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ISSUE 35 • FALL 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest & Holiday ISSUE

A Sicilian Christmas Reverie Loyal to the Soil Fairview Gardens L O YA L T O L O C A L


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edible

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WIL FERNANDE Z

C AROLE TOPALIAN

fall and Holiday

Departments 8 Food for Thought

28 Edible Garden

by Krista Harris

This Spud’s for You by Joan S. Bolton

10 Small Bites 2 Eat and Drink Local 1 This Fall 15 In Season 16 Seasonal Recipes Santa Barbara Ranch Dressing Herbes de Provence Cheese Crackers Sicilian Orange and Fennel Salad

24 Local Food Artisans A Beautiful Partnership by Janice Cook Knight

page 18 4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

JOSHUA CURRY

26 Drinkable Landscape Some Bloody Good Spooky Spirits by George Yatchisin

32 Global Local Cuisine Indian Feast by Laura Booras

78 Event Calendar 80 Eat Drink Local Guide and Maps 88 The Last Sip Fall’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder

page 32


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fall and Holiday

38 Rebuilding Connections at Fairview Gardens by Nancy Oster

page 20

46 A Sicilian Christmas Reverie by Leslie Westbrook

60 Loyal to the Soil Ballard Canyon’s Syrah Mission by Sonja Magdevski

70 It Takes Great Grapes to Make Great Wine A Conversation with Winegrower

Recipes in This Issue Soup 75 Silky Cauliflower Curry Soup with Crispy Shaved Brussels Sprouts

Salads and Salad Dressing

Ruben Solorzano

77 Roasted Parsnip and Arugula Salad 16 Santa Barbara Ranch Dressing 20 Sicilian Orange and Fennel Salad

by Sonja Magdevski

Main Dishes

72 Foraging for Ideas Each Season Brings Fresh Vegetable Delights at the Market

76 Stuffed Delicata Squash

by Pascale Beale

Side Dishes and Snacks 18 Herbes de Provence Cheese Crackers 74 Trio of Carrot Purées

Beverages ABOUT THE COVER

Timballo di bucatini—a Sicilian holiday specialty prepared by Alberto Morello of Olio e Limone. Photo by Fran Collin.

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

27 Blood Beach Cocktail

JOSHUA CURRY

Features


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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

STE VEN BROWN

Eat Local Challenge Each October I challenge myself to eat entirely local food for 31 days. It’s not that I don’t eat plenty of local food the rest of the year, but there is something about an official challenge to usher in new intentions and to get inspired again. Each fall I invite you to join me in taking this challenge, but this year I have a slightly more tangible way for you to do it. We have created a special email newsletter that you can sign up for if you’d like to do the challenge along with me. Each weekday morning in October, you’ll receive an email with a project for something related to the Eat Local Challenge—along with tips, recipes or suggestions. The idea is to do this as a community; whether you are in Santa Barbara or elsewhere, you can eat local wherever you are. We will be seeking out our nearest farmers market or purging our pantry or making some condiments from scratch together. And to make it a little easier, I’ve created short videos to go along with some of the projects; you can find them on our YouTube channel. At the end of the month, we will have supported our local food producers and will have learned a thing or two as well. I hope you give it a try. If you are on the fence, I encourage you to at least sign up for the newsletter and see what the projects are all about. Even if you don’t do every one, you might pick up some inspiration along the way. I sometimes think that the areas where I fail are the most interesting aspect of the Eat Local Challenge. Maybe it’s the restaurant I ended up at that didn’t have much in the way of local on the menu or perhaps it was my well-intentioned plan to make my own yogurt that somehow never happened. I have stretched the boundaries of “local” to include Sonoma and Northern California when there was some cheese that I wanted to include. For me it’s not about perfection, it’s about intention. Thinking about where my food comes from and asking questions is the important part of taking this challenge. As October comes to a close, I love the subtle change of season that means Thanksgiving is near, followed by all the festive gatherings in December. I’d like to offer my thanks and gratitude to all our readers and to the rich, vibrant local food community I call home.

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

Visit our website EdibleSantaBarbara.com Sign up for the Eat Local Challenge at any time during the month of October. You can also find a link to our YouTube channel at EdibleSantaBarbara.com. Please consider subscribing to our channel and leaving your comments about the videos.

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

edible

SANTA BAR BAR A Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHERS

Steven Brown & Krista Harris EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson Julie Simpson DESIGNER

Steven Brown ADVERTISING & EVENTS

Katie Hershfelt ads@ediblesantabarbara.com SOCIAL MEDIA

Jill Johnson EAT LOCAL CHALLENGE COORDINATOR

Ivy Hirsch

Contributors Pascale Beale Joan S. Bolton Laura Booras Fran Collin Joshua Curry Liz Dodder Erin Feinblatt Wil Fernandez Janice Cook Knight Sonja Magdevski Nancy Oster Carole Topalian Leslie A. Westbrook George Yatchisin Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

®


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Small Bites Books to read and to give this fall and holiday season.

Your Vegetable Guide Les Legumes: Vegetable Recipes from the Market Table By Pascale Beale

Pascale Beale, a regular contributor to Edible Santa Barbara, has released another of her ingredientfocused cookbooks. This time she turns her attention to vegetables —not just the pea and bean members of the family, as you might think from the title—with recipes from salads to entrees in the blend of French and Mediterranean styles she is known for. You can’t help feeling you are right there with her at the farmers market as you read the introduction and the headnotes for each recipe. And you could easily use this book as a guide for what to do with the overflowing basket of vegetables you sometimes end up with when you get carried away at the market. The book is organized by vegetable type: Some are focused on a single one, like asparagus, carrots, tomatoes or mushrooms; others are sensibly grouped together, like beets and radishes or endive and fennel. It’s also a book to cure ennui in the kitchen. When you feel like you can’t look another of your tried-and-true recipes in the face, you need her recipe for Heirloom Tomato and Burrata Salad with Savory Granola or Zucchini Cappuccino with Lime Crème Fraîche. Pascale’s Roasted Kale and Brussels Sprouts with Dates and Pecans might reignite your flagging interest in kale and be the ideal potluck contribution during the holidays.

Your Inspired Cookbook Kale & Caramel: Recipes for Body, Heart, and Table By Lily Diamond

Blogger and photographer Lily Diamond has created a cookbook that will feed your soul. The introduction and headnotes for each recipe read like a beautifully crafted

10 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

memoir. You will find yourself getting to know the author on such an intimate basis that you’ll want to share a cup of tea or a cocktail with her. The book is organized in two sections: herbs and flowers. Her notes on the herb flavor profiles, qualities and suggested pairings are helpful in embracing her sensory-based approach to these mostly vegetarian and often vegan recipes. Familiar herbs like basil turn up in something sweet like her Roasted Strawberry & Basil Cream Pie or in something more exotic like the Lemongrass Basil Coconut Ice Cream with Black Sesame Brittle. Diamond’s photos are sun-drenched and stunning— providing that extra nudge to get you to make the recipes. They never sound terribly hard, either. Her voice shines through in the friendly text, encouraging you to try something new. In addition to salads, soups, entrees and desserts, she includes a number of skin care recipes using herbs and flowers, such as the easy Cucumber Rose Petal Mask. This fall I’m looking forward to sipping her Pomegranate & Thyme Spritzer or Fennel Apple Limeade while snacking on some Persimmon Bites with Pomegranate Molasses & Pesto.

Your Tasting Companion Simply Delicious Wine Country Recipes By Robin Goldstein

Local chef and cookbook author Robin Goldstein has brought us A Taste of Ojai and A Taste of Santa Barbara. Now she turns her attention to recipes inspired by our local wine country, the Santa Ynez Valley. The stunning photography takes full advantage of the scenery with panoramic shots and mouthwatering full-page compositions of the food. And what a lot of food there is! The recipes flow smoothly from one to another, with chapters on perfect bites, a taste of cheese, food for white wine, red wine, with grapes and delicious endings. Recipes for preparing your own mustard, jam and ricotta cheese will encourage you to make some ingredients you might not have thought of making. And as you might guess from the wine country theme, you’ll find ways to use grape leaves (and a handy technique for freezing them) as well as recipes for roasted grapes, pickled grapes and grape salsa. There are many recipes that call out to be put into heavy rotation this fall: SyrahBraised Short Ribs, Mulled Red Wine Ice Cream and Autumn Fruit Compote with Lemon Panna Cotta. This is a book you will cook from for many seasons to come.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 11


e Santa Barba ibl ra Ed

eat & drink Local this fall

CHALLENGE OCTOBER 2017

Edible Santa Barbara is sponsoring an Eat Local Challenge for the month of October. The Challenge encourages people to take a personal pledge to eat and drink local products October 1–31. When you participate in the Eat Local Challenge, you’ll choose to eat only foods produced within a 100- or 150mile radius of your home, or within your region, or within your state. Decide if you are going to make any exceptions (such as for coffee, tea or spices), but try to stay as local as possible.

Sign Up Go to EdibleSantaBarbara.com and join the email newsletter. Each weekday morning in October you’ll receive an email assignment to inspire and inform you on how to access local food, cook with local ingredients and seek out and support local farmers, fishermen, food and beverage artisans. The Eat Local Challenge is a great way to encourage you to think about where your food comes from and to perhaps change the way you shop and the food you buy. You might start shopping more at the farmers market or at local farm stands. You might sign up for a local produce delivery service.

12 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

Local Produce

Beyond Produce

If you are participating in the Eat Local Challenge—and even if you’re not—now is a great time to seek out new local food products and to experience the wide variety of local produce that our area has to offer.

Eating local isn’t just about sourcing local fruits and vegetables. Try local meats and poultry, grass-fed beef, seafood, olive oil, nuts, raw milk, cheeses and butter, jams, preserves, bread and pasta. You can even find local convenience foods— jars of tomato sauce, salsa and peanut butter.

Fall is a great season to focus on buying more local produce. Many summer fruits and vegetables are still available and the cool-season produce is starting to come in as well. Whether you get hooked on shopping at the farmers market or you start seeking out local produce at the grocery store, co-op or farm stand, we have some tips to help you transition to a more local way of eating.

Buy What’s In Season Check our In Season list for what you will typically find at the farmers market or grocery store during the fall. Don’t waste your time looking for cherries or fava beans. Instead, enjoy the bounty of pomegranates, persimmons, apples and butternut squash. Join a community-supported agriculture (CSA) harvest subscription service which provides a weekly box of produce. See a listing of the CSAs located throughout Santa Barbara County on EdibleSantaBarbara.com.

Some grocery stores identify local products with a special label on the shelves. Keep an eye out for these. And it might be a good time to visit a small specialty shop where you can ask for local food items.

Local Seafood Look for and ask for local seafood at markets and restaurants. We have some of the best seafood around, and fall is a great time to enjoy the local season for ridgeback shrimp and spiny lobster. You can also find many local seafood delicacies year round, such as mussels and urchin.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 13


in Season this fall Fall Produce Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Basil Beans, green Blackberries Blueberries Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cantaloupe Celery Cherimoya Chiles Chives Cilantro Collards Corn Cucumber Dill Eggplant Fennel Figs Grapefruit Grapes Kiwi Lavender Limes Melons Mint Mustard greens Nectarines Onions, green bunching Papayas Peaches Peppers Persimmon Plums/Pluots Pomegranate Raspberries Squash, summer Strawberries Tangerines/Mandarins Tomatillo Tomatoes Turnips Watermelon

Year-Round Produce

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Fall Seafood Mussels Ridgeback shrimp Rock fish Sardines Spiny lobster Swordfish White sea bass Yellowtail

Apples Arugula Beans, dried Beets Bok choy Broccoli Carrots Cauliflower Chard Dandelion Dates

Year-Round Seafood

Garlic

Eggs Coffee Dairy

(harvested Sept/Oct) (harvested May/June)

Herbs

(Bay leaf, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Edible flowers Kale Leeks Lemons Lettuce Mushrooms Onions, bulb

(harvested May/June)

Oranges Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Potatoes Radish Raisins

Abalone (farmed) Black cod Clams Oysters Rock crab Sand dabs Urchin

Other Year-Round

(Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil Meat

(Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork)

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat

(Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta, pies produced from wheat grown locally)

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Spinach Sprouts Squash, winter

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Yams

(harvested Aug/Sept)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 15


seasonal

Recipes

Santa Barbara Ranch Dressing The origin of Ranch Dressing can be directly traced to the dressing that Steve and Gayle Henson created and served to customers at their dude ranch, Hidden Valley Ranch on San Marcos Pass in Santa Barbara. So what better condiment to make during the Eat Local Challenge? Makes about 1 cup 1

⁄ 2 cup mayonnaise

1

⁄ 2 cup buttermilk

1 small shallot, finely chopped 1 clove garlic, smashed and finely chopped 1

⁄ 2 teaspoon dry mustard

2 tablespoons chives, finely chopped 1 tablespoon dill, finely chopped 1 tablespoon Italian parsley, finely chopped Pinch of paprika Salt and pepper, to taste

Egg Salad Sandwich

Combine the mayonnaise and buttermilk in a medium bowl until smooth. Add the rest of the ingredients and whisk until well combined. Taste and adjust seasoning. Use as salad dressing or sauce. You can put into a glass jar and keep in the refrigerator for up to a week, if it lasts that long. – Krista Harris

What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche Salt and pepper, to taste

Additions: • A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion • A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro, chervil or tarragon • A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash of white wine vinegar Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) JOSHUA CURRY

Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix

until incorporated with a still chunky texture. Taste and add 16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALLbut 2017 more seasoning or additions if needed.


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seasonal

Recipes

Herbes de Provence Cheese Crackers These are a slightly softer, thicker cracker with lots of flavor from the herbes de Provence and aged cheese. They are delicious for snacking or as an accompaniment to wine. Make them for the Eat Local Challenge or any time you want an easy homemade snack. Makes 18–20 crackers 1 cup flour (all-purpose or gluten-free) ½ teaspoon salt Pinch of pepper 1

⁄ 2 teaspoon herbes de Provence (Shepherd Farms)

3 tablespoons butter, chilled and cut into cubes 1 cup grated firm, aged cheese (I use Drake Family Farm Idyllwild aged goat cheese) 1

⁄ 4 cup milk, chilled

Preheat oven to 375°. Combine the flour, salt, pepper and herbes de Provence in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until combined. Add the butter and pulse until it resembles coarse meal. Add the cold milk and pulse just until dough comes together. Form the dough into a log about 1½ inches in diameter, wrap in waxed paper and refrigerate for several hours or overnight. Unwrap the dough and slice into ¼-inch rounds. Place on a baking sheet an inch apart. Bake 12–15 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool. Store in an airtight container.

JOSHUA CURRY

– Krista Harris

18 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


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seasonal

Recipes

Sicilian Orange and Fennel Salad My great-grandfather was Sicilian, but sadly I did not inherit any recipes from the Sicilian side of my family. That hasn’t stopped me from visiting Sicily and from exploring its cuisine. This salad is typically made in the winter, but I can usually find oranges and fennel at the market in the fall. You can use navel oranges or blood oranges or a combination of the two. It makes a great accompaniment to holiday feasts or simple weeknight suppers. Makes 6 servings 6 oranges (include some blood oranges if available) 1 large fennel bulb 1

⁄ 2 red onion

Handful of black olives, pitted Olive oil Salt and pepper

With a sharp knife cut the peel and white pith off of each orange and slice crosswise into ¼-inch-thick rounds. Remove some of the green feathery tips from the fennel bulb and set aside. Cut off and discard the stalks. Cut the bulb in half and then cut into very thin slices (use a mandoline if you have one). Cut the red onion into very thin slices. Arrange the orange slices on a large platter. Add the fennel and onion slices and scatter the olives on top. Drizzle with a little olive oil, then add some of the reserved fennel fronds on top and season with salt and pepper.

