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LEARNING PORTFOLIO: MIDTERM

ERIC FURA ARCH 103

SPRING 13


EXAMINING FILM:

AS A TOOL FOR CREATING ARCHITECTURAL NARRITIVE

CITY OF LOST CHILDREN Repetition of people/events ● Zoom ● Scene change cut ● Warped views ● Track movement ● Close up ● Pan to show scene ● Horizon line drop ● Sepia tones ● Series of close ups ● Dim lighting ● Themes/variations/cycles ● Follow ● Point of view shot ● Distortion ● Icons/symbols ● Focus changes ● Reveal ● Slow vs. quick pan ●

TRIPLETS OF BELLEVIEW Black and white ● Repetition ● Synchronized movements ● Social class distinction ● Subtlety ● Color vs. monotone ● Shadow ● Directed focus ● Zoom out larger perspective of space ● Foreground/background ● Framed view ● Proportion of human scale ● Different languages ● Reality/animation ● Cut off view ● Tension/release ● Scene changes to show movement of time ● Pauses ● Familiarity w/ repetition ● contrasts ●


ICE BREAKER: SF PHOTO MONTAGE

EXPECTATION: I will approach this by researching the areas of significant interaction that I have chosen in order to determine the distinctive and attractive qualities of each. My messages would be that the vitality of these neighborhoods comes from community pride, embracing diversity, support of local businesses, ingenuity and accessibility .

My approach to the ice breaker assignment began with selecting the neighborhoods that I most enjoyed in San Francisco. I decided to focus on SOMA, the Mission & the Castro. I ventured out, camera in hand, and snapped photos of anything that looked interesting or “vital � to me. I took pictures of storefronts, parks, community centers, historical sites, landmarks, streets, signs, lights, public transportation, hidden spectacles, murals, and anything I found interesting along my journey. The organization of my board was determined by the large transportation map underlay. Public transit binds our city so I used it as the basis for how I would arrange my finds. I divided the images into three basic heights based on how much I believed the content of the image was related to vitality; the more it contributed, the higher it stood. Interestingly, the layout eventually revealed the grid organization of the city as the tiles were placed.


KEVIN A. LYNCH: THE IMAGE OF THE CITY Photographs and SketchUp models recognizing and defining the five basic urban forms according to Kevin Lynch .


LANDMARK

PATHS

a point or radial references, a defined physical object, e.g. building, sign, store, or mountain; a campanile or broadcast tower seen from 360 degrees afar.

channels along which the observer moves, e.g. streets, walkways, transit lines, canals, railroads, etc.

In the Mission District, the Mission Dolores High School is a landmark which can be seen for many blocks in the surrounding area. It is often used by those in search of Dolores park, signifying that they are close. Only a few blocks away, is the Christian Science Church, which distinguishes itself with the large dome on top. Finally, in the Castro, the iconic Castro Theatre stands as a beacon of vibrancy with it's large neon sign. In a neighborhood known for it's colorful inhabitants and liveliness, it seems only appropriate. While it cannot be seen from all sides, it highlights the main throughway of the Castro.

The pathway that cuts through Dolores park connects the Mission District to the edge of the Castro. It starts as a simple road as far down as Potrero Hill, cuts through the edge of SOMA and enters the Mission where it is interrupted by Dolores park. However, the part encourages the pathway to continue with a walkway which divides the park in half and connects Dolores street to Church St. Along the way, there are palm tree markers, historic bells and statues, and a bridge to cross the tunnel carved out for transportation lines at the top of the hill. Dolores street is one of the major roadways in the Mission and one of the most beautiful streets in the city. The giant date palms line the middle of the roadway and beg you to follow them over the rolling hills. Dolores street connects market street to the Mission, to Noe Valley and beyond.


NODE

EDGE

points, the strategic spots in a city into which an observer can enter, and which are the intensive foci to and from which (s)he is traveling.

linear elements not used or considered as paths by the observer. They are the boundaries between two phases, linear breaks in continuity: shores, railroad cuts, edges of development, walls.

