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W VU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES | SPRING 2017

MAKING AN IMPACT.

INSIDE: WVU Nursery School receives $1 million gift and leads the way with innovative pre-K curriculum. Sisters establish first-ever award to support supervising teachers at WVU. CEHS student makes a career change in order to give back.


SPRING 2017

Letter from the Dean

E. Gordon Gee President, West Virginia University

Dear Alumni and Friends,

ADMINISTRATION Gypsy Denzine, Ph.D. Dean, College of Education and Human Services Dale Niederhauser, Ph.D. Associate Dean of Academic Affairs M Cecil Smith, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education Laura Porter, Ed.D. Assistant Dean for Student Services and Accreditation Jeffrey Daniels, Ph.D. Chair, Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling and Counseling Psychology Reagan Curtis, Ph.D. Chair, Learning Sciences and Human Development Barbara Ludlow, Ed.D. Chair, Special Education Sam Stack, Ph.D. Interim Chair, Curriculum and Instruction/Literacy Studies Jayne Brandel, Ph.D. Chair, Communication Sciences and Disorders

EDITORIAL STAFF Amy Lutz Director of Advancement Lindsey Kudaroski Communications Specialist Lauren Seiler Assistant Director of Development and Outreach Megan Edison Professional Technologist Kim Mocniak Program Assistant

ART DIRECTION WVU University Relations — Design Sheree Wentz, Multimedia Specialist

Thank you for being a part of the WVU College of Education and Human Services’ continued success. I am proud to share that 2016 was another strong year for the College and our students. A result of your commitment to giving back, our College saw a record year in private giving. On behalf of our faculty, staff and students, I cannot begin to express our sincere gratitude for your continued support. Our College, as part of the University’s comprehensive campaign, A State of Minds: The Campaign for West Virginia’s University, has raised more than $7.2 million, 128% of our $6.6 million campaign goal. I am confident in our ability to continue to meet our vision, mission and goals, while staying laser-focused on meeting the needs of West Virginia. We continue to take our land-grant mission very seriously, and your support allows us to provide access to higher education and guarantee success for our students. Your help also ensures our ability to provide outstanding academic programs for our students by hiring and retaining the very best faculty and staff members. Our academic programs continue to earn national recognition and the highest ratings of accreditation. Our faculty members consistently publish research findings in areas relevant to providing solutions to real problems in education and human services. In addition to our philanthropic private funding, I am proud to say we have significantly increased our external funding by receiving state and federal grants. Our College exists to offer hope and better lives for others. We are able to offer a better future for our students, who will positively impact others, because of your support. I thank you for your commitment and hope you enjoy learning more about the ways you have impacted our College, our students, our faculty, our state and our nation through your tremendous support.

PHOTOGRAPHY WVU University Relations — Communications M.G. Ellis, Senior Photojournalist Brian Persinger, Photojournalist

EDITORIAL OFFICE

College of Education and Human Services West Virginia University 802 Allen Hall P.O. Box 6122 Morgantown, WV 26506-6122 Phone: 304-293-5705 Fax: 304-293-7565 Email: cehsnews@mail.wvu.edu

cehs.wvu.edu

Gypsy Denzine Dean, College of Education and Human Services

WVU is an EEO/Affirmative Action Employer — Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran. The WVU Board of Governors is the governing body of WVU. The Higher Education Policy Commission in West Virginia is responsible for developing, establishing and overseeing the implementation of a public policy agenda for the state’s four-year colleges and universities. (349390)


CONTENTS FEATURES 12 16

New Chances for Success

Nursery School now positioned to do more with recent donation.

A First in Support of Teachers

Sisters support supervising teachers through unique gift.

Snapshot Garden-Based Learning Graduate student Hannah Stone uses garden-based learning to teach math, science and nutrition to fifth-grade students from North Elementary School. Garden-based learning uses the garden as the foundation for integrated learning across disciplines. Photo by Brian Persinger

DEPARTMENTS 2 4 8

Matter of Fact Student Scholarships Faculty and Student Research

22 26

Funding the Future Donor Roll


Matter of Fact

BRIAN PERSINGER

Endowed Professor

Dr. Barabara L. Ludlow, chair of the Department of Special Education, was recently named the Chester E. and Helen B. Derrick CEHS Endowed Professor. The endowment supports a professorship for any program at the College, providing a broad range of support for research, teaching and service. Ludlow has pioneered new models of teacher education in special education, using the first field-based training at multiple centers around the state in the 1980s, then live television courses available at public viewing sites during the 1990s, and, finally, fully online programs accessible in the workplace or home beginning in 2001. In collaboration with her colleague, Dr. Melissa Hartley, she has also been involved in exploring applications of 3-D virtual immersive environments in teacher education since 2010. Ludlow has authored numerous articles on teacher education in special education and is a leading authority on rural special education and on technology-based delivery of personnel preparation programs. She has authored three professional reference books on distance education, online instruction and virtual reality. She has served as the executive editor of two major professional journals and currently serves on editorial boards of several other major journals in the disciplines of special education and disability services. Her efforts have been recognized through a variety of University, state and national awards for teaching, research and service, especially innovative uses of technology. The American Council on Rural Special Education (ACRES) named her as a recipient of the Eagle Award for Leadership in Rural Special Education.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

Exhibit Fosters Learning From September 18 through October 28, 2016 students across the state of West Virginia attended the “Negro Leagues Beisbol: African American Baseball and Hispanic Culture 1860-1960” exhibit at WVU’s Erickson Alumni Center. The exhibit, which was open to the public, was presented by the Center for Democracy and Citizenship Education (CDCE) and hosted by students of Dr. Robert Waterson, CDCE director. The CDCE provided West Virginia teachers with classroom materials to prepare students for the exhibit and foster learning and understanding about the Negro Leagues’ role in the Civil Rights Era. Future events held by the CDCE will be supported by the Endowment for Civic Life.

Order of Vandalia Two of the 2016 Order of Vandalia inductees, Dr. Anne Nardi and Deborah Smyth Green, call CEHS their home. Nardi spent a successful career at WVU serving as chair of the Department of Educational Psychology (now Learning Sciences and Human Development) from 1985 to 1996, and as dean of the College of Human Resources and Education (now CEHS) from 2002-2008. Green earned her bachelor’s degree in history and her master’s in counseling at WVU. Green spent her career teaching, before ending up as a counselor in a large suburban high school for 25 years.


Hall of Fame 2016

M.G. ELLIS

Four outstanding individuals were inducted in the CEHS Hall of Fame for 2016. This year’s inductees were Dr. Richard Cavasina, Dr. Catherine Perry Cotten, Dr. Patricia Love and Dr. Patricia Obenauf. Dr. Cavasina is a 1987 doctoral graduate of CEHS and a professor emeritus of California University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cotten received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from WVU. She went on to earn her doctorate in science education from the University of Southern Mississippi. Dr. Love earned her master’s and doctoral degrees from WVU and is a distinguished professor, licensed marriage and family therapist, and long-time clinical member and approved supervisor in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Dr. Patricia Obenauf, who retired from CEHS as an emeritus professor in 2015, served the College as a professor, administrator, researcher, adviser and scholar for more than 40 years. Sadly, Dr. Obenauf passed away in January 2017.

Inaugural Teacher Mentor Dinner On November 4, 2016, CEHS held the first-ever Teacher Mentor Dinner. The dinner was organized to offer students in our five-year teacher education and elementary teacher education programs the opportunity to engage with seasoned teachers and experts in the field. The mentors included three alumni, Sharon DeWitt, Sue Heydon and Marlene Greenleaf, who together have a combined 116 years working in schools. The mentors hold expertise in various subject matters, grades, administration, program development, and more.

By the Numbers

CEHS STUDENT ENROLLMENT UNDERGRADUATE

TOTAL STUDENT ENROLLMENT

1,818 *Statistics from fall 2016 semester

985 833 GRADUATE

GRADUATE

713

PROFESSIONAL

120

SPRING 2017

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Student Scholarships

Overcoming Adversity As the only traditional high school graduate of his four siblings and the first college graduate in his family, John (J.R.) Sprouse wants to use his life experience to give back to the place he calls home. From a hollow in East Bank, W.Va., which runs along the Kanawha River and has fewer than 1,000 people, Sprouse truly relates to the many struggles associated with poverty and rural communities. “I’ve seen firsthand the negative impact of poverty. I’ve been impacted by drug addiction, domestic abuse and poor education in some way,” said Sprouse. “I made a decision in high school that I really wanted to see the world, and it motivated me to get out of East Bank. I really believed that education was something that no one could ever take away, and that it could get one out of almost anything and anywhere.” For Sprouse, focusing on his education and band felt like a ticket out. In a small house with a large family, peace and quiet was hard to come by, but Sprouse found it in the graveyard nearby, where he practiced his French horn every day. “I know other kids who felt the same about getting out of our town, but my teachers really made the difference for me,” said Sprouse. “They taught me that you have to discover what you want and what you are good at and then really work hard at it. I learned that you’re not always going to make it, but life is about the struggle.”

