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MONDAY 18

TUESDAY 19

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 20 21

FRIDAY 22

AUGUST

25

26

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit

27

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

1

2

SEPTEMBER

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit

9

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit

3

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

16

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit 4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

29

30

4

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit

5

6

12

13

19

20

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

10

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

15

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit

SET-UP DAY 10:00 – 3:00pm Gallery Room

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

8

28

SATURDAY 23

11

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit 4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

17

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

18

10-11:30 School Days for Exhibit

SUNDAY 24

2:00-3:00 EXHIBIT OPENS Presentation: Sam Stack 3:15-4:00 Reception (Invited Guests) in Barnette BOG Rooms 110-111

31

2-3:30 Open Exhibit for Public Presentations: Kate Staples Matt Vester

7

2-3:30 Open Exhibit for Public Presentations: Kenneth Fones-Wolf Krystal Frazier

14

2-3:30 Open Exhibit for Public & Presentations: Elizabeth Fones-Wolf Jason Philips

21 EXHIBIT IS CLOSED

4-6:00 Open Exhibit for Public

The Center for Democracy and Citizenship Education acknowledges the following for their assistance in establishing the CDCE “Touching History” educational experience: Jack Aylor, Director of Development, CEHS Kris Bex, President of Remnant Trust Carolyn Brejwo, Adjunct Instructor, CEHS Clifton Colebank, Chief Business Officer, CEHS Megan Edison, Professional Technologist II, CEHS Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, Chair, Department of History, Eberly Ernie Goeres, Professor, CEHS Kimberly Goletz, Accounting Assistant II, CEHS Tara Hannum, Research Graduate Assistant, CDCE Mary Haas, Professor, CEHS Ross Higgins, Doctoral Student

Mary Kinsley, Director, WVU Erickson Alumni Center Malorie Kreighbaum, Office Manager, The Remnant Trust, Inc. Eric Moffa, Doctoral Student Dale Niederhauser, Chair, Department of CILS, CEHS Remnant Trust Foundation Board of Directors Lynne Schrum, Dean, CEHS Mary Beth Sickles, Development Representative, CEHS Samuel Stack, Professor, CEHS Christie Zachary, Director of Marketing and Communication,CEHS


Exhibit Schedule ADMITTANCE FOR SCHOOLS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC Begins August 26, 2014 and ends September 20, 2014. TUESDAYS and THURSDAYS School students will be admitted to see the exhibit from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. TUESDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and THURSDAYS The general public will be admitted to see the exhibit from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. (Wednesday, September 10, 2014 the exhibit will be closed to the public) SEPTEMBER 20, 2014 The general public will be admitted to see the exhibit on its final day from 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.

WEEKEND PRESENTATIONS Sunday, August 24, 2014 – EXHIBIT OPENS 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Presentation: Sam Stack, Professor Grammatical Institute of the English Language: An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking Reception (Invited Guests Only) 3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Barnette BOG Rooms 110 – 111 Sunday, August 31, 2014 - Exhibit open to public 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Presentations: Kate Staples, Associate Professor of History The Magna Carta

Matt Vester, Associate Professor of History Institutio Principis Christiani

Sunday, September 7, 2014 - Exhibit open to public 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Presentations: Kenneth Fones-Wolf, Professor of History Proceedings and Debates of the Virginia State Convention of 1829 – 1830

Krystal Frazier, Assistant Professor of History Up from Slavery: An Autobiography

Sunday, September 14, 2014 - Exhibit open to public 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Presentations: Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, Professor of History Gospel of Wealth

Jason Philips, Associate Professor of History Emancipation Proclamation


“Touching History” The Wisdom of the Ages Athenaeum Scholarship Addresses Samuel Stack Professor, Grammatical Institute of the English Language An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking (1794) Often referred to as the “Schoolmaster of America,” and best known for his “Blue-Backed Speller” and the American Dictionary, Noah Webster had a clear purpose in mind when he wrote the Grammatical Institute of the English Language An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking. Calculated to “improve the minds and refine the taste of youth,” Webster believed that American school children should be exposed early to a love of God and country and that our principles of virtue and patriotism could be instilled while the students were learning to read and write. This address will discuss Webster’s “vocabulary of Republicanism” and also his “quiet Christianity” as he sought to teach children in the early republic.

Kate Staples Associate Professor of History, The Magna Carta (1350) The Magna Carta looms large in discussions of freedom and rights. This presentation will place the great charter within the historical context of King John’s disputes with his barons and the resolution at Runnymede, but will also consider medieval ideas of revolt and just governance, women’s and men’s access to political influence, and the legacy of the document itself.

Matt Vester Associate Professor of History, Institutio Principis Christiani (1516) Desiderius Erasmus wrote his Institutio Principis Christiani [Education of a Christian Prince] in 1516, within a year or two of Thomas More’s Utopia and Niccolò Machiavelli’s Prince. In some ways, the Dutch humanist’s “philosophy of Christ” runs parallel to the late medieval natural law tradition of Thomas Aquinas, but in other ways it resonates with Machiavelli’s unbridled power politics.


Kenneth Fones-Wolf Professor of History, Proceedings and Debates of the Virginia State Convention of 1829-1830 Three decades before the Civil War, a constitutional crisis emerged in Virginia. At stake were the issues of democratic representation, political equality, and the future of slavery in the Commonwealth. The inability of the Virginia Constitutional Convention to solve these issues planted the seeds of disunion and the possibility for western Virginians to create their own state.