The intersection of Church & 18th St creates a node where several transportation systems intersect. The node is defined by large areas of pavement exposed on all of the corners of the intersection where people congregate Along the west Side of Dolores Park, there is a steep drop-off and railroad tracks dividing the park while they wait for their train or bus. It's a common meeting place for park goers before they get lost in the From the residences on the other side. This edge is also created by the train tracks that run the length of crowds that form on warm days. the park. This example of an edge blurs it's exact distinction because it also serves as a path for the trains A street ending can become a node because it stops the flow of traffic, pedestrian and car. The Street ending And along the west wall, there is a pedestrian path carved into the hillside. The edge though is still strong I found in the mission also was located near a public basketball court and tennis court. The surrounding because of the danger involved in crossing it. In order to get across the edge safely, one must use the buildings are backed up a bit to open up the space, and a little pocket for gathering forms. bridge in the middle of the park which happens to be part of a long pathway extending through the park Another node which has formed at the intersection of several major transportation routes is the corner of and continues down 19th St. or go to either extreme side. In a very urban city, the edges of parks can Castro and Market St. Again, large areas of sidewalk are exposed on the corners where people wait for their block the outside view and create an oasis in the middle of the city. trains, buses, etc. This node also serves as an intersection of the two main commerce “drags� that make up the Castro. It is the epicenter of all of the action. Because of the heavy pedestrian population and changes in train routes, the neighborhood converted the corner into a gathering space with traffic blockades, tables and chairs and a performance space (whether it was intended for that purpose is questionable.)


DISTRICT medium to large sections of the city, conceived of as having two dimensional extent, which the observer mentally enters “inside of,� and which are recognizable as having some common, identifying character.

Eric Fura ARCH 103: Architectural Design III: Spring 2013 City Image Project 1.29.13

The 3 districts I centered my initial explorations on were SOMA, the Mission and Castro. Each of these areas has its own identity yet the boundaries which separated them are very undefined. The major distinction between these neighborhoods is mostly defined by the culture of the people who inhabit them. The Mission is a very culturally diverse neighborhood with an emphasis on it's powerful and prideful Hispanic community. The Castro also attracts a particular demographic; the GLBT community has adopted the area and many of the establishments catered to meet their needs. Meanwhile, SOMA is an up and coming neighborhood which houses members of both of these communities while it continues to develop it's own personality. Both the Mission and Casrto are know for their vibrant colors whether it's the brilliant murals on Valencia or the pride flags that line Castro street. SOMA has been transforming itself from nondescript warehouses into a thriving area with high end lofts and plenty of nightlife. These neighborhoods often blend into each other for good reason in that they all embrace diversity as well as self preservation. (They also know how to have a good time!) All of the neighborhoods through street fairs and community events along their busiest streets from Castro to Mission to Folsom.

Excerpted from and inspired by: Lynch, Kevin. The Image of the City. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1960. ISBN 0 262 62001 4.


KEVIN A. LYNCH: THE IMAGE OF THE CITY 2ND ITERATION

Striving for more specific information and credible conclusions.


ZONING

The most vital areas of the city contain the highest concentration of commercial zoning. Higher density areas attract commercial development. Typically, public areas such as parks are surrounded by Residential development. Proximity to transit lines determines type of zoning, close to transit is more commercial, and industrial. Vital areas tend to cluster and branch off following the connected Roadways. Many vital areas are zoned for multi-use.

ERIC FURA ARCH 103


PATH/EDGE DIMENTIONED

ERIC FURA ARCH 103

Traffic flow is increased when lanes are separated. When roadways are divided, it is necessary to break the divide at major intersections for ease of entering/exiting. Divisions between buildings and open space can effectively be made with objects 他 the height of the building provided there is space equal to the height of the building between them.

Dolores Street Church/Dolores Park

Placing transit lines below ground-line eliminates them from view, and creates a boundary without blocking sight-lines. Edges are more defined when enhanced with vegetation such as as a line of trees. When a line of trees is the same height as the buildings on the opposite side of the street it creates a tunnel effect. An equal plot of land between path and elevation change is comfortable.


NODES Nodes at intersections should be equal to or greater than the with of the roadway. Pedestrian paths can be crossed by public transportation routes so long as they are well marked by changes in color/material on the ground. Permanent dividers are necessary to divide nodes from roadways in order to create a safe environment. Large nodes placed at the entry point of a neighborhood welcome people into the area and act as a gateway, luring passersby into the district. Nodes attract vitality when they reclaim urban areas as public space. Close proximity to transportation and popular transit routes allow for fantastic people watching. These places become the place to see and be seen. Nodes at street corners should be enhanced with a setback on at least one of the corners to open up the area. Nodes help