“I know there are kids out there like me, who probably don’t have people rooting for them. I want to be the one who roots for them.” — J.R. Sprouse 4

WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

Sprouse’s hard work paid off. He was accepted to West Virginia University and enrolled to begin in the fall of 2007. “I told my parents I wanted to go to WVU. They told me that if I could find a ride there then I could. So I did,” said Sprouse. Sprouse hitched a ride to Morgantown, began his college career and joined the Pride marching band. “I was excited about the opportunity to be in the band, but I was most excited about learning. I initially had aspirations of becoming a nuclear physicist,” said Sprouse. “I really wanted to understand math — not in the way I was taught in high school, but in a theoretical way, to really understand what I was learning.” In Sprouse’s opinion, being from a rural community presented him with challenges that many of his peers were not experiencing. Staying in school was always a financial hardship and he sometimes struggled with his math courses, though it continued to be his preferred subject. While he didn’t become a nuclear physicist, Sprouse graduated in May 2012 with a degree in mathematics and received the Most Outstanding Senior Band Member award that year. “It was such an honor receive this award. It exemplifies what the Pride of West Virginia has to offer and is voted on by peers,” stated Sprouse. “I really, really love the band — a running through my veins kind of love.” Given the challenges he experienced as a new student from a rural county, Sprouse made an effort each year to introduce himself to every new freshman in the band. During the first day in the band room, he would approach each one and tell them to reach out anytime they needed anything. “I really enjoyed connecting with and helping my peers in the band. I hoped that I could be that person who connected with students coming from backgrounds similar to mine and hopefully help them be successful in school,” said Sprouse. For Sprouse, band also became his way to see the world. “I went to places like Niagara Falls and even saw the Mountaineers play in the Fiesta Bowl in Arizona,” said Sprouse. Following graduation, Sprouse married his wife, Katy. Both new graduates of WVU, they moved closer to Katy’s family in Parkersburg, W.Va., where Sprouse began working as a customer service representative with Blue Cross Blue Shield. “I enjoyed working and even had an opportunity for a better job not long after starting my career,” said Sprouse. “But, my


BRIAN PERSINGER

wife really wanted to go back to school. I decided that life isn’t really always about money and sometimes you have to do what’s right . . . so we moved back to Morgantown.” Even while pursuing his undergraduate degree, Sprouse had considered teaching as a career path, but did not move forward with gaining his certification. Sprouse saw this move back to Morgantown as an opportunity to switch his career — to do something he was passionate about. “Originally, Katy was interested in a degree in nursing Through her, I met Dr. Ruth Kershner, who unfortunately passed away in 2014,” stated Sprouse. “Dr. Kershner told me that sometimes you have to figure out what you’re meant to do in life. This was a turning point for me. I realized what I wanted to do was something that would give back to my community. From my travels with the band, I came to realize that the rest of the world is dealing with similar problems, just in different ways. I decided I wanted to find a way to give back to West Virginia — to make it better, to make it different.” In the 2015-16 academic year, Sprouse and his wife enrolled in the Master of Arts in Certification program at the College. The program gives students who already have a bachelor’s degree (in any field) an opportunity to become professional educators. “It was the perfect opportunity for both me and my wife. We both agreed that we wanted to return to a rural community in southern West Virginia to teach,” said Sprouse.

“For me, being a teacher is the best way to help a community, because you are in the front lines of the community. You see the cause and effect of every law and every public decision and you are the influencer of over 30 kids for more than half a year. I just couldn’t think of a more effective way to make an immediate impact.” However, this move didn’t come without struggles. “We made the leap to both be in school again, but financially it was a really tough decision,” stated Sprouse. “We were really blessed to find out we were recipients of college scholarships. I’m not sure we could have done this without them.” Sprouse was the recipient of both the Leon and Mae Newell McKown Scholarship and the Rita Riffee LeHere Teaching Scholarship. His wife was a recipient of the Margaret B. Fitzgerald Scholarship. All three scholarships are intended to support students pursuing degrees in education. “Fortunately for me, I can look back on the struggles I’ve had in my life and be glad I had them, because it made me who I am today,” said Sprouse. “I’m really looking forward to having my own classroom. I know there are kids out there like me, who probably don’t have people rooting for them. I want to be the one who roots for them. The one who teaches them that there is life outside the holler walls.” Sprouse will graduate from the MAC program in December 2017, and his wife in May 2018.

SPRING 2017

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Student Scholarships

2017 Scholarship Awards ALEX AND BETTY F. SCHOENBAUM TEACHER PREPARATION SCHOLARSHIP/LOAN Isabella Alexandratos Emily Hughes Graciana Darby Summer Jones Amy Floyd Anne Lituchy Heather Hall Shannon Warman

DR. THOMAS P. LOMBARDI SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Lindsay Grace

ANN AND BOB ORDERS STEM TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP Rachel Burky

EDDIE C. KENNEDY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP Rachael Darlington

ANSEL-LYNCH COMMUNICATIONS AND DISORDERS SCHOLARSHIPS Jacinda Hickman

EDNA AND JAMES M. (JUNE) BECKETT, JR. SCHOLARSHIP Beverly Nichols

ARLAND IMLAY, PH.D. SCHOLARSHIP Kathryn Skolka BOB WAGNER SCHOLARSHIP Brittany Warwick BRADLEY J. RAMSEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Trent Smith C. KENNETH AND SHARON MURRAY SCHOLARSHIP Amber McClure CAROL DIANE COOK ELDER SCHOLARSHIP Lauren Mills Kayla Thomas CARTER FAMILY FOUNDATION TEACHER EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Megan Houchins CEHS GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP Haley Loris Kaitlin Carlino Charity Sigley Stephanie Henry Chelsea Latorre Cassidy Keller DELMAS MILLER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP Lauren Trumble DONNA HOYLMAN PEDUTO ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP Gina Paugh

ED JACOBS COUNSELING SCHOLARSHIP Victoria Stella

ELIZABETH CAPUDER TIANO EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Thomas Stauffer ELOISE GUNN DIVERS PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP Brandi Whited FORD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Brittany Allen GENERAL FEDERATION OF WOMEN’S CLUBS WEST VIRGINIA SCHOLARSHIP Brianna Kowalsky Katelyn McClure (Six) Donna Minnix Leigh Owens HOWARD AND MIRIAM JONES SCHOLARSHIP Victoria Travis JEANNETTE LUCHOK MORIAK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Joseph Gray JENNIFER MARIE BAXTER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Emily Ruiz JESSEE FRANCES BROWN LILLY SCHOLARSHIP Hannah Walls JILL CLAMPITT MEMORIAL SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Erin McMahon

DR. C. SUE MILES SCHOLARSHIP Jada Adlington

JOHN ALBERT KASUBA AND WALTER L. KLAS HRE SCHOLARSHIP Natalia Chambers

DR. DIANNA M. VARGO SCHOLARSHIP Eleni Nardone

JONE PHARR COOK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Casey King

DR. ROGERS MCAVOY EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP Angela Fiore

JOSEPH AND MILLI CIPOLLONI ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP Taylor Brancazio

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JUNE HITT BLAKE SCHOLARSHIP Sarah Acquisto Dianna Montz Bethany Ackley

SCOTTISH RITE FOUNDATION SPEECH, LANGUAGE AND PATHOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP Rachael Kauffman

KATHRYN A. DAVIS EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Jenna Custer

TAYLOR FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP Sarah Fullen

KATHRYN C. VECELLIO EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES SCHOLARSHIP Kayla Caudle Claire Reece

THE PELUSO-ATKINS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP Jenna Cramer

KATHRYN CRAMER MORGAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Eric Breun Hannah Cottrill Abby Kinzer Sana Ghori Erica Gorman Olivia Wilson LEON AND MAE NEWELL MCKOWN SCHOLARSHIP John Sprouse LESTER H. KINCAID MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Tia Coleman Chelsey Lunsford M. WOOD STOUT AND LOVA MARTHA CASTO STOUT SCHOLARSHIP Carrington Riggs MARGARET B. FITZGERALD SCHOLARSHIP Jamie McBride Kathleen Sprouse MARY AULT GROVES EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Hannah Spencer

THOMAS J. JR., AND BARBARA P. WITTEN CEHS SCHOLARSHIP Anetta Shirky VERIZON PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP Kaitlin Hunter Nicole Mazze Alison Thomas WALTER W. COLE SCHOLARSHIP Carly Connell WILBERT AND ANNA MICK SCHOLARSHIP Amelia Sark WILLIAM “BILL” THOMAS MCLAUGHLIN II EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Tracey Frisch WILLIAM C. WATERS SCHOLARSHIP Danielle Poling

MARY C. AND ALLEN G. WELSH SCHOLARSHIP Carson Kochman

WILLIAM JOSEPH STURGIS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP Laura Capron Katherine Craig Caroline Miskovsky Jing Zhang Michalla Sanders Chelsea Wilfong

MICHAEL AND JANETTE HEITZ SCHOLARSHIP Brandie Styer

WILLIAM S. AND KAREN E. BINGMAN EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Hayley Foster

MOORE FAMILY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP Danielle Bartley

WOODROW AND VIRGINIA BONDS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP Sarah Milam (Berkey)

MORGANTOWN SCOTTISH RITE/DR. I.A. WILES SCHOLARSHIP Samantha Kerwood

By the Numbers

NORMAN AND MARTHA LASS SCHOLARSHIP Chelsea Simpkins PAULA JAN BARBER MUSCATELLO SCHOLARSHIP Katie Craig

RAISING THE BAR The number of CEHS scholarships has increased over the years, from 23 in 2006 up to 89 in 2017. The overall scholarship amount awarded for 2016-2017 totaled $191,500.