Krystal Frazier Associate Professor of History, Up from Slavery: An Autobiography (1901) This presentation on Booker T. Washington’s autobiography Up From Slavery will focus on understanding how Washington’s background prepared him to lead the “Tuskegee Machine” and become the most prominent African American leader of his time. This talk will also explore the foundational components of his “racial uplift” strategy which has often been incorrectly juxtaposed against the writings of W. E. B. DuBois.

Elizabeth Fones-Wolf Professor of History, Gospel of Wealth (1900) The late nineteenth century was an era when a small group of entrepreneurs amassed great wealth. Andrew Carnegie argued that the wealthy had a responsibility to redistribute their surplus through philanthropy. His Gospel of Wealth is a statement about the importance of giving for the public good that continues to have important contemporary implications.

Jason Phillips Associate Professor of History, Emancipation Proclamation (1862) Jason Philips will explore the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation by explaining how it contributed to abolition and Union victory. Looking beyond the Civil War, my talk will also consider how the Proclamation affected global efforts to end slavery.


CDCE Director’s Rationale Statement: One of the CDCE’s missions is to bring programs to our university community that enhances historical knowledge and understanding from great minds of the past. I view this exhibit as an outstanding opportunity to be able to reach many people in our rural areas and within our schools to help stimulate a desire to learn more about the writings of these scholars and philosophers. This rare book exhibit is an exceptional educational experience allowing all citizens to actively participate by “touching history” in its purest form. The Center for Democracy and Citizenship Education (CDCE) strives to create high-quality, student-centered programs that involve WVU faculty who approach their work in a manner that builds relationships with students that emphasize trust and excellence. It is believed that in this setting, WVU faculty must mentor students through accountability, high standards, and mutual respect. In direct alignment with the WVU 2020 strategic mission statement, helping students become leaders of wisdom and integrity will prepare them for the most important position they will hold in life, that of citizen. The study of history is foundational to the formation of the whole person. To this end, the CDCE cultivates through its programs a critical understanding of the past and helps students develop the skills of historical research, analysis, and communication. In addition, the CDCE emphasizes the importance for all WVU community members to be active and ethical global citizens. Therefore, I encourage students to pursue further education and/or a fulfilling career valuing service to others in our community and around the world. Robert A. Waterson, Ph.D. Associate Professor Director, Center for Democracy and Citizenship Education College of Education and Human Services West Virginia University

Visit the CDCE website at http://cdce.wvu.edu


CDCE Board of Advisors • • • •

Elizabeth A. Dooley, Ed.D. Priscilla Haden, M.S. A. G. Rud, Ph.D. Douglas J. Simpson, Ph.D.

• Sam Stack Jr., Ph.D. • Phillip J. VanFossen, Ph.D. • Woody Wilson, M.A.

What others say…. I was pleased to be invited to speak at two CDCE events in the fall of 2013. I was impressed with the connections CDCE has made across WVU, but also out in the state. Students in its programs not only learn about American history and political processes, but they also learn how to model democratic ways of teaching and learning. CDCE reaches across the state to encourage collaborative teaching and experience-based learning on American political and social institutions. I am proud to be associated with CDCE, a national leader in social studies education and community outreach. -A. G. Rud, Distinguished Professor, Washington State University. My very first visit to the beautiful State of West Virginia was at the behest of Dr. Robert Waterson (CDCE programs) who invited me to participate in a teacher’s workshop, the subject being the Holocaust. Dr. Waterson first heard me some years earlier when I presented talks about my personal Holocaust experiences at Purdue University where he was pursuing his doctorate. As it is my mission to speak about and inform as many students and adults about the lessons learned from that dark period of our history as possible, I naturally jumped at the opportunity to speak to and with a large group of educators. It was an incredible experience, and I felt privileged to have been invited to participate in this well-organized CDCE workshop. In addition to the workshop, Dr. Waterson arranged for me to present in public schools. A second invitation from Dr. Waterson arrived about a year later, when it was arranged for me to speak to and with students bused into a large WVU facility from many area middle schools. I was amazed to see more than 20 busloads of young students stream into the large presenting room. Organization of this event was flawless, with 800+ students attending this session, with many good and important questions. As a direct result of these two WVU visits, two additional visits resulted in other areas of the state. In all, several thousand students heard my first-hand accounts of the Holocaust and the relevant messages of respect and tolerance. This generation of students will be the last to hear first-hand accounts of the Holocaust, and I am therefore greatly indebted to Dr. Waterson and the CDCE for his hard work and great vision.

-Marion Blumenthal Lazan, Holocaust Survivor, Speaker, and Co-Author of her memoir, Four Perfect Pebbles

As a pre-service teacher, I was involved in some of the earliest programs the WVU Center for Democracy and Citizenship Education developed. As I begin my fourth year teaching, I have made civic education a priority in my classes and by advising Capital High School’s Model United Nations and Youth in Government clubs. I can directly attribute these passions to Dr. Waterson and the CDCE. Though my career in education has been relatively short, the center has given me some of the most formative and meaningful professional development opportunities. Whether it is connecting the classroom and community through interviewing local veterans, using historical actors to engage students with the past, or discussing controversial social issues in a forum of educators, the CDCE has met a crucial need for West Virginia’s students, communities, and their social studies teachers.

-Matthew Cox, Social Studies Teacher at Capital High School, Charleston, WV


CDCE - Touching History Program  

The WVU College of Education and Human Services Center of Democracy and Citizenship Education presents "Touching History". A rare book exhib...

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