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wild thing

Women on the Rise as the Family Buck Winners By Rachel Shockley

Above: Dolly Aragon earned a guided elk hunt in southeast New Mexico with her perfect score on the Department of Game and Fish hunter education course exam. Photo courtesy of New Mexico Department of Game and Fish.

More than ever, American women today eat local by hunting and harvesting their own meat from wild big-game animals such as deer and elk that free range in nearby forests and meadows. “It’s nice to know that you can harvest your own meat and to know that you are the one responsible for taking that animal, and taking it humanely,” said Jennifer Morgan, hunter education coordinator for the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. “And the meat is as organic as you can get.” According to US Census Bureau, the number of women hunters grew by twenty-five percent between 2006 and 2011. Women now total one and a half million and comprise eleven percent of all hunters in the United States. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish annually hosts the New Mexico Outdoor Expo to offer free instruction in skills such as archery, and shotgun and rifle shooting. “Women are interested in learning these skills. Last year, more than four thousand people came to participate and thirtyfive percent were women,” Morgan said.

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edible Santa Fe | SPRING 2014

Edible Santa Fe - Spring 2014  

Women and Food - The spring issue is a showcase of amazing women working in food and agriculture, from those defining local food distributio...

Edible Santa Fe - Spring 2014  

Women and Food - The spring issue is a showcase of amazing women working in food and agriculture, from those defining local food distributio...