RAMSBURG FAMILY EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP Jillian Dishion RITA RIFFEE LEHERE TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP Madison Hayes John Sprouse RUBY A. CARTER SCHOLARSHIP Megan Martin

65

83

89

23 2006

2015

2016

2017

SPRING 2017

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Faculty and Student Research

STEM’s Super Couple For Paul Hernandez and Karen RamboHernandez, both professors of educational psychology in the College, work-life balance is an interesting concept. Coming from very different backgrounds — Hernandez an IT specialist from San Francisco, CA, and Rambo-Hernandez, a middle school mathematics teacher from Coppell, TX — the couple found a common interest around their doctoral program. In 2007, they both began a doctoral program in measurement, evaluation and assessment at the University of Connecticut. “Our program was a three-person cohort, so it was just Paul, me and one other woman,” said Rambo-Hernandez. “I remember well — Paul and I started dating over studying for our Fortran computer training programming class, but somehow we managed to keep it secret until we were engaged a year later. Then people started asking who I was engaged to and it was hard to not be honest.” The couple had a destination wedding in Estes Park, CO, at the Stanley Hotel in 2009 and completed their doctoral program in 2011, before beginning their dual career. “We started job searching and eventually accepted positions at Colorado State University,” said Rambo-

“There is a huge amount of attrition with women who begin college as STEM majors, so the project focuses on supporting these women . . . through to graduation.” — Paul Hernandez 8

WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

Hernandez. “But after a while, we realized it probably wasn’t the place we wanted to call home, so we started looking again.” In 2014, Hernandez flew into the Pittsburgh airport for an interview at West Virginia University. He interviewed for a position in the Department of Learning Sciences and Human Development at CEHS in jeans and a borrowed tie because he had lost his luggage during a snowstorm. “We found out I had received the job, even after such an eventful interview — and it just felt right for us, but Karen still needed a job as well,” said Hernandez. Fortunately for them the department had room for them both. They began their careers at WVU as assistant professors in educational psychology in the fall of 2014. Almost three years later, the couple continues to work well in close proximity, and they even share similar research interests. Hernandez’s research focuses on research experiences and motivation in order to broaden participation in STEM careers. He and a multidisciplinary team of scientists are currently working on a project supported by a $1.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation. The project, PROGRESS, resulted in the launch of a professional development and mentoring network for undergraduate women studying geosciences. “PROGESS stands for promoting geoscience research, education and success. The NSF funded us to create an informal and deliberative mentoring program for women STEM majors with an interest in earth and environmental sciences,” said Hernandez. “There is a huge amount of attrition with women who begin college as STEM majors, so the project focuses on supporting these women. We focus on women in STEM majors within their first or second year of college and work to support these women through to graduation.” Currently, according to Hernandez, the PROGRESS project is designing a multi-site quasiexperiment with a total of eight universities in Colorado and North and South Carolina, where they are recruiting women into the program in order to monitor their progress and compare these women to women not in the program, but in the same schools and the same STEM programs. Hernandez is also working on a $1.5 million grant funded through the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, a part of the National Institutes of Health. Through this


BRIAN PERSINGER

grant, Hernandez, and a few other faculty collaborators, are looking at the degree to which behavioral, cognitive and emotional selfregulation helps majority and underrepresented minority students persist in STEM majors. “We are following the entire class of 2020 at the University of Connecticut. This research is more exploratory in that at this time we are not providing intervention,” said Hernandez. According to Hernandez, they are looking at aspects such as who stays in school, how well they perform in certain STEM classes, and how self-regulations — such as planning, avoiding distractions, or seeking social-emotional support after receiving bad news such as earning a low grade, affects a student’s persistence on their path to a STEM degree. “We hope that by looking at a variety of aspects, such as cognitive, behavioral and emotional self-regulation that we will identify self-regulatory behaviors that may be helpful or particularly helpful to minorities,” said Hernandez. For Rambo-Hernandez, while different, the interest in STEM fields and supporting women and underrepresented minorities is also a strong aspect of her research. Rambo-Hernandez is currently working on a $200,000 grant funded by NSF with engineering faculty and education researchers, with an emphasis on improving undergraduate STEM education. Her work focuses on implementing programs that foster diversity appreciation and inclusive behaviors that promote diversity in engineering for all students, particularly first-year engineering students. “In our research, we found that women tend to be marginalized when in groups where no other females are present. We found that when the women had ideas they were not taken seriously unless there was another woman in the group or if another man repeated or validated their suggestion,” said Rambo-Hernandez. “This finding motivated us to find ways to change this culture, to encourage more inclusive behaviors.” In 2015, Rambo-Hernandez was also included in a $70,000 project funded by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. The project is focused on helping teachers in four

West Virginia counties, Fayette, Wood, Raleigh and Kanawha, to create and implement project-based learning (PBL) engineering programs into their classrooms. “In West Virginia, teachers are required to teach engineering standards, but many of them do not have this background and there are rarely engineering courses for all students to take. The project is a way to help mathematics and science teachers learn how to implement projectbased learning into their classroom in order to teach these engineering standards and make their courses more interactive,” said Rambo-Hernandez. “The first year we did this project we focused on high school mathematics teachers in these four counties, the second year middle school science teachers and this upcoming year we will train middle school mathematics teachers.” According to Rambo-Hernandez, they have found that students are understanding the material and that teachers are more confident in their ability to assess PBL, which translates to being more willing to use PBL in their classrooms. A power research team, the couple believes that broadening participation in STEM education and careers is essential for local, regional and national prosperity and equity. Their research is contributing to the recruitment and retention of interested women and minorities, which is a critical part of the strategy to expand participation in the scientific workforce.

SPRING 2017

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Faculty and Student Research

2017 Graduate Student Awards JOHN J. PATERSON STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD Ashley Murphey WIRT C. AND MAE S. BELCHER GRADUATE EDUCATION AWARD Amy Burt Stephanie Jones Elisabeth Kee Natalya Kuznetsova Myriah Miller BERLIN B. CHAPMAN GRADUATE STUDENT AWARD Olivia Scott Jeneice Shaw JOHN AND BARBARA PISAPIA DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARD Chelsey Morgan DR. ANNE H. NARDI PH.D. IN EDUCATION STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD Samantha Jusino ROBERT E. STITZEL GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD Hilary Bougher MIKE REED STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD Megan Mikesell

By the Numbers

$18,650 WAS AWARDED IN GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH AWARDS FOR 2017. OVER $3.1 MILLION WAS RAISED IN EXTERNAL GRANT FUNDING IN 2016.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES


BRIAN PERSINGER


New Chances for Success Last fall, CEHS accepted the largest single private donation ever made to the College. The gift will support the WVU Child Development Laboratory, better known as the WVU Nursery School. Since 1944, the WVU Nursery School has been an integral part of the campus community, providing a child development laboratory where researchers and educators can create new curriculum for students in their earliest and most formative years of learning. The school provides observational, practicum and student teaching experiences for WVU students majoring in child development and family studies, particularly pre-K education, as well as training and other opportunities to the community.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES


BRIAN PERSINGER

“More than 1,000 students use our classroom in various capacities throughout the year, and we host 50 WVU students weekly for practicum, student teaching and internships.” – DR. BARBARA GIBSON WARASH


“More than 1,000 WVU students use our classroom in various capacities throughout the year, and we host 50 WVU students weekly for practicum, student teaching and internships,” said Dr. Barbara Gibson Warash, director of the WVU Nursery School. According to Warash, the Nursery School provides value to the University as a controlled environment based on scientific research. Students, staff and faculty who work within the WVU Nursery School create, research and improve innovative practices that can be developed and applied not only at the school, but also in the greater early childhood education community. “We provide a safe space for WVU students to try their hand at teaching,” Warash said. “It’s a less intimidating place to make mistakes, and there’s faculty support when needed.”

This April, the Nursery School hosted their Family History Museum, where children who chose to research their family members had the opportunity to showcase their projects. One student, Winnie, presented about her greatgrandfather, Commander Frank Borman of Apollo 8. Another, Thomas, also studied his grandfather, a former professor at the University of Tennessee. Each child had a scrapbook documenting the story of their chosen family member, along with a handmade exhibit of various items representing their subject. The project helps young children conceptualize and take an interest in the past by bringing history to life through selfdirected study.