JOSHUA CURRY

– Krista Harris

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Egg Salad Sandwich What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche Salt and pepper, to taste

Additions: • A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion • A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro, chervil or tarragon • A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash of white wine vinegar Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add more seasoning or additions if needed. Create an open-faced or closed sandwich using additional mayonnaise on each slice if you love mayonnaise—or just mustard, or neither. Pickled vegetables make a great topping as well, such as a couple stalks of Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto. — Krista Harris

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 21


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LOCAL FOOD ARTISANS

A Beautiful Partnership

Tomatoes into Sauce

by Janice Cook Knight

I

n late summer, I like to make my own tomato sauce, then freeze it for use the rest of the year. But when my homemade sauce is gone, I’m happy to say I’ve found a sauce I like as much as my own. Michael De Paola has partnered with Chris Cadwell of Tutti Frutti Farms to make three organically grown, Italian-style tomato sauces: Pomodoro, a simple sweet marinara; Roasted Garlic, with a rich but mellow flavor; and Arrabbiata, which has a spicy kick. I used the Pomodoro sauce to make a lovely eggplant Parmigiano. These sauces are family recipes, also used in Michael’s former restaurant, Emilio’s, which he owned with his father, Emilio De Paola, for 22 years. Besides the tomato sauces, the Tutti Frutti product line also includes two excellent salsas: Heirloom Roasted Salsa contains jalapeños, tomatoes, a touch of garlic and salt; and Roasted Garlic Salsa, which has a pronounced toasty flavor. Both salsas are delightfully, but not too, spicy. Perhaps my favorite product of theirs is Candied Jalapeños. It’s a sweet jalapeño pickle, like the flavor of pepper jelly but with the crunchy texture of jalapeño slices. One fan exclaimed, “I find ways to use them in so many things: tacos, burgers, even added to stir-fries.” I added them to sautéed corn and used them to garnish shrimp tacos. You’ll want to grab a spoon and eat them straight out of the jar, too. Tutti Frutti Farms tomatoes are both organic and heirloom. We’re lucky they’re grown here and we can buy them directly from the farmers market, but their tomatoes are also distributed nationally. All the sauce and salsa ingredients are organically grown. Michael De Paola, besides being the former owner of Emilio’s and, previously, the pizzeria Michael Anthony’s, operates De Paola Vineyard in Arroyo Grande, featuring awardwinning Zinfandel, Pinot Noir and Petite Syrah. You can buy the sauces, salsas and jalapeños at the Tutti Frutti stand at our Saturday and Tuesday farmers markets. They will also be available this fall at many local grocery stores and markets. Janice Cook Knight is the author of The Follow Your Heart Cookbook: Recipes from the Vegetarian Restaurant and Follow Your Heart’s Vegetarian Soup Cookbook. She has taught cooking for 35 years. Her article in the Fall 2014 issue of Edible Santa Barbara, “Hurray for the Orange, Red and Gold: The Season for Persimmons,” won the 2015 M.F.K. Fisher Award in the Print category. JaniceCookKnight.com 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


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EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 25


DRINKABLE LANDSCAPE

Some Bloody Good

Spooky Spirits by George Yatchisin

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his fall issue’s timespan is chock-a-block with holidays, dear reader, and while some might prefer a cool Yule or a tryptophan-hazed Thanksgiving, the favorite season at our house is All Hallows’ Eve. We’ll whip up a scary little cemetery in the yard for the neighborhood kids, have a party or two in our haunted house and think of ways to make spooky food (at least squid ink pasta) and drinks that lead to shaky hands even before any alcohol is consumed. Reader, meet the Blood Beach (ooh, creepy name). This is our local version of the venerable, if often badmouthed, Blood and Sand. Despite first appearing in the classic 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book, and getting its name from a Valentino silent film, Punch magazine called the Blood and Sand “a murky mess that’s one of the canon’s more infamous scourges.” I figured—what could be more terrifying than trying to revive a drink with such a bad rep? 26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

Not surprisingly, if you keep doing research you can find ways to rescue almost any supposed disaster. The basic Blood and Sand is equal parts Scotch, sweet vermouth, orange juice and a very specific cherry liqueur, Cherry Heering. Complaints about that drink generally worried that the parts never coalesced, so it just seemed like a murky screwdriver with whisky. Terrifying, indeed. The good news is that the drink has four moving parts one can play with to get things right. For while it is often made with a blended Scotch like Dewar’s, a single malt adds some edge. You can push that edge even further (if you care to spend the money) by using Lagavulin 16, from the land of peat, Islay. I highly recommend it—particularly for fall. The campfire nose is delightful, and gives the Blood Beach a hearty canvas to paint on. (And if you want a south of the border version, try playing with mezcal.) We are—so fortunately—in a dream era for vermouths. While I’m generally a huge fan of Carpano Antica, it’s so bold it can throw some drinks, like this one, out of balance. So here I recommend the just-introduced-fromSpain Lustau that is crafted from both Amontillado and Pedro Ximénez sherries. This mix gives it fascinating depth without being too overpowering. Plus, for Halloween, what better than to have an allusion to Edgar Allan Poe’s unsettling story “The Cask of Amontillado” hiding in your cocktail? You won’t have anything too watery hiding in your cocktail if you grab an orange from outside your door. One reason the Blood and Sand historically has failed is that commercial oranges are big, beautiful and not so tasty. That slightly funny-looking one from your own tree will work much better, especially if it’s a Valencia or Cara Cara. There’s only ¾ ounce of juice per cocktail, so you want it to count. And a self-sourced orange is also crucial for the flaming peel garnish. Store-bought oranges are often waxed, and if you use them for flaming, you’ve just shot paraffin all over your cocktail. Ick. Then, for one last moment to face up to fears, this is the perfect drink to add some extra texture to via egg whites. Consuming raw eggs can be nerve-wracking to many—just check the warnings restaurant menus now offer—but once again, enjoy your drinkable landscape. While not everyone has


Blood Beach Makes 2 cocktails 2 egg whites 2 ounces Lagavulin 16 Years Old Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky

A Trip to Italy , without the Jet Lag…

1½ ounces Cherry Heering 1½ ounces sweet vermouth (Lustau recommended) 1½ ounces freshly squeezed orange juice 2 orange peels (cut those off the orange before you juice— it’s easier)

Add egg whites, whisky, Cherry Heering, vermouth and juice into a shaker. Cap and shake—this is known as a dry shake—very carefully. Adding air to the egg white makes both a lovely texture for the drink and a loose meringue, but it can also foam up and nearly blow off the top of your shaker. Have a towel handy and don’t wear your favorite shirt. After a vigorous shake of 20 seconds, carefully remove the shaker lid and add ice. Shake again for 15 seconds—you are both chilling and aerating the drink. Strain through a Hawthorn strainer into two up glasses. Garnish with the orange peels, but flame them first (you did this with your Spring ’17 wine cocktail, remember?). Slice off some very fresh orange peel, and if you get a bit of pith that’s OK; this trick is easier with a thicker piece of skin. Hold the peel by its narrow sides. Light a flame between the peel and the drink’s surface, and squeeze. The oil in the peel will spark through your flame to the cocktail. Cocktail fireworks!

hens laying very healthy, safe eggs in their yards, the eggs you can get at the farmers market or at better stores are quite safe (especially when they end up awash in alcohol). The unity it brings to the drink, the light meringue with which each drink is topped, the luscious creaminess throughout—it’s completely worth the worry over the eggs. You can’t really sub for the Cherry Heering, by the way. First, it’s seriously red, and often other cherry-flavored liquors, like Luxardo maraschino, are clear. We need that blood in there. (Although, to be honest, the drink ends up an odd brown-going-to-crimson, so a bit challenging and scary to drink.) Second, it brings the cherry goodness as it’s made by soaking Danish—where inventor Peter Heering was from— cherries and spices in neutral spirits and letting that age in barrel. After the cocktails, you can move on to straight “blood” shots of the Heering if you feel daring. George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

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EDIBLE GARDEN

This Spud’s for You

C AROLE TOPALIAN

by Joan S. Bolton

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cratch just below the surface—which is where potatoes literally grow—and you’ll discover that the common potato is anything but common. While russets for baking, white rose for boiling and specialty fingerlings may immediately come to mind, there are hundreds of other types of potatoes, thanks to thousands of years of cultivation and experimentation. Grow your own, and you can soon be harvesting the edible tubers in earthy shades of blue, red, purple, gold, brown and white, and with all sorts of different textures, tastes, sizes and shapes.

Getting Growing Potatoes are native to the Andes, where ancestors of the Incas first grew the calorie-rich vegetable 4,000 to 6,000 years ago in loose, volcanic soil. Over the past several centuries, potatoes have been cultivated throughout the rest of the world in many other types of soil. But regardless of the region, potatoes must have a loose, 28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

fall-through-your-fingers medium, with sandy loam here on the Central Coast being ideal. They also need full sun and an ongoing supply of water. Plant potatoes now for a spring harvest. Plant them again late next spring, to add substance to your diet during next October’s Eat Local Challenge. Or plant them any time of year for a fresh crop in four months.

In the Garden You’ll plant seed potatoes, which aren’t really seeds. Instead, they’re chunks of potato with an eye or two. Just like for asparagus, you’ll dig a trench, then add soil as the plants grow. In the case of potatoes, that’s because the new tubers form in the space between the seed potatoes and the surface. If your seed potatoes are too shallow, there won’t be much room. Also remember that anything other than extremely loose soil is the kiss of death. My first time, I dug foot-wide, footdeep holes in my clay soil, then amended heavily. The plants


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Three to four months after planting, the leaves will begin to yellow and die back. Stop watering. Two weeks after the foliage has collapsed, carefully dig out the potatoes by hand. While you could harvest your entire crop at once, I dig out only as many as I expect to use within a week or so, returning time and again to gather the remaining tubers. Although the experts strongly advise against it, if you don’t collect all of your crop, the remnants are likely to go dormant for a month or two, then re-sprout and start the cycle again. Optimal storage is at 40° in a dark place with 80% to 90% humidity. Keep in mind that the potatoes are still alive. Do not keep them in your refrigerator, where the dry air will dehydrate them. Freezing causes their starch to convert to sugar and ruins them. Exposure to light will prompt them to produce solanine and turn green, rendering them inedible. grew beautifully. But by harvest time, the surrounding, heavier clay had collapsed into the holes. When I tried to unearth my potatoes, they broke into disappointing bits. Lesson learned. I now plant in the loosest of raised beds. To get started, dig a 10- to 12-inch-deep trench. Line the trench with gopher wire. Cover the wire with 2 inches of soil. Cut any seed potatoes bigger than a golf ball into pieces. Space the chunks 1 foot apart, eyes up. Cover with another 2 inches of soil, then thoroughly soak the bed. Keep the soil moist. Look for the first leaves in two weeks. Once the plants reach a foot tall, begin to layer loose soil, compost, straw or fine-textured mulch around them, leaving the top 4 to 6 inches of each plant exposed. Gradually fill the trench, chasing the plants’ growth, but never covering the tops of the plants. Once you’ve reached the original grade, you can keep “hilling” in order to provide an even deeper layer for the new tubers to form.

Other Tactics If raised beds aren’t an option, try growing potatoes on top of your existing soil. Break up the surface first. Set in place an inverted tomato cage lined with a plastic garbage bag to corral the planting medium. Punch holes in the bag for drainage, then fill the cage with 4 to 6 inches of a mix of loose soil, compost and/or straw. Space three or four seed potatoes as far apart as possible. Cover them with another 2 inches of material, then carry on. Buckets, tubs and other containers work just as well, provided they’re at least 18 inches deep and have drainage holes.

Care & Harvest Continue to water, keeping the planting medium evenly moist. If you must fertilize, foliar feed with a mild solution of fish emulsion or seaweed fertilizer only up to the time of flowering. Those flowers herald the harvest of your first “new potatoes.” The small, choice spuds offer a tender taste of what’s to come. Brush back the soil to unearth a few newbies from each plant, then let the remaining tubers mature. 30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

Sourcing Seed Potatoes Most of us surely recall the grade-school science project of jabbing toothpicks into a potato, suspending it over a jar of water and watching it magically sprout. These days, only organic potatoes may cooperate. Non-organic ones are typically sprayed with a growth inhibitor. Indeed, organic potatoes that I’ve left too long in a cupboard are my go-to source for seed potatoes. However, there’s no guarantee that my store-bought potatoes are virus free. And that’s where the Irish ran into trouble during the Great Potato Famine. Potato blight, a fungal disease, devastated three consecutive years of crops. More than one million people died of starvation and another million left the country. To be absolutely sure that you won’t infect your own garden soil, seek virus-indexed certified seed potatoes. While seed potatoes are most commonly available in the spring, some mail-order companies do ship to California during fall and winter. Those late-season seed potatoes may have been freshly picked, so may be heading into their natural month-ortwo dormancy. To break the cycle, place the seed potatoes in a paper bag with several apples, bananas or onions, all of which release ethylene gas, which jump-starts sprouting. To keep your soil clean, also rotate your potatoes. I generally grow two, maybe three, rounds in a raised bed, then shift to something else for a couple of years. Potatoes belong to the nightshade (Solanaceae) family. Do not precede or follow them with any other family members, including eggplant, peppers, tomatoes or tomatillos. Right now, I’m giving my most recent potato bed a break by growing vibrant orange zinnias and Mexican sunflowers (Tithonia rotundifolia). Aside from being pretty, both entice butterflies and bees to visit my garden. Joan S. Bolton is a freelance writer, garden coach and garden designer who confesses to a lifelong love affair with plants. She and her husband, Tom, have filled their four-acre property in western Goleta with natives and other colorful, water-conserving plants. They also maintain avocado, citrus and fruit trees and grow vegetables and herbs year-round. SantaBarbaraGardens.com


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GLOBAL LOCAL CUISINE

Indian Feast by Laura Booras PHOTOGRAPHY BY WIL FERNANDEZ

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alifornia is fortunate in its ability to grow fresh produce all year long. Our temperate climate and fertile soils, especially in Santa Barbara County, allow for even delicate foods like strawberries to grow the majority of the year. Eating local food is a way of life. However, my passion is cooking exotic cuisines. So using local ingredients to create meals influenced by cuisines from around the world is something I adore. I like to challenge myself to create authentic flavors using as many local ingredients as possible. The cuisine of India has always intrigued me. When I was a little girl, my grandparents visited India, returning laden with beautiful souvenirs and endless stories of colorful markets. Ever since, I have immersed myself in the culture, languages, religions and food. The subtle heat, the glorious colors of the spices and the intricacy (what is that flavor?) of the recipes brought on an obsession— one I have tried to perfect over the years. My revelation was perfectly cooked chapati, a flatbread made throughout India. At the age of nine I tested numerous recipes, but finally mastered this simple creation which, when cooked on a stovetop, browned perfectly. Slightly chewy and nutty, it melded seamlessly with vindaloos, curries and 32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

vegetable combinations of all kinds. It was a profound lesson in the importance of bread within a culture: Whether a French baguette, an Italian ciabatta or an Indian chapati, these staples play a huge role in the meal itself. Seasonality plays a role, too. In the fall, my favorite produce includes spinach and other greens, pomegranates and late tomatoes and eggplants. I often seek out farms and growers in our area, and one I continually return to is Finley Farms. This family-run farm in Santa Ynez is accessible at most local farmers markets, and also has an honor-system vegetable stand tucked away on Refugio Road. Onions from the organic farm have an appealing sweet and pure flavor, and Finley’s greens are exceptional year-round. Their squash—brightly colored and blemish free—is also wonderful in every season. Supporting a local family and their organically grown delicious produce bolsters our farming community. The beauty of Indian food is in the colors and textures, so the menu and recipes presented here reflect those characteristics. Preparing all of these dishes will take some time, but the results are mouthwatering surprises, especially for guests who aren’t sure what to expect. The wonderful thing about this food is


that if you’re able to plan ahead, the meals can simply be heated right before you eat, so you’re able to enjoy time with your guests. I tend to make the bread the morning of the meal, and if you make the curries and meat dishes the night before, the flavors will deepen even more by the time you serve them. There are many spices used in Indian cooking, and this is one area where you will probably have to source from outside our region. I find a few of them to be truly indispensable. Start building your own Indian pantry with these ingredients, and your dishes will take on a whole new element of flavor. Fenugreek, in dried leaf form or seed, has a pungent aroma from a chemical called sotolon often found in some aged Champagnes and Cabernets. It heightens the aromas of the other spices used. Asafetida is probably the most exotic component in these recipes, and it adds a truly Indian flavor to vegetable dishes. Alone, it has an almost unpleasant smell, but in dishes it becomes slightly oniony. Finally, green cardamom pods add a distinctly citrus herb flavor and are used in many Indian recipes. With all of the spices and flavors in Indian food, choosing a beverage can be a challenge. Typically these foods are paired with light beers and lagers, which can work very well. But we opted to experiment with local wine pairings, considering producers who make high-acid food-friendly white wines like Rieslings, bright and fresh rosés and light, lively red wines. The recurring element in our taste tests ended up being low alcohol, because the slight chile heat in the cuisine easily makes wine taste “hot.” For an Indian feast, I love to start with something crunchy, and for some reason it usually seems to involve potatoes. Samosas are always a treat, but Spinach and Potato Cakes (Palak Ki Tiki) are unique and have a subtle spiciness that matches well with white wines like Grüner Veltliner and Riesling. The cakes can easily be made ahead and reheated in the oven, and their aroma will fill the room. The 2016 Spear Grüner Veltliner from Solminer is a fantastic match with these because of its interesting saline note that finishes with sweet pea, lime and maybe apple paste. The 2015 Stirm Riesling is a great pairing as well, with its lovely stone fruit and rose petal aroma.

Palak Ki Tiki (Spinach and Potato Cakes).

Preparing Chapati.

Carrot Pudding.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 33


Food culture enthusiast Laura Booras prepares an authentic Indian feast using local farm produce.

In India, family-style main courses are the norm, so the wines need to have enough acidity to balance many kinds of foods. My Indian dinners typically include rice, a lamb or chicken dish and lots of vegetables. My absolute favorite Indian dish, hands down, is Saag Paneer, or Spinach with Indian Cheese. For years, my recipes at home didn’t quite taste right, until, on a whim, I added dried fenugreek—and I found my missing ingredient for perfect Saag Paneer. If you want to go all-out, making your own paneer is simple and delicious, but you can purchase it as well, or use potatoes or even tofu. I also don’t purée my Saag Paneer; I love the chunky texture of the onions and spinach together. You could opt to go for a completely vegetarian feast, but I love several Indian meat dishes, so I tend to include one. Pomegranate Chicken is perfect for fall, and the presentation is gorgeous with fresh pomegranate seeds sprinkled on top. One favorite recent pairing is Solminer’s 2014 Rubellite, a Syrah, Grenache and Riesling blend, which combines beautifully with lamb korma, a more commonly known Indian dish. Dessert is usually not spotlighted on the Indian table, but that’s not to say that something sweet isn’t vital to the meal. Carrot pudding, made just like rice pudding but with carrots, brings out the natural sweetness of this vegetable and is the perfect end to a spicy and complex meal. Cardamom seed, with its herbal and citrusy character, melds well with the carrots. Eating and drinking with friends is vital to our life here on the Central Coast, and this type of meal, where everyone shares stories, laughs and passes dishes around, is a perfect way to enjoy it. No culture in the world embraces family and community like India, and it’s easy to mimic that here in our local area by using fantastic, locally grown, organic ingredients. 34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

Menu

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TO START Palak Ki Tiki (Spinach and Potato Cakes) FAMILY-STYLE FEAST Saag Paneer (Spinach with Indian Cheese) Pomegranate Chicken Sweet and Sour Butternut Squash Chapati Rice DESSERT Carrot Pudding WINE NOTES 2014 A Tribute to Grace Grenache—Bright cherry and an earthy component makes this a great match for meatier dishes. 2014 Tatomer Riesling—Minerality and apricot blend on the palate with those intricate spices, creating a lovely match. 2015 Stirm Riesling, “Kick-On Ranch”— Dry and full of stone fruit and minerals, this wine is a fantastic partner to the complexities of the meal. For recipes mentioned in this article, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com/global

Laura Booras is the general manager at Riverbench Vineyard & Winery in the Santa Maria Valley. She lives on the vineyard, where she regularly hosts food writers, celebrity chefs and wine critics for unique meals prepared with locally sourced ingredients.


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Rebuilding Connections at Fairview Gardens by Nancy Oster P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y E R I N F E I N B L AT T

Most people know the nonprofit Center for Urban Agriculture at Fairview Gardens for its roadside produce stand. I was curious to meet the new executive director, Lacey Baldiviez, and to learn what brought Lacey to this job—especially after the drought had taken most of the fields out of production and killed many of the fruit trees. Getting these dry, weedy fields back into production looked challenging.

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tanding at the north edge of the field closest to Fairview Attentive to her diet and health while playing basketball in Avenue, Lacey Baldiviez, executive director of Fairview high school and college, Lacey became passionately devoted to Gardens, stopped mid-sentence and pointed across understanding the role nutrition plays in health and healing. the field. After earning an undergraduate degree in biology from University of Redlands, she studied at UC Davis, where she earned a PhD “We have a guest,” she said, her brown eyes radiating in nutritional biology with an emphasis in international and delight, “a wildlife visitor.” A blue heron stared intently at the community nutrition. After graduation, Lacey worked as a soil, then slowly stepped forward. The newly tilled soil was project manager in nutritional research for the USDA. damp from the warm rain that morning. “Looking for organic worms?” Lacey suggested. Perhaps. One research project took her to Ghana to evaluate the effects of iron supplements on We left the heron to do its pregnant women exposed to malaria. work. But later, after a little “Food is life,” Lacey says. “That But what caught her attention there, research, I learned that herons and changed her career focus, was are expert gopher catchers, which connection is in all of us. Food what she experienced at their weekly should make this one an honored is the centerpiece of our health farmers market. She knew that guest at Fairview Gardens. Dealing survival in remote Ghanaian villages and our social connections.” with gophers is high on Lacey’s depended on making knowledgeable to-do list, along with fixing broken purchases at the Saturday market, irrigation systems and responding but what surprised her was seeing how agriculture formed the to the reported sighting of a bobcat. structure for community identity and relationships between the “A personal motivation in my job quest was to find surrounding villages. something that would keep my interest,” Lacey explains. Lacey paints a lively picture of the market. “Old vans called “Farming is complex, unpredictable and personally tro-tros bus people in from the surrounding villages. You see challenging… today I’m dealing with a bobcat!” stall after stall winding through the marketplace of maybe 400 Lacey didn’t start off planning to become a farmer. At a vendors. Families come to buy the goods they need for living, young age, however, she became interested in the connection such as textiles and food…. There is raw meat on tables in the between biology and the environment. Her curiosity came sun, colorful cone-shaped piles of freshly ground spices, baskets as the result of being born with a non-genetic heart defect filled with fruits and vegetables. It’s hot and there’s lots of that required open-heart surgery. The cause of the defect is noise, colors and smells. People yelling, eating food, exchanging unknown, but the experience had a powerful impact on her greetings, catching up with each other, laughing and talking.” early life.

38 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 39


Left to right: Lacey Baldiviez, farmer Abel Basch and apprentice Sabine Gahm working in the seed house.

40 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 41


Pollinator-friendly flowers, dry-farmed pomegranates and a Boston pickling cucumber.

“Food is life,” she says. “That connection is in all of us. Food is the centerpiece of our health and our social connections.” But we have become disconnected from this elemental force in our lives. “I grew up in Santa Maria, which is agricultural. But going to grocery stores removes you from understanding how the food was grown and making farmbased purchase decisions.” “When I came home from Ghana I worked on the student farm at UC Davis and joined community service groups that glean harvest leftovers and donate them to people in need.” After a couple of years Lacey decided to attend the California Farm Academy and start her own farm. “I already had my business plan approved and a site picked out when I saw the job posting for Fairview Gardens. I was, like, ‘Wait, this is my dream!’” Fairview’s mission statement mirrored Lacey’s own: a desire to build community around food production and to establish a grassroots appreciation for sustainably grown local organic food. It’s easy to see why the Fairview Gardens board chose this dynamic 32-year-old woman to direct and represent their Center for Urban Agriculture. As we walked around the farm, Lacey shared her plans for the farm’s future—agriculturally, educationally and as a place for reconnection with nature. For example, the newly tilled field hosting the blue heron will be farmed using conventional organic methods, while the slope above it is planted with contoured permaculture beds. These beds are created using layers of compost, mulch and horse manure and are planted with a mix of vegetables and flowering plants that attract pollinators and pest-eating insects like ladybugs. A mural highlights some of the many educational programs held at Fairview Gardens.

42 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Lacey Baldiviez holds a Silkie Bantam in the hen house.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 43


The farm stand is run on an honor system. A sign near the permaculture beds proclaims the no-till philosophy.

The same crops will be planted in both areas, offering a sideby-side comparison of two different organic methods. Lacey and her four apprentices will measure and compare weed and pest pressure, water retention and soil temperature. The goal is to “document the drawbacks and benefits of each of the two types of systems,” she explains. “Using that information, we can create innovative methods that maximize the benefits of each, and create the best sustainable system for a particular setting.” What the apprentices learn here, they will take to their next farm jobs or on to their own farms. These results will be especially beneficial to commercial farmers who don’t have the flexibility to experiment. Nonprofits can raise money to support experimentation, whereas commercial farmers depend on making a profit every season. The apprentices also help out with experiential summer and after-school children’s programs. Lacey is creating a program in which a group of kids go into the greenhouse to plant seeds for a specific type of tomato, for example, then they go into the field to plant a row of eggplant seedlings started by a previous group. They move to the next row to weed and check the soil of some cucumbers planted by another group, and then they harvest a row of kale planted by yet another group. “We connect them with other kids in the community, working together as a team,” Lacey says. “The final piece is to teach the students to cook the fresh produce they have grown and distribute it to people in need of healthy organic food.” In addition to connecting the kids to each other, “it helps them understand the food system so that they begin to ask questions about how and where the produce they eat was grown and who grew it. It also builds their respect for the people who grow it and the land that produces it,” she says. Lacey wants Fairview Gardens to be recognized as a shared community resource. “We’d like to create an agricultural park with benches and areas where people can sit and have a 44 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

picnic, read or write. A place where you can relax, observe and reconnect with nature. There are already pathways built in, so people don’t have to step on the beds. Visitors can wander, explore, check out the insects and see what’s growing.” At the top of the main path is the old farmhouse, used today as a gathering place for community groups. Near the farmhouse is a mulberry tree with branches that reach down to the ground, enclosing a room-sized space around the thick trunk. Lacey points to a nearby Habitat for Artists structure that she will rebuild as part of a nationwide network of small working spaces for artists. A children’s area is in the process of being rebuilt, which includes bean-covered teepee hideaways, a vine-covered tunnel, a scented-herb-lined labyrinth path and a corn maze designed and planted by summer campers. “Yeah, I have a lot of balls in the air right now, but it’s engaging,” Lacey says with a smile. Personally, I have no doubt that under Lacey’s direction, irrigation pipes will be mended, fields tended, bobcats dealt with and gophers dispatched. If you want to experience the farm yourself, it is open to visitors every day from 10am to sunset. But don’t be surprised if a tall, dark-haired woman greets you on the path with an outstretched hand, awakening you to the rich fragrance of the soil, the songs of wild birds, and the profusion of healthy vegetation, colorful flowers and ripe fruit growing all around you. Lacey’s search for this kind of connection is what brought her to Fairview Gardens, and we are grateful that she is here. The Center for Urban Agriculture is located at 598 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. FairviewGardens.org

Nancy Oster enjoys meeting and writing about people who share her passion for food and cooking. She feels fortunate to live in Santa Barbara, where she has a year-round garden and can also find juicy oranges, crisp fresh greens, tangy sweet apricots and vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes grown organically by farmers who live right here in Santa Barbara County.


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A Sicilian

Christmas Reverie by Leslie Andrea Westbrook PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRAN COLLIN

I’ve only visited the craggy Mediterranean island of Sicily once— so far. A local woman there informed me that I would cry when I left. She was right.

S

icily is a place that is easy to fall in love with—especially if it’s part of your heritage and hard to get

out of your system. “It’s in the blood,” my womanizing grandfather, Johnny Blandino, reminded me once upon a time while inquiring about my love life, not my cooking skills. Despite my WASP-y name, I am half Sicilian. I am several generations removed from the old country. Both sets of my maternal great-grandparents—none of whom I knew—immigrated long ago (one side landed in New Orleans). Traditions filtered down and became diluted, or disappeared altogether, as my family acclimated to their new homeland. 46 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Cucciddati —Sicilian Christmas fig cookies.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 47


Chef/owner Alberto Morello of Olio e Limone in Santa Barbara.

Sometimes I wish I could not only turn back the clock but time travel. Where would I go? To the towns where my ancestors lived—Campo Felice, Cefalu, Palermo and Piana degli Albanesi—before they emigrated to America. What were holidays like on this Italian island, a place unto itself, I wondered? I began by asking my mother, Marcella, what she remembered from her childhood family traditions. Her grandparents had a ranch in Baldwin Park in LA’s San Gabriel Valley, where she spent lots of time and made happy memories. “My grandmother made old-style, thick-crust pizza with tomato sauce and anchovies, which was considered a great delicacy. She also made cookies with lots of anise in them,” she said, adding, “She was very pious and always on her knees praying!” What my mother remembers is Sfincione di San Giovanni or, in English, Palermo Christmas pizza made of mozzarella and

parmesan cheese combined with a host of sweet caramelized onions, a layer of thick tomato sauce and a few anchovies, encased between a thick, soft focaccia-style crust and a mountain of toasted breadcrumbs covering the top—making it crunchy. The sfincione (which translates to “thick sponge”) pizza my mother recalled is not round, but baked in a square tray and cut into squares or rectangles and often sold as street food in Palermo. Chef/owner Alberto Morello of Olio e Limone in Santa Barbara concurred: “It’s a big focaccia with a thin layer of tomato sauce, onions, salted anchovy and lots of breadcrumbs that have been first toasted in a pan with olive oil, which gives it a crunchy top, similar to Chicago pan pizzas.” Pizza for Christmas? Licorice-flavored cookies? It’s true! Sicilian born and raised until the age of 18, Chef Alberto

Opposite: Timballo di bucatini—thick noodles with meat sauce and a layer of fried eggplant and young pecorino.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 49


50 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Opposite: White anchovies marinated with parsley and lemon with caper berries. Above: Large prawns with spicy oregano oil.

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Roasted baby goat with polenta.

52 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Perhaps, if I visit the grotto in Alberto’s Sicilian hometown, my wish to know more about my ancestors would manifest. Although my lineage of yesteryear won’t be there, I can conjure what life was like for them in earlier times. I might gain a clue as to what enticed them to make the arduous journey to America, the promised land.

added plenty more Sicilian food memories. He returns annually to visit his 92-year-old mother in his childhood town, where he helped create a special attraction (more on that in uno momento). In Alberto’s village of Custonaci, in the province of Trapini, sweets were always a treat. He fondly remembered graffe—a donut without the hole filled with a ricotta cannoli-style filling made from sheep milk (Bellwether Farms produces a sheep milk ricotta): “The sugar goes through until your ears become red!” he laughed. “After church, we’d have a few cents left and run to the local bar to buy some!” My mother told a donut story of her own. “I was about eight years old and I came home from school one day when we were living with my grandparents. I decided I wanted to cook something. So I looked in an American cookbook and got the ingredients out of the cupboard. My grandmother didn’t speak English and didn’t know what one of the ingredients was, so I left it out. I put oil in the frying pan— she knew what I was doing and helped me with that. My donuts were beautiful and tasted good but were hard! I’d left out the shortening, because she didn’t know what that ingredient meant. They looked like and tasted like donuts, but they were hard as doorknobs. The family always called my homemade donuts doorknobs!” she laughed. Back to the old country memories, Alberto made me hungry with his long list of traditional Christmas Eve dinner items, especially the Feast of the Seven Fishes that is not only important, but also abundant. He reeled off the following: white anchovies marinated with parsley lemon and alici marinade, tiny sardines marinated in lemon and oil; clams with oregano breadcrumbs; baccalà alla Siciliana — fried salt cod filet (not my favorite when tried in Portugal recently, maybe the Italian version is better?) with onions, parsley and olive oil; big or small shrimp with a spicy oregano oil and calamari salad with green onions. “Moray eel is very important, with tomato, capers and olives. Vegetables are served buffet style. Families gather together, all dressed up for the holiday, exchange presents and usually celebrate until 1am!” said Alberto, noting that his Christmas meals were more meat-oriented. “What I remember the most is the timballo di bucatini— thick noodles with meat sauce. In a large pan, put a layer of fried eggplant in the middle of the pasta, a layer of primo sale (young pecorino) and an egg here or there. We used to prepare this and put it in the oven at 8am on Christmas morning. When we returned home from church (if midnight Mass was missed), it was ready and the outside was so crispy!” the chef recalled. Alberto, an only child with many aunts and uncles, fondly remembered a special menu of roasted baby lamb or baby goat (capretto) with potatoes and escarole sautéed with olive oil and garlic, and a salad made of thin slices of fennel with blood oranges and black olives. EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 53


Christmas fig cookies called cucciddati and items that aren’t available here, including pastry filled with figs, clove and honey and cannoli filled with cassata (again, made with sheep ricotta) topped off his list. Torrone, the delicious and chewy white nougat with almonds, is a favorite candy usually sold at Italian delis. Alberto said torrone is also popular around Christmastime in Sicily, but it is a Northern Italian import, not a southern tradition. Christmas trees were introduced to Sicily in 1943, thanks to the servicemen there during WWII. To drink? “In my area, Campari with orange,” said the chef.

La Famiglia

the Italian American service club. These buttery/flour/sugar/ almond balls are popular in other cultures and also known as Mexican wedding cookies and Russian teacakes. Isn’t life about making new traditions as well as savoring the old ones? I discovered a few unfamiliar treats in my research for this story, including a traditional Sicilian Christmas dessert called buccellato, thanks to Southern Italian cookbook author and culinary tour guide Rosetta Costantino (who has a recipe on her website). Rosetta compares the pretty crimped pastry to a “supersized fig cookie.” I may give it a swirl this Christmas— although several male Italian chefs told me it was “challenging” to make (perhaps due to the special crimping tool that is traditionally used). Rosetta is bringing me a crimper from Palermo. I can’t wait to try it out. But I might have to visit her in the meantime, to learn the art of my ancestors.

On my maternal grandfather’s side, the Blandinos were a large family. My grandfather Johnny and his eight sisters and brothers grew up in a large house in what was a more rural Chef Alberto’s Special downtown Los Angeles (on 23rd Street Attraction near San Pedro Street) a century ago. The Alberto’s village is famous for a “living family also had a ranch in the far reaches history” museum. Grotta Mangiapane of the San Fernando Valley. One day, depicts 18th-century life and is when he was a teenager, my grandfather especially active during Christmastime. got into trouble—his punishment was to Alberto helped create this star attraction walk all the way home from the ranch. It in an old grotto/cave dwelling, along took him the entire day! with the town priest and other locals. We never attended big Blandino Now I yearn even more to family Christmases. My mother, experience Christmas in Sicily—where father, sister and I spent the holiday nativity scenes are a big deal and with my father’s side of the family. whistles are blown at midnight and, (Apparently this was my divorced Italian more importantly, the world stands still grandmother’s choice.) Decades later, I for family gatherings. got to savor Easter at my Auntie Clara’s “Nobody works! Everybody STOPS Marcella Blandino (the author’s mother) at age 5 in 1934. table groaning with homemade ravioli, at Christmas—except the hospital!” lasagna, baked chickens, salads and Alberto said. My friend Chris Woods vouched and wrote to me: more—and desserts from the family’s favorite go-to: Claro’s “I was in Sicily one Christmas. Everything was closed. Had to Italian Deli. When I asked my cousin, Jack the dentist, what he eat Pringles for lunch. We did eat eventually. Everyone came out recalled of family Italian Christmas traditions, he mentioned on the streets around 7pm and then it got quite jolly!” struffoli honey balls. Perhaps, if I visit the grotto in Alberto’s Sicilian hometown, Whatsa’ struffoli, I wondered? Basically, it’s sweet donuts my wish to know more about my ancestors would manifest. coated in a honey glaze that are piled high, similar to the French Although my lineage of yesteryear won’t be there, I can conjure croque-en-bouche (the French version are cream puffs drizzled what life was like for them in earlier times. I might gain a with caramel). clue as to what enticed them to make the arduous journey to “I never did understand the big deal with the struffoli that America, the promised land. would be piled up like a honey-soaked pyramid, but my mom If I am very, very lucky, I might even learn how to make the and aunts were major fans!” my cousin recalled. ring-shaped dried fig Christmas treat buccellato from someone My grandmother, whose birth name Angelina became else’s beautiful Sicilian nonna! Anglicized to Jeannie, always brought a beautiful box of carefully wrapped cookies coated in powdered sugar for our Award-winning writer/author Leslie Andrea Westbrook is a thirdgeneration Californian on both her Sicilian (maternal) and Westbrook Christmas Eve open houses. I recently reproduced the Italian (paternal) sides. Her articles appear nationally (Traditional Home wedding cookies, but switched up the season by taking them to magazine), regionally in California and online globally. If not dreaming the annual summer pizza/bocce ball party put on by UNICO, about traveling to Sicily about now, she’s probably pondering a pizza.

54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


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Loyal to the Soil

Ballard Canyon’s Syrah Mission by Sonja Magdevski PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRAN COLLIN

Saarloos and Sons Windmill Ranch Vineyard.

60 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Syrah grapes from the Jonata vineyard.

O

ne of my favorite spots in the Santa Ynez Valley this time of year is 1,200 feet above sea level amidst the robust Syrah vines of Tierra Alta Vineyard at the north end of Ballard Canyon. The football-field-length climb is steep with a crumbly loam soil under my feet. Sweat forming around my temples is washed away by the determined early evening wind. During my midsummer trespass the sun is still hours from setting, casually making its way over the neighboring ridges of the Santa Rita Hills where it will drop into the Pacific Ocean. The 360-degree view is as jolting as it is familiar. Blinking lights cruising the 101 Freeway, slinky dirt roads along the surrounding Purisima hilltops and the golden grass prairie leading toward the San Rafael Mountains. The silence amplifies my breath as I twirl to capture it all with a lonely owl box perched above as my witness. The Ballard Canyon American Viticultural Area (AVA) was approved in 2013 as Santa Barbara County’s fifth appellation. Just a few miles long and a couple miles wide, it sits within the larger Santa Ynez Valley AVA and comprises just 10% of its total space. With less than 600 acres planted within its borders, 300 of which are dedicated to Syrah, the few yet robust group of Ballard Canyon estate producers aim for their own mighty goal: to create some of the best damn Syrah in the world.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 61


“On a larger scale you enter the books of history,” said Michael Larner of Larner Vineyard. He was instrumental in spearheading the AVA effort when he started the Ballard Canyon Wine Growers Alliance. “Sommeliers now study Ballard Canyon as part of their training of America. That is pretty cool. I never liked the word terroir because I felt it was snobby French but there is a sense of place that you can’t escape. It is the fingerprint. We say here we are loyal to the soil. I am a geologist so it makes sense. So if I can do something like make a bottle of Syrah in particular that has a unique sense of place that is not reproducible, putting it on a platform for quality to compete with other regions of the world, you have to have an AVA to see it through. You need to have a clear message. You have to pick a champion.”

The Elephant in the Room Syrah is a versatile grape and while it has its ideal growing zones, it can produce well in both warmer and cooler climates. Today, it is the third most widely grown varietal in Santa Barbara County, yet has experienced stagnant wine sales domestically for years now. Word on the street was that Syrah was one of the hottest new grape varietals during the planting boom of 1995–2000 in California that saw grapevine acreage double in Santa Barbara County. Chardonnay has been in first place as the most widely planted and popular selling varietal for decades. Pinot Noir used to be a harder sell. Starting with some of the first vineyards of Santa Barbara, the gig was that producers could buy Chardonnay if they also purchased Pinot Noir. Growers finally got the message and began to replant Pinot Noir vines in favor of the sexier, trendier Syrah.

Left to right: Matt Dees of Jonata, Peter Stolpman of Stolpman Vineyards, Jeff Newton of Coastal Vineyard Care, Keith Saarloos of Saarloos and Sons, Michael Larner of Larner Vineyard, Ruben Solorzano of Coastal Vineyard Care and Steven Gerbac of Rusack Vineyards.

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Then Sideways happened. It was an event. The film about a wine-tasting road trip to the Santa Ynez Valley featuring Pinot Noir as the main character’s muse was released in 2004 and unexpectedly took the world by storm. People who had never had a drop of wine started trampling towards the Santa Ynez Valley. Domestic Pinot Noir sales skyrocketed and have yet to subside. The dotcom bust of the early 2000s didn’t help sell luxury goods. All those Syrah vines planted during the boom were now in full production. This issue with grapevines is that they are costly to plant considering land prices, infrastructure and labor, and there is at least a three-year lag phase between

planting and production. Right about the time growers were ready to make their return on investment the Syrah glut created a buyer’s market. One of the dilemmas with art has been the same throughout time. Does the artist favor mass appeal or does the artist do what is right for art? In Ballard Canyon, the choice is both complicated and simple. Ballard Canyon’s climate does not favor Pinot Noir production. The zone is too warm and intense for this delicate varietal. The area is much better suited toward hardier mid-temperature Rhône varietals such as Syrah, which performs consistently well under various soil and EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 63


Winemaker Matt Dees drives along the dusty back roads of the Jonata vineyard.

climate conditions throughout the AVA. The area also does well with other Rhône varietals and, to a much lesser extent, some Bordeaux and Italian varietals in specific pockets, though Syrah has proven to be the chameleon grape able to handle cooler and warmer vintages with tremendous grace across the landscape. Yet, to Steve Beckmen’s chagrin, he continues to get lauded for a Pinot Noir he has never made. “People tell me all the time, ‘I’ve had your ’98 Pinot Noir and it was great!’” said Beckmen, of Beckmen Vineyards, who also farms their 365-acre Purisima Mountain vineyard in Ballard Canyon. “I say ‘Great! I don’t want you to be wrong, but I’ve never made one!’” By choosing to focus on Syrah, the growers and producers of Ballard Canyon have chosen to do what is best represented in their hometown, perhaps at great risk or stroke of genius. The idea for the AVA began serendipitously when in 2010 a group of 40 sommeliers were visiting Santa Barbara County for a three-day educational exploration organized with the Sommelier Journal. Ballard Canyon producers decided to showcase two wines each: one that was similar to the others and one that was different. 64 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

They agreed the similar wine should be a Syrah from the same vintage. During the tasting, sommeliers noticed the unique characteristics and parallels of Ballard Canyon Syrah and questioned why the area lacked its own identifying AVA. Afterwards, Larner formed the Ballard Canyon Wine Growers Alliance, invited all the producers to join and decided not to reinvent the wheel. They hired Wes Hagen to write their petition as he had “Ballard Canyon” stamped onto the just completed two consecutive bottle’s shoulder. AVA victories with Sta. Rita Hills and Happy Canyon. They determined their focus would be on Syrah and also agreed that funding, cohesion and marketing


The soils are all sand.

Jonata vineyard workers attaching nets to the vines to protect the grapes from birds and deer.

would be instrumental to their success. After much negotiation, they also selected a unique bottle mold created exclusively for them with “Ballard Canyon” stamped onto the bottle’s shoulder. The bottle can only be used for Syrah grown and produced by estate producers within the AVA, which currently includes Larner, Kimsey, Jorian Hill, Stolpman, Beckmen, Harrison-Clark, Rusack, Saarloos and Jonata, though the last two estates have chosen not to use the Ballard Canyon bottle. “Syrah is always going to reflect where it is grown, as it should,” said sommelier and wine journalist Randy Caparoso, who was one of the key organizers of the Sommelier Journal trip. “That is how you define a great wine. You give allowances for a wine’s style when you get to a certain level of smarts and understanding. There are certain expectations with wines from certain areas, such as whether it is a Cabernet Sauvignon from Paso Robles or Napa or the Médoc. The issue isn’t that we don’t know Ballard Canyon makes beautiful wine. The growers know, the producers know. We are just waiting for the rest of the world to figure it out.”

It was obvious during the tasting, Caparoso said, that the wines of Ballard Canyon had no relation to their surrounding region. Syrah is a wonderful wine and everyone knows it once you get people to taste it, he said. The issue is getting people to pick up the habit. “It took consumers 30 years to come around to Pinot Noir,” he continued. “Sideways helped propel it even further. Syrah is a great grape, it just doesn’t have that push.”

Location Location Location Had Ballard Canyon growers taken the advice of a French vineyard consultant from Bordeaux, their beautiful hillsides would be dotted with wispy asparagus fronds instead of handsome swaths of undulating vineyards. Matt Dees of Jonata Winery tells me this is a true story, surprised that I had yet to hear this one, as we drive along the dusty back roads of the Jonata property on a very warm June day. When the Jonata winery owners purchased their property in the early 2000s, their neighbors told them to plant Syrah. With all due respect, they thought, an outside objective approach might be worthwhile. EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 65


Above: Larner Vineyard. Below: Winemaker Michael Larner and a replica of the original Ballard General Store.

66 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


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Their consultant spent two days studying the potential 80-acre planting sites. The soils are all sand. Nothing could grow here, he said. Asparagus would be best. “There is a ton to learn here and we are always learning,” Dees said. “Do you know that great story about cellist Pablo Casals?” Dees asks. “At age 96 he had increased his practice time and someone asked him why he was practicing so much. He said, ‘I think I am finally starting to hear improvement.’ Winemaking is the same thing.” Dees said that making wine in Santa Barbara County has taught him to throw both convention and conventional wisdom out the window. Preparing for his 14th vintage with Jonata, the vineyards are planted to 11 different varieties closely monitored by Dees, who jumps out of his truck regularly during our tour as he notices something that catches his keen attention. “Sand shouldn’t work. I don’t disagree,” he pauses. “Yet it does. Nothing is really out of the question here. I used to think that everything had to be exact and everything in the vineyard had to look exactly the same and this place has changed my mind. Variation and diversity in wine is very important. Ballard Canyon is an incredible place to grow grapes.” At the height of the afternoon, the temperature gauge on Dees’ truck reads 94°. With the moonrise, temperatures will drop to the mid 50s. The diurnal shift regularly averages 40° in Ballard Canyon, a big deal in premium grape-growing regions like Santa Barbara. Sunny, warm daytime temperatures provide photosynthesis for sugar accumulation in grapes, while cool nighttime temperatures give vines a reprieve from the heat, allowing them to retain natural fruit acidity. In the simplest of terms, grape sugar provides flavor and alcohol while acidity provides a wine’s balance and lift. Ballard Canyon’s location in the middle of the Santa Ynez Valley also provides what Larner calls the Goldilocks effect—not as cool as the Sta. Rita Hills to the west and not as warm as Happy Canyon to the east. Ballard Canyon also runs north-south, contrary to the Santa Ynez Valley’s defining east-west orientation starting at the ocean. Purisima Mountain sits at the northern half of Ballard Canyon. Keith Saarloos, of Saarloos and Sons, likens Purisima to the bow of a ship with Ballard Canyon as the hull. Purisima’s formation also dredged up unique soils. The eastern side of Ballard Canyon is composed of limestone-clay soils, while the western half is sand and gravel. The mountain also protects the area from the onslaught of coastal fog that penetrates the Sta. Rita Hills each morning, allowing it to gently crest the ridge and snake its way through the northern and southern openings. “Ballard Canyon would not be special if there wasn’t Purisima Mountain,” said Saarloos, who farms Windmill Ranch in Ballard Canyon. “It would just be part of the riverbed that runs through Foxen Canyon Creek. Purisima gives us a shove above it all.” Standing at a gravely hilltop, Dees points toward the dirt below our feet. He explains that the soils of Ballard Canyon are polar opposites. Long ago, essentially, the beach ran into gravel then into limestone. Other consultants from Napa told Jonata to plant in gravely areas, mimicking famed regions in Bordeaux, again dissuading them from planting in sand. Yet Dees said their

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few gravel plantings are their weakest sites that don’t make it into their finished wines, while the sandy sites extract incredible fruit intensity. “As a plant and soil scientist I understand plants more than I understand people,” Dees said.

Upending the Past Ballard Canyon’s history reads much like the rest of the county’s: planting the right grapes in the wrong places. Jeff Newton of Coastal Vineyard Care said in the early 1980s that Ballard Canyon was a backwater vineyard area with only three vineyards: Ballard Canyon Winery, Wilkening and DailyForthman. All of them followed their neighbors’ example by growing Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Riesling. The planting boom of 1995 put a spotlight on sparsely planted Ballard Canyon, though Tom Stolpman was the first to commit to the area when he purchased his property and started planting in 1992 with a particular bent toward limestone soils. Peter Stolpman, Tom’s son who runs the vineyard and winery today, said he was five years old at the time his parents were looking for vineyard property. Tom told realtors not to call him unless they found limestone. Peter remembers his job was to collect rocks during these property visits. Eventually Stolpman met Newton, who told him about a limestone outcropping in Ballard Canyon that the Perrin family of the famed Château de Beaucastel winery in the Rhône region of France was eyeing the year before. Looking to make a statement in the United States, the Perrins eventually chose a location in Paso Robles to create what is today Tablas Creek Winery. Stolpman purchased the property with what Newton called the “Beaucastel Seal of Approval.” Limestone is considered ideal planting material because of its cooling effects that can delay ripening—lengthening a grapevine’s maturation time and allowing for prolonged flavor development. With Newton’s help, Stolpman began planting typical varieties for the area at the time, such as Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Syrah, and eventually planted 18 different varietals for good measure. His property became both a benchmark and


incubator for other producers and growers in Ballard Canyon. Over the course of the next 15 years, Stolpman planted more and more Syrah, recognizing that was his strongest varietal. Today, Syrah is Stolpman’s primary grape with 95 acres planted. “You don’t really know what a region will do best unless you plant many different varieties,” said Newton. “In the end only a few show the greatest potential. Syrah and Grenache have risen to the top in the last 20 years in Ballard Canyon from two radically different soils that have produced fine wines.” As more producers started planting vineyards in the area, it became obvious that Syrah was the grape to bet on. Beckmen planted Purisima Mountain shortly after Stolpman in 1996. In 1999, Larner planted 23 acres of Syrah out of 32 total. Then came Tierra Alta, Windmill Ranch, Jonata… the list continues, with large parcels of Syrah planted in all of them. “I like to think they taught me a lot and we taught them a lot,” said Beckmen of his relationship with Newton and his other colleagues. “We were reaching into the high places of Ballard Canyon where no one had planted before and there was doubt as to whether things would grow on some of these tops of the hills where it is windy and chalky and no dirt to really grow things in. I think we have proved we can do that here.” Today, Newton said, we know far more about planting the right varietal in the right microclimate in Santa Barbara than we did 30 years ago. Farming and winemaking are much better now and the AVA system has helped clarify to consumers the diversity of Santa Barbara County. We’ve come along way, he said, but don’t kid yourself if you think we’ve arrived. There is much work to be done and many things to explore and discover. And yet, after dedicating the majority of his vineyard to Syrah, Peter Stolpman still had initial misgivings about the importance of a Ballard Canyon AVA. He had spent years in the marketplace selling Stolpman wines and felt they were successful without needing an extra push. What he admits to now is how much easier it has been to promote Stolpman wines through the Ballard Canyon lens. “It didn’t matter that people had no idea where Ballard Canyon was,” he said. “I can now tell a sommelier in Manhattan that if you are going to carry one Syrah from America we are the only area focused on it. Ballard Canyon is such a significant niche of Syrah in the world. If you look at appellations around the world, we are about the same size of planted acreage of Côte Rôtie, we are twice of Hermitage,* with a similar amount of wine out in the world seeking to be the very best. Everyone is always trying to be the new Burgundy. Everybody has given up on Syrah except Ballard Canyon.”

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* Côte Rôtie and Hermitage are primary Syrah-growing regions in the northern Rhône valley in France. Sonja Magdevski is winemaker/owner of Casa Dumetz Wines, a tiny producer in love with Grenache and specializing in Santa Barbara County Rhône varietals. She is also a reemerging journalist finding her way in the intricate and wonderful world of wine. For a behind the scenes look at the photo shoot for this article, go to the Edible Santa Barbara YouTube channel.

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It Takes Great Grapes to Make Great Wine A Conversation with Winegrower Ruben Solorzano by Sonja Magdevski PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRAN COLLIN

R

uben Solorzano started farming grapes 28 years ago under the guidance of Jeff Newton of Coastal Vineyard Care

when the company had only a couple of ranches under its belt. Today, he is one of the company’s owners. When researching the Ballard Canyon story, it seemed natural to spend a long morning under Ruben’s guidance since he was present from the start—with planting the first Syrah vines at Stolpman in 1992. All of our area’s winegrowers have a wealth of knowledge and insight of our farming and culture. Whereas other regions of the world have been farming wine grapes for centuries, Santa Barbara County is going on 50 years. Those who were here since the very beginning are our living history. I hope to capture their spirit with this series on the AVAs of Santa Barbara County.

Ruben Solorzano.

Sonja: How much has farming changed since you’ve been in the business? Ruben: Huge! When I first started we only pruned the vines, did leaf suckering and harvesting. That is it. We didn’t shoot thin, we didn’t pull any leaves—we didn’t do any of these fancy things. Did that seem right? At that time I didn’t know anything different. It was called California sprawl. There were no catch wires, no shoot tying, nothing. Then in 1992 we planted the first blocks at Stolpman vineyards and BOOM, people from Napa and Europe were consulting and telling us to tie the shoots so they aren’t touching each other, pull leaves for sun exposure, we measured every cluster and we tried to do things perfectly. It was, like, wow, too much! We saw a big difference in the vines and in the finished wines. Tell me how you see the difference with all the handwork you do to the vineyards now. Vines are like teenagers. They want to do many things. They don’t know they can’t do it. The first two years that we changed our practices they wanted to behave the same as before. After two

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years we trained the vines to be smaller. We left fewer shoots and we created the space for each shoot that made room for each cluster to grow and it slowed down the vines. The thing is, we don’t want bigger vines if we have less fruit. So little by little they adapted. It was hard for me and it was hard for the vines at first. When you say you see the difference in wine, do you mean fruit concentration? Flavor profile? Varietal characteristics? You see the difference in every way. Concentration, flavors, aromas. Syrah tastes like Syrah. Pinot tastes like Pinot. Before it was just red wine. The varietals don’t lack any of their characteristics. You farm all over Santa Barbara County so in terms of different growing conditions what do you see that is different in the varying AVAs? We have a difference in the soils for sure. The big difference for me between Ballard Canyon and Sta. Rita is the weather. Ballard Canyon is not much hotter than Sta. Rita Hills. If you combine the day and night temperatures Ballard Canyon is warmer during the day and colder at the night and Sta. Rita is not too hot during the day and doesn’t get too cold at night. Overall the temperature ranges are average. What makes things colder in the Sta. Rita Hills is the wind. I want to say that Ballard Canyon is easier to farm. We get the heat here. It is not too windy. It is drier than the Sta. Rita Hills, which creates fewer problems with mildew and weeds because there isn’t as much humidity. What do you think about the AVA system? Is it important? There are unique differences within each AVA. I think for marketing it is good to have the AVAs and then also for every vineyard they have to show their differences. For me, the smaller the AVAs can be, the better. Ballard Canyon is all about Syrah. Can you tell me why? Because we have learned to farm Syrah. It is so easy for Syrah to show big yields, but when you do that with Syrah the wine is different. How do you know this? By doing it. Syrah vines are weeds. They are big and they want to grow. When they have a lot of fruit left on the vine, Syrah spends 75% of its life in growing leaves. They are slow learners—they forgot about the fruit. They remember their goal is to ripen fruit late in the season. And if you have too much fruit on the vines they are not able to ripen it all because the days are getting shorter—there is less light and heat. This is what I have seen in blocks where we try to leave four or five tons an acre. You will get sugar by dehydration, but you never get the flavors you are looking for. What we do in Ballard Canyon is that we go down to one cluster per shoot before bloom. It is a big risk, but we haven’t been burnt yet.

What level of farming do you think we have right now and how far do we have to go? Each year is totally different, and we have learned a lot over the last 10 to 15 years. I would love to get to a place where we find what is the best combination in a particular block in a vineyard with rootstock, clone, varieties, space between rows and space between the vines—everything and everywhere. This probably won’t happen in my lifetime, though. How do you define best? From the performance of the fruit or on the assessment of the wine? Both. The way the vines grow and the resulting wines. The problem is that you don’t know about the wines until four or five years later. For me, the main thing is finding places where the vines work for you and it’s not you working for the vines. Here in California, we tend to force the vines to do something maybe they don’t want to do. We make really good wines, but sometimes it is not always the right place for that variety. You make wine. Why did you start? Because I love wine and drink too much wine! Making wine is a great experience for me. It is the best thing I have done in my life. I made Syrah from Ballard Canyon. The first year I made one barrel, bottled it and gave it to friends. The next year I said, ‘Let’s do two barrels’ and then, before you know it, I have too much wine! What can I do now? I know, this is what happens. Next thing you know you are a winemaker. This helped me understand the whole cycle better. I now understand the other side of what this farming means. When winemakers come and tell me their difficulties, I have a better understanding. For me, it is so much fun growing grapes and making wine but selling wine is hard. Before, when I’d see winemakers traveling here and there talking to people and going to dinners, I would think they are not working. But now I know that it is all work and very hard work. When I go to the tasting room and pour wine I have a joke where I pour four bottles and sell two! If you were to plant a new vineyard, what is the perfect situation? How do you start making decisions? I want to be honest: I don’t feel 100% confident that what I say will be the best. I still try different options in the vineyard to see what will work better. This is why I say I don’t think I will have enough time to discover the answer of perfecting grape growing here. I think when you find the combination that is right, the vine doesn’t need to do too much work and neither does the farmer. Sonja Magdevski is winemaker/owner of Casa Dumetz Wines, a tiny producer in love with Grenache and specializing in Santa Barbara County Rhône varietals. She is also a reemerging journalist finding her way in the intricate and wonderful world of wine.

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Foraging for Ideas Each Season Brings Fresh Vegetable Delights at the Market by Pascale Beale

M

y favorite days, wherever I find myself in the world, be it California, London or Provence—the places I call home—are market days. I eagerly anticipate them. I love to meander from stall to stall, to linger, to smell, to taste, to soak up the atmosphere unique to each locale, to chat with friends, talk with farmers about their latest harvest and strike up conversations with passersby. Season after season, these farmers markets stir my creative juices and literally nourish me, body and soul. My rhythms of the seasons are punctuated by my visits to the farmers market. For some, winter markets seem tedious, an uninteresting parade of little more than Brussels sprouts, potatoes and onions. While those vegetables are certainly abundant during this season, there are so many more fantastic choices, such as vibrant winter greens, watercress and rainbow-colored chard, and so many creative ways to transform even the stodgiest of dishes. I also love the fruits of the season— blood oranges, persimmons, pomegranates and Meyer lemons—and how they enhance the vibrant color and freshness of rich carrot purées, brighten a roasted acorn squash salad or transform a simple cauliflower into a curried soup piled high with lemon-scented crispy shaved Brussels sprouts. I like, too, how they perfume, enliven and complement winter vegetables and bring a tangy freshness to otherwise traditional winter comfort foods. After a long cool winter, I often crave not only some warm sunshine—yes, even in California—but spring vegetables with their crisp, bright, herbaceous flavors. I have always felt as though, after months of hibernation, the Earth has awakened and decided to shower us with a multitude of delicacies, each one fresh, invigorating and tempting, prompting a type of visceral spring fever. I admit I tend to go a little overboard at the market when I spy the first of the season’s small purple artichokes and freshly picked spring asparagus; that I will go plunging into a pyramid of peas, or lust after luminescent fava beans and pea sprouts; that I gather up baby zucchini with bright yellow flowers by the basketful; and pick an abundance of fresh herbs and bouquets of basil—lemon-scented, Thai and purple. Is there anything better than filling your market basket with these eye-popping vegetables, then coming home, preparing them and cooking them in a multitude of ways or simply drizzling them with a fruity olive oil and a pinch of coarse sea salt? Just when I think the markets cannot get any better, summer vegetables come bursting to life, and the farmers market tables groan under the weight of magnificent heirloom tomatoes, plump

purple eggplants, colorful whimsical pattypan squash, multi-hued haricots verts and sundrenched corn. It’s food that makes me want to dine outside, to have barbecues, picnics and languorous afternoons on the grass while eating bowls of bright salads and grilled vegetables accompanied by a cool tzatziki, some freshly baked bread and some cheese. Then, as the days grow shorter, the leaves turn golden hues and a chill creeps into the nighttime air, my thoughts turn naturally to the autumnal dishes that comfort me. It’s time for big bowls of soup made from sculptural autumnal squashes and roasts with masses of the root vegetables I find piled higgledy-piggledy on market tables. It’s a time for risottos with wild mushrooms and spiced tagines with parsnips, pumpkins, onions and multi-colored carrots. I always think of the autumn as a time of gathering—a bringing together of family and friends, a harvest of sorts, a reaping not only of autumnal crops but of the year’s hard work before we settle in for the winter months. It is also the time of year for the feast to end all feasts: Thanksgiving. In the years since I have called California home I have embraced this tradition above all others. I adore this holiday. What could be better than a daylong celebration about food? I have to admit that in the 30 or so years since I have been preparing this meal, I have come to appreciate, dare I say it, all the side dishes more than the turkey. Last year I suggested that we have a feast entitled “everything but the bird” only to be met with vigorous opposition. I notice, however, that all the accompanying dishes have taken on greater prominence and multiplied. Whereas in the past I might have made one salad, now we’ll have two or three, perhaps a salad with golden, crunchy fuyu persimmons, one with roasted root vegetables such as parsnips, and one with roasted kale, dates, pecans and packed with herbs. Last year we made not one, but three different types of carrot purée whose colors reflected the carpet of leaves falling from the trees outside. I made grilled Brussels sprouts, mashed potatoes with celeriac and crème fraîche (a nod to my French roots) and stuffed acorn squash. The abundant meal fed everyone for days, which was (and is) part of its pleasure. The weekend was filled with long walks, afternoons working puzzles, reading books and delving into the fridge for a tasty morsel. One night I made a large pasta dish using up all the remaining stuffing and vegetables as part of the sauce—delicious! EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 73


As we head into autumn once more, I’m looking forward to ambling through the weekly markets in the months to come; to discovering a hidden gem, possibly a new apple or squash variety; and to planning, testing and tasting innovative dishes for this year’s feast, with a new soup, salad or gratin perhaps. This is part of the fun, the enchantment that comes from foraging for ideas amongst the market tables. Happy hunting and bon appetit!

RECIPES from Les Legumes Trio of Carrot Purées My first Thanksgivings were for a bunch of French and British expats. We often had 20 or so Brits and French men and women around the table, so our feast had a distinctive AngloFrench Mediterranean flavor to it, complete with pâtés, cheese platters and Tarte aux Pommes. Over the last 30 years, the meal has evolved, as have our Thanksgiving traditions. We always begin the meal in the early afternoon, take a break after the main course to go for a long walk, watch the sunset, and return to tuck into all the desserts. As they became older, my children started helping with the preparations and made sure that certain dishes always appeared on the menu. Carrot purée was one of them. Last year, we made three carrot purées using different varieties. Their color was stunning and each had a subtle, yet distinctive flavor. I think we may have started a new tradition. Makes 8–12 servings as an accompaniment

FOR THE RED CARROT PURÉE 3 pounds red carrots, peeled and cut into ¼-inch rounds 2 ounces butter Zest and juice of 1 lemon Salt and pepper

FOR THE YELLOW CARROT PURÉE 3 pounds yellow carrots, peeled and cut into ¼-inch rounds 2 ounces butter 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper

FOR THE ORANGE CARROT PURÉE 3 pounds orange carrots, peeled and cut into ¼-inch rounds 2 ounces butter 3 tablespoons chives, finely chopped Salt and pepper

Steam the carrots (keeping the colors separate) for 12–15 minutes or more, until quite tender. Separately purée each carrot type with their respective ingredients in a food processor until very smooth. Keep each purée warm in a saucepan or double boiler until ready to serve. 74 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


Silky Cauliflower Curry Soup with Crispy Shaved Brussels Sprouts (Pictured on page 72) Cauliflower is a versatile vegetable that lends itself to all manner of preparations— everything from shaved raw or roasted whole, to being grated for “risotto” or blended for soups. It also absorbs flavors well, but one must be careful not to overpower it with too strong a spice or herb. Curry is a perfect complement to cauliflower, and in this soup it creates a fragrant backdrop for the puréed vegetables. I like to serve puréed soups with a little garnish that provides texture. In this instance, it’s the Brussels sprouts that add a little crunch and a lovely earthiness to the gentle, sweet flavor of the cauliflower. Makes 8 servings

FOR THE SOUP 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large yellow onion, peeled and finely chopped 2 leeks, ends trimmed, cleaned, white and light green parts finely chopped 1 tablespoon curry powder 2 heads cauliflower (2 pounds each), core removed, separated into florets Salt and pepper 8 cups vegetable stock

FOR THE BRUSSELS SPROUTS Olive oil 1 pound Brussels sprouts, finely sliced using a mandoline Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives Zest of 1 lemon
 Crème fraîche

Pour the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, leeks and curry powder and cook for 4–5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the onions are softened. Add the cauliflower, a good pinch of salt and 10–12 grinds pepper, and continue cooking for 2 minutes. Add the vegetable stock to the saucepan and simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 20–25 minutes. Remove from the heat and purée the soup using an immersion blender. For a smoother texture, pass it through a fine-mesh sieve. Cover and keep the soup warm until ready to serve. Pour a little olive oil into a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts, a good pinch of salt and 4–5 grinds pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until the sprouts are golden brown. Add the chives and lemon zest and toss to combine.

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Serve the soup in warmed soup bowls. Place a dollop of crème fraîche in the center of each bowl and top with a spoonful of the crispy Brussels sprouts.

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Stuffed Delicata Squash These beautiful golden squash have a sweet, delicate flavor, a creamy texture, and are entirely edible—yes, skin included. They are also the perfect receptacles for stuffing. In this version, they’re packed with “forbidden rice” (black rice) that’s chock-full of herbs and pistachios, and have a lively citrus zing. This is lovely with a spoonful of yogurt or some crumbled goat cheese on top. Makes 8 servings

FOR THE SQUASH 8 small delicata squash, halved lengthwise, seeds removed Olive oil Salt and pepper

FOR THE STUFFING 1 cup black rice, well rinsed
 3 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley 


2 green tomatoes, diced
 Zest of 1 lime
 Juice and zest of 1 lemon
 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 350°. Place the squash cut side up on a baking sheet. Drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with a little salt and pepper. Roast for 30–35 minutes, or until a knife is easily inserted. While the squash is roasting, prepare the stuffing. Place the rice in a small saucepan with 1½ cups of water and a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover and cook for 20–25 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the water has been absorbed.

3 tablespoons finely chopped chives 


Place the cooked rice and the remaining stuffing ingredients in a medium bowl and mix well to combine.

2 tablespoons pistachios, finely chopped


Fill the cooked squash with the stuffing mixture. Serve warm.

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Roasted Parsnip and Arugula Salad Roasted parsnips have a sweet, earthy flavor and are the perfect foil for light-leafed, peppery arugula. This is a great salad to serve as part of a vegetarian Thanksgiving, or with some Portobello mushrooms, roast chicken, turkey or crispy duck. Makes 8 servings 1½ pounds parsnips, peeled, cut into long ½-inch-thick strips 
 Olive oil Coarse sea salt Black pepper 1 tablespoon Dijon or walnut mustard 
 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon almond oil 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 8 ounces baby arugula
 2 Belgian endives, ends trimmed, thinly sliced 1

⁄ 2 cup almonds, roughly chopped


12 large dates, chopped

Preheat the oven to 375°. Place the sliced parsnips in a large mixing bowl. Drizzle with a little olive oil and toss to coat. Place the parsnips on a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle with a little salt and add 6 –7 grinds fresh black pepper. Roast in the middle of the oven for 30 minutes, turning the parsnips halfway through the cooking time. Remove from the oven and let cool for 5 minutes. While the parsnips are roasting, prepare the vinaigrette. In a large salad bowl, whisk together the mustard, olive and almond oils and the vinegar to form an emulsion. Place serving utensils over the vinaigrette. Place the arugula, endives, almonds and dates on top of the salad utensils. Add the cooked parsnips. When ready to serve, toss the salad well. This salad is best served while the parsnips are still warm.

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Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons, Salade, Les Fruits and Les Legumes. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.

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FALL W HARVEST INTER & ED HOLIDAY IBLE EV Edible E N T Events S OCTOBER 1–31 Eat Local Challenge Edible Santa Barbara presents the ninth annual Eat Local Challenge for the month of October. CHALLENGE We encourage you to take a pledge to eat and drink local foods for 31 days. To sign up, visit EdibleSantaBarbara. com, join the email newsletter and you will receive projects, tips and recipes throughout the month of October. e Santa Barba ibl ra Ed

OC T O B ER

OCTOBER 2017

T H U RS D AY

F R I D AY – S U N D AY

OCTOBER 5

OCTOBER 6–8

Curated Cocktails

California Avocado Festival

7–9pm at Museum of Contemporary Art in Santa Barbara Join us for happy hour at Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara with signature cocktails, hands-on art activities, special DJ sets and free admission to the exhibition Guatemala from 33,000 km: Contemporary Art from 1960–Present. More info at MCASantaBarbara.org.

Linden Ave., Carpinteria One of the largest free festivals in California with over 75 music acts on four stages. Come celebrate the importance of the avocado to the Carpinteria Valley. Avo Expo Tent, Largest Avocado Contest and World’s Largest Vat of Guacamole are just a few things not to miss. Come hungry and enjoy some avocado creations. Free; AvoFest.com.

SATU RDAY

SATUR D AY

S AT U RD AY

S AT U RD AY

OCTOBER 7

OCTOBER 7

OCTOBER 14

OCTOBER 14

Santa Barbara Polo & Wine Festival

Santa Barbara Brew Festival

Santa Barbara Wine & Seafood Pairing

Santa Barbara Harbor & Seafood Festival

2–5pm at Santa Barbara Oceanfront

Noon–3pm at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

10am–5pm at 132-A Harbor Way Santa Barbara

11am–7:30pm at Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club Held at the beautiful Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club, the festival combines polo, local wine and music for a one-day experience that will be enjoyed by all who attend. This is a true celebration of Santa Barbara and Southern California living. Tickets and more info at SBPoloAndWine.com.

Experience the California Brew Festival in Santa Barbara at a beautiful oceanfront venue. Guests grab a souvenir glass and start sipping just a frisbee throw away from the sparkling Pacific, while One2Tree, a soulful reggae band, keeps the beat for this all-day feast for the senses where beer is king. More info and tickets at CaliforniaBrewFestival.com.

F R I D AY – S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

M O N D AY – S U N D AY

OCTOBER 20–22

OCTOBER 21

OCTOBER 23–29

Gelato Festival 2–7pm at La Cumbre Plaza in Santa Barbara Gelato Festival is coming from Tuscany to America to spread the culture of authentic Italian artisanal gelato and would like to welcome you to join the fun. Chefs and gelato artisans will make unique flavors for the event. Experience the creation of Italian gelato and take part in contests and activities. More info at GelatoFestivalAmerica.com.

6–9pm at Flag Is Up Farms in Solvang

OCTOBER 24

6pm at Barbareño in Santa Barbara Join us for a special Eat Local Supper Club at Barbareño. The chef will create a special menu showcasing the cuisine of Santa Barbara. For menu, additional information and to purchase tickets, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com.

Various locations in Santa Barbara County

This event, often referred to as “The Party of the Year,” raises much-needed funds for Santa Ynez Valley arts education nonprofit Arts Outreach. Up to 60 amateur chefs will show off their culinary skills as they serve up tastes of their carefully prepared dishes. $60–65. To purchase tickets, visit ArtsOutreach.com.

W E D N E SD AY

Seafood lovers of all ages can go to the Harbor for delectable regional seafood specialties, cooking demonstrations, interactive maritime education, boat rides, live music and more. Free admission. HarborFestival.org

Santa Barbara County Craft Beer Week

Real Men Cook

T U E S D AY

Edible Santa Barbara Supper Club at Barbareño

Join us as we celebrate fall and local seafood on the museum patio overlooking the Santa Barbara Harbor. Enjoy local wine paired with small bites by restaurants Industrial Eats, Corazon Cucina, Frankland Crab & Co. and Michael’s Catering $35 pre-sale; $45 at the door; SBMM.org or 805 456-8747 for tickets.

Santa Barbara County’s craft breweries have made a name for themselves with their creative, handcrafted brews. Join us for a week of craft beer, fun, live music, special releases and more. 15+ craft breweries at 20+ locations will participate throughout the week. For more info, visit SBCraftBeerWeek.com.

T H U RS D AY

T U E S D AY

OCTOBER 25

OCTOBER 26

OCTOBER 31

Santa Maria Empty Bowls

Culinary Herbs 101

Ghost Village Road

11:30am and 12:30pm seatings at Santa Maria Fairpark

6–8pm at Art from Scrap in Santa Barbara

For a $25 ticket donation, Empty Bowls guests choose a beautiful handmade bowl, enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread and water and take home the bowl as a reminder of the meal’s purpose: to feed the hungry in our community. Proceeds benefit the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. Purchase tickets online at FoodbankSBC.org or 805 937-3422 x 104 or at the Foodbank in Santa Maria.

Learn everything you’ve ever wanted to know about culinary herbs with farmer and chef Michelle Aronson. You’ll walk away with awesome new skills, a handy recipe packet, homemade herb butter and your own potted herb seedling to take home. This workshop includes all materials, instruction and a glass of wine. $40; more info at ExploreEcology.org.

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3–6pm at Here’s the Scoop in Montecito Costume contest and seasonal treat “Worms & Dirt” gelato for kids in costume. Part of the “Ghost Village Road” Halloween events on Coast Village Road.


For updates and more details on these and other events, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com W E D N E SD AY

S AT U RD AY

NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 4

NOVEMBER 12

Taste of the Sea

Sustainable Table: Local Farm Feast

Santa Barbara Empty Bowls

5:30–7:30pm; Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

NO VE M AY MBER

A benefit for FishSB, guests at Taste of the Sea will explore new ways to enjoy local seafood with cooking demonstrations from four of Santa Barbara’s top chefs: Michael Hutchings, Mossin Sugrich, Randy Bublitz and James Sly. $30 for museum members, $40 for nonmembers. To register, visit SBMM.org/ all-events or call 805 456-8747.

S U N D AY

5pm; Rancho Dos Pueblos

11am, noon and 1pm seatings at Ben Page Youth Center, Santa Barbara

Join us for a reimagined farm-to-table benefit for Explore Ecology. Seven-course zero-waste menu will feature delicious food sourced from local organic farms and innovative menu created by Clark Staub of Full of Life Flatbread and Alix Mascuzzio and Allie Chandler of Slate Catering. $140; ExploreEcology.org/ calendar.

For a ticket donation of $30, guests choose a beautiful handmade bowl, enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread and water and take home the bowl as a reminder of the meal’s purpose to feed the hungry in our community. After lunch, tour the Foodbank next door and learn about ways to get involved. Tickets available at FoodbankSBC.org.

S ATU RDAY

SUN D AY

T U ES D AY

S U N DAY

NOVEMBER 18

NOVEMBER 19

NOVEMBER 21

NOVEMBER 26

Taste of Persia Cooking Class

Pork & Pinot

6:30–9:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria

3–5pm at Cambria Estate

Take & Bake Thanksgiving Pies

Taste of Santa Barbara Walking Tour

The aromas of saffron, nigella seeds and cardamom are in the air as you cook up a Persian feast. Learn how to make Sambusas (crispy chickpea dumplings), cucumber mint dipping sauce, tabuleh salad, pollo albalo and saffron chicken and lamb kabobs. Tickets are $65 and can be purchased at HeatCulinary.com.

Come out to Cambria’s Estate and enjoy Pinot Noir tasting, live music, lite lunch and holiday gift packs for sale. For more information and to purchase tickets, please contact 805 938-7318 or email tastingroom@cambriawines.com or nathaniel.axline@cambriawines.com.

On the day before Thanksgiving, head over to HEAT to make two delicious pies to take home and bake for your families to enjoy. Learn how to make classic pumpkin and lattice-top apple pie. Pie tins provided; $50; purchase at HeatCulinary.com.

This walking tour introduces guests to tasty locations in downtown Santa Barbara. Sample French pastries, Northern Italian dishes, gourmet cheese, local wine, handcrafted chocolates, and East Coast deli fare. Includes a total of six stops combined with local history and info about architectural points of interest along the way. $75; SBTastingsTours.com.

THUR SDAY

S AT U RD AY

S AT U RDAY

DECEMBER 7

DECEMBER 9

DECEMBER 9

Edible SB Holiday Pop-Up Shop

Uncorked: Beauty Behind the (Big) Bottle

1–5pm at Carr Winery Santa Barbara

Noon–2pm; Zaca Mesa Winery Santa Ynez

Featuring businesses from the Edible Gift Guide on pages 56–59, seasonal grub and wine from Carr Winery. Sip and savor as you shop for holiday gifts and meet some of Santa Barbara’s best local artisans. Free and open to the public. Food and beverage for purchase.

Magnums, Jeroboams and beyond... With such a wide variety of wine bottle sizes, it’s difficult to know where to begin. Walk through the barrel room and experience an exclusive tasting of large-format Syrahs and taste what makes them so unique. Paired expertly with gourmet cheeses. $40–50; ZacaMesa. com.

F RI D AY

F R I D AY – M O N D AY

DECEMBER 22

DECEMBER 22–25

Curated Cocktails 7pm at Museum of Contemporary Art in Santa Barbara

JU E DEC EN MBER

S ATU RDAY–SUN D AY

DECEMBER 9–10 Christmas on the Trail Join the Foxen Canyon wineries for a special holiday weekend event. Your Passport allows you to enjoy 20 one-ounce pours from 13 participating wineries on the famous Foxen Canyon Wine Trail. On Saturday each winery will provide delicious small bites for you to enjoy. Your ticket also gets you a commemorative glass and special gift. Each winery will also offer special deals for Passport holders. Tickets at Eventbrite, search “Christmas on the trail 2017”.

11am–2pm in downtown Santa Barbara

6:30–8:30pm at 4342 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria

Happy hour at Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara with signature cocktails, hands-on art activities, special DJ sets and free admission to the exhibition Guatemala from 33,000 km: Contemporary Art from 1960–Present. Part of Downtown Santa Barbara’s 1st Thursdays.

Muni Mega Mall Multi Vendor Holiday Shop 7–10pm at Municipal Winemakers Santa Barbara Holiday vendors will be popping up at Muni’s tasting room in the Funk Zone. Makers, Beef Hearts, The Golden State Store, Lindsey Ross Tin Type Photograph and more. Free; wine available for purchase.

Volunteer at Organic Soup Kitchen Santa Barbara Join the team at Organic Soup Kitchen as they prepare and serve nutrientdense, plant-based meals to those in our community who need it most. Various times available. Sign up to volunteer at OrganicSoupKitchen.org/volunteer.

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edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

E AT DRINK LOC AL GUIDE & MAPS

Santa Barbara County has its own unique food tradition and lifestyle. We’d like to help you find some of the area restaurants, bakeries, food producers and specialty retail shops that contribute to the distinctively Santa Barbara experience. From Ballard to Carpinteria, and from catering to wine tasting, our Guide will help you find what you are looking for and more.

Ballard Ballard Inn & Gathering Table

Carpinteria

Goleta

The Food Liaison

Backyard Bowls

2436 Baseline Ave. 805 688-7770 BallardInn.com

1033 Casitas Pass Rd. 805 200-3030 TheFoodLiaison.com

5668 Calle Real 805 770-2730 BackyardBowls.com

Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and awardwinning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Gathering Table one of the most sought-after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country.

Catering. Counter. Classes. Utilizing many locally grown organic ingredients, enjoy daily rotating entrées and soups, seasonal menu and gourmet salad bar. Corporate and event catering since 2013. Sign up for cooking classes online. Lunch counter Mon–Fri 11am–3pm.

Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Buellton Alma Rosa 250-G Industrial Way 805 688-9090 AlmaRosaWinery.com With certified organic vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills, Alma Rosa focuses on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as other food-friendly wines with the high acid and extraordinary balance for which Richard Sanford’s wines have been known since 1976. .

Margerum Wine Company

59 Industrial Way 805 686-8500 MargerumWines.com Located at the gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills, Margerum now offers tasting at their winery on Industrial Way in Buellton. Taste Margerum and Barden releases, sample wine from tank or barrel and tour the winery. Open Sat and Sun 11am–5pm.

The Hitching Post II 406 E. Hwy. 246 805 688-0676 HitchingPost2.com A favorite of locals and visitors since 1986. Serving wood-grilled fare, prepared in the regional barbecue tradition, along with their highly regarded Hitching Post Wines. Casual and relaxed setting.

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Giannfranco’s Trattoria 666 Linden Ave. 805 684-0720 Giannfrancos.com Experience authentic Italian regional cuisine at this family-owned and family-operated trattoria in downtown Carpinteria. Chef Giovanni prepares each dish from the freshest local and imported foods to offer his creative take on Tuscan grill specialties. Weekday lunch served 11am–3pm. Weekend lunch served noon–3pm. Dinner served 5–9pm; closed Tue.

HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave. 805 242-1151 HeatCulinary.com Santa Barbara County’s culinary school, food truck and full service caterer. HEAT events are known for personalized service, organic ingredients, large portions and attention to detail. Offering originality and undivided attention to create a memorable event.

Sly’s 686 Linden Ave. 805 684-6666 SlysOnline.com Sly’s is known for great food, with an emphasis on farmers market and local produce, great cocktails and great times in Carpinteria. Open Mon–Fri for lunch 11:30am–3pm; lounge menu weekdays 3–5pm; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9pm, Fri and Sat 5–10pm; and weekend brunch & lunch Sat–Sun 9am–3pm.

Ca’ Dario Cucina Italiana 250 Storke Rd. 805 884-9419 CaDario.net Chef and owner Dario Furlati brings his signature pastas, pizzas and authentic Italian dishes to a casual, family-friendly eatery in the heart of Goleta. Daily specials, friendly service, handsome ambiance and an extensive list of Italian and California wines offer a delightful dining experience in the Goodland. Open 7 days a week 11:30am–2:30pm, 5–9pm.

The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters

250 Storke Rd. 1A 805 968-0493 DuneCoffeeRoasters.com Sourcing, roasting and serving the best coffees from around the world. They love serving their carefully selected coffees and in-house-baked pastries and bread to the community. Visit The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters and let them show you the magic of coffee! Open Mon–Fri 6am–7pm, Sat–Sun 7am–7pm.

Lompoc Central Coast Specialty Foods 115 E. College Ave., Ste. 10 805 717-7675 CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com High-quality local & imported specialty foods, including charcuterie, gourmet cheeses, a fullservice deli, exotic meats (alligator, wild boar, bison


and more), specialty foods from around the world, and local beers and wines. Catering available; small intimate affairs to large special events. Open MonWed 10am–6pm, Thu–Fri 10am–7pm, Sat 10am–6pm and Sun 10am–4pm.

Babcock Winery & Vineyards 5175 E. Hwy. 246, Lompoc 805 736-1455 BabcockWinery.com A passion for revolutionary farming and conservation continue to define this family-owned Sta. Rita Hills winery. Stunning single-vineyard Pinot Noirs are showcased alongside acclaimed Chardonnays and other varietals. Chill in the super soulful tasting room filled with vintage, art and eclectic treasures. Tasting room open daily 11am–5:30pm.

Longoria Wines 415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866-759-4637 LongoriaWine.com Longoria Wines is a small family-owned winery with over three decades of producing acclaimed artisanal wines from some of the finest vineyards in Santa Barbara County. Enjoy a tasting or a glass of wine in the tasting room or lounge of the restored historic JM Club at their new winery facility in Lompoc, open daily 11am–4:30pm.

Melville Winery 5185 E. Hwy. 246, Lompoc 805 735-7030 MelvilleWinery.com Melville’s 100% estate boutique winery is located in the heart of the Sta. Rita Hills appellation. They are dedicated to growing and producing exceptional cold-climate Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Syrah. Their wine is grown exclusively from their own land with their hands. Quality. Purity. Open daily 11am–4pm.

Scratch Kitchen 610 N. H St. 805 819-0829 Scratch-Kitchen.com With a wealth of local and seasonal produce and local wines, Scratch Kitchen aims to highlight all the best culinary elements of the Lompoc and Santa Ynez Valleys. Open for lunch and dinner Tue–Sat 11am–9pm, brunch Sun 10am–2pm and Sun dinner 5pm–9pm.

Los Alamos Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St. 805 344-1911 BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hardto-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Valle Fresh’s tacos and tapas menu. Thu 4–8pm, Fri–Sat noon–8pm, Sun noon–6pm.

room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Open Thu noon–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun 11–6pm. Vineyard tours and barrel sampling available by appointment.

Full of Life Flatbread 225 W. Bell St. 805 344-4400 FullofLifeFoods.com Full of Life Flatbread offers an extremely innovative menu based almost entirely on what is grown locally and in season. Open Thu–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 4–8pm; Sat–Sun lunch 11am–3pm.

Bell Street Farm Eatery & Market

Martian Ranch & Vineyard

406 Bell St. 805 344-4609 BellStreetFarm.com

9110 Alisos Canyon Rd. 805 344-1804 MartianVineyard.com

This cozy and delicious eatery is surrounded by gorgeous vineyards and farmland. Award-winning cuisine and sophisticated yet comfortable design, a distinctive environment to enjoy a meal, snack or wine tasting for residents and visitors alike. Assemble your own picnic baskets and accessories for creating a portable meal, as well as gifts and merchandise from local artisans and some of the best of California. Thu and Mon 11am–4pm, Fri–Sun 11am–5pm.

The Martian Ranch tasting room is open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Taste their estate-grown biodynamically farmed wines for an out-of-this-world experience! Winery tours daily; vineyard tours on the weekends. Enjoy wines by the glass, bocce court, horseshoe pit and dog-friendly picnic areas. Open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Mon and Tues by appointment only.

Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St. 805 344-3000 BobsWellBread.com Making bread the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection in a custom-built stone-deck oven. Drop in to taste what visitors and journalists are raving about as “worth the drive”—signature Pain au Levain, award-winning artisanal breads, croissants and specialty pastries. All-day menu of made-to-order breakfast, lunch and weekly special dishes. Indoor-outdoor picturesque café. Thu–Mon 7am–6pm. Café closes at 3pm. Closed Tue and Wed.

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St. 805 344-1900 CasaDumetzWines.com A boutique winery specializing in Rhône varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting

Plenty on Bell 508 Bell St. 805 344-2111 PlentyOnBell.com Longtime Los Alamos chef and local favorite Jesper Johansson is back in the kitchen at Plenty on Bell, serving local, seasonal food. Open for breakfast and lunch Tue–Sat 8am–3pm; dinner Fri only 5:30–8pm. Closed Monday.

Valle Fresh at Babi’s Beer Emporium

388 Bell St. 805-865-2282 ValleFresh.com Tasting counter now open inside Babi’s Beer Emporium in Los Alamos. Specializing in handcrafted, genuine food sourced from local farms, ranches and artisans. This family-owned catering company offers personalized menus for all occasions including weddings, pop-up events, food and wine pairings, themed dinners, gourmet taco bars and more. Thur–Sat noon– 8pm, Sun noon–5pm.

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Los Olivos Andrew Murray Vineyards 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 686-9604 AndrewMurrayVineyards.com Andrew Murray, a grape-growing pioneer and Rhône varietal visionary in Santa Barbara County, founded his winery in 1990. Andrew and his team look forward to sharing the AMV experience with you at their stunning Estate Winery and Visitor Center along Foxen Canyon Road. Tasting room open daily 10:30am–5:30pm.

Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave. 805 693-0700 OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Larner Vineyard & Winery 2900 Grand Ave. 805 688-8148 LarnerWine.com Experience the most intimate tasting room in Los Olivos. Located inside the Los Olivos General Store. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Los Olivos General Store 2900 Grand Ave. 805 688-8148 LosOlivosGeneralStore.com Located in the heart of Santa Ynez Wine Country, the Los Olivos General Store features a broad selection of merchandise ranging from home goods, gourmet food, books, candles, and more. Stay for a wine tasting at Larner Vineyard & Winery. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 688-9339 ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, Zaca Mesa Winery has crafted distinctive wines from their unique mesa top vineyard. As an early pioneer of the region, they now have 150-acres planted, specializing in the production of estategrown Rhône-style wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm. Call for more information on winery tours and private event space.

Montecito American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd. 805-335-8110 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm.

Bree’Osh 1150 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-2500 Breeosh.com Bree’Osh is a French artisan bakery café specializing in sweet and savory brioche bread made with traditional sourdough. Featuring local, organic, high-quality ingredients. Open Wed–Fri 7am–3pm; Sat–Sun 7am–2pm. Closed Mon–Tue.

Here’s the Scoop 1187 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-7020 ScoopSB.com Here’s the Scoop is a local, family-owned business that makes traditional Italian gelato flavors like Stracciatella and Pistachio. Their seasonal farmers market sorbets use local, organic farm-fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs. Sorbets are non-dairy, organic and vegan. Mon–Thu 1–9pm, Fri–Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm.

Montecito Country Mart 1016 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-9664 MontecitoCountryMart.com The Montecito Country Mart, built in 1964, has recently been renovated and preserved, with its original barber shop, post office, market, old-fashioned toy store, as well as Rori’s Ice Cream and Merci to Go artisan food shop. Independent boutique shops include Mate Gallery, Kendall Conrad, Calypso, Malia Mills, Hudson Grace, James Perse and Space NK Apothecary. Shops open Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat–Sun 10am–5pm.

Montecito Village Grocery 1482 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-1112 MontecitoGrocery.com Offering local and organic produce, full service butcher and deli, gourmet cheese, amazing wines and craft beers. Great selection of non-dairy, gluten free, vegetarian and vegan products. Convenient parking and friendly staff. Open daily 7am–8pm.

San Ysidro Ranch 900 San Ysidro Ln. Santa Barbara 805 565-1724 SanYsidroRanch.com Visit the Stonehouse, named one of the 50 Best Restaurants in America by Open Table, or visit Plow & Angel for a comfortable and convivial atmosphere.

Tecolote Bookstore 1470 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-4977 Tecolote Bookstore is an independent bookstore located in the upper village of Montecito. Open Mon–Fri 10am–5:30pm; Sat 10am–5pm; closed Sun.

Santa Barbara Backyard Bowls 3849 State St. 805 569-0011 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

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Il Fustino

3401 State St. 805 845-3521 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 3315 State St. 805 569-2400 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Telegraph Brewing Co. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. 805 963-5018 TelegraphBrewing.com Handcrafting unique American ales that embrace the heritage of California’s early brewing pioneers and use as many locally grown ingredients as possible. Visit the tasting room, open Tue–Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat 2–10pm; Sun 1–7pm. Telegraph beer is available at many restaurants and grocery stores in Santa Barbara County and throughout California.

The Dining Room at Belmond El Encanto 800 Alvarado Pl. 805 770-3530 Belmond.com/ElEncanto Dine in the elegant Dining Room or delight in a romantic dinner under the stars on The Terrace. An innovative menu presented by Chef Johan Denizot offers contemporary California-coastal cuisine, complemented with gracious service and a side of stunning Santa Barbara views. Open 7am–10pm daily.

Santa Barbara (Downtown) American Riviera Bank 1033 Anacapa St. 805 965-5942 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St. 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots. Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years, along with other varietals. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines available. Tasting room open Mon–Fri noon–6pm, Sat and Sun 11am–6pm.


Destination Maps

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1. Broken Clock Vinegar Works 2. Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 3. Valley Brewers 4. Mad & Vin at The Landsby 5. Solvang Visitors Bureau 6. Buttonwood Farm and Winery

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Destination Maps 2

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1. Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, Commercial Fishermen of Santa Barbara Saturday Market 2. Riverbench Santa Barbara, Helena Avenue Bakery, The Lark Santa Barbara, The Lucky Penny, Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant, Loquita, Santa Barbara Wine Collective 3. Municipal Winemakers 4. Lama Dog 5. Backyard Bowls, Downtown SB 6. Chocolate Maya 7. Green Table 8. Grapeseed Co. 9. 805 Boba 10. Barbareño 11. Scarlett Begonia 12. Bouchon Santa Barbara 13. SB Public Market, Il Fustino 14. Renaud’s, Arlington Plaza 15. Ca’ Dario & Ca’ Dario Pizzeria 16. OnQ Financial 17. Somerset 18. The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters

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Santa Barbara (Downtown cont.) August Ridge Vineyards 5 E. Figueroa St. 805 770-8442 AugustRidge.com August Ridge crafts wine that combines the spirit of California with the restrained, classic elegance of wines from northern and central Italy. Distinctive wines from the Paso Robles region to be opened as you gather for a meal, surrounded by friends, family and loved ones. Tasting room open Sun–Mon, WedThurs noon–7pm, Fri-Sat noon–8pm. Happy Hour Mon and Wed 3–6pm. Closed Tuesday.

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 805 845-5379 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Barbareño 205 W. Canon Perdido 805 963-9591 Barbareno.com Offering a casual approach to the classic California tavern, highlighting the traditions and specialties of the Central Coast and its many outstanding purveyors. Sit inside and enjoy the enticing atmosphere of an open kitchen, or outside on the patio alongside the Santa Maria grill. Dinner nightly 5–9:30pm; barbeque lunch Thu–Fri 11:30am–2pm; closed Tue.

Bouchon 9 W. Victoria St. 805 730-1160 BouchonSantaBarbara.com Bouchon sources all of its ingredients using an “asfresh-and-as-local-as-possible” approach. Experience fine dining, excellent regional wines and relaxed service in a warm, inviting ambience. Private dining in the Cork Room is available for groups of 10–20. Dinner nightly 5–10pm.

Cebada Wine & Forbidden Fruit Orchards 8 E. De La Guerra St. 805 451-2570 Tasting Room 805 735-4648 Farm CebadaWine.com Cebada Vineyard is a working farm that vinifies estategrown Pinot Noir and Chardonnay located west of Sta. Rita Hills AVA. Their boutique winery produces sophisticated Burgundy-style wines. The handcrafted wines are made on the farm and available at the farm or downtown Santa Barbara. Tasting room open daily; farm tours available by appointment.

C’est Cheese 825 Santa Barbara St. 805 965-0318 CestCheese.com In addition to being a local source for the finest cheeses and artisanal foods, C’est Cheese serves breakfast and lunch—fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and incredible pastries. Open Tue–Fri 8am–6pm (Cafe closes at 3pm); Sat 7am–6pm (cheese shop opens at 8am); Sun 8am–3pm. Closed Mon.

Ca’ Dario 37 E. Victoria St. 805 884-9419 CaDario.net Chef Dario Furlati’s flagship eatery offers a fine Italian dining experience featuring authentic recipes made with fresh, local ingredients. Handmade pastas, local seafood, weekly farmers market specials and an extensive Italian wine list. Located in the heart of the downtown Arts District. Serving lunch and dinner Sun–Thu 11:30am–10pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am–10:30pm.

Ca’ Dario Pizzeria Veloce 38 W. Victoria St. 805 884-9419 CaDarioPizza.net Located inside the Public Market, just a block away from Chef Dario Furlati's flagship eatery, Ca'Dario Pizzeria offers a casual, urban atmosphere to enjoy authentic pizzas, salads and appetizers. Open daily 11:30am–9pm.

Carr Winery 414 N. Salsipuedes Street 805 965-7985 CarrWinery.com Visit the 1940s Quonset Hut in downtown Santa Barbara and enjoy the ambiance of a working winery while sipping on delicious wines on the patio or at the beautiful barrel top bar. Wines by the glass, wine tasting, and wine on tap served daily. Monthly art shows and live music. Open daily 11am–9pm, Sun 11am–6pm.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St. 805 965-5956 ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped temptations that are made from the highest-quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Mesocacao including some small bean-to-bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and some exotic findings from their travels overseas.

Grapeseed Company 21 W. Ortega St. 805 456-3655 TheGrapeseedCompany.com The Grapeseed Company creates botanical spa and skin care products handcrafted from the byproduct of wine plus antioxidant-rich local and organic ingredients. Open Mon–Fri 10:30am–6pm, Sat 11am–5pm, closed Sun.

Green Table 113 W. De La Guerra St. 805 618-1233 Green-Table.com Delicious homemade foods, cleanses and drinks with original recipes that offer organic, gluten-free and vegetarian dishes, from matcha lattes to quinoa veggie burgers. Their vision is a world where natural, organic food is the staple of our meals and we eat to nourish our bodies while enjoying the great taste. Mon–Sat 8am–5pm, Sun 8am–2pm.

Il Fustino 38 W. Victoria St. 805 845-4995 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Margerum Wine Company 813 Anacapa St. 805 845-8435 MargerumWineCompany.com Located in the historic El Paseo complex, Margerum offers two venues for tasting in Downtown Santa Barbara. Enjoy a tasting (or a glass) of handcrafted, small production Margerum and Barden wines sourced from top vineyards around Santa Barbara County. Open Mon–Wed noon–5pm, Thu–Sun noon–6pm.

Santa Barbara Maritime Museum 113 Harbor Way, Ste. 190 805 962-8404 SBMM.org The Santa Barbara Maritime Museum brings history to life through its educational programs and interactive exhibits, as well as events. Open 10am–5pm. Closed Wed.

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 728 State St. 805 324-4402 McConnells.com McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, founded in Santa Barbara in 1949, is now in its third generation of family ownership. They make their ice creams as they always have: from scratch, using Central Coast, grass-grazed milk, cream and the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients from partner farms, artisans and purveyors they’ve worked with for decades. No preservatives. No stabilizers. No additives. Ever. A 70-year sweet legacy of keeping it real.

On Q Financial 1332 Anacapa St. 805 845-0694 OnQFinancial.com Since 2013, On Q Financial’s goal has been to ensure the mortgage process is streamlined and smooth for every client. Their team even works closely with community partners to provide homebuyers’ workshops to the Santa Barbara community. They are ready to help you purchase a home or refinance your existing home loans—in Santa Barbara and beyond.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 1324 State St. 805 892-2800 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 7am–3pm.

Scarlett Begonia 11 W. Victoria St., #10 805 770-2143 ScarlettBegonia.net Scarlett Begonia will always strive to have interesting, thoughtful food. Menus change weekly with an innovative, fresh approach to breakfast and lunch. Showcasing progressive modern cuisine, Scarlett Begonia features

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Subscribe Online Today EdibleSantaBarbara.com For more information email us at info@EdibleSantaBarbara.com sustainable, organic, high quality ingredients coupled with innovative cooking to provide one of the most food-centric experiences in Santa Barbara. Now open seven days a week 9am–2pm. Available evenings for special events and private parties.

Somerset 7 E. Anapamu St. 805 845-7112 SomersetSB.com Decor inside Somerset is a paean to mid-century modern with luxurious counterpoints, while outside is a beautiful and timeless walled garden with 100year-old olive trees and a central hearth. All produce is sourced within a 100-mile-radius. Taking advantage of proximity to the Santa Barbara coast, Chef utilizes local fish and livestock humanely raised on local ranches. Open Mon–Fri 5:30pm–close, Sat–Sun 5pm–close.

The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters

1101 State St. and 528 Anacapa St. 805 963-2721/805 962-7733 DuneCoffeeRoasters.com Sourcing, roasting and serving the best coffees from around the world. They love serving their carefully selected coffees and baked-in-house pastries and bread to the community. Visit The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters and let them show you the magic of coffee! Open Mon–Fri 6am–7pm, Sat–Sun 7am–7pm.

The Wine Cask 813 Anacapa St. 805 966-9463 WineCask.com The Wine Cask Restaurant features the freshest local ingredients, the best wine list in town and seasonal signature cocktails. They offer fine dining in 86 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017

Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant

131 Anacapa St., Ste. B 805 284-0380 LesMarchandsWine.com

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their exquisite Gold Room and casual dining in the courtyard and at their Intermezzo bar. Lunch: Tue–Fri 11:30am–3pm. Dinner: Tue–Sun from 5:30pm. Last seating at 9pm Sun–Thu and at 10pm Fri–Sat.

Santa Barbara (Funk Zone) Lama Dog 116 Santa Barbara St. 805 880-3364 LamaDog.com Craft beer tap room and bottle shop located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Wed 11:30am–10pm, Thu 11:30am–11pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am–midnight. @lamadog

Helena Avenue Bakery 131 Anacapa St., C 805 880-3383 HelenaAvenueBakery.com An artisan bakery offering wholesome breads and handmade seasonal pastries. Specializing in baked goods made from scratch and a complete menu of grab-and-go items ideal for dining in or takeaway. Offering an expanded breakfast and espresso menu. Open daily 7am–7pm. Inside SB Wine Collective, off Helena Avenue.

The Lark 131 Anacapa St., Ste. A (805) 284-0370 TheLarkSB.com The Lark, Santa Barbara’s premier dining destination, features locally sourced seasonal ingredients celebrating the abundant bounty of the Central Coast. Meals are served family-style with handcrafted cocktails and an extensive wine list to complement Chef Jason Paluska’s creations. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Les Marchands is a European-style wine bar and retail shop with a world-class team of sommeliers providing unique experiences in wine, food and education. With an extensive wine list, Les Marchands offers something for everyone. Open Sun–Thu 11am–9pm; Fri–Sat 11am–11pm.

Loquita 202 State St. 805 880-3380 LoquitaSB.com Loquita, a tribute to Santa Barbara’s Spanish origins, presents authentic Spanish food including tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats and three types of paella. Menu created by Executive Chef Peter Lee and Spanish Chef Perfecte Rocher. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Lucky Penny 127 Anacapa St. 805 284-0358 LuckyPennySB.com Offering casual dining fare of breakfast goodies, espressos, coffees and teas, wood-fired pizzas, sandwiches and salads, beer and wine. Outdoor patio seating. Located in the heart of Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10pm.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 137 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 324-4100 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 11am–6pm daily.

Santa Barbara Wine Collective 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 456-2700 SantaBarbaraWineCollective.com Santa Barbara Wine Collective is a downtown tasting room for five local like-minded producers focusing on Santa Barbara County’s unique terroir. Wines are available for tastings, by the glass or bottle or to take home. Open Sun–Thu 11am–7pm, Fri–Sat 11am–8pm.

Santa Barbara (Mesa) Chooket 2018 Cliff Dr. 805 845-5519 Chooket.com Chooket is a French bakery specializing in individual fine pastries, cakes of French traditions, catering events and weddings. This pretty boutique is the kingdom of cream puffs, eclairs, fresh fruit tarts and offers seasonal menus. Artisan bakery, all treats are made on site and only with fresh ingredients. Open Tue–Sat 10am–6pm. Closed Sun–Mon.


Lazy Acres 302 Meigs Rd. 805 564-4410 LazyAcres.com Santa Barbara’s best source for wholesome, natural and organic foods and products with real people dedicated to providing unmatched personal service. Mon–Sat 7am–11pm, Sun 7am–10pm.

Santa Maria Cambria Estate Winery 5475 Chardonnay Ln. 805 938-7318 CambriaWines.com Family-owned, sustainably farmed estate winery. Visit and experience the flavors of the Santa Maria Bench. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Viognier and Syrah. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7200 and 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-4251 FoxenVineyard.com The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open 11am–4pm daily.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 6020 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 10am–4pm daily.

Santa Ynez Carr Warehouse 3563 Numancia Street 805 688-5757 CarrWinery.com Visit Carr Winery’s 3,800 square-foot climate-controlled wine storage facility in downtown Santa Ynez. The warehouse is where all of the Carr Wines are waxed and bottle aged. The facility has an open floor plan with a u-shaped bar and booths for visitors to enjoy wine tastings and wines by the glass. Live music on the First Friday of each month. Open daily 11am–6pm, Fri 11am–8pm.

SY Kitchen 1110 Faraday St. 805 691-9794 SYKitchen.com Modern Northern Italian dishes showcasing local ingredients and Chef Luca Crestanelli’s light touch. Specialties include homemade pastas; pizzas served from the wood-fired oven; oak-grilled chicken, seafood, lamb and steak. The bar features dazzling cocktails crafted by Alberto Battaglini. Also featured is The Courtyard, a casual outdoor lounge with full service dining. Lunch daily 11:30am–2:30pm, Aperitivo Mon–Thur 4–5:30pm, Dinner Sun–Thur 5–9pm and Fri–Sat 5–9:45pm.

Solvang Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-3032 ButtonwoodWinery.com In 1968 Betty Williams came to Buttonwood, creating a life that found expression through a connection with the land. The vineyard now has 33,000 vines with a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Marsanne, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm.

Mad & Vin at The Landsby 1576 Mission Dr. 805 688-3121 TheLandsby.com Mad & Vin, which translates to food & wine in Danish, specializes in delicious wine-country inspired cuisine made with seasonal ingredients from California’s Central Coast. There's also a welcoming lobby bar which serves craft cocktails, specialty shrubs, beer and wine. Breakfast 7:30-10:30am, Sat–Sun until 11am. Dinner Tue–Sun 5–9pm. Bar Mon–Thu 4–9pm, Fri 4–10pm, Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm. Happy Hour daily 4–6pm.

The Landsby 1576 Mission Dr. 805 688-3121 TheLandsby.com Located in the heart of Solvang, this newly renovated 50-room boutique hotel offers warm hospitality and refined, stylish accommodations. With its bright, open guestrooms, contemporary Scandinavian design and unrivaled location, a stay at The Landsby makes for the perfect vacation.

Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 1555 Mission Dr. 805 691-9444 SucculentCafe.com Comfort food with a twist, prepared with seasonal and local farm-fresh ingredients. The best charcuterie plates around feature farm-fresh cheeses, house-made jams, pickled veggies, nuts and fruit. Great local wine, craft beer and signature cocktails. Breakfast/Lunch: weekdays (except Tue) 10am–3pm, Sat & Sun 8:30am–3pm. Dinner Wed–Mon 5–9pm.

Source Guide Bob’s Red Mill BobsRedMill.com Bob’s Red Mill works hard to ensure the highest quality by maintaining a close relationship with their products, every step of the way. Relationships start at the source—with the farmer who produces the grain. We maintain personal relationships with farmers all around the country and make an effort to visit their farms. Together, we ensure that we're offering the best product available, while always using best practices.

Bragg Live Foods Bragg.com Founded in 1912 by Dr. Paul C. Bragg and now run by his daughter Dr. Patricia Bragg in Goleta, Bragg Live Food Products offers organic and natural health products and publishes self-health books. Available locally at Fairview Gardens’ Farm Stand, Lassen’s, Gladden and Sons, Tri-County Produce, Whole Foods Market, Lazy Acres and in the health section of your neighborhood grocery store.

Drake Family Farms DrakeFamilyFarms.com Making locally produced farmstead artisan goat cheese in Ontario, California. At Drake Family Farms every goat has a name and their goat cheeses are made on the farm with milk exclusively from the farm’s own animals. Available at local farmers markets and online.

Harvest Santa Barbara 805 696-6930 HarvestSantaBarbara.com Delivering freshly harvested wholesale produce— sourced directly from local family farms—to schools, restaurants, hospitals and retail businesses. Their mission is to be the catalyst for a healthier, more sustainable food system by strengthening the ties between farmers and the community.

Jimenez Family Farm 805 688-0597 JimenezFamilyFarm.com Small family-run local farm specializes in sustainably grown food and their famous handmade pies, quiches and small-batch preserves. Visit them at the farmers market to purchase produce, pies, jams and naturally fed and farm-raised rabbit, lamb, pork, goat and poultry.

Ron Helman Jazz 505 603-3648 RonHelmanMusic.com Ron Helman draws from the great jazz songbook of the 1950s and 60s to play for big and small Central Coast events. No gimmicks here, just straight-ahead jazz that puts a smile on your face and a dance in your step.

Plow to Porch 805 895-7171 PlowToPorch.com Plow to Porch Organics is a local organic/pesticide-free produce and grocery delivery service to members who subscribe. They simplify the purchase of local fresh organic produce and other organic, local foods in order to inspire good nutrition, support local farmers, protect the environment and make eating healthy food fun!

Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market 805 962-5354 SBFarmersMarket.org Seven markets, six days a week.

Santa Barbara – Tree Farm CalAtlanticHomes.com Brand new homes in the foothills of Santa Barbara County in a 26-acre setting.

Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa! Mangalitsa ground pork (the real hamburger) and hickory smoked bacon are now featured in the Larder Meat Company’s Larder Club meat box, delivered monthly throughout California (sign up at http://www.lardermeatco.com). You can also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website—please call first! Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@WinfieldFarm.us) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

EdibleSantaBarbara.com FALL 2017 | 87


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Santa Barbara Rock Crab Eggs Benedict

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Fall’s

Jane at the Marketplace

Don’t-Miss Dish

With items like breakfast pizza fritta, shakshuka eggs, housemade levain breads and seafood galore, it’s difficult to pick a dish from the new weekend brunch menu at Jane at the Marketplace in Goleta. After eight years in its downtown Santa Barbara location, Jane expanded to this outpost and added brunch to the French- and Mediterranean-inspired menu.

by Liz Dodder

LIZ DODDER

Fall’s seasonal Benedict is made with local Santa Barbara rock crab over fresh spinach and sliced tomatoes on a housemade bun. And the rock crab is extremely fresh, sometimes only hours out of the ocean (and never frozen). At Jane, the kitchen staff for each shift calls in the seafood order for the next meal service, which means this crab is ordered from Santa Barbara Fish Market the night before. Almost all the bread at Jane is sourdough— including the fried pizza dough in the pizza fritta— and made in-house from a starter that’s been alive as long as the restaurant. Chef Mark Huston started his bread for the Goleta location almost two years ago when they opened, so that local yeast would contribute to the bread’s taste and makeup. This signature bread is still evolving with the air— adorning tables and dishes at brunch, lunch and dinner. And it goes so well with bright, sweet crab and delicate, French-style Hollandaise sauce. To make the dish, Huston gently boils the crab in salted water for 10 –15 minutes, then cools and cracks the crab and removes the meat. He grills the buns in clarified butter and tops them with sliced tomatoes and fresh spinach. He makes Hollandaise sauce by blending egg yolks, lemon, vinegar and clarified butter, then adds a tiny spot of hot water at the end (this makes it lighter and more delicate). He adds a poached egg to each bun, tops with the fresh Hollandaise and garnishes with herbs or chives. Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com

88 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA FALL 2017


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Edible Santa Barbara Fall 2017  

Celebrating the local food and wine culture of Santa Barbara County.