOGRAPHY

Handpainted welcoming signs above and at right.

W

The grazing table by Slate Catering, above and far right.

hat happens when two people who are in the food and hospitality industry get married? Magic. Lynee Gonsalves, business manager of Pure Joy Catering, and Brad Bennett, owner of Pacific Pickle Works, decided to design a wedding that would showcase their local friends, favorite food and beverage makers, designers and entertainers from around the area. The evening featured locally designed and created cocktails made with locally distilled spirits and cocktail shrubs, beer from local home brewers and M. Special Brew Co. A 16-foot grazing table from Slate Catering featuring local makers such as Brad’s own Pacific Pickle Works, on-site espresso drinks from Welcome Coffee Cart featuring locally roasted coffee by Dart Coffee, farmers market-sourced produce and Santa Barbara

46 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA W E D D I N G G U I D E

Signature cocktails included the Black Bear in the foreground, which featured local ingredients such as Cutler’s Stagecoach Whiskey, and Nostrum Blackberry Cacao Nib Sage Shrub.


Host your next big event at Zinke Wine Co. Built in 1908, this truly breathtaking space can be transformed for your specific event needs. From a wedding on the lawn to an anniversary underneath the lights of the bocce ball court, an event at Zinke Wine Co. is a one-of-a-kind experience that will create lasting memories.

Zinke Wine Co. 2366 Alamo Pintado Ave. Los Olivos 805 691-9718 ZinkeWines.com

A S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N | 47


A “naked” chocolate cake with cappuccino mousse filling by Chooket. Below: Custom made-to-order crepes by Pure Joy Catering.

Channel-caught seafood prepared by Pure Joy Catering. The cake was made by Chooket and dessert featured a handmade crepe station where Pure Joy Catering was making fresh crepes on site and serving them up with McConnell’s ice cream and a variety of other fillings. It wasn’t just the food and beverages that were local. They also incorporated locally designed and created florals from Terra Malia Designs, and much more all set in a beautiful Carpinteria ranch and captured by local photographer By Cherry Photography. The result was a magical evening with locals uniting over communal-style tables, enjoying farmers market fresh food, beautiful decor and set to the music of two different local bands to create the mood for a perfect evening! — Contributed by Zohe Felici. 48 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA W E D D I N G G U I D E

Something for the latte lovers. Below: Florals by Terra Malia Designs.


B E L M O N D E L E N C A N T O , S A N TA B A R B A R A

WHERE TRUE ROMANCE REIGNS Lush gardens and sweeping ocean views set a lovely scene for your wedding or gathering. From the wisteria-lined Arbor and Lily Pond to the elegant ballroom with exclusive patio, you can select from a variety of signature locales to host your event. From rehearsal dinners to ceremonies and post wedding brunches, Belmond El Encanto offers the ideal venue for your special day.

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800 | SALES.ELE @ BELMOND.COM HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS | BELMOND.COM

A S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N | 49 EE Edible SB full page wedding guide ad 1217.indd 1

12/8/17 10:22 AM


Ron Helman draws from the great jazz songbook of the 1950s and ’60s to play for big and small Central Coast events, design the perfect ensemble to meet your entertainment needs and create the best band for any occasion.

Specializing in event lighting, fabric draping, decor, audio, video and generators.

Ron Helman Jazz

Spark Creative Events

505 603-3648 • RonHelmanMusic.com

805 201-6262 • SparkCreativeEvents.com

Making Your Wedding Day the Perfect Day. Full Service Coordination and Catering.

Rincon Events 805 566-9933 • EventsByRincon.com

Offering an extensive repertoire to enhance the emotion and spirit of your special day.

Santa Barbara String Quartet 805 570-8956 • SantaBarbaraQuartet.com

50 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA W E D D I N G G U I D E

Create the wedding cake and dessert bar of your dreams. Fine French pastry tastings by appointment.

Chooket Mesa Shopping Center, 2018 Cliff Dr., Santa Barbara 805 845-5519 • Chooket.com

Black Bow Sweets

Slate Catering

805 364-2764 BlackBowSweets.com

feedme@slatecatering.com 805 364-2699 SlateCatering.com


Planning Your Local Wedding Your Dream Team List Vendor Phone Email

Pre-Wedding

Engagement Party________________________________________________________________________________________ Invitations_______________________________________________________________________________________________ Website_________________________________________________________________________________________________ Registry_________________________________________________________________________________________________ Planner__________________________________________________________________________________________________ Bachelorette Party________________________________________________________________________________________ Bachelor Party__________________________________________________________________________________________

Rehearsal Dinner Venue___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Caterer__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Ceremony Venue___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Officiant_________________________________________________________________________________________________ Music___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Reception Venue___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Caterer__________________________________________________________________________________________________ Bar Service_______________________________________________________________________________________________ Wine____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Beer____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Spirits___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Cake/Dessert____________________________________________________________________________________________ Music___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Other Entertainment______________________________________________________________________________________ Photo Booth_____________________________________________________________________________________________

General Services Invitations/Stationery/Menus _______________________________________________________________________________ Floral Designer___________________________________________________________________________________________ Favors __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Photographer____________________________________________________________________________________________ Videographer____________________________________________________________________________________________ Hairstylist________________________________________________________________________________________________ Makeup Artist____________________________________________________________________________________________ Spa Appointments________________________________________________________________________________________ Bride’s Attire_____________________________________________________________________________________________ Bridal Party’s Attire________________________________________________________________________________________ Groom’s Attire____________________________________________________________________________________________ Groom’s Party’s Attire______________________________________________________________________________________ Rentals (Chairs/Tables/Linens/Etc)___________________________________________________________________________ Transportation____________________________________________________________________________________________ Guest Accommodations___________________________________________________________________________________ A S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N | 51


MIKE L ARSON

The Edible Santa Barbara Wedding Guide A special advertising feature designed to showcase local businesses providing wedding services that align with our mission. For additional details on these advertisers, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com/weddings. To be considered for inclusion in our next edition, contact Katie Hershfelt at 805 722-5324 or Katie@ediblesantabarbara.com.

#LoyalToLocal


PIZZERIA Artisan Italian pizzas, salads and small bites. Open Daily 11am-9pm 805 884-9419

300 North 12th St., Unit 1A Lompoc, CA 93436 805.819.1372

Santa Barbara Public Market

Visit www.KitaWines.com

www.cadario.net

38 W. Victoria St., Santa Barbara

Local Treats!

Enjoy our Gelato & Sorbet from Locally Grown Farms & Farmer’s Market Fruit

FEATURED WINTER FLAVORS

Pomegranate, Blood Orange and Cherimoya

Along with Traditional Italian Flavors • MADE FRESH DAILY ON OUR PREMISES • Family Owned & Operated Since 2004 Come See Us in Our New Street Level Location • 1187 Coast Village Road, Montecito, CA 93108 • 805-969-7020 • ScoopSB.com

gourmet olive oils & vinegars

Locally grown and handcrafted goods made in California. SolvangOliveCo.com

·

1578 Mission Dr., Solvang

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 53


Egg Salad Sandwich What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche

Teach Kids to Cook, Salt and pepper, to taste

Additions:

and They Can Feast for a Lifetime

• A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion

• A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, By Janice Cook Knight

M

cilantro, chervil or tarragon

ost children naturally enjoy cooking. What’s more fun than getting in the kitchen with food? Food is colorful,

beautiful, fragrant, messy, sweet or savory. You can mix it, knead it, chop it (sharp knives!), ferment it, bake it and a million other things too. It tastes good, and we need to eat it at least three times a day.

A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the A •lot of kids learn to cook right at home. But in our busy lives, pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash taking the time to teach cooking skills sometimes gets left off the of white wine vinegar agenda. Sometimes we don’t take the time to stop and show kids Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) those proper knife skills, or how to break apart a cauliflower and Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) sauté the florets, or how to properly grill a steak, or a piece of fish, vegetables (optional) orAdditional eggplant pickled or peppers. Sometimes we are so busy getting dinner Lettuce on the table there doesn’t seem to be enough time to slow down Combine eggs, is mayonnaise, seasoningkids and additions andifmix and teach. the Which too bad, because of all ages, given a until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add chance, like to help. more seasoning or additions if needed. I still remember learning to make a béchamel sauce (we Create open-faced closed called it an white sauce)orwith mysandwich mom. Iusing was additional about 8 years old. mayonnaise on each slice if you love mayonnaise—or just mustard, She patiently guided me through the steps of melting the butter, or neither. Pickled vegetables make a great topping as well, such asjust keeping the temperature low so it didn’t burn, and adding a couple stalks of Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto. — Krista Harris

54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


the right amount of flour, which we stirred in but didn’t allow to brown. Meanwhile, in a separate pan we heated some milk to a gentle simmer, and slowly poured that into the butter and flour, stirring all the while. We cooked the sauce over low heat, still stirring often, until it had the consistency of heavy cream. Voila! We had a creamy sauce, which we used as the basis for my mom’s macaroni and cheese—and many other dishes. It is a wonderful memory, but more than that it has been a guide—like a built-in cookbook—as I’ve cooked for myself and my family almost every day of my adult life. I’ve taught students to cook as well. We all have to eat—and so we must cook, or hope to benefit from someone else’s cooking. Teaching children to cook and eat healthfully is one of the best things we can pass on to them. For kids who want to learn the basics, or just expand their repertoire, we are fortunate to have some wonderful children’s and teens’ cooking programs in Santa Barbara: A 2-year-old program called Apples to Zucchini teaches children to cook using farmers market produce and the experience of local chefs. Their mission: teaching children and families to prepare delicious, nutritious, affordable meals made from real food. Apples to Zucchini was founded by the powerhouse team of Nancy Marz and Terra Hillyer, who have backgrounds in nonprofit work and in nutrition and cooking, respectively. Their classes are taught as after-school programs on school campuses. About 60 kids are currently enrolled, at Adams School and Monte Vista School in Santa Barbara, and at Brandon School in Goleta, with plans to expand in coming months. Apples to Zucchini is a nonprofit partnering with the Santa Barbara Foundation and Partners in Education to make these programs affordable to all. Scholarships are available. I watched an Apples to Zucchini class at Adams School taught by Chef Diana Cuttrell, owner of the catering business Dining with Di. The children made a beautiful pear crostata, with pears donated by our local farmers market. They prepared the pastry, chopped the pears, rolled the dough and shaped the crust into a free-form pear “pie,” and the chef popped it into the oven. They learned the difference between the baking pears used in a crostata and crispy Asian pears, which are better for eating out of hand. Both kinds of pears were available at class that day so kids could see and taste for themselves. The children participated in all aspects of the cooking class, including learning table manners, eating their tasty creations, and cleanup. I happened to visit on a rare dessert day; other classes in the series might include making a complete meal, such as kid-

friendly chicken tenders, salad and a vegetable. The farmers market participation challenges chefs and students to learn to use vegetables and fruits in season. Cooking classes are among the many offerings at Girls Inc. of Santa Barbara and Goleta. Girls Inc. is a national program whose mission is “dedicated to inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold.” Classes are offered as after school enrichment and during summer camps. Classes such as My Plate, The Science of Cooking, Master Chef, Flavors of the World and What’s for Lunch? are tailored for specific grade levels, from first and second grade up to teens. There is even a Friday Snack Shack, where kids help prepare food to be sold to parents on Fridays, learning entrepreneurial food skills as well. The class called Flavors of the World celebrates food diversity. Students in first and second grade explore geography and culture, and how food varies in different places. Students also practice literacy through recipe writing. Another class, The Science of Cooking, helps students discover the elements that make a recipe work. Fourth and fifth graders can be inventive and experiment with recipes in this class. And nutrition is one of the subjects studied in the teen program, available at the Girls Inc. center in Goleta. The TLC, or Teens Love Cooking, program is offered through the Food Bank of Santa Barbara County. I first learned about the program when I became a Food Bank volunteer. The seven-week program teaches teens to cook quick, healthy meals, while learning about nutrition and our local and long-distance food systems. Teens begin with knife and other kitchen safety skills. They might watch a short video of British chef Jamie Oliver, who gives a brilliant knife skills demo. The lead educator demonstrates knife skills and teens get to practice while volunteers supervise. Teens love learning knife skills. Each week the recipes—for things like whole-grain pasta with fresh, uncooked tomato/garlic/basil sauce; mango salsa; traditional hummus and orange-chicken stir-fry with brown rice—demonstrate useful, everyday foods that students can repeat at home. Recipes stress whole grains over refined, and lots of fresh veggies and fruits. Traditional sugary desserts are not emphasized, though fresh fruit is, but students might prepare a simple fruit cobbler with a small amount of sugar. Alternative proteins, such as tofu, are explored. Teens also learn which foods (such as fast foods), are especially high in salt, fat and sugar, and learn how to make

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 55


F R I E N D S • F L O W E R S • F A M I LY • F O O D • F U N

Enjoy Spring at the Enjoy Spring Enjoy Enjoy SpringWinter at the at the

IENDS • FLOWERS • FO AM • NF O O D • F U N F R I E N D S • FFFLR D IILY •LYF •U ROI EWNEDRSS •• FFLAOMWI LY E R S• •F O FA M FOOD • FUN

better choices. Students carefully examine labels of prepared foods, and calculate fat, salt and sugar intake in typical portions. The curriculum covers which basic nutrients are available in fresh foods, and why eating a rainbow of colorful foods (red cabbage, spinach, dark green or red-leaf lettuce, fresh garlic, yellow bell pepper, as examples) is beneficial. For the last class, students create a “fiesta,” where they prepare their favorite class recipes and share them with their families and invited friends. This brings home what they have learned. They even earn prizes, such as small cooking utensils or cookbooks, to take home at the end of class. As of this writing, classes are being offered in Isla Vista at the St. George Family Youth Center and Housing Authority’s Teen Academy, and at Carpinteria Middle School. Caveat: To take the above-mentioned classes, students first must be enrolled in one of the participating schools or programs or at Girls Inc. Some of the classes listed in our adult cooking class section also have classes for kids and teens. Heat and Food Liaison, both in Carpinteria, offer kids’ classes, as does Cooking with Laurie.

7 Markets • 6 Days a Week Rain or Shine *CalFresh is matched dollar-for-dollar, up to a maximum $10 per family, per market day. Los benefi• un cios CalFresh se duplican por dólar, hasta por familia, por día de mercado. •7dólar Markets • 6 máximo, Days$10a Week

6 Days a Week 7 Markets 76Markets Days a Week Rain or or Shine Shine Rain or Shine Rain

What’s in your basket What’s in What’s this in week? What’s in basket your basket your basket this week? week? this week? S U N D AY S

S AT U R D AY S

Downtown Santa 6 Markets • 6Barbara Days a

Camino Real Marketplace Week • Rain or Shine

In Goleta at Storke & Hollister Corner of Santa Barbara & 10:00am SSUUN YYSS NDD–AA2:00pm D AY S S A TCota U RStreet S U N D AY S 8:30amSanta – 1:00pm Camino Barbara Camino Real Real Marketplace Marketplace Downtown

S AT U R D AY S

Downtown Santa Barbara

Camino Real Marketplace W E D N E S D AY S

Goleta atatStorke &&Hollister & at Storke &In InHollister Goleta StorkeVillage Hollister Corner Corner of Santa Barbara &TofUSanta E S DBarbara A YIn S Goleta Solvang 10:00am –– 2:00pm 2:00pm Cota Street 10:00am – 2:00pm10:00am Cota StreetOld Town Santa Barbara Copenhagen Drive & 1st Street 8:30am – 1:00pm 8:30am – 1:00pm W EED DDAAYYSS 500 & 600 Blocks of State W Street W2:30pm DN NEE–SS6:30pm E D N E S D AY S AY S 4:00pm – 7:30pm TUESD T U E S D AY S Solvang Solvang Village Solvang Village F R I DVillage AY S Barbara Drive Old Town Santa Copenhagen Drive&&1st 1stStreet Street Old Town Santa Barbara Drive &Copenhagen 1st StreetMontecito T H U R S D A Copenhagen YS 2:30pm––6:00pm 6:30pm 500 600 Blocks of State Street 2:30pm – 6:30pm 2:30pm 500 & 600 Blocks ofCamino State&Street Real Marketplace 100 & 1200 Block of 3:00pm – 6:30pm 7:30pm 4:00pm – 7:30pm 4:00pm FFRRIIVillage DDAAYYSRoad Coast In Goleta at Storke & HollisterF R I D A Y S S 8:00am – 11:15am T3:00pm HU UR RS S–D A H D6:00pm AY YS S Montecito T H U R S D AY S T Montecito Montecito Camino Carpinteria Real Marketplace Marketplace Camino Real 100&&1200 1200Block Blockofof Camino Real Marketplace 100 & 1200 Block of100 InHollister Goleta at of Storke & CoastVillage VillageRoad Road 800 Block Linden Avenue Coast Village Road Coast Goleta at Storke & Hollister Hollister In Goleta at Storke &In 3:00pm 8:00am –– 11:15am 11:15am 3:00pm–––6:00pm 6:30pm 8:00am – 11:15am 8:00am 6:00pm 3:00pm – 6:00pm 3:00pm facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket Carpinteria Carpinteria Carpinteria 800 Block of of Linden Linden Avenue Block Avenue 800 Block of Linden 800 Avenue 3:00pm –– 6:00pm 6:30pm 3:00pm – 6:30pm 3:00pm

www.sbfarmersmarket.org

facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket facebook.com/SBFarmersMarket

(805) 962-5354

www.sbfarmersmarket.org www.sbfarmersmarket.org www.sbfarmersmarket.org (805) (805) 962-5354 962-5354 (805) 962-5354

56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Leah Diamond is the owner of Healthy Cooking with Kids. Her classes are taught in her home and are generally small, usually five or six students, so that all students are hands-on cooks. Leah has been teaching healthy cooking for over 20 years. She will also teach private classes in your home, including children’s birthday parties. Leah can accommodate dietary restrictions such as gluten-free or dairy-free cooking; she teaches adult cooking as well. Call 805 683-2525. I’m happy that these excellent cooking programs are available. I only wish there were more. Given the obesity rate among children and teens (in California, about 30%), and the corresponding diseases associated with obesity, I’d love to see hands-on healthy cooking classes built in at every school. We must eat every day of our lives. Eating well is as important as English, math, computer skills, the arts, sciences, sociology and leadership. If we do not eat well, how can we flourish?


Adult Cooking Schools

The Santa Barbara area offers a wealth of cooking classes for adults, whether you are learning the basics or expanding your repertoire. Here are some of the most popular:

Cook and Bake with Laurie Laurie Zalk was the owner of Our Daily Bread, the beloved local bakery, for 35 years, and owned the Main Squeeze for 12. After all that experience teaching her staff to prepare food, it’s a gift to our community that she’s now available to teach private classes for small groups. Classes can be held at her home or yours. She specializes in bringing you great recipes for every dietary requirement, and likes to demonstrate tricks like fast, fabulous but easy desserts. Possible classes: Men’s Only, Children’s Baking and Cooking, Gluten-free Baked Doughnuts, Summer Salads. She can do it all. Laurie also is one of the chef/teachers in the Apples to Zucchini program. CookAndBakewithLaurie. com; 805 689-2416; Instagram, Facebook.

Farmbelly Michelle Aronson, a farmer herself, offers classes with a farm-to-table aspect. Classes with titles like Eat Like a Farmer, Pickling and Fermenting, Farmhouse Cheesemaking, Vegetable Butchery and Culinary Herbs 101 emphasize using the best local produce. Michelle will teach in your home, or for larger classes will arrange another venue. Michelle trained at the famous Ballymaloe Cooking School in Cork, Ireland, and managed an educational organic farm in Charlottesville, Virginia. More recently she has been the garden manager and sustainability coordinator for dining services at Westmont College. Last fall she taught a fundraising Tomato Preservation Class with the organization Veggie Rescue, which distributes surplus farm produce to people in need. Farmbelly.com, 314 369-8140; Facebook, Instagram. (continued on Page 58)

Demeter Certified Biodynamic Rhone and Spanish Varietals

Visit Our Tasting Room on Alisos Canyon Road

Wednesday–Sunday 11–5pm » Monday/Tuesday by appt. only Picnic Areas » Horseshoe Pit » Bocce Ball Court » Dog Friendly

MartianVineyard.com

9110 Alisos Canyon Road, Los Alamos 805.344.1804

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 57


Adult Cooking Schools The Food Liaison Nirasha Rodriguez and her husband, Jason, have remodeled a strip mall space in Carpinteria into a beautiful kitchen and small restaurant. There are two working kitchens on site that can be used for cooking classes. Some of the classes are taught by Nirasha, others by chefs Food Liaison brings to the space. They often feature local farm produce. Past classes have included Vegan Tapas, The Essential Grilling Guide Class, Date Night: Spicy Cajun and Kids’ Fiesta. Food Liaison also offers team-building cooking classes for corporate events. TheFoodLiaison.com; 805 200-3030; Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.

HEAT Culinary Nikki Dailey’s HEAT Culinary in Carpinteria offers a large variety of hands-on cooking classes for adults. Classes generally have about 12 people. The adventurous class subjects cover Persian cooking, Tamale making, Croissants, Thai Street Food and Cast-Iron Cooking, to name just a few. She sometimes teaches classes for children and teens as well. The kids’ classes generally run in the summer, in a week-long camp where kids make as many as 15–16 dishes per day. Now that’s cooking with heat. HeatCulinary.com; 805 242-1151. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.

Le Petit Chef Denisse Salinas offers in-home cooking classes that are global in scope, and her ingredients follow the seasons. She will customize recipes for her clients, and accommodates special diets. Her website lists a wide range of cooking class possibilities, including Leaving the Nest, a series of classes for teens going off to college; Girl’s Night Out; Chocolate Creations; and Cooking for Vitality: Intro to Raw and Vegan. She may be short in stature, hence her company’s name, but not in cooking knowledge. Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest. LePetitChefSantaBarbara. com; 805 637-3899.

Market Forays Laurence Hauben’s cooking classes offer a true locavore experience. Her Saturday class might meet at the fish market at the harbor, then on to the farmers market for fresh fruits and veggies, followed by a trip to the cheese shop and other local purveyors before meeting at her charming home to make a meal with all the goods. Laurence also offers private classes in your home for a party or a special event, as well as corporate team-building classes; other Santa Barbara culinary adventures, such as visits to local wineries or craft breweries, are also possible. MarketForays.com; 805 259-7229, Instagram, Facebook.

58 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Pico Restaurant, at the Los Alamos General Store Chef Drew Terp at Pico Restaurant in Los Alamos is teaching insider cooking classes, the secrets of Pico’s restaurant menu. Past classes have included fresh pasta making, cheesemaking (mozzarella and ricotta) and a poultry class where students learned to debone a quail, stuff and truss a chicken and split and trim a duck, making duck confit out of the legs. He teaches about one class per month, but oh what a class. LosAlamosGeneralStore; 805 344-1122; Facebook, Instagram.

Private Chef Robin Chef Robin Goldstein brings a chef’s perspective to her cooking classes, demonstrating a chef’s tricks of the trade. Cooking classes are held in your home. Chef Robin has 35 years of experience as a chef, caterer and event planner in California and abroad, and is the author of three cookbooks, including the recently published Wine Country Recipes. She also teaches at venues such as Food Liaison in Carpinteria and at the Lavender Inn and Millworks in Santa Barbara. PrivateChefRobin.com; 805 284-4264, also on Facebook and Instagram.

School of Extended Learning, SBCC Formerly known as Santa Barbara City College Adult Education and the Center for Lifelong Learning, there are cooking classes here on a wide range of subjects. For Spring 2018 they will offer classes in Indian Vegetarian Cooking; Tapas, Meze and Antipasti; Sushi; Gourmet MakeAhead-Meals; Fusion Food; Cooking for Two (or One); Bread Making; Ableskivers and more. The prices are still the best in town. Classes can be large, but they are generally hands-on and a lot of fun, and a great way to meet friends you can cook with. SBCC.edu/extendedlearning.

Studio Nihon Fukiko Miyazaki offers Japanese cooking classes in students’ homes. She learned to make sushi in Japan from her mother and grandmother. You may know her through the classes she taught at SBCC’s Adult Education program; Fukiko also worked as a sushi chef at Ahi Sushi. You can take classes in sushi making, both Japanese-style and American-style rolls, or take a class in Japanese home cooking and learn to make dishes like tonkatsu, nabe and okonomiyaki. Fukiko is also a sake sommelier! There are so many different kinds of sake. StudioNihon.com; 805 453-7616; Facebook. Janice Cook Knight is the author of The Follow Your Heart Cookbook: Recipes from the Vegetarian Restaurant and Follow Your Heart’s Vegetarian Soup Cookbook. She has taught cooking for 35 years. Her article in the Fall 2014 issue of Edible Santa Barbara, “Hurray for the Orange, Red and Gold: The Season for Persimmons,” won the 2015 M.F.K. Fisher Award in the Print Category. JaniceCookKnight.com


Purveyors of European & Domestic Cheeses, Charcuterie and Specialty Foods

Fresh Meats & Poultry Niman Ranch Ham Cascade Creek Lamb Goose, Duck & Pheasant Exotic Meats Avila Valley Barn Pies

OPEN DAILY

Full Service Deli Local Wine & Beer Gourmet Cheese Charcuterie Cheese Pairings

Gift Certificates Gift Baskets Catering Party Platters & Bowls BBQ Saturdays Lunch & Picnic Boxes

Now Open for Breakfast | We’ll be moving to a new location soon

115 East College Avenue, Ste 10, Lompoc, CA 93436 805.717.7675

CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com

Uniquely Californian Ales & Lagers

TELEGRAPH BREWING CO. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. Santa Barbara, CA Tasting Room Open Six Days a Week - TelegraphBrewing.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 59


60 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


by Sonja Magdevski

I

t is all about the hands. They start to hurt at the beginning of the grape harvest. I can’t be the only one who wakes up in the middle of the night clenching and unclenching my fists to relieve the pain. A few days in and your whole body quickly catches up. Everything aches. Some days you feel like you’ve been punched in the gut. Others days, hungover from fatigue. You are in constant motion from the moment you wake until the moment you rest your head. Climbing up and down ladders. Assembling and disassembling large equipment. Jumping on and off forklifts. Connecting and disconnecting hoses with valves, o-rings and clamps. Pushing and pulling bins of grapes delivered in 1,000-pound increments.

LINDA BLUE

This is How Harvest Feels heat and fire. This year it was extreme heat and rain. Amidst it all we thrive on the chance of renewal, to get it better year after year. No amount of excitement, though, can prepare you for what you are about to endure mentally and physically. The most difficult part is that very few people outside the world of your harvest truly comprehend what is happening and how vital this time is. They question your intense concentration, focus and prioritization of this world above all else, not understanding the magnitude and joy of this moment. As grape growers and winemakers we have one opportunity to get it right. This responsibility is not to be taken lightly. We are working with a very labor-intensive, costly agricultural product that only produces once a year. Whether a winery makes 1 million cases or 100 cases the intensity is the same. Get it right the first time and everything else throughout the next 12 months is much easier. While seemingly endless in the heat of battle, it is also a very finite process. Harvest always ends. Vineyards are swept clean of grapes, their luster fading from shiny green to rich gold.

“It is these and other small things that make all the difference.” Then there is the constant cleaning. I still can’t believe our hands remain so wine stained with the amount of washing they endure. None of those gritty manly soaps work, either. I have tried them all. Thankfully, callouses form easily on our palms, protecting us from the onslaught of the next three months. I soon stop waking up at 2am from the pain in my hands. My body has acclimated to its new routine. It’s my brain that can’t catch up with the running to-do lists rustling around my head. I swear, each night from September through November I only dream of grapes. It is like riding a bicycle, only uphill both ways. Even if a harvest-training program did exist, it would be inadequate. Every year we know it’s coming and every year we are faced with a new set of challenges. Last year it was extreme

What is constant is the hands that continue to work—not complaining and lending support whenever and wherever needed. This community of hands makes everything go, writing weigh tags, harvest tickets, grape varietals and crew numbers on blue painters’ tape. These hands mark the start of the season. They illuminate the midnight sky, holding up glowing lights to reveal the work path ahead. These hands drive tractors, steadfastly clipping clusters, tossing them in buckets that are then tossed into bins. These hands are priceless. They work fast and hard and oftentimes in the dark with music and laughter.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 61


When you are seemingly at your lowest there is always someone working harder than you with a bleary-eyed smile to lift you up. That is when the quiet moments of grace strike, frequently when the harvest crews arrive. When I am wrapping up in the dark of night, coiling the hoses back in place, the harvest crews start rolling up in carpools. They are covered in protective layers against the evening’s cold that will replace the sun’s warmth. I know I will see them roll out again in the early morning when we resume our daily dance. It is these and other small things that make all the difference. Like the surprise doughnuts left on the counter. (My favorite is plain old-fashioned.) The precious smell of those first fermentations kicking off, with the aroma of rose petals, jasmine and blueberry pie swirling through the air The bright lights still illuminating the pre-dawn dimness. The final barrels being filled with wine to rest for the winter. And those hands that pick the final crop of the season. The vineyard is finally at rest, crews quietly returning to standard working hours. We will all return soon enough in the New Year, wrapped again in protective clothing this time to guard against the daytime cold and winter sun.

The cycle starts all over again with these hands.

LINDA BLUE

Sonja Magdevski is winemaker/owner of Casa Dumetz Wines, a tiny producer in love with Grenache and specializing in Santa Barbara County Rhône varietals. She is also a reemerging journalist finding her way in the intricate and wonderful world of wine.

62 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


1150 COAST VILLAGE ROAD SUITE E, MONTECITO WED–FRI: 7AM–3PM; SAT–SUN: 7AM–2PM; CLOSED MON & TUE

805 570-9151 Breeosh.com

fresh ceviches, mouthwatering tacos and homemade agua frescas

Eat In, Take Out, Catering & Events 38 W Victoria [inside the Public Market] Open Daily 11am–9pm (805) 845-0282

Facebook: SBCorazonCocina

Culinary School Food Truck Full Service Caterer Teambuilding HEATculinary.com 805-242-1151

BREAKFAST & LUNCH 7 Days a Week from 9:00am–2:00pm 11 WEST VICTORIA #10 • IN VICTORIA COURT [805] 770-2143 • SCARLETTBEGONIA.NET

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 63


Blue Sky Sustainable Living Center

Placemaking in Cuyama Valley

CHUCK GR AHAM

by Rachel Hommel

“There is a beauty and solitude here… it is gritty, entrepreneurial, prideful. Small rural places are incredibly generous and neighborly places. People look you in the eye. There’s a sense we are in this together.” —Philip Jankoski

64 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


STE VEN BROWN

Opposite: Camping at the Carrizo Plain. Above: Philip Jankoski, executive director of the Blue Sky Center.

Cuyama. In Chumash it means to rest, to wait. The two-lane highway of Route 166 is a hidden gem, often traveled during wildflower season in late March. The gorgeous route winds along the Cuyama River, through a canyon separating the Sierra Madre Mountains from the mountains in San Luis Obispo County. Passing by the mile-high Caliente Range, the Carrizo Plain wildflowers are in full view. Largely untouched, the land has a story to tell. Cuyama Valley is only approximately 300 square miles of high desert, bounded on all sides by mountains. Cuyama has long been rooted in agriculture, from the late 1930s with potatoes to current row crops of carrots and grains. When oil was discovered in 1948, the town of New Cuyama was born, a bustling hub for growth and discovery: California’s fourth-most-productive oil region, with its own airport. Yet as quickly as the rise came the fall. Nowadays, the town has turned into a food desert, one of the poorest communities in the state. With most food produced here being exported to the global market, many locals have to drive over 60 miles for a supermarket. “We are working to understand where the issues are, to make a scalable impact on the Cuyama community that could be pointed to as a model for the present and future,” said Philip Jankoski, executive director of the nonprofit Blue Sky Center, a rural impact center with the mission “to regenerate the

economy, land and communities of the Cuyama Valley through equitable partnerships and to share scalable models with other communities.” Last May, the organization brought together over 75 leaders across sectors including agriculture, philanthropy, government, business, academia, arts, design and more for a Blue Sky Rural Summit. The day culminated in a farm-to-table dinner organized by Clark Staub of Full of Life Foods, featuring local ingredients from within the Cuyama Valley and outlying region. “We see the food revolution as being tied to economic development and tourism,” said Jankoski. “We want to bring community back and create a sense of identity in Cuyama.” Recognizing a disconnect between rural communities like New Cuyama and urban communities such as Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, Blue Sky wants to create a bridge between the two. They would like to connect people back to the land where there food is produced and attract visitors or those who are interested in relocating. With a population of only 1,100, they need to get everyone involved. And bring in some new voices. Last July, the Center welcomed four AmeriCorps VISTA members to live, work and make change. The year-long program renews for up to five years and is fully funded. The current cohort has focused on capacity building within the Blue Sky Center organization and community of the Cuyama Valley in three areas: food systems and agriculture, community design and development, and equitable partnership formation,

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 65


66 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


STE VEN BROWN

The Shelton Huts offer unique accommodations at the Blue Sky Center. Following page: The farm-to-table dinner organized by by Clark Staub of Full of Life Foods at the Blue Sky Rural Summit held last May.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 67


STEVEN BROWN

68 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 69


70 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

When not rallying for fair food, Rachel Hommel can be spotted at the farmers market, practicing yoga and dancing to the “beet” of life.

Resources

CHUCK GR AHAM

CHUCK GR AHAM

including a Community Food Action Survey, used to guide grant applications for food-related community projects. Redeveloping the community of New Cuyama is the goal, but much of the focus is on food access and regenerative agriculture. Blue Sky’s resources include 250 acres of farmland along with another 38 acres of land suitable for housing. The center also includes the New Cuyama private runway and 22,000 square feet of existing buildings. Their hope is to develop these assets while engaging the community, especially the youth at Cuyama Valley’s elementary and high schools. The future is in the hands of people in those schools. I had a chance to talk with Food Action Coordinator Elise Dixon. Her energy was infectious as we spoke about her experience as a VISTA member. Surrounded by food and farming as a child, the position has allowed her to combine her academic background to a real-world food desert situation. Working with local organizations and farmers to build capacity, her work has included applying for a grant in hopes of funding a cold storage facility on Blue Sky’s property. “Most of our land is fallow and ready to be used for organic farming. We are looking into many different uses for the land— working with small growers, testing out regenerative practices and creating a value-added product like cider or olive oil. There is so much potential,” said Dixon. As an impact group, Blue Sky has forged a strong collaborative partnership with the Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan, which offers project management, advising and expertise in four action areas: investing in the food economy, investing in health and wellness, investing in community and investing in the local foodshed. Using the plan to elevate the local community food system, Blue Sky has shown a devoted commitment to the resources, support and overall vision of the plan, with a strong sense of community buy-in. “Solutions aren’t meant to be pushed broadly; thoughtful modification is key,” said Emily Miller, with the Community

Environmental Council. “Blue Sky has taken the time to listen to the community, to meet with the stakeholders and adapt our plan to fit the community needs.” Miller has worn many hats— from environmental consultant to farmer and, most recently, former fellow for the Food Action Plan. In her current role, Miller helps to implement strategies as a consultant, assisting Blue Sky directly in its alignment with local food systems, grant approvals and Food Action Plan implementation. Speaking at last May’s Rural Summit, Miller stressed a local approach, one that is for the community, driven by the community. “Blue Sky is giving hope to Cuyama Valley and its future through engagement,” she said. “We want the community to be a part of every solution we offer up.” Blue Sky hopes to demonstrate how a sustainable food system can work and the possibilities it could open up for the future. In addition to offering nutrition classes on site, Blue Sky plans to build the capacity for agriculture on their land with a flagship organic regenerative farm. Due to the high desert elevation, low humidity and minimal to no pest or fungal issues, it is cost effective to be organic in Cuyama. Blue Sky would like to attract a new generation of farmers from both the local population and from afar. “We are looking for farmers who are willing to be part of this new revolution, who want to make a statement and prove it can be done,” said Jankowski. “Cuyama is an ideal place to prove it, to invest in a place that will serve as both a hub for research and education.” Perhaps New Cuyama has been resting or waiting for this moment to reconnect with the land, the place that holds such promise for its future.

Visit BlueSkyCenter.org to learn more about how you can get involved with the Blue Sky Center. They are seeking financial supporters, partners, donated equipment and supplies and volunteers. For more information about the Carrizo Plain, call the visitor center at 805 475-2131 or visit BLM.gov/visit/carrizo-plain-national-monument and SaveTheCarrizo.org. The peak wildflower bloom varies each year, but is often in mid to late March. Staying in New Cuyama: If you have an Airbnb or HipCamp account, search for “New Cuyama, CA 93254.” Email stay@blueskycenter.org with any inquiries or questions. Also, the Buckhorn is a restaurant and hotel, visit Facebook.com/cuyamabuckhorn52 for more information.


T H E G AT H E R I N G TA B L E

AT T H E

Catering & Events Tasting Counter at 380 Bell St., Los Alamos • 805 865-2282 • ValleFresh.com

(800) 638-2466 • ballardinn.com • 2436 BASELINE

Artistry in Winemaking Since 1982 Longoria Winery & Tasting Room 415 E. Chestnut Avenue Lompoc, CA Open 11am– 4:30pm Daily LongoriaWine.com 866-759-4637

Open –Thurs: 12–7, Fri and Sat: 11–7 and Sun: 11– 6 388 Bell Street, Los Alamos, CA 93440 805.344.1900 CasaDumetzWines.com 1

botanical beauty from wine

made fresh daily

Artistry in Winemaking Extra Sincevirgin 1982olive oils, flavored olive oils, olive tapenades, table olives, gourmet vinegars, local food products.

3 great locations: 120 Santa Barbara St, the guilded table 21 W ortega Street, santa barbara, ca 4193 Carpinteria Ave #6, carpinteria, ca grapeseedco.com

TASTE The Magic of Mangalitsa USDA certified Mangalista pork

Longoria Winery & Tasting Room

Open Daily 11–5

415 E. Chestnut Avenue Lompoc, CA Open 11am– 4:30pm Daily 2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 LongoriaWine.com 866-759-4637

olivehillfarm.com

2

Serving authentic Spanish food including hot and cold tapas, wood-fire grilled seafood and meat, and seasonal paella.

D I N N E R DA I LY 5 P M 2 0 2 S TAT E S T R E E T 805-880-3380 LO Q U I TA S B . C O M

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 71


72 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018


Culinary Journeys Discovering the World through Cookbook Collections by Pascale Beale PHOTOGRAPHY JOSHUA CURRY

“Cookery means the knowledge of Medea and of Circe and of Helen and of the Queen of Sheba. It means the knowledge of all herbs and fruits and balms and spices, and all that is healing and sweet in the fields and groves and savory in meats. It means carefulness and inventiveness and willingness and readiness of appliances. It means the economy of your grandmothers and the science of the modern chemist; it means much testing and no wasting; it means English thoroughness and French art and Arabian hospitality.” —John Ruskin Opposite: Author Pascale Beale peruses the shelves of her cookbooks. Above: The 1890 edition of Mrs. Beeton’s Book of Household Management.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 73


T

he wall behind my desk is lined with wooden shelves, crammed with a cornucopia of cookbooks from around the world. They feed my inspiration. I disappear into them and, in an instant, am transported to the souks of Marrakesh, the dappled-light-filled markets of Provence, the fish markets of Marseille, the farmers markets of California, and beyond. Piled onto the shelves are also food memoirs, technical cookbooks, restaurant cookbooks and massive culinary dictionaries. They come in all shapes and sizes, illustrated and not. Some are new, some rather old; a few are battered copies that I have carted halfway around the world, filled with scraps of paper marking a recipe or story of note. Through them I travel the continents and explore the culinary treasures they encompass. It wasn’t always thus. I became aware of the act of cooking long before I was aware of cookbooks as a source for recipes. My mother and grandmother just cooked with nary a book in sight, creating dishes with seeming effortlessness. I assumed that I would acquire the same repertoire just with my proximity to the kitchen, and that seemed to be the case as I was put to work at a young age chopping vegetables and sorting salads, or learning to make béchamel with a guiding hand on mine. My grandmother, a refined cook of classical French dishes, produced multi-course meals at the drop of a hat. Little did I realize that she had not passed her culinary prowess and knowledge on to my mother, but rather furnished her, soon after her marriage, with a book intended to provide her with the answers to all matters related to the kitchen. The book in question was the daunting, red-leather-bound La Cuisine by Raymond Oliver. Filled with thousands of recipes, it was a tour de force, a lexicon of classic French cooking. I soon discovered that my mother would consult it before any major dinner party and labor for hours over extravagant creations such 74 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

as festooned pheasants. It was the source for the now-infamous (in our house at least) canard à l’orange, a 40-hour, never to be repeated, cooking odyssey. As I got older I pored over its pages, digesting recipes for everything from fantastic terrines to towering pièces montées, and returned to it annually to finally master what became my thensignature dish, a pâté en croûte, filled with layers of marinated meats encased in a buttery, flaky crust. The book is filled with gallentines, aspics, gastriques, sauces that take two days and 38 ingredients to prepare, dishes that never see the light of day in a family kitchen and the assumption that all readers of the book had more than a modicum of cooking knowhow. It was imposing and challenging. It seemed to me, at the time, that one cooked either simple meals or great feasts with nothing in between. The next books I acquired did nothing to dispel this perspective. I was born, fortuitously, into a family of self-avowed food fanatics where driving a few hundred kilometers for a good meal was not unheard of. Driving across any part of France meant an in-depth study of the famed Guide Michelin, a copy of which was always kept in the glovebox. Trips were planned accordingly, and, if the chef had by chance written a cookbook, I would sometimes be the lucky recipient, complete with a signed menu from the establishment to commemorate the occasion. I paged through these books reverently, salivating over the exquisitely produced dishes, never imagining that I would recreate them in my own kitchen. My cooking at this point was of a hearty country variety. These books fueled my curiosity, a guide if you will, to the nec plus ultra. Our passion, as a family, for all culinary matters was matched by our passion for books, which were piled high in various corners of the house. When Time-Life Books started their subscription series my mother immediately signed us up. We eagerly anticipated the monthly shipments on geography, history, photography and cooking. I relished the latter, The Good Cook/Techniques and Recipes. From these technically precise books I learnt how to make, amongst other things, floating islands, buttery shortbread and marmalade. These books became my reference library. In my early 20s I received an 1890 edition of Mrs. Beeton’s Book of Household Management, complete with color plates of extravagant table settings, menus with 22 courses and details on how one should instruct a scullery maid and the duties of one’s butler! It is a time capsule, a view into the world of Edwardian England, a “Downton Abbey”–esque portrayal of life far removed from the internet-driven, warp-speed world we live in today. It was with this book that I became intrigued with older texts and the window they gave one into another era. When Claudia Roden was researching her book of Middle Eastern food she spent months studying historical cookbooks and testing 13th-century Baghdadi court recipes. In an interview for The New Yorker, Roden said “I just got so interested in the history of food and I was making all those medieval dishes, and it blew my mind—the idea that through food you could describe and reconstruct the world!”


It was only when I moved to Los Angeles that I discovered things culinary from an early age, said this “voyeuristic explorafood writing of another genre. Here I found Alice Walters, tion connected me to the fact that all people were not white Mollie Katzen and Gourmet magazine. The writing was Americans and food was not just meat, potatoes and salad with comforting and approachable. I felt at home with this food dressing.” She read ethnic cookbooks as novels, and the works and it proved to be life-changing. A single recipe in Gourmet of Elizabeth David and Claudia Roden that opened the door, transformed the way I cooked. The recipe—a scallop and figuratively and then literally, to another world. With the proshrimp poached “sausage” with a beurre blanc sauce—was the ceeds from baking cookies she traveled to Italy to explore, eat catalyst that propelled me into the food business. and cook the food she had read about. There, she found older Italian cookbooks, some with no lists of ingredients, just evocaUp to that point I had used recipes as guides to flavor tive narratives with general directions, imbued combinations, and referred to books to learn a particular with the essence of the region they represented. technique. I restyled all recipes to fit with my somewhat casual Provencal-French country For this very reason, both cooking. That recipe Kleiman and James Beard challenged me to push Award–winning author boundaries and explore new Clifford A. Wright, have dishes. Successfully executed, a penchant for cookbooks I went back to my old French written in Italian. Evan cookbooks and dove headfirst Kleiman carried the books into their texts, cooking back to California to add my way through chapters to her growing collection, of Raymond Blanc, Michel including favorites such as Guerard’s Cuisine Minceur La Cucina di Mia Casa by and Cuisine Gourmande, the Zenone Benini and the works Roux Brothers’ and George of Franco Muzzio and Slow Blanc’s sumptuous chicken Food founder Carlo Petrini. dishes. I started keeping I was struck, as I discussed notebooks filled with menus the cookbook collections with so that I didn’t feed my their owners, that although friends and family the same they varied widely in scope dish twice. and focus, everyone spoke These cookbooks of a cookbook’s capacity to propelled me, fed me, reveal a culture through the nourished my curiosity and cuisine they explored. The my taste buds. I devoured the collection of Nancy Oster Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook, (recipe editor for Edible basked in Mireille Johnson’s Santa Barbara ) has a strong Cuisine of the Sun, and baking bent. Jill Johnson plunged headfirst into the (food writer and social media Silver Palate. maven) hunts down Junior League cookbooks. Graphic I read them cover to designer and cookbook editor cover, gobbling up recipes, Harriet Eckstein’s collection is filling my head with flavors, eclectic, a true reflection of her swimming in glorious sauces peripatetic journeys around the flavored with spices from Handwritten notes in the pages of La Cuisine by Raymond Oliver. world. Krista Harris (publisher around the world. The more and editor of Edible Santa Barbara) seeks out pre-1950s I read and cooked, the more curious I became. My culinary cookbooks. Tracey Ryder’s (co-founder of Edible Communities) horizons now stretched well beyond France’s borders and spilled collection is filled with French and vegetarian books. Local Chef into every country surrounding the Mediterranean, drawing on Pink’s collection is inspired by many fellow restaurateurs. the multi-flavored palates of the Iberian Peninsula, North Africa, Persia, Israel, Turkey, Greece and Italy, and then further afield I asked Anne Willan—founder of the prestigious cooking to the foods of India and Asia. I traveled vicariously through the school La Varenne, rare cookbook collector and award-winning pages to these countries and discovered I wasn’t alone. author who also penned The Cookbook Library: Four Centuries of the Cooks, Writers and Recipes that Made the Modern Cookbook— In speaking with many similarly cookbook-obsessed friends why she thought cookbooks still sell and what she liked about and food professionals, I found a similar trait. Evan Kleiman cookbooks in general. “A successful cookbook is much more than (host of KCRW’s “Good Food”), a voracious reader of all EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 75


just a collection of recipes,” she replied. “It adds up to a picture of a certain type of cuisine and the author’s view of it. In a truly great cookbook, the voice of the author comes through loud and clear, creating a portrait of a character as well as their cooking. It reads like a novel, a new turn in the plot on every page!” Asked the same question, Evan Kleiman echoed that sentiment: “In a cookbook you are looking at a person with a point of view. Cookbook authors are characters I rely on.” When I asked my friends about the longevity of cookbooks as opposed to the mass availability of cooking information and recipes online, Anne replied “Nothing online replaces the character and feel of a book in the hand. And it is so much easier to assess a recipe in the context of the rest of the book when you can flip the pages to and fro instead of scrolling up and down a screen.” Evan added, “The difference between browsing online for a recipe and browsing in a bookstore is that your eye falls on a page and draws you in.” Clifford felt that “cookbooks are far more substantial, provide context and story and engage the reader/cook with their soul.” Chef Pink told me, “I buy printed versions of a book [as opposed to a digital version] because I believe in holding something in my hands that someone has created, rather than a fleeting image or video, which is soon forgotten.” It quickly became apparent to me that these physical books seemed very much tied to the physical act of cooking, of creating and of sharing food. The books, like the dishes one eats, are tangible. Jill Johnson said, “There will always be a market for hardcover books. People like having pages to flip through and mark up, taking time to savor making a dish … the smell of the books is so comforting, even seeing the stains on certain pages tells you your favorite recipes.” Finding marginalia, stained pages, faded letters and notes tucked into old books are all part of their charm and mystique. They represent a tactile historical record of the books life. Evan Kleiman told me that she had purchased a second copy of Marcella Hazan’s book on Italian cooking because the first one had fallen apart from constant use. Tracey Ryder told me that after having read her books cover to cover she puts sticky notes on all the recipes she wants to cook later. My dilapidated copy of the Silver Palate is decorated with drawings and comments on when I made a particular dish and who was there, the index annotated with tick marks against the recipes I completed, with shopping lists tucked into the nowloosened pages. Looking back on these annotations and saved recipes I see how my cooking has evolved and how my tastes have changed. Like music that echoes an epoch, so do vintage cookbooks. I spoke with Dianne Jacob, acclaimed author of Will Write for Food, about her collection and which cookbooks she was particularly drawn to. She spoke reverently about the food of the Cochin Jews, in particular a book by Mavis Hyman entitled Indian-Jewish Cooking, and books related to her heritage. So why are we are all drawn to all these cookbooks? 76 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Reading List for Cookbook Lovers • The Chef’s Library: Favorite Cookbooks from

the World’s Great Kitchens by Jenny Linford • A History of Cookbooks: From Kitchen to Page

over Seven Centuries by Henry Notaker • History of Food in 100 Recipes

by William Sitwell • The Cookbook Library

by Anne Willan & Mark Cherniavsky • The American History Cookbook

by Mark H. Zanger

I recently came across an article about Chef Jose Andreas in which he described part of the attraction. He likes books, he said, that create a sense of discovery. He referred to BrillatSavarin, author of the famed The Physiology of Taste, as the Jules Verne of gastronomy. Andreas’ inspiration, came not just from the spices on his shelves but also on what he has learned about food from his books, “Old cookbooks,” he wrote in an article for the New York Times, “connect you to your past and explain the history of the world.” This palpable link to one’s past is a common thread weaved through all the collections I explored, often with a poignant connection. We each have books that, though not often read, act as a touchstone. Anne Willan told me, “When I’m feeling nostalgic, I go back to my mother’s handwritten book of recipes, first from her childhood and then as a young married woman before World War II. It is a picture of another era, and also a memory of my own childhood when I hung out all day in the kitchen every week on Thursday, baking day of treats for the next week. I was not allowed a taste until Friday—freshly baked goods were bad for the digestion, said our stout old cook.” Krista Harris told me recently, “Quite a few years after I started collecting old cookbooks, my aunt gave me a book that had been my great-grandmother’s. She died when I was a baby so I never knew her, but I heard stories about what a wonderful cook she was. I loved seeing the handwritten notes in her cookbook.” Celia Sack, owner of Omnivore Books—where I always feel as though I have stepped into a well-appointed personal library rather than a gem of a cookbook shop—told me she “loved the aesthetic of old cookbooks, and the story they tell about a place and time.” And amid much laughter (on my part) Evan Kleiman mentioned that she was drawn to reading vintage books because they re-created the dishes of home and said “I was drawn to them because I wanted to be my own grandma!” Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons, Salade, Les Fruits and Les Legumes. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.


Locally owned & operated since 2003

Cheese &Cheers

Gourmet Gift Boxes, Party Platters, Gifts, Wine, Gift Certificates . . . and everything you need to make your holidays deliciously cheerful.

3315 State St. & 1324 State St. Santa Barbara, California www.renaudsbakery.com (805) 569-2400

825 Santa Barbara St.

965-0318

cestcheese.com

Tecolote Book Shop Since 1925

Santa Ynez Valley Farmed Meat & Produce

1470 eaSt Valley rOad (upper VillaGe Of MOntecitO)

SEE US AT THE FARMER S MARKET! 805-688-0597 JIMENEZFAMILYFARM.COM

Gift WrappinG • ShippinG • Special OrderS • BOOk SearcheS authOr appearanceS

CHICKEN, LAMB, PORK, ’GOAT, RABBIT . FRUIT PIES, QUICHES, JAMS AND PRESERVES

805 969-4977

Thank you to the firefighters. Thank you to the first responders. Thank you neighbors. Thank you friends and family near and far.

Support each other. Support local. Santa Barbara + Ventura County Strong #LoyalToLocal

FRESH

LOCAL

Specializing in Sourcing and Delivering the Best Local Seasonal Organic and Pesticide Free Produce, Local Grass-fed Meats, Pasture Raised Poultry, Fresh Fish and Many More Wonderful Local Artisanal Food Products

Subscriptions start at $25. You control your produce box delivery via our website! • Delivery options include weekly or every other week • Freedom to suspend your delivery • Weekly billing • Various box sizes available • Gift certificates available

www.PlowToPorch.com EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 77


WW IN I NTTEERR EED DII B L EE EEVVEENNTTS S F R I D AY

S U N D AY

JANUARY

JANUARY

JANUARY

Wine Tasting Winter Pass

Jam Cooking Class

Gluten Free Baking

6pm at The Food Liaison 1033 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria

3–6pm at HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria

Carpinteria-made Red Hen Cannery jams and marmalades are fun, delicious, versatile pantry staples that make any culinary creation memorable. Meet jam-maker Maureen Foley and learn her tips on canning. Includes jam samples, snacks, wine and dozens of recipe ideas. $55 per person. TheFoodLiaison.com.

Some of your favorite baked good recipes, with a gluten free twist! This class will cover: classic banana bread muffins, pull-apart dinner rolls, carrot cake with cream cheese frosting, chocolate lava cakes and chewy chocolate chip cookies. $65 per person. HeatCulinary.com.

1–31

J A NU A RY

Pass holders receive one wine tasting at each participating Santa Ynez Valley Wine Country Association tasting room ($140+ value). Valid the entire month of January. Winter Passes are $45 each. For a list of participating wineries and to purchase passes, visit SantaYnezWineCountry.com.

5

21

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

JANUARY

JANUARY

JANUARY

Santa Ynez Valley Restaurant Week

Ladies Night Out Cooking Class

Winter Wine Classic

Restaurants throughout the Santa Ynez Valley will offer three-course tasting menus for $20.18 (excluding tax, tip and beverages). Several tasting rooms and wineries will also be offering special wine and small bite pairings. DineSYV.com

6:30pm at The Food Liaison 1033 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria

21–27

26

4–7:30pm at The Fess Parker Resort, Santa Barbara Taste from more than 100 classic California wines and food purveyors at one of the largest gatherings of the California’s ultra-elite winemaking masters. $45–$110 per person. For more info and to purchase tickets, visit CaliforniaWineFestival.com.

Featuring Taste of California’s Chef Robin. Menu includes: Homemade Ricotta Crostini with Roasted Fruit Jam, White Bean and Spinach Flatbread, Crab Beignets, Frisco Parmesan Crisps, Tomato Cheese Panini and Chocolate Wine Truffles. $85. TheFoodLiaison.com. F R I D AY

F R I D AY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

The French “Chandeleur” Party

Elegant Brioche Cooking Class

2–6pm at Chooket French Pastry 2018 Cliff Dr., Santa Barbara

11am–2pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab

Come discover the Provençal tradition of the Chandeleur, a traditional and popular celebration of Marseille. Come and taste the Navettes, a sweet specialty homemade biscuit flavoured with ingredients from the south of France. Free to taste. Chooket.com

Discover the simple steps required to make sweet or savory brioche and how to fit brioche-making into your schedule. From hamburger buns to baba au rhum, perfect brioche is only a lesson away! $33 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

2

F E B R U A RY

27

2

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

S U N D AY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

Topa Topa and Casitas Valley Farm Pop-up Dinner

Fermentation Class

Wine Tasting Experience

10:30am–1pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab

5pm at Jamie Sloan Wines 23 E. de la Guerra St.

These healthy, flavorful, sustainable superfoods can easily be made in your home and included in an exciting variety of recipes. Reduce food waste and increase shelf life while you use ancient methods to create modern, simple cuisine. $33 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

Experience premium SB County wines paired with delicious chocolates from the local French chocolatier Jean-Michel of Chocolats Du CaliBressan in the Jamie Slone Wines Private Reserve Room. $35 ($20 members) for 60 minute session; max 6 guests; reservations required 805 560-6555.

3

6:30pm at The Food Liaison 1033 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria The Food Liaison executive chef Nirasha Rodriguez, the lead brewers from Topa Topa Brewing Co., and the farmers from Casitas Valley Farm will collaborate to create a Hawaiian Feast showcasing great beer, fresh produce and island flavors. $125 per person.TheFoodLiaison.com.

78 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

3

4


For updates and more details on these and other events, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com T H U R S D AY

S AT U R D AY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

Indoor Grilling

Riedel Tasting Seminar

6:30-9:30pm at HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria

1:30pm at Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos

Everything you need to know to fire up the indoor or outdoor grill and entertain guests. Class covers: artichokes with roasted garlic aioli, asparagus with red bliss potatoes and portobello mushroom, beef tenderloin with mustard sauce and pound cake with pears. $65 per person. HeatCulinary.com.

Experience a hands-on demo by a Riedel ambassador and discover how the shape of a wine glass delivers the bouquet, taste, balance and finish of a wine to the senses. Each Riedel glass paired with a Zaca Mesa wine. Includes three-glass Riedel wine tasting set and cheese reception. $75 club, $85 non club; tickets 805 688-9339 x320.

10

8

M AY

FEBRUARY

14 Valentine’s Day

S AT U R D AY

W E D N E S D AY

S AT U R D AY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

An Innkeeper’s Breakfast

Flavor Fusion Cooking Class

11am–2pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab

10am–2pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab

Fragrant Feast: Indian Cooking Class

Join a Wine Country innkeeper and learn the secrets of fabulous breakfasts that keep guests raving. Carbonara Porridge, Black Bean and Quinoa Nachos, Creamy Chorizo Polenta and Sunrise Stuffed Peppers. $43 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

Discover which ingredients work well together and see how far you can push your culinary boundaries. Get in on this current foodie trend, grow your confidence in the kitchen and wow your guests with unique flavor sensations. $64 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

MARCH

MARCH

Taste of New Orleans

Sourdough Bread Class

6:30–9:30pm at HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria

10am–2pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab

17

9

MJU A RNCH E

Celebrate the culinary traditions of Louisiana creole and all of its added spice. This class will cover: charbroiled oysters with garlic butter sauce, gumbo with crawfish, jambalaya with andouille sausage, beignets with raspberry sauce. $65 per person. HeatCulinary.com.

24

21

11am–2pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab Master the delicious vegetarian dishes of India. From pakoras and chutney to paneer and palao, your everyday cooking will never be the same. Authentic recipes and hands-on practice will provide a unique cooking experience. $43 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

10

Discover the secrets of sourdough starter and how to create a perfect loaf time and time again. Try incorporating a wide variety of artisanal grains to produce amazing results with combinations and applications you never thought possible. $44 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

T H U R S D AY

S AT U R D AY

MARCH

MARCH

Taste of Solvang

Che Empanadas

Since 1993 Solvang has celebrated its rich culinary and cultural heritage with the Taste of Solvang Food & Wine Festival featuring local desserts, delicacies, wines and live entertainment. Advance ticket purchases are highly recommended and can be made online at SolvangUSA. com or call 800 719-9106 to purchase by phone.

6pm at The Food Liaison 1033 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria

Chicken Curry Cooking Class

MARCH

14 –18

22

Buen provecho! Embracing his vibrant Argentinian roots, Chef Luis will teach a relaxed, hands on class where you’ll learn to make delicious empanadas, chimichurri and salsa criolla. Join us for a night to remember. $75 per person. TheFoodLiaison.com.

24

11am–2pm at Santa Barbara Schott Campus, Rm. 27 Culinary Lab Experience real chicken curry the way it was meant to be, accompanied by beautiful, complimentary side dishes created with spices and techniques found only in Pakistan and India. $43 per person. Register at SBCC.edu.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 79


edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

E AT DRINK LOC AL GUIDE & MAPS

Santa Barbara County has its own unique food tradition and lifestyle. We’d like to help you find some of the area restaurants, bakeries, food producers and specialty retail shops that contribute to the distinctively Santa Barbara experience. From Ballard to Carpinteria, and from catering to wine tasting, our Guide will help you find what you are looking for and more.

Ballard Ballard Inn & Gathering Table

Carpinteria

Goleta

The Food Liaison

Backyard Bowls

2436 Baseline Ave. 805 688-7770 BallardInn.com

1033 Casitas Pass Rd. 805 200-3030 TheFoodLiaison.com

5668 Calle Real 805 770-2730 BackyardBowls.com

Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and awardwinning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Gathering Table one of the most sought-after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country.

Catering. Counter. Classes. Utilizing many locally grown organic ingredients, enjoy daily rotating entrées and soups, seasonal menu and gourmet salad bar. Corporate and event catering since 2013. Sign up for cooking classes online. Lunch counter Mon–Fri 11am–3pm.

Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Buellton Alma Rosa 250-G Industrial Way 805 688-9090 AlmaRosaWinery.com With certified organic vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills, Alma Rosa focuses on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as other food-friendly wines with the high acid and extraordinary balance for which Richard Sanford’s wines have been known since 1976. .

Margerum Wine Company

59 Industrial Way 805 686-8500 MargerumWines.com Located at the gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills, Margerum now offers tasting at their winery on Industrial Way in Buellton. Taste Margerum and Barden releases, sample wine from tank or barrel and tour the winery. Open Sat and Sun 11am–5pm.

The Hitching Post II 406 E. Hwy. 246 805 688-0676 HitchingPost2.com A favorite of locals and visitors since 1986. Serving wood-grilled fare, prepared in the regional barbecue tradition, along with their highly regarded Hitching Post Wines. Casual and relaxed setting.

80 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Giannfranco’s Trattoria 666 Linden Ave. 805 684-0720 Giannfrancos.com Experience authentic Italian regional cuisine at this family-owned and family-operated trattoria in downtown Carpinteria. Chef Giovanni prepares each dish from the freshest local and imported foods to offer his creative take on Tuscan grill specialties. Weekday lunch served 11am–3pm. Weekend lunch served noon–3pm. Dinner served 5–9pm; closed Tue.

HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave. 805 242-1151 HeatCulinary.com Santa Barbara County’s culinary school, food truck and full service caterer. HEAT events are known for personalized service, organic ingredients, large portions and attention to detail. Offering originality and undivided attention to create a memorable event.

Sly’s 686 Linden Ave. 805 684-6666 SlysOnline.com Sly’s is known for great food, with an emphasis on farmers market and local produce, great cocktails and great times in Carpinteria. Open Mon–Fri for lunch 11:30am–3pm; lounge menu weekdays 3–5pm; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9pm, Fri and Sat 5–10pm; and weekend brunch & lunch Sat–Sun 9am–3pm.

Ca’ Dario Cucina Italiana 250 Storke Rd. 805 884-9419 CaDario.net Chef and owner Dario Furlati brings his signature pastas, pizzas and authentic Italian dishes to a casual, family-friendly eatery in the heart of Goleta. Daily specials, friendly service, handsome ambiance and an extensive list of Italian and California wines offer a delightful dining experience in the Goodland. Open 7 days a week 11:30am–2:30pm, 5–9pm.

The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters

250 Storke Rd. 1A 805 968-0493 DuneCoffeeRoasters.com Sourcing, roasting and serving the best coffees from around the world. They love serving their carefully selected coffees and in-house-baked pastries and bread to the community. Visit The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters and let them show you the magic of coffee! Open Mon–Fri 6am–7pm, Sat–Sun 7am–7pm.

Lompoc Central Coast Specialty Foods 115 E. College Ave., Ste. 10 805 717-7675 CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com High-quality local & imported specialty foods, including charcuterie, gourmet cheeses, a fullservice deli, exotic meats (alligator, wild boar, bison


and more), specialty foods from around the world, and local beers and wines. Catering available; small intimate affairs to large special events. Open MonWed 10am–6pm, Thu–Fri 10am–7pm, Sat 10am–6pm and Sun 10am–4pm.

Babcock Winery & Vineyards 5175 E. Hwy. 246, Lompoc 805 736-1455 BabcockWinery.com A passion for revolutionary farming and conservation continue to define this family-owned Sta. Rita Hills winery. Stunning single-vineyard Pinot Noirs are showcased alongside acclaimed Chardonnays and other varietals. Chill in the super soulful tasting room filled with vintage, art and eclectic treasures. Tasting room open daily 11am–5:30pm.

Kita Winery 300 N. 12th St., Unit 1A 805 819-1372 KitaWines.com Established in 2010 as a small, premium wine producer, Kita’s focus is on respecting the balance of soil, climate, location and taste. The word “Kita” means “our valley oak” in the Santa Ynez Chumash language of Samala. Tasting room opening Winter 2018.

Longoria Wines 415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866-759-4637 LongoriaWine.com Longoria Wines is a small family-owned winery with over three decades of producing acclaimed artisanal wines from some of the finest vineyards in Santa Barbara County. Enjoy a tasting or a glass of wine in the tasting room or lounge of the restored historic JM Club at their new winery facility in Lompoc, open daily 11am–4:30pm.

Scratch Kitchen 610 N. H St. 805 819-0829 Scratch-Kitchen.com With a wealth of local and seasonal produce and local wines, Scratch Kitchen aims to highlight all the best culinary elements of the Lompoc and Santa Ynez Valleys. Open for lunch and dinner Tue–Sat 11am–9pm, brunch Sun 10am–2pm and Sun dinner 5pm–9pm.

Los Alamos Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St. 805 344-1911 BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hardto-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Valle Fresh’s tacos and tapas menu. Thu 4–8pm, Fri–Sat noon–8pm, Sun noon–6pm.

Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St. 805 344-3000 BobsWellBread.com Making bread the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection in a custom-built stone-deck oven. Drop in to taste what visitors and journalists are raving about as “worth the drive”—signature Pain au Levain, award-winning artisanal breads, croissants and specialty pastries. All-day menu of made-to-order breakfast, lunch and weekly special dishes. Indoor-outdoor picturesque café. Thu–Mon 7am–6pm. Café closes at 3pm. Closed Tue and Wed.

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St. 805 344-1900 CasaDumetzWines.com A boutique winery specializing in Rhône varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Open Thu noon–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun 11–6pm. Vineyard tours and barrel sampling available by appointment.

Full of Life Flatbread 225 W. Bell St. 805 344-4400 FullofLifeFoods.com Full of Life Flatbread offers an extremely innovative menu based almost entirely on what is grown locally and in season. Open Thu–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 4–8pm; Sat–Sun lunch 11am–3pm.

Martian Ranch & Vineyard 9110 Alisos Canyon Rd. 805 344-1804 MartianVineyard.com The Martian Ranch tasting room is open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Taste their estate-grown biodynamically farmed wines for an out-of-this-world experience! Winery tours daily; vineyard tours on the weekends. Enjoy wines by the glass, bocce court, horseshoe pit and dog-friendly picnic areas. Open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Mon and Tues by appointment only.

Plenty on Bell 508 Bell St. 805 344-2111 PlentyOnBell.com Longtime Los Alamos chef and local favorite Jesper Johansson is back in the kitchen at Plenty on Bell, serving local, seasonal food. Open for breakfast and lunch Tue–Sat 8am–3pm; dinner Fri only 5:30–8pm. Closed Monday.

Valle Fresh at Babi’s Beer Emporium

388 Bell St. 805-865-2282 ValleFresh.com Tasting counter now open inside Babi’s Beer Emporium in Los Alamos. Specializing in handcrafted, genuine food sourced from local farms, ranches and artisans. This family-owned catering company offers personalized menus for all occasions including weddings, pop-up events, food and wine pairings, themed dinners, gourmet taco bars and more. Thur–Sat noon– 8pm, Sun noon–5pm.

Los Olivos Andrew Murray Vineyards 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 686-9604 AndrewMurrayVineyards.com Andrew Murray, a grape-growing pioneer and Rhône varietal visionary in Santa Barbara County, founded his winery in 1990. Andrew and his team look forward to sharing the AMV experience with you at their stunning Estate Winery and Visitor Center along Foxen Canyon Road. Tasting room open daily 10:30am–5:30pm.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 81


Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave. 805 693-0700 OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 688-9339 ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, Zaca Mesa Winery has crafted distinctive wines from their unique mesa top vineyard. As an early pioneer of the region, they now have 150-acres planted, specializing in the production of estategrown Rhône-style wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm. Call for more information on winery tours and private event space.

Montecito American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd. 805-335-8110 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm.

Bree’Osh 1150 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-2500 Breeosh.com Bree’Osh is a French artisan bakery café specializing in sweet and savory brioche bread made with traditional sourdough. Featuring local, organic, high-quality ingredients. Open Wed–Fri 7am–3pm; Sat–Sun 7am–2pm. Closed Mon–Tue.

Here’s the Scoop 1187 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-7020 ScoopSB.com Here’s the Scoop is a local, family-owned business that makes traditional Italian gelato flavors like Stracciatella and Pistachio. Their seasonal farmers market sorbets use local, organic farm-fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs. Sorbets are non-dairy, organic and vegan. Mon–Thu 1–9pm, Fri–Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm.

Montecito Country Mart 1016 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-9664 MontecitoCountryMart.com The Montecito Country Mart, built in 1964, has recently been renovated and preserved, with its original barber shop, post office, market, old-fashioned toy store, as well as Rori’s Ice Cream and Merci to Go artisan food shop. Independent boutique shops include Mate Gallery, Kendall Conrad, Calypso, Malia Mills, Hudson Grace, James Perse and Space NK Apothecary. Shops open Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat–Sun 10am–5pm.

82 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Montecito Village Grocery 1482 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-1112 MontecitoGrocery.com Offering local and organic produce, full service butcher and deli, gourmet cheese, chef prepared dishes, amazing wines and craft beers. Great selection of non-dairy, gluten free, vegetarian and vegan products. Convenient parking and friendly staff. Open daily 7am–8pm.

San Ysidro Ranch 900 San Ysidro Ln. Santa Barbara 805 565-1724 SanYsidroRanch.com Visit the Stonehouse, named one of the 50 Best Restaurants in America by Open Table, or visit Plow & Angel for a comfortable and convivial atmosphere.

Tecolote Bookstore 1470 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-4977 Tecolote Bookstore is an independent bookstore located in the upper village of Montecito. Open Mon–Fri 10am–5:30pm; Sat 10am–5pm; closed Sun.

Santa Barbara Backyard Bowls 3849 State St. 805 569-0011 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Il Fustino

3401 State St. 805 845-3521 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 3315 State St. 805 569-2400 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Telegraph Brewing Co. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. 805 963-5018 TelegraphBrewing.com Handcrafting unique American ales that embrace the heritage of California’s early brewing pioneers and use as many locally grown ingredients as possible. Visit the tasting room, open Tue–Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat 2–10pm; Sun 1–7pm. Telegraph beer is available at many restaurants and grocery stores in Santa Barbara County and throughout California.

The Dining Room at Belmond El Encanto 800 Alvarado Pl. 805 770-3530 Belmond.com/ElEncanto Dine in the elegant Dining Room or delight in a romantic dinner under the stars on The Terrace. An innovative menu presented by Chef Johan Denizot offers contemporary California-coastal cuisine, complemented with gracious service and a side of stunning Santa Barbara views. Open 7am–10pm daily.

Santa Barbara (Downtown) American Riviera Bank 1033 Anacapa St. 805 965-5942 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St. 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots. Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years, along with other varietals. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines available. Tasting room open Mon–Fri noon–6pm, Sat and Sun 11am–6pm.

August Ridge Vineyards 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 770-8442 AugustRidge.com August Ridge crafts wine that combines the spirit of California with the restrained, classic elegance of wines from northern and central Italy. Distinctive wines from the Paso Robles region to be opened as you gather for a meal, surrounded by friends, family and loved ones. Tasting room open Sun–Mon, WedThurs noon–7pm, Fri-Sat noon–8pm. Happy Hour Mon and Wed 3–6pm. Closed Tuesday.

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 805 845-5379 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Barbareño 205 W. Canon Perdido 805 963-9591 Barbareno.com Offering a casual approach to the classic California tavern, highlighting the traditions and specialties of the Central Coast and its many outstanding purveyors. Sit inside and enjoy the enticing atmosphere of an open kitchen, or outside on the patio alongside the Santa Maria grill. Dinner nightly 5–9:30pm; barbeque lunch Thu–Fri 11:30am–2pm; closed Tue.


Destination Maps

PERKINS ST. SHAW ST.

OC

AR I

TO

MAIN ST.

SA

NT A

135

BA

RB

AR

RRAY RD

246

1. Hitching Post II 2. Buellton Visitors Bureau 3. Industrial Eats 4. Alma Rosa 5. Buscador Winery 6. Margerum Wine Company

WAITE ST.

A

T.

OF THE FLAG S

5

Buellton

A

DS

E AVENU

NT AM

2N

.

MP

LW AY

STR IA

6

LO

IND U SA

BELL STR EET WICKENDEN ST.

AUGUSTA ST.

HELENA ST.

CENTENNIAL ST.

DENT ST.

5 6

4 3

7. Martian Ranch and Vineyards

Santa Barbara

TO

4

TO

7

101

1 2 3

246

ALISOS CANYON RD.

MCM U

3.22 Miles From Hwy 101

101

2

2ND ST.

Los Alamos

1. Full of Life Flatbread 2. Babi’s Beer Emporium, Valle Fresh 3. Casa Dumetz 4. Bell Street Farm 5. Plenty on Bell 6. Bob’s Well Bread Bakery

CE NT RA LA VE .

Los Alamos

SO

LVA N

G

1

101

COINER ST.

A ST.

7TH ST.

E. COLLEGE AVE. G ST.

CABRILLO HWY.

1 2

LAUREL AVE.

RD.

Lompoc

Solvang

1. Scratch Kitchen 2. Central Coast Specialty Foods 3. Longoria Wines 4. Lompoc Wine Ghetto 5. Kita Winery 6. Babcock Winery & Vineyards

1. Broken Clock Vinegar Works 2. Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 3. Valley Brewers 4. Mad & Vin at The Landsby 5. Solvang Olive Company 6. Solvang Visitors Bureau 7. Buttonwood Farm and Winery

LAUREL AVE.

EUCALYPTUS DR.

HAG

MO

LLE

PINE ST.

AL R

BA

RB

AR

A

DR.

AL R ALIS

1ST

ST.

D.

ST.

TO

A NT

OLD MILL RD.

WAY

EN

WA Y

246

SA

FIGUEROA MTN. RD.

3RD

ALIS

MISSION D R . PAR K

6

CO

OAK ST.

D.

ATTERDAG

FIR AVE.

PEN

GRAND AVE.

SAN MARCOS AVE.

JONATA ST.

1

SA N ALTA ST. ALAMO PINTADO AVE.

ALAMO PINTADO AVE.

2

M AR CO

S

PA S

S

RO AD

3

154 TO

R DO

A INT

OP

M ALA

ROBLAR AVE.

SA

N

TA

BA

RB

AR

A

E N. R

D.

FU G

IO

RD .

ON TIV ER

1. Olive Hill Farm 2. R&D los olivos 3. Brander Vineyards 4. Ballard Inn & Restaurant 5. Andrew Murray Vineyards 6. Zaca Mesa Winery 7. Foxen Winery 8. Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 9. Cambria Winery

RAILWAY AVE.

GRAND AVE.

Los Olivos & Ballard

ELM AVE.

CHUMASH HIGHWAY

ALAMO PINTADO RD.

STEELE ST.

SANTA BARBARA AVE.

154

TO HWY 101

BALLARD CANYON RD.

CALKINS RD.

28.1mi 19.6mi 17mi 9.5mi 4.75 mi

NOJOQUI AVE.

FOXEN CANYON RD.

To Santa Maria

9 8 7 6 5

LAUREL AVE.

RD. 5TH ST.

Y

4 5

2ND

TO

1

HW

1 10

ST.

O

246

246

VE. NA

CEA

7TH ST.

A ST.

G ST.

3 1 2

6

CHESTNUT AVE. CABRILLO HWY.

5 7 mi on 246

.

9TH ST.

4 3

INDUSTRIAL WAY

4TH PL

CHESTNUT CT.

12TH ST.

1

7 2 mi

ALAMO PINTADO RD.

SANTA ROSA

HILL ST.

D. SR O

ROBLAR AVE.

BASELINE AVE.

4

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 83


EZ A VE.

Destination Maps 2

VIA RE

H 7T

LL Y

.

HO

AV E

.

EL M

AV E

.

M

D.

N AL W

. ST

AP

E AV

AV E .

LN SIDRO NY SA 1.7 Miles

6

1. Montecito Country Mart 2. Bree’Osh 3. Here’s the Scoop E C 4. Cava Restaurant 5. Tecolote Bookstore 6. Montecito Village Grocery 7. American Riviera Bank 8. San Ysidro Ranch

GG

CA

From San Ysidro Ln.

7

5 E. VALLEY RD.

EA L

. LV D

5

TT

ER

. RD

MIDDLE RD.

T

S

BU

S. PATTERSO N AVE.

HO

NG RI SP

FLY

LN

.

D W AR

HOLLISTER AVE.

RDENS LN.

THE FRENCH PRESS 250 STORKE RD.

217

SUMIDA GA

4 PINE AVE.

CA' DARIO CUCINA ITALIANA 250 STORKE RD.

1 2

C OAST VILLAG

101

IV FOOD CO-OP 6575 SEVILLE RD. ISLA VISTA

D.

MAGNOLIA AVE.

2.5 mi 3

R OLIVE MILL

M

EM

OR

IA

LB

101

RO RD. SAN YSID

LE R C AL

YO AN N R D .

N. KELLO

OR

2

SS PA AS SIT

8

AM

FAIRVIEW AVE.

LM PA

SYC

2. Backyard Bowls 3. Ca’Dario Cucina Italiana 4. The French Press 5. Isla Vista Food Co-op CALLE REAL

LM PA

Montecito

1 1. Fairview Gardens

4

.

E AV

.

LI N DE

Goleta

E. AV

LE

DR

. ST

IA

AN

N

. ST

YL

R TE IN RP

H . ST

T.

ND

UT

2

3

SA

TO SANTA BARBARA

101 CA

8T H

HS

7T

MEADOWVALE RD.

. AV E

. ST

EDISON ST.

H

1. HEAT Culinary 2. Sly’s 3. Giannfranco’s Trattoria 4. The Food Liaison

5T

MISSION DR.

9TH ST.

9T

NUMANCIA ST.

URA

. ST

Carpinteria 3

1

IA AVE.

LINDE N

TO VE NT

P I N TER

AV E

ES TE

MADERA ST.

246

C AR

LI N DE

RO

1

AVE.

101

FARADAY ST.

4

TO SOLVANG

TO SANTA BARBARA

AL

SAGUNTO ST.

N

1. Lucky Hen Larder 2. SY Kitchen 3. Carr Winery 4. Dos Carlitos

SANT A YN

Santa Ynez

COAST VILLAGE CIRCLE

4

E RD.

101

3

Summerland

84 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

DO RD I

A

PE

28 IP 27

SA

N

CT O

LS

CA

NO

VI

NA RE LT O HE IC

DE

S

DR. S TA

CA

RR

ST . Z RE

GA RD T. EN LI S

GU

YA

NT EC IT O

ST .

ST .

6 5

CA ST

IL

ILL

O

CLIF F D R.

S

34

INE REL HO

DR.

E

CE 101 SA R

CH

AV E

4 ST. 3 ILLO ST. BR A C

Stearns Wharf

ST .

Harbor

33

NA NO

ST 2 AT E ST .

ST .

ST . LL

ER

ST .

A

ILP AS

CA

TI

O

7 N

VI

ST .

O

1

LA

LO

ST.

CA10 ST ILL

LA

M

CA

RR ILL

O

AN

ST .

AP AM

U

DE

M

UE

ST .

M

RI

ST .

IS M

101

16 14 15 SA NT 13 A 17 BA RB 12 11 AR 19 A 20 AN ST . A CA 21 18 S PA TA TE ST23 22 . ST 26 . 24 CH 9 25 AP 8 A ST .

ST .

SI

O

N

ST .

ST AT E

RA V I

1. Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, Commercial Fishermen of Santa Barbara Saturday Market 2. Riverbench Santa Barbara, Helena Avenue Bakery, The Lark Santa Barbara, The Lucky Penny, 18. The French Press Les Marchands Wine Bar & & Dune Coffee Roasters 19. August Ridge Vineyards Merchant, Loquita, Santa Barbara Wine Collective 20. American Riviera Bank 21. C’est Cheese 3. Municipal Winemakers 22. The Wine Cask, 4. Lama Dog 5. Backyard Bowls, Downtown SB Au Bon Climat, Margerum Wines 6. Chocolate Maya 23. Bara’s Fresh 7. Green Table 24. Cebada Wine & Forbidden 8. Grapeseed Co. Fruit Orchards 9. 805 Boba 25. McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 10. Barbareño 26. The French Press & Dune 11. Savoy Wines Coffee Roasters 12. Bouchon Santa Barbara 27. Carr Winery Scarlett Begonia 28. Telegraph Brewing Co. 13. SB Public Market, Il Fustino 29. Belmond El Encanto 14. Renaud’s, Arlington Plaza 30. Renaud’s, Loreto Plaza  15. Ca’ Dario & Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 31. Il Fustino 16. OnQ Financial 32. Backyard Bowls, La Cumbre 17. Smithy Kitchen + Bar 33. Chooket 18. Savoy Café and Deli 34. Lazy Acres

ST .

30

FLO

31 32

LAS POSITAS

Santa Barbara

LA CUMBRE

29 Belmond El Encanto STATE ST.

1

Z

.

.

RD


Santa Barbara (Downtown cont.) Bouchon 9 W. Victoria St. 805 730-1160 BouchonSantaBarbara.com Bouchon sources all of its ingredients using an “asfresh-and-as-local-as-possible” approach. Experience fine dining, excellent regional wines and relaxed service in a warm, inviting ambience. Private dining in the Cork Room is available for groups of 10–20. Dinner nightly 5–10pm.

Ca’ Dario 37 E. Victoria St. 805 884-9419 CaDario.net Chef Dario Furlati’s flagship eatery offers a fine Italian dining experience featuring authentic recipes made with fresh, local ingredients. Handmade pastas, local seafood, weekly farmers market specials and an extensive Italian wine list. Located in the heart of the downtown Arts District. Serving lunch and dinner Sun–Thu 11:30am–10pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am–10:30pm.

Ca’ Dario Pizzeria Veloce 38 W. Victoria St. 805 884-9419 CaDarioPizza.net Located inside the Public Market, just a block away from Chef Dario Furlati's flagship eatery, Ca'Dario Pizzeria offers a casual, urban atmosphere to enjoy authentic pizzas, salads and appetizers. Open daily 11:00am–9pm.

Carr Winery 414 N. Salsipuedes Street 805 965-7985 CarrWinery.com Visit the 1940s Quonset Hut in downtown Santa Barbara and enjoy the ambiance of a working winery while sipping on delicious wines on the patio or at the beautiful barrel top bar. Wines by the glass, wine tasting, and wine on tap served daily. Monthly art shows and live music. Open daily 11am–9pm, Sun 11am–6pm.

Cebada Wine & Forbidden Fruit Orchards 8 E. De La Guerra St. 805 451-2570 Tasting Room 805 735-4648 Farm CebadaWine.com Cebada Vineyard is a working farm that vinifies estategrown Pinot Noir and Chardonnay located west of Sta. Rita Hills AVA. Their boutique winery produces sophisticated Burgundy-style wines. The handcrafted wines are made on the farm and available at the farm or downtown Santa Barbara. Tasting room open daily; farm tours available by appointment.

C’est Cheese 825 Santa Barbara St. 805 965-0318 CestCheese.com In addition to being a local source for the finest cheeses and artisanal foods, C’est Cheese serves breakfast and lunch—fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and incredible pastries. Open Tue–Fri 8am–6pm (Cafe closes at 3pm); Sat 7am–6pm (cheese shop opens at 8am); Sun 8am–3pm. Closed Mon.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St. 805 965-5956 ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped temptations that are made from the highest-quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Mesocacao including some small bean-to-bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and some exotic findings from their travels overseas.

Corazón Cocina 38 W. Victoria 805 845-0282 CorazonCocinaSB.com Located inside the Santa Barbara Public Market, offering homemade, local, unique and fresh cocina Mexicana. Join Chef Ramón Velazquez for fresh ceviches, mouthwatering tacos and homemade agua frescas. Open daily 11am–9pm.

Grapeseed Company 21 W. Ortega St. 805 456-3655 TheGrapeseedCompany.com The Grapeseed Company creates botanical spa and skin care products handcrafted from the byproduct of wine plus antioxidant-rich local and organic ingredients. Open Mon–Fri 10:30am–6pm, Sat 11am–5pm, closed Sun.

Il Fustino 38 W. Victoria St. 805 845-4995 ilFustino.com Located inside the Santa Barbara Public Market, Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars. Open daily 10am–8pm.

Margerum Wine Company 813 Anacapa St. 805 845-8435 MargerumWineCompany.com Located in the historic El Paseo complex, Margerum offers two venues for tasting in Downtown Santa Barbara. Enjoy a tasting (or a glass) of handcrafted, small production Margerum and Barden wines sourced from top vineyards around Santa Barbara County. Open Mon–Wed noon–5pm, Thu–Sun noon–6pm.

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 728 State St. 805 324-4402 McConnells.com McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, founded in Santa Barbara in 1949, is now in its third generation of family ownership. They make their ice creams as they always have: from scratch, using Central Coast, grass-grazed milk, cream and the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients from partner farms, artisans and purveyors they’ve worked with for decades. No preservatives. No stabilizers. No additives. Ever. A 70-year sweet legacy of keeping it real.

On Q Financial 1332 Anacapa St. 805 845-0694 OnQFinancial.com Since 2013, On Q Financial’s goal has been to ensure the mortgage process is streamlined and smooth for every client. Their team even works closely with community partners to provide homebuyers’ workshops to the Santa Barbara community. They are ready to help you purchase a home or refinance your existing home loans—in Santa Barbara and beyond.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 1324 State St. 805 892-2800 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 7am–3pm.

Scarlett Begonia 11 W. Victoria St., #10 805 770-2143 ScarlettBegonia.net Scarlett Begonia will always strive to have interesting, thoughtful food. Menus change weekly with an innovative, fresh approach to breakfast and lunch. Showcasing progressive modern cuisine, Scarlett Begonia features sustainable, organic, high quality ingredients coupled with innovative cooking to provide one of the most food-centric experiences in Santa Barbara. Now open seven days a week 9am–2pm. Available evenings for special events and private parties.

Savoy Café & Deli 24 W. Figueroa St. 805 962-6611 TheSavoyCafe.com A family owned and operated café featuring scratch cooking. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner for the past twelve years. Award winning salad bar, bakery, soup, hot and cold prepared foods, coffee and tea bar and excellent selection of wines by the glass. Cozy atmosphere, dog friendly patio. Open Mon–Sat 7–9pm, Sun 8am–8pm.

Savoy Wines 18 W. Anapamu St. 805 962-5353 SavoyWinesSB.weebly.com Locally owned and operated, Savoy Wines is Santa Barbara’s go-to wine shop. Boasting an extensive local and import selection, the shop offers one-ofa-kind ambiance, with knowledgeable, friendly and outgoing staff to assist you in finding that perfect bottle, in a relaxed vibe, smack dab in the middle of downtown Santa Barbara. Open Mon–Sat 11am–7pm, Sun 12–6pm.

Smithy Kitchen + Bar 7 E. Anapamu St. 805 845-7112 SmithySB.com Smithy Kitchen + Bar features local farm-to-table ingredients that are rustic and approachable while still being nuanced. Featuring small plates meant to be shared family style, Smithy is the perfect place to enjoy a night out. Dine in the whitewashed reclaimed wood interior or outside on rustic benches under hundred year old olive trees. Happy hour daily 4–6pm, dinner Mon–Sun 5pm–close, lunch Mon–Fri 11:30am–2:30pm, Sun brunch 10am–2pm.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 85


e l b i d e

ISSUE

28 •

WIN

TER

2015

edible

ISSUE

ar a arb B a ant

S

Celeb

ratin

g the

Loca

an l Food

d

Cul Wine

ture

nt of Sa

a Ba

rbara

Count

San Celeb

ratin

g the

Loca

l Fo

d od an

The S K COOue Iss : Santa oven Interw

WIN

TER

2014

ISSUE

29 •

SPRIN

16 G 20

West Justin Chef

• Maria • D R I N K • R E A D E AT

W

ultu ine C

re of

Sant

a Ba

rbara

Count

Loquita 202 State St. 805 880-3380 LoquitaSB.com

ar a

arb ta B

y

Masa rch of I N K In Sea TH

24 •

y

Loquita, a tribute to Santa Barbara’s Spanish origins, presents authentic Spanish food including tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats and three types of paella. Menu created by Executive Chef Peter Lee and Spanish Chef Perfecte Rocher. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

e ? S Issu ur Kids Cook OOK rown Do Yo The C’s Kringle and C

MU OM LE C EDIB lvang te So M E M B E R O F hocola Fine C

NIT

IES

iny The T

ing Build d Foo nities mu Com

Rules House Cider n No w To mall T H I N K of a S •

AD • RE Taste A Big E AT • D R I N K Mess

eat. drink. read. think. WE DELIVER…

Subscribe Online Today EdibleSantaBarbara.com For more information email us at info@EdibleSantaBarbara.com

Lucky Penny 127 Anacapa St. 805 284-0358 LuckyPennySB.com Offering casual dining fare of breakfast goodies, espressos, coffees and teas, wood-fired pizzas, sandwiches and salads, beer and wine. Outdoor patio seating. Located in the heart of Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10pm.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 137 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 324-4100 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 11am–6pm daily.

Santa Barbara Wine Collective

The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters

1101 State St. and 528 Anacapa St. 805 963-2721/805 962-7733 DuneCoffeeRoasters.com Sourcing, roasting and serving the best coffees from around the world. They love serving their carefully selected coffees and baked-in-house pastries and bread to the community. Visit The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters and let them show you the magic of coffee! Open Mon–Fri 6am–7pm, Sat–Sun 7am–7pm.

The Wine Cask

Helena Avenue Bakery 131 Anacapa St., C 805 880-3383 HelenaAvenueBakery.com An artisan bakery offering wholesome breads and handmade seasonal pastries. Specializing in baked goods made from scratch and a complete menu of grab-and-go items ideal for dining in or takeaway. Offering an expanded breakfast and espresso menu. Open daily 7am–7pm. Inside SB Wine Collective, off Helena Avenue.

The Lark

813 Anacapa St. 805 966-9463 WineCask.com

131 Anacapa St., Ste. A (805) 284-0370 TheLarkSB.com

The Wine Cask Restaurant features the freshest local ingredients, the best wine list in town and seasonal signature cocktails. They offer fine dining in their exquisite Gold Room and casual dining in the courtyard and at their Intermezzo bar. Lunch: Tue–Fri 11:30am–3pm. Dinner: Tue–Sun from 5:30pm. Last seating at 9pm Sun–Thu and at 10pm Fri–Sat.

The Lark, Santa Barbara’s premier dining destination, features locally sourced seasonal ingredients celebrating the abundant bounty of the Central Coast. Meals are served family-style with handcrafted cocktails and an extensive wine list to complement Chef Jason Paluska’s creations. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Santa Barbara (Funk Zone) Lama Dog 116 Santa Barbara St. 805 880-3364 LamaDog.com Craft beer tap room and bottle shop located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Wed 11:30am–10pm, Thu 11:30am–11pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am–midnight. @lamadog

86 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2018

Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant

131 Anacapa St., Ste. B 805 284-0380 LesMarchandsWine.com Les Marchands is a European-style wine bar and retail shop with a world-class team of sommeliers providing unique experiences in wine, food and education. With an extensive wine list, Les Marchands offers something for everyone. Open Sun–Thu 11am–9pm; Fri–Sat 11am–11pm.

131 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 456-2700 SantaBarbaraWineCollective.com Santa Barbara Wine Collective is a downtown tasting room for five local like-minded producers focusing on Santa Barbara County’s unique terroir. Wines are available for tastings, by the glass or bottle or to take home. Open Sun–Thu 11am–7pm, Fri–Sat 11am–8pm.

Santa Barbara (Mesa) Chooket 2018 Cliff Dr. 805 845-5519 Chooket.com Chooket is a French bakery specializing in individual fine pastries, cakes of French traditions, catering events and weddings. This pretty boutique is the kingdom of cream puffs, eclairs, fresh fruit tarts and offers seasonal menus. Artisan bakery, all treats are made on site and only with fresh ingredients. Open Tue–Sat 10am–6pm. Closed Sun–Mon.

Lazy Acres 302 Meigs Rd. 805 564-4410 LazyAcres.com Santa Barbara’s best source for wholesome, natural and organic foods and products with real people dedicated to providing unmatched personal service. Mon–Sat 7am–11pm, Sun 7am–10pm.


Santa Maria Cambria Estate Winery 5475 Chardonnay Ln. 805 938-7318 CambriaWines.com Family-owned, sustainably farmed estate winery. Visit and experience the flavors of the Santa Maria Bench. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Viognier and Syrah. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7200 and 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-4251 FoxenVineyard.com The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open 11am–4pm daily.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 6020 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 10am–4pm daily.

Santa Ynez Carr Warehouse 3563 Numancia Street 805 688-5757 CarrWinery.com Visit Carr Winery’s 3,800 square-foot climate-controlled wine storage facility in downtown Santa Ynez. The warehouse is where all of the Carr Wines are waxed and bottle aged. The facility has an open floor plan with a u-shaped bar and booths for visitors to enjoy wine tastings and wines by the glass. Live music on the First Friday of each month. Open daily 11am–6pm, Fri 11am–8pm.

SY Kitchen 1110 Faraday St. 805 691-9794 SYKitchen.com

mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Marsanne, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm.

Mad & Vin at The Landsby 1576 Mission Dr. 805 688-3121 TheLandsby.com Mad & Vin, which translates to food & wine in Danish, specializes in delicious wine-country inspired cuisine made with seasonal ingredients from California’s Central Coast. There's also a welcoming lobby bar which serves craft cocktails, specialty shrubs, beer and wine. Breakfast 7:30-10:30am, Sat–Sun until 11am. Dinner Tue–Sun 5–9pm. Bar Mon–Thu 4–9pm, Fri 4–10pm, Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm. Happy Hour daily 4–6pm.

Solvang Olive Company 1578 Mission Dr. 805 213-1399 SolvangOliveCo.com Solvang Olive features locally grown olive oils, fruit and balsamic vinegar and hand-crafted gourmet olives. The Solvang store also carries olive oil beauty products, tableware and cooking ingredients created by Californian artisans. Tasting room open Wed–Thu 10am–4pm, Fri–Sun 9am–5pm.

Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 1555 Mission Dr. 805 691-9444 SucculentCafe.com Comfort food with a twist, prepared with seasonal and local farm-fresh ingredients. The best charcuterie plates around feature farm-fresh cheeses, house-made jams, pickled veggies, nuts and fruit. Great local wine, craft beer and signature cocktails. Breakfast/Lunch: weekdays (except Tue) 10am–3pm, Sat & Sun 8:30am–3pm. Dinner Wed–Mon 5–9pm.

Source Guide Bragg Live Foods Bragg.com Founded in 1912 by Dr. Paul C. Bragg and now run by his daughter Dr. Patricia Bragg in Goleta, Bragg Live Food Products offers organic and natural health products and publishes self-health books. Available locally at Fairview Gardens’ Farm Stand, Lassen’s, Gladden and Sons, Tri-County Produce, Whole Foods Market, Lazy Acres and in the health section of your neighborhood grocery store.

Modern Northern Italian dishes showcasing local ingredients and Chef Luca Crestanelli’s light touch. Specialties include homemade pastas; pizzas served from the wood-fired oven; oak-grilled chicken, seafood, lamb and steak. The bar features dazzling cocktails crafted by Alberto Battaglini. Also featured is The Courtyard, a casual outdoor lounge with full service dining. Lunch daily 11:30am–2:30pm, Aperitivo Mon–Thur 4–5:30pm, Dinner Sun–Thur 5–9pm and Fri–Sat 5–9:45pm.

Drake Family Farms

Solvang

Jimenez Family Farm

Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-3032 ButtonwoodWinery.com In 1968 Betty Williams came to Buttonwood, creating a life that found expression through a connection with the land. The vineyard now has 33,000 vines with a

Ron Helman Jazz 505 603-3648 RonHelmanMusic.com Ron Helman draws from the great jazz songbook of the 1950s and ’60s to play for big and small Central Coast events. No gimmicks here, just straight-ahead jazz that puts a smile on your face and a dance in your step.

Plow to Porch 805 895-7171 PlowToPorch.com Plow to Porch Organics is a local organic/pesticide-free produce and grocery delivery service to members who subscribe. They simplify the purchase of local fresh organic produce and other organic, local foods in order to inspire good nutrition, support local farmers, protect the environment and make eating healthy food fun!

R&D los olivos 505 999-7752 RandDlosolivos.com R&D los olivos offers an ever-changing curated collection of fine jewelry, art and gifts handmade by artisans. Jewels and treasures for every day, located in Los Olivos, the heart of Santa Barbara wine country. Featuring Diane Dorsey Jewelry, DianeDorsey.com.

Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market 805 962-5354 SBFarmersMarket.org Six markets, six days a week. Schedule on page 56.

Santa Barbara–Tree Farm CalAtlanticHomes.com Brand new homes in the foothills of Santa Barbara County in a 26-acre setting.

Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa! Mangalitsa ground pork (the real hamburger) and hickory smoked bacon are now featured in the Larder Meat Company’s Larder Club meat box, delivered monthly throughout California (sign up at http://www.lardermeatco.com). You can also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website—please call first! Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@WinfieldFarm.us) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

DrakeFamilyFarms.com Making locally produced farmstead artisan goat cheese in Ontario, California. At Drake Family Farms every goat has a name and their goat cheeses are made on the farm with milk exclusively from the farm’s own animals. Available at local farmers markets and online.

Follow us on Twitter

805 688-0597 JimenezFamilyFarm.com Small family-run local farm specializes in sustainably grown food and their famous handmade pies, quiches and small-batch preserves. Visit them at the farmers market to purchase produce, pies, jams and naturally fed and farm-raised rabbit, lamb, pork, goat and poultry.

Over 10,000 tweets, over 7,000 followers and an Eddy Award Finalist in Social Media.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2018 | 87


THE

L

AS

T

Bite

Winter’s

Don’t-Miss Dish Photos & words by Liz Dodder

For most of us, winter means time for soup! And the ultimate soup is consommé: a super clear, concentrated broth usually served with a few hearty ingredients like meat, pasta or vegetable garnishes. A soup so clear and simple can taste so bold with amazing concentration of flavor. Of course, there are many steps to make this perfectly clear, traditional French soup, so we’re lucky Chef Drew Terp of Pico at the Los Alamos General Store can show us how to make it. Chef Drew has cooked in and helmed at Michelinstarred kitchens in Napa, New York City, Spain, Las Vegas and Washington, D.C. Now he is spreading the love in Los Alamos, with monthly cooking classes at Pico. “I want to help cultivate passion in people who want to learn to cook better. It’s such an opportunity to be able to go into a professional kitchen to learn, instead of online or with video,” says Chef Drew. He remembers folks calling in with cooking questions to the butcher shop where he worked in Alabama, and he loved helping each one. See page 58 for more info about his cooking classes. To make duck broth consommé, Chef Drew roasts or grills duck bones

(or beef knee or leg bones) until brown. He browns onions, carrots, fennel and garlic in grapeseed oil in a large stockpot, then deglazes with dry white wine, scraping bottom of pan and reducing the mixture by half. He adds the roasted bones, covers with cold water, toasted peppercorns and bay leaf, then simmers on low for 4–6 hours. He then strains it through cheesecloth and refrigerates it overnight.

Duck Consommé with Tortelloni at Pico

In the morning, he grinds carrots and onions with two egg whites, puts the mixture in the bottom of a stockpot and gently covers with the cold broth. He cooks it all over very low heat until the mixture at the bottom creates a raft and begins to float to the top, clarifying the broth on the way. He lets it rest at room temperature until the raft sinks a little. Then he pours it through cheesecloth and seasons it with salt, pepper and soy sauce. To serve, he pours the heated consommé over cooked pasta, grilled meat, blanched squash and green onion in a warm bowl. Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com

88 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER WINTER2018 2018


Edible Santa Barbara Winter 2018  

Celebrating the local food and wine culture of Santa Barbara County.

Edible Santa Barbara Winter 2018  

Celebrating the local food and wine culture of Santa Barbara County.