History in the Making

The family history project is not the only unique aspect of the Nursery School’s curriculum — WVU students who work with the school’s classes consistently bring new activities and projects to the three- and four-year-olds enrolled there. Another is the visual arts project, which requires children to reproduce famous works of art with acrylic paint on canvas. The project begins with teaching both the three- and four-year-olds about a famous artist’s background, body of work and painting techniques. They are then asked to examine some of the artist’s paintings and provide feedback about their observations. Eventually, the children paint replicas of the famous paintings. Warash said that this task encourages close examination of the artwork, manual dexterity and differentiation of colors and patterns. With assistance from – ANONYMOUS DONOR their teachers, the kids focus on reproducing one section of a painting at a time, giving them the ability to hone in on very intricate aspects of each painting. When the paintings are completed, the young artists host an art gallery for their families, where they sell the paintings to help cover the cost of the art materials.

In fact, some of the curriculum used at the Nursery School was developed by WVU students. One particular assignment, the family history project, continues to be a classroom favorite. For this project, four-year-olds and their families are encouraged to create family trees that link as far back as the students’ great-grandparents.

The Art of Teaching

“We believe that providing kids with an early start gives them a better chance to succeed. The WVU Nursery School is an impressive program . . . there is a strong commitment from the instructors and students.” The family trees include basic information about each family member, but also contain more personal details like the family members’ hobbies and interests. Upon completing their family trees, the children choose a family member to study more in-depth. With help from their teachers, they conduct research and prepare exhibits based on their studies. “It’s a fascinating project, because the children’s family members become classroom subjects who we study,” Warash said. “It’s also a great way to get their families involved.” For example, a four-year-old, Liza, chose to study her grandmother for the assignment. When Liza found out that her grandmother, Ida Chico, loved to swing dance, Liza decided that she wanted to learn how. Soon, the entire fouryear-old class was taking a swing dancing lesson dressed in paper costumes.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

Setting Goals for Success Endeavors like the family history and visual arts projects are just two of the original curriculum components pioneered by the Nursery School. The common thread that ties them all together is that the kids guide which activities they complete each day, inspiring them to pursue individual interests. “We continually research and try new things at the WVU Nursery School. We want to identify best practices for


BRIAN PERSINGER

2017 WVU Nursery School Class

getting kids interested in learning at a young age,” Warash said. “We strive to create a community of learners of all ages, from our pre-K students to our teachers.” Empowering these young students to take ownership of their education begins with setting goals, a process that involves teaching them the meaning of a goal, asking them to set their personal learning goals, and helping them to achieve their goals through daily progress and tracking. While the goals may be as simple as memorizing a phone number, the skills involved in the goal-setting process benefit the children throughout their lives. “We help our young students to become independent, set goals, plan ahead and make good choices, through the innovative and creative ideas of our older WVU students,” Warash said. “That’s our focus.”

The Gift of Learning Last fall, CEHS accepted a gift of $1 million, the largest single private donation ever made to the College, in support of the WVU Nursery School. From donors who wish to remain anonymous, the gift will support an endowed directorship and an endowed enhancement fund. “We could not be more appreciative of this gift and continued commitment to our program. Our research has

received national recognition and has only prepared us to better serve our students,” Warash said. The directorship will support Warash, providing a broad range of support for research, teaching and service. The enhancement fund will provide broad support to the educational and training mission of the WVU Nursery School. “We are extremely grateful for this support to our College, specifically our Nursery School and Dr. Warash,” stated Dr. Gypsy Denzine, dean of the College. “This gift allows our program to continue to have not only a local, but a national impact in the development of outstanding early childhood professionals. We strive to be the leader in early childhood education in the state of West Virginia and beyond, and this gift will help us to achieve this goal.” The donors shared their joy in being able to support students who are committed to the field of early childhood education, knowing these students would benefit from such a well-established program. “We have supported early childhood programs for many years. We believe that providing kids with an early start gives them a better chance to succeed. The WVU Nursery School is an impressive program, and it was evident to us that there is a strong commitment from the instructors and students,” the donors said. “We want to support the preschool to help continue a program that looks so promising.”

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A First in of Tea BOTH TWO-TIME GRADUATES OF THE WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES, SISTERS DR. EVELYN DI TOSTO AND DR. MARY MAROCKIE CREDIT THEIR SUCCESSFUL CAREERS TO THEIR EXPERIENCES AT WVU.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES


Support chers Dr. Mary Marockie with award recipient Keisha Hopkins Kibler (left) and Dr. Evelyn Di Tosto with Dean Denzine (right).


dr. mary marockie Marockie obtained both her master’s degree in elementary education and psychology and her doctorate in education with a minor in psychology from WVU. She began her teaching career in Charleston, W.Va. While teaching, she spent three summers traveling to Morgantown to complete her master’s program at WVU. After seven years of teaching, she was selected for a scholarship that provided her with the opportunity to study mathematics education at the University of Michigan. Following this experience, Marockie began teaching at the lab school at WVU, which trained student teachers. This teaching position led her toward continuing her education. She began her doctoral residency as a graduate assistant working in the College’s reading center with Dr. Eddie Kennedy.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

“I was fortunate to work with Dr. Kennedy, who helped to build my background in the field of reading, which has grown tremendously since,” stated Marockie. “I benefited greatly from his expertise.” Marockie moved to Parkersburg, where she completed her doctoral dissertation and began teaching extension courses for WVU Parkersburg. Just a couple years later, however, she returned to Morgantown while her husband, Dr. Henry Marockie, completed his doctoral program. After the move, she continued to teach at WVU. “I not only had the experience of teaching at WVU, but also had the opportunity to work with supervising teachers when we returned,” said Mary. “This was really my first hands-on experience working with supervising teachers, though I already had a huge respect and understanding of the importance of their role in helping to educate and prepare student teachers.”


retain these teachers, it is important to provide access to strong mentors — which was a large part of this program.” While Marockie is proud of these successes, her story doesn’t end there. She worked at RESA for a number of years and served on many boards and committees throughout her career, including the board of the International Reading Association (now the International Literacy Association). In this role and as a result of her expertise and reputation, Marockie has given major presentations in more than 35 states. “The IRA had 100,000 members at the time, so it was an honor to be elected to their board,” said Marockie. Marockie continues to engage and remain involved in the education field. She is an active member of the West Virginia Reading Association, serving as editor and co-writer of their publication, WVRA Interchange.

dr. Evelyn di tosto

Marockie’s education led to a career full of successes. While in Parkersburg, she was instrumental in writing one of the first major grants for education, receiving $600,000 to build a diagnostic reading clinic in Wood County that served seven other counties in the area. From Parkersburg, Marockie moved to Ohio County, where she became the research and curriculum director for the Regional Education Service Agency 6 (RESA). She helped to build a beginning teachers program in Ohio County, which eventually became the prototype for others in West Virginia and was chosen as the best beginning teacher program in the country by the National School Personnel Administrators Association. “I served on the ATE National Commission for Beginning Teachers. As a consultant for Ohio County, I helped to implement a beginning teacher program in the schools,” stated Marockie. “I believe that beginning teachers are instrumental to schools, and in order to

Di Tosto earned a master’s degree in education and a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from WVU. Like her sister, Di Tosto had an inspiring and impactful career in education. Her time at WVU established the path her career would continue on for many years. “When I came to WVU to work on my doctorate, part of my fellowship was teaching a course that required a high level of interaction with supervising teachers,” stated Di Tosto. “This motivated my dissertation research, which was studying both student teachers and teachers working with student teachers.” Di Tosto began holding workshops once a month to help train supervising teachers on best practices for working with student teachers. “I saw these workshops as two-fold. They were both an opportunity to train these contracted supervisors to be better mentors and also a way to say thanks, through a short break from the classroom and a free breakfast,” said Di Tosto. “These teachers are typically not paid or paid very little. They do it because they are passionate and professionals.” Following her program at WVU, Di Tosto moved to Maryland to begin her career. In her first position, she was responsible for evaluating colleges that prepared teachers. She found that these colleges did very little

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to support supervising teachers and paid them nominal fees. “It became my mission to improve this process. I have a great respect for supervising teachers, as I know they do this work simply because they are professionals, not because of what it pays,” said Di Tosto. In her next career move, she began working with the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) as a consultant in teacher education. According to Di Tosto, her relationships with deans and other leaders throughout the state were instrumental in helping to improve these programs, ultimately raising the teaching profession in Maryland. Di Tosto then became the chief teacher of education and certification at the MSDE, coordinating certification for more than 40,000 educators in the state. Keisha Hopkins Kibler, first recipient of the Di Tosto and Marockie Award Additionally, Di Tosto served for a decade as chair for a national group that developed standards “My sister, my husband and I are all graduates and have had for teacher education. She was able to influence the successful careers in education, so it is something that we approval process in states that evaluated teacher believe in.” education programs and provided reciprocity for those The sisters established the Di Tosto and Marockie programs across the country. Di Tosto retired in 2002, Outstanding Supervising Teacher Award in 2016. The but continued working as the director of student endowment provides $1,000 each year to a teacher teaching at Notre Dame of Maryland University for the who is serving as a supervising teacher, mentoring and next ten years. helping to prepare preservice teachers at WVU. The supervising teacher must be employed full-time with at least ten years’ experience in the classroom. Additionally, the teacher must have mentored at least four full-time In 2016, together the sisters began thinking about their student teachers, supervised teachers during the current legacy and giving back. or last calendar year, and demonstrated exemplary ability “We both agreed we were comfortable enough at and effort in the supervision of preservice students. this point in our lives that we wanted to give back to the “When deciding what we would like to do for institution that built both our careers,” stated Marockie. the College, we both agreed that supervising teachers

Giving back

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES


were such an instrumental part of the student teacher experience, yet so often there is very little reward associated with this role,” said Di Tosto. “You cannot prepare a teacher without this experience. We decided, what better way to give back than to support one of the most powerful influences on a student teacher?” According to Dr. Marockie and Dr. Di Tosto, supervising teachers need to be well chosen and competent, but that given the expertise, rapport, mentorship and time these teachers bring to the table, they are typically poorly rewarded. They hope that this award will provide a little something extra to recognize and say to these supervising teachers, “You are important and you can offer a great deal in shaping the teachers of the future.”

LEADING THE WAY CEHS selected Keisha Hopkins Kibler, a longtime supervising teacher in Preston County, W.Va., as the first recipient of the Di Tosto and Marockie Award. “I was shocked when I found out that I received this award,” Kibler said. “There are many deserving educators who work with preservice teachers, so it was an honor to be chosen.” Kibler has been a middle school English and language arts teacher at West Preston School for the past 12 years. She is a Mercer County native and 2003 graduate of CEHS’ five-year teacher education program. Kibler also teaches graduate students at CEHS as an adjunct professor of two English methods courses, and she is a National Board Certified Teacher. In her time as an educator, Kibler has served as a supervising teacher for 12 CEHS preservice teachers, many of whom are now working in classrooms throughout the state of West Virginia. She encourages her preservice teachers to try new techniques in the classroom and to use the knowledge they’ve gained as students in their teaching. “My classroom is a space where preservice teachers can bridge theory to practice, make mistakes and learn how to grow [the class] as a community,” Kibler said. Though most of the preservice teachers who work with Kibler are only in her classroom for eight weeks, the relationships she’s formed with them have continued long afterward. “I still talk to many of my former preservice teachers, sometimes on a weekly basis,” Kibler said. “They’ll call to ask me a question, get advice on something that’s going on in their classrooms, and sometimes, just to talk.”

For 80% of the 2014-15 graduates of

teacher preparation programs,

71%

employed as full-time educators

16 % speech-language pathologists 5%

otherwise employed

4%

part-time or substitute educators

3%

in graduate school or serving in the military

1%

not seeking employment or unemployed

The number of teacher vacancies in West Virginia has almost doubled in the past three years. These vacancies are being filled with short- and long-term substitutes.*

400 2015

593

2016

700+

2017

* Source: West Virginia Metro News February 2017

*


Funding the Future

A Girl in White For Elaine Quattro, being able to give back feels like a passage that she hopes others will have the opportunity to experience. From Western Pennsylvania, Quattro often traveled through the city of Morgantown on the way to visit her grandfather’s farm. “I will always remember how much I loved the buildings and the feel of Morgantown, W.Va,. This is what drove me to attend,” said Quattro. “I was lucky enough to live in the first residence hall on Evansdale. Attending WVU was a great learning experience, but for me — it really changed my life.” According to Quattro, her experience at WVU was not only a chance for a great education, but also to move on from the life she had known in Pennsylvania. Neither of Quattro’s parents graduated high school, so college was a prodigious opportunity. “Following my time at WVU, I developed a wanderlust to travel and to help people, which really gave me the impetus that got me going on a great career track,” said Quattro. Quattro received an undergraduate degree in Family Resources from the WVU College of Education and Human Services. She went on to work at the Providence Gas Company as “a girl in white.” “Back then, utility companies were really interested in hiring home economics majors to promote the use of gas or electric. It was before the big energy crisis, so people competed on whether to use gas or electric


in their kitchen for their range. I did cooking shows at holidays, introduced recipe sheets and answered questions on subjects like ‘how to cook a turkey’. I guess you could say I was a real kitchen connoisseur,” Quattro laughs. Eventually, the utility “girl in white” programs faded out and Quattro was back on the job market. Quattro worked in a number of sales and marketing positions and also worked for a number of years in the convention and visitors bureau business. “I had a good run working with CVBs — 18 years total. I moved a bit, but I enjoyed working in the industry,” said Quattro. “Eventually, though, there was less and less money available within the industry, so I saw it as a chance to make a career change. At

for mental health services, so it was also important to me to support counseling. I believe everyone needs a little therapy.” Quattro’s bequest will create a $50,000 endowed support fund, to be named the Elaine Marie Quattro Memorial Scholarship. The scholarship will provide support for female graduate students enrolled in the Master of Science in Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling in the CEHS Department of Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling and Counseling Psychology. “Given my career history, I think it’s nice for students to have an opportunity to switch careers to one that may be more lucrative or offer other opportunities,” stated Quattro. “Maybe my scholarship will do just that.”

“WVU provided me a head start towards bigger and better things . . . my fondness for the University led me to pay it forward to another student pursuing a similar path to mine.” – ELAINE QUATTRO

PHOTO SUBMITTED

age 44, I went back to school for a master’s in counseling psychology.” Now 20 years later, Quattro has had a fulfilling career as a therapist. First she worked for the county of San Diego helping children with emotional and behavioral issues and then she started her own private practice. Now retired, Quattro still occasionally sees clients, such as women and military personnel. “I enjoyed working in the schools. It is rewarding, since kids often do not receive the necessary attention needed when they have behavioral and emotional issues,” said Quattro. “My private practice has also been rewarding. I particularly enjoy working on women’s issues, helping other women find themselves.” Quattro recently began redoing her will, assessing the parts of her life that have had the biggest influence. WVU fell at the top of this list. “Education has always been important to me, and WVU provided me a head start towards bigger and better things,” said Quattro. “My fondness for the University led me to pay it forward to another student pursuing a similar path to mine. There is such a need

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Funding the Future

Faculty Give Back For many a career is just a job, hopefully with a few successes along the way. But, for four faculty members in the College their careers helped them to understand firsthand how private support can equip students and programs for success. Last year, two current faculty members and two faculty emeriti established endowments. Each with a different purpose or area of support, but all with the intention of allowing CEHS and its constituents to continue to support students and influence the community.

department, which has a very supportive and productive faculty and staff, as well as an outstanding undergraduate and graduate student body. It has been rewarding to participate in many of their successes as well,” stated Lass. Eight of Lass’ past students are now serving as faculty members within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. In addition, he has had at least 15 students whose parents were former speech pathology or audiology students. Despite these successes and impact on the department through his work, Lass was motivated to do more, driving him and his wife to establish this endowment. “We are lifelong learners and have such a respect for education and the pursuit of education,” said Lass. “We

For Dr. Norman Lass and Dr. Ed Jacobs, current members of the CEHS faculty, the priority was helping students with the financial burden of pursuing a degree. Lass established the Norman and Martha Lass Scholarship, supporting graduate students studying speech language pathology and audiology in the Department of Communications Sciences and Disorders. “I have had a very fulfilling career at WVU. It really has been a wonderful fit. I am very grateful to WVU and our

are grateful to be in a position to help others pursue higher education, especially within a field and subject I am personally passionate about.” Jacobs established the Ed Jacobs Counseling Scholarship for graduate students in the Department of Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling and Counseling Psychology. Jacobs’ scholarship is the first endowed scholarship for the department. The gift supports students pursuing their Master of Arts in Counseling.

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES


“I decided to start the endowment because I felt it would help one or more students pay for books or some of the tuition, given the high cost for getting a master’s degree,” said Jacobs. “After 44 years as a professor, I understand firsthand the challenges many students face with the burden of increasing tuition and costs of attendance.” As permanent funds, both scholarships will allow CEHS to continue to provide additional financial support to students in the pursuit of degrees within the fields of speech pathology, audiology or counseling. For faculty emeritus, Dr, Ernie Goeres, his gift to the College also has a focus on students. He hopes that his gift will provide the program where he spent his career the extra support needed to offer students a complete and fulfilling graduate experience. The Dr. Ernest R. Goeres Higher Education Administration Fund will provide support to the College for research, teaching and service activities, as well as for the “extras” that come with a highly respected program. The support this endowment will give to students at CEHS also includes assistance for student research

projects, graduate assistantships, program-sponsored activities as well as positive opportunities to communicate with their peers. Dr. Ron Iannone, CEHS faculty emeritus, established the Ron V. Iannone and Family Keynote Speaker Endowment, supporting the keynote speaker each year for the CEHS Celebration of Scholars. “Our intention in establishing this endowment is to support a program at the College that will provide teachers with great ideas for research,” said Iannone. “Research they can put into action, helping teachers become institutional change-leaders.” Each year, the CEHS Celebration of Scholars includes a student research poster fair, Faculty Ed Talks and a keynote speaker. Iannone hopes that exposure to this program and research will help students to become more specialized in their own personal subject matter. For these four faculty members, spending years in Allen Hall just wasn’t enough. Their passion for their students and education is clear in their actions and continued support of CEHS.

TOGETHER WE CAN SHAPE THE FUTURE. At CEHS, students arrive with an existing passion to help others, and it is up to us to support their eagerness and dedication. Scholarships, cutting-edge technology, enhanced curriculum and top-notch faculty and staff are an essential part of providing a quality education. As an alum, parent, student or friend, you have a stake in our future. Every donation, large or small, helps determine our consistent presence among the leading universities. For more information on how to donate, visit give.wvu.edu/cehs or call us at 304-293-3292.


Donor Report Thank you to the following individuals, corporations, and foundations that have provided gifts to CEHS from January 1 to December 31, 2016. On behalf of the students, faculty and staff, your generosity is greatly appreciated. ORGANIZATIONAL GIVING Wirt C. and Mae S. Belcher Fund

Dr. Anne H. Nardi Mr. Christopher G. Owen Dr. R. Roger Smith Mr. L  arry D. Taylor and Dr. Lydotta M. Taylor

Gifts of $5,000 to $9,999

Gifts of $5,000 to $9,999

Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Fioravanti, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert O. Orders, Jr. Mrs. Nancy P. Raley Dr. and Mrs. James A. Rye

Gifts of $10,000 to $24,999

Gifts of $1,000 to $4,999 Scottish Rite Foundation of WV Fetzer Institute VeriSign West Virginia University NSSLHA Chapter

Gifts of $1,000 to $4,999

Antoinette Rose Sgarlata Wiseman Trust Arena & Harrison Certified Public Accountants, Inc. Billeter Trust Daniel S. Mason, MS CCC-A Edgewood Summit, Inc. Hammer Educational Services LLC Marian L. Ours Trust Olashuk Environmental, Inc. Riverside Woods Owners Association Santino T. Serpento Revocable Trust Shifflette Family Revocable Trust Suttle & Stalnaker Von Saunder Family Trust

Ms. Kathryn A. Davis Dr. Gypsy M. Denzine Mr. Walter J. Fitzgerald Mrs. Priscilla A. Haden Mr. Don L. Hoylman Dr. and Mrs. Richard M. Iammarino MD Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Lilly Dr. Barbara L. Ludlow Thomas and Mary Lou McCullough Dr. G  ary L. McKown and Ms. Jill M. Meuser Dr. C. Sue Miles Mr. Joseph P. Muscatello, Jr. Dr. D  avid M. Smith and Mrs. Machelle R. Smith Drs. Edwin R. and Patricia K. Smith Mr. and Mrs. John A. Tiano Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Witten, Jr.

INDIVIDUAL GIVING

Gifts of $500 to $999

Gifts of $500,000 to $999,999

Dr. Carolyn P. Atkins Mrs. Bonita L. Andreani Mrs. Anganena Beynon Mr. Carl J. Castille Mrs. Kristen L. Casto Mrs. Elizabeth M. Doherty Ms. Jacqueline A. Dooley Dr. Tanya L. Easton Mr. Alverton A. Elliott Ms. Susan B. Fahey Mrs. Jamie H. French Dr. S  tephen A. Howard and Dr. Joan R. Howard Mrs. Teresa L. Kamm Mrs. Jennifer B. Margolin Watts Dr. and Mrs. Charles K. Murray Ms. Mary Elizabeth Oates Ms. Mandy Putnam Drs. Alexander J. and Sandra K. Sabo Dr. Gordon R. Short Mrs. Sandra C. Stephenson Mr. R  obert F. Lehman and Dr. Molly B. Vass-Lehman

Gifts of $1 to $999

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Cavasina Gifts of $25,000 to $50,000 Dr. William S. Bingman Paula and Jeff Comfort Dr. Evelyn C. Di Tosto Dr. and Mrs. Ronald V. Iannone Dr. Edward E. Jacobs Mrs. Candace L. Johnson Drs. Henry R. and Mary D. Marockie Miss Elaine M. Quattro Mrs. Amy-Ann Richardson Mr. Robert C. Weber Gifts of $10,000 to $24,999 Ms. Nancy C. Bryant Mr. Joseph Cipolloni, Jr. Ms. Andrea L. Dibello Dr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Goeres Mrs. Jeanne C. Lanting Dr. and Mrs. Norman J. Lass

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WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

Mrs. Patricia Z. Wilhelm Gifts of $250 to $499 Mrs. Linda K. Adamchak Dr. Carole J. Adams Dr. and Mrs. C. Brian Arthurs Mrs. Mary-Margaret E. Booe Mrs. Mary Ellen Burris Mrs. Debra K. Cantrell Dr. Frank G. Carney EdD Ms. Sheri Clampitt-Dean Mrs. Kathleen H. Fragola Mr. Paul M. Gardner Mrs. Mary Ellen Giacobbe Mrs. Marlene B. Greenleaf Mr. Frederick R. Ignatovich Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Kerzak Dr. M  ichael J. Klishis and Dr. Lesley Ann Klishis Ms. Jean S. Kurtz Dr. Ruth C. Lewis EdD Dr. Melonie S. Marple Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Meek, Jr. Dr. Betty M. Mei Mr. Timothy L. and Dr. Katherine Mitchem Mrs. Judith K. Mountjoy Mrs. Lynette K. Nelson Mr. and Mrs. Steven W. Perry Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Simpson, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Larry G. Spees Mrs. Mary B. Strickland Ms. Katherine E. Vani Mr. and Mrs. William S. Victorson Mrs. Barbara K. Wagner Ms. Nancy P. Waring Dr. Peggy S. Williams Dr. D  iane T. Woodrum-Leuthold and Mr. Peter P. Leuthold Gifts of $100 to $249 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Aluise Ms. Barbara M. Anderson Mr. Eric E. Anderson Dr. Michael M. Athey Mr. and Mrs. Brady A. Augustine Mrs. Betty M. Bailey Mrs. Carol W. Banks Mrs. Patricia A. Barnabei Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Barnes Dr. and Mrs. William P. Barone Mr. Robert G. Bartlett Mrs. Alice S. Batten Robert L. Bishop Mr. James R. Blevins Mrs. Donna K. Bohach


Mr. and Mrs. John N. Bolyard Ms. E. Joyce Bostaph Mrs. Barbara J. Bowes Dr. Nancy J. Bryson Mrs. Jeanne D. Bugyis Ms. Judith A. Burns Dr. Donna H. Callar Dr. Shannon B. Campbell Ms. Debra L. Carpenter Rev. Dr. Marvin H. Carr III and Mrs. Sarah L. Carr Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Caruso Mrs. Barbara M. Castille Mrs. Cara L. and Dr. Felix H. Cheung Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Clark Mrs. Katherine V. Clovis Mr. Charles M. Coiner, Jr. Mr. Clifton R. Colebank Mrs. Lisa M. Costello Mrs. Marga C. Cothran Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth D. Cover Drs. Susan J. & John R. Criswell Mr. and Mrs. Charles V. Critchfield Mrs. Barbara A. Cumpston Dr. Allison S. Dagen Mrs. Rebecca T. D’Annunzio Mrs. Mary M. Davis Dr. Ardeth M. Deay Mr. and Mrs. John F. Dickinson II Dr. George F. Drain Ms. Sue A. Edwards Dr. Jean C. Faieta Dr. Joy L. Faini Saab Dr. Stephen Feit Judge and Mrs. Edwin F. Flowers Mrs. Faith S. Foltz Ms. M  ichelle A. Fondas and Mr. Robert D. Wilson Mr. Charles W. Francis Mr. and Mrs. James E. Fridley Dr. and Mrs. Carl H. Friebel, Jr. Mr. Joseph J. Fritsch Mrs. Cynthia C. Frola Mr. and Mrs. Dave A. Gaspar Mr. and Mrs. Clifford W. Gay, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Given Dr. Susan S. Goodlive Dr. Mavis E. Grant EdD Dr. Adam S. Green Dr.Jonathan Green and Ms. Andrea Shiroff Mr. and Mrs. John T. Griffith Ms. Mary E. Haas Mrs. Doreen L. Hall Dr. Rebecca B. Hamilton Mr. D  avid C. Hardesty and Mrs. Susan H. Hardesty Ms. Sharon B. Hayes Miss Erin E. Hays Stephens Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Hendershot Mrs. Karen S. Hickman Mrs. Lisa J. Hileman Dr. James F. Hilgenberg, Jr. Mrs. Pamela M. Hill Mrs. Patricia A. Hostutler Mr. and Mrs. Victor W. Huang

Dr. Ronald W. Hull EdD Mrs. Rachel I. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. Johnston Mrs. Carmen A. Jones Allan and Millie Karlin Dr. and Mrs. Edward R. Kennedy Esq Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Kennedy Mrs. Jeannie J. King Mrs. Sue B. Kotalik Mrs. Rose M. Kutz Mrs. Sue H. Langmyer MA Mr. Charles L. Layman Mr. and Mrs. C. Barton Loar Dr. Diana L. Long and Mr. Mike Long Mr. and Mrs. James E. Long Mrs. Amy M. Lutz Mrs. Georgeanna M. Lyden Drs. Ranjit and Indira Majumder Mr. E  nrico J. Massimino and Ms. Teresa A. McBee Dr. Cindy L. McCoy Mr. G  eorge K. McCrum and Mrs. Janet K. McCrum Ms. Darcy K. McDowell Mr. James R. McGrady Dr. Jeffrey K. Messing Mrs. Stacy D. Mitchell Mrs. Sue S. Moats Mr. Joseph T. Monahan Mr. and Mrs. Herman L. Moses Ms. Elizabeth H. Mullett Mr. Scott C. Murray Mr. Todd Murray Dr. Beth E. Musser Dr. and Mrs. William A. Myers Mrs. Joan V. Nadeau Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Neely Dr. Duane G. Nichols and Dr. C. Sue Miles Drs. Artis J. and Linda A. Palmo Dr. Tyrone F. Parker Dr. and Mrs. Everett J. Pesci Dr. Linda M. Pettit Mrs. Laurie L. Phillips Mrs. Margaret J. Pickering Mrs. Elizabeth A. Porter Rick and Elizabeth Porter Ms. Monna L. Pugh Mrs. Elizabeth L. Quinn Ms. Victoria A. Railing Mr. and Mrs. William M. Raudabaugh Mr. and Mrs. Randy Riggs Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Riner Mrs. Karen E. Roberts Mrs. Rita C. Roberts Dr. and Mrs. Paul W. Rosier Ms. Elizabeth L. Ross Dr. and Mrs. Dennis Ruscello Mrs. Carol A. Savage Mr. and Mrs. Sam Scolapio, Jr. Dr. Richard D. Seymour Mr. Michael K. Sheldon Mr. Jan I. Skolnick Dr. M Cecil Smith Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Sole, Jr. Mrs. Veronica K. Southern

Miss Donna L. Staggs Mr. and Mrs. William E. Stahl Ms. Carol Steager Ms. Barbara A. Steele Dr. D  avid L. Stewart and Mrs. Connie L. Stewart Dr. and Mrs. David L. Stewart Mrs. Ruhamah M. Strite Ms. Jody A. Sutton Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Tanner, Jr. Dr. Nancy S. Taylor Dr. Janet A. Ternent Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. Theierl, Jr. Mr. Eberhard Thieme Dr. Judith A. W. Thomas EdD Dr. William R. Thompson Dr. Douglas L. Timmons Dr. Patrick J. Tray Mr. Roger L. Trusler Mr. and Mrs. David C. Tucker Mr. James R. Turner Mr. Daniel Vidovich Dr. Jeremy E. Vittek Mrs. Helen V. Wallace Mr. and Mrs. William R. Walter Dr. Barbara G. Warash Mr. Neal M. Watzman Ms. Frances A. Welch Dr. William A. Welker Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey S. Werner Mr. Frederick G. Western Mrs. Susan E. Westfall Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Whipp Mrs. Sherri R. Whitely Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Whitmer Miss Eleanor L. Wilson Mr. David E. Winchester Mrs. Toni W. Witzemann Mrs. Emily P. Wolfe Dr. Faxian Yang Mr. and Mrs. Randal N. Zinn Mrs. Judy G. Zizzo Mr. Edward L. Zoretic Gifts up to $99 Mrs. Rebecca A. Adamson Mr. and Mrs. Phillip J. Alt Dr. and Mrs. Edgar M. Ansell Dr. Mary F. Archey Mrs. Susan S. Arentsen Mrs. Alyson C. Armstrong Mr. John C. Armstrong Mrs. Sally M. Atkins Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. Ault Miss Heidi A. Bach-Arven Mrs. Norma H. Bacon Mrs. Lenore L. Baier Mr. Milton A. Baker Ms. Lindsey N. Balash Mrs. Susan L. Baldwin Miss Wilma D. Ball Ms. Kimberly Ballance Mr. and Mrs. Harold R. Bandy II Mrs. April D. Barker Mr. Albert J. Barnabei

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Donor Report Mr. C  harles A. Berryhill and Mrs. Marion M. Berryhill Mrs. Charlotte J. Billingsley Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur H. Black Mrs. Leigh A. Blatt Dr. Charles G. Blewitt Ms. Martha R. Bloom Ms. Alicia D. Board Mr. Gregory J. Bobro Dr. and Mrs. Larry G. Bradley Mrs. Marjorie L. Brant Dr. and Mrs. Dennis F. Brestensky Mrs. Elise N. Broddle Mr. and Mrs. William L. Brubaker Ms. Victoria C. Bruhn Dr. James L. Butcher Mrs. Margaret G. Cadle Mrs. Ann E. Cady David and Zoann Callahan Mr. Mason W. Callis, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher M. Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Joe L. Carpenter Mrs. Kristine T. Carr Dr. and Mrs. Mark S. Carter Ms. Anna M. Casale Mr. Florian F. Ceperley Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Chambers Mr. and Mrs. John R. Chaplin Mrs. Carol A. Chisler Mr. Jay S. Church Mr. and Mrs. Eugene P. Cipoletti Mrs. Barbara B. Clifford Mr. Felix Colaciello Mr. and Mrs. John J. Connors Mrs. Denice E. Corder Mr. and Mrs. Hobert H. Corley, Jr. Mrs. Kay B. Correira Mrs. Barbara H. Cowell Mrs. Linda E. Cox Mr. and Mrs. Matthew D. Cox Mrs. Janice S. Crane Ms. Melissa J. Cupp Dr. Reagan P. Curtis Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Dailey Mrs. Barbara K. Davis Ms. Kathy A. Dean Dr. Marion F. Dearnley Dr. Steven L. DeGeorge Ms. Linda Beth DeHaemers Mrs. Barbara B. Delaquila Mr. Edward N. Denny Mrs. Juliette R. Depiro Mr. and Mrs. Christopher P. Derico Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. DeVendra Mrs. Sandra A. DiBacco Mrs. Tracy V. Donofrio Mr. and Mrs. D. Lyn Dotson Mrs. Janice S. Dubois Ms. Margaret M. Dudash Ms. Jean A. Duncan Mrs. Doris E. Dunn Ms. Irene R. Durr Mr. and Mrs. Stephen K. Dye

28

Dr. Teresa T. Edkins Mrs. Loretta F. Edmundson Mr. and Mrs. J Douglas Elliott Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Ellwood Mrs. Pamela A. Emch Miss Kathleen Endrizzi Mr. Peter F. Episcopo Mrs. Theresa A. Estes Mrs. Polly A. Evans Mr. and Mrs. Clifford J. Everly Ms. Barbara A. Falck Mr. and Mrs. Tommy M. Farmer Mrs. Christine S. Fazio Mr. Joseph E. Felix Mrs. Cynthia C. Fickes Mrs. Doris A. Fiddler Ms. Deborah R. Filanowski Ms. Carleen F. Firl Mrs. Roberta A. Flanigan Mr. Russell F. Flint Mrs. Naomi R. Flowers Mr. and Mrs. David B. Foreback Dr. M  erna D. P. Galassi and Mr. John P. Galassi Mrs. Nancy S. Gehweiler Dr. Zornitsa G. Georgieva Mrs. Mary B. Girardi Mrs. Krista B. Gisler Dr. Larry S. Glenn Dr. Carole A. Gnatuk Mrs. Racheal L. Goff Dr. Suzanne H. R. Goodall EdD Mr. David E. Goodwin Mrs. Evelyn M. Goudy Mrs. Nancy D. Graham Dr. Gerry Grant-Aceto Miss Rachelle E. Green Ms. Morna L. Greene Ms. Beverly L. Griffith Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred K. Groce, Jr. Ms. Susan Grogan-Johnson Mrs. Larelda B. Gruber Ms. Jean I. Guerette Mrs. Joanne B. Haggerty Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey S. Hale Mrs. Marilee S. Hall Mrs. Gail A. Harbaugh Mrs. Anita M. Hardesty Mrs. Bernice B. Harshberger Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Hartigan Ms. Michelle Hartosh Mrs. Christine M. Heinrich Mrs. Beverley B. Hellickson Drs. Richard B. and Judy H. Helm Mrs. Chelsy D. Helmick Dr. Joan M. Henderson EdD Mr. and Mrs. James B. Henry Ms. Isabel C. Hernandez Mrs. Melva C. Hess Mrs. Constance A. Hinkle Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Hoak Ms. Fran Holliday Mr. and Ms. Mark T. Honosky Ms. Kimberly E. Hotlosz

WVU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

Mrs. Ashley B. Howery Mrs. Ann M. Howieson Mrs. Rosemary Hriblan Dr. Joy L. Hutchins Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Hutira Mr. and Mrs. Ray F. Isaacs Ms. Dorothy Janicki Ms. Wendy Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Wayne R. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Harry V. Joseph Mrs. Ruthmarie S. Junkins Mrs. Elizabeth Kantor-Bright Mrs. Ella L. Keener Mrs. Cynthia A. M. Keller Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Kelly Mr. Steven M. Kennedy Dr. David I. Kennedy Mrs. Constance L. Kepner Miss Carole L. Kiger Mrs. Rosalind Kimmelman Mrs. Linda G. Kratsas Mrs. Monta J. Kutchen Mrs. Kathy L. Kuykendall Mr. and Mrs. Howard P. Lafave Dr. Natalie A. Lambright Dr. and Mrs. James W. Latham, Jr. Mrs. Diantha B. Lavoie Mrs. Phyllis H. Law Mrs. Jacqueline L. Law Mr. Stephen M. Layton Mrs. Brenda C. Lee and Mr. Clarence E. Lee Dr. Ellen F. Leonard Mr. and Mrs. Burkey Lilly Dr. and Mrs. Robert T. Little Mr. and Mrs. James A. Looney Dr. Colleen T. Ludeker Mrs. Ann C. and Mr. Samuel S. Ludlow Dr. Donna J. Lukich Dr. E. Joy Lynch Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Macik Miss Maranda M. Mackey Mr. James W. Maloy Mr. John S. Markutsa Dr. Lucille D. Martin Ms. Pamela B. Martin Ms. Theresa A. Martin Mrs. Stefanie J. Masinter-Simunic Thomas and Barbara Mathias Mr. and Mrs. David N. Maurer Mrs. Wilma Maurizio H. Lynwood and Irene McBride Mr. Michael McClung Dr. Theresa E. McCormick Mr. John W. McCullough Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. McDonald Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Mckneelen Mrs. Barbara J. Mehalov Mr. and Mrs. Jesse L. Mehle Mr. Robert L. Milie II Dr. Lee Ann H. Miller Mrs. Elizabeth Mills Mr. and Mrs. George R. Milne Mrs. Beth A. Mitchell


Ms. Nancy Q. Mizen Dr. G  annett P. Monk and Dr. Katheryn S. Monk Mr. Harold L. Morton Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Mosko Mr. and Mrs. William E. Mullett Ms. Lois H. Nelson Mrs. Melanie O. Oates Dr. and Mrs. Jon R. Oberly Ms. Mary C. O’Hair Mr. Harrison N. Oonge Ms. Linda D. Orlidge Drs. Robert F. and Jennifer E. Orlikoff Mrs. Leslie M. Owens Mr. George J. Parish Mr. Robert I. Park, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Franklin Parker Mrs. Karen A. Parlett Dr. and Mrs. J. Ricardo Pastor Mr. Paul C. Pawlowski Mr. and Mrs. Vincent G. Pellegrini Mrs. Miriam A. Perriello Mr. and Mrs. Stuart M. Perry II Mr. and Mrs. Lewis A. Petonick Mr. Robert L. Phelps Dr. John F. Phillips Mrs. Susan W. Polgar Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Ponton Mr. D. Michael Porterfield Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Prendergast LTC and Mrs. Clemens C. Prybyloski Mrs. Jamie J. Pullen Dr. and Mrs. Paul J. Rach, Jr. Mrs. Gale C. Regel Miss Maggie Richardson Mrs. Audra M. Ritchie Mr. Akbar H. Rizvi Mrs. Elaine S. Robbins Dr. J. Kenneth Roberts Mr. Michael L. Robinson Mrs. Marcia A. Rogers Mrs. Georgia J. Roy Ms. Lydia J. Rzucidlo

Dr. Joseph A. Sanfilippo Ms. Margaret A. Santilli Ms. Jenny L. Santilli Dr. and Mrs. G. H. Budd Sapp Mr. Robert T. Sawyer II Mr. and Mrs. Myron J. Seese II Mr. Joseph P. Seiaman Ms. Jeanette L. Shahan Mrs. Tina H. Shockey Ms. Angela S. Shockley Dr. and Mrs. James C. Shuman Jerry and Jane Shuren Ms. Patience M. Simon Mrs. Clara G. Simpson Mr. David W. Singleton Dr. and Mrs. Albert N. Skomra Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey A. Smay Dr. and Mrs. Leslie C. Smedley Carolyn and William Smith Mr. Jeffery L. Sole Mrs. Judith A. Sorrenti Ms. Nancy Speicher Mr. James R. Spurgeon Ms. Mary M. Staun Judith A. and Robert F. Stechly Rev. J. Thomas Steele Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Stewart Dr. and Mrs. R. Jay Stipes Mrs. Jacqueline and Mr. Ronald C. Stocking Mrs. Mary J. Stokes Ms. Jeanne M. Stone Mrs. Brenda J. Stoneking Ms. Candace D. A. Strader Mrs. Dana S. Stringer Mrs. Margot H. Strong Ms. Melonie Terry Mr. and Mrs. David A. Thomas Ms. Eva M. Thomas Mr. Wayne G. Thomson Mrs. Tricia J. Timmons Ms. Kay M. Toben Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Tomaino Mrs. Phyllis A. Totten

Ms. Shevonne M. Travers Dr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Treanor Ms. Alice C. Tuckwiller Ms. Patricia G. Turley Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn E. Turner Mrs. Louise D. Ulrich Mr. Joy D. Underwood Ms. Elizabeth A. Underwood Baron Mrs. Janet L. Urquhart Robert and Rebecca Varlas Mr. Nicholas M. Varveris Mrs. Joy W. Viers Miss Kristen S. Walburn Mrs. Tina Walcott Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Walden Carol A. Wallman Mrs. Janet K. Walls Mrs. Margaret I. Walls Mr. and Mrs. Larry W. Wamsley Dr. and Mrs. Scott A. Warner Mrs. Judith E. Warner Ms. Holly G. Waybright Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell D. Webster Mr. and Mrs. Rodney C. Weikle Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Welty Ms. Sara L. Westfall Mr. and Mrs. Glenn L. White Mrs. Peggy R. White Mrs. Laura S. Whittington Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Wielgus Ms. Jo A. Wilking Mrs. Mary Ann Wollerton Mr. and Mrs. Jack W. Woods Dr. Tammy L. Woody Mrs. Denise L. Workman Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wriston Mrs. Rinda S. Wyman Ms. Joanne M. Yurik Mr. and Mrs. Harold N. Zarin Mrs. Etta O. Zasloff Mrs. Janet A. Zatezalo Ms. Joyce M. Znoy

NEW ENDOWMENTS Di Tosto and Marockie Outstanding Supervising Teacher Award

Kathryn A. Davis Education Scholarship

Dr. Dianna M. Vargo Scholarship

Larry D. and Lydotta McClure-Taylor Scholarship

Dr. Ernest R. Goeres Higher Education Administration

Norman and Martha Lass Scholarship

Ed Jacobs Counseling Scholarship

Paula Bajus Comfort Endowed Scholarship

Endowment for Civic Life

Ron V. Iannone and Family Keynote Speaker

Joseph and Milli Cipolloni Endowed Scholarship

William S. and Karen E. Bingman Endowed Education Scholarship

Joseph Keen Education Scholarship

Young-Keiter Memorial Fund

Thank you to our supporters this year who joined the Irvin Stewart Society by making a future gift commitment to the College, and to those who established permanent endowed funds.

IRVIN STEWART SOCIETY Richard Cavasina, ’87

Andrea L. Dibello, ’70

Toni T. Cavasina

Elaine Marie Quattro, ’70

SPRING 2017

29


Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Morgantown, WV Permit No. 34 Allen Hall, 355 Oakland Street P.O. Box 6122 Morgantown, WV 26505-6122

cehs.wvu.edu  VU College of Education W and Human Services @WVU_CEHS

LEARN TO LEAD. Take your career further with a Master of Arts in Literacy Education from the College of Education and Human Services.

Online classes

This program is nationally accredited through the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation and the International Literacy Association.

 ultiple Courses with Flexible Scheduling M (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Learn more at cils.wvu.edu/literacy-ed.

Reading Specialist Certification (Pre-K-Adult) 30 Credit Hours

 chool-based Intervention practicum may S be completed in your home area, supervised remotely by WVU faculty

CEHS Magazine: Spring 2017 Issue  

The Spring 2017 issue of the WVU College of Education and Human Services magazine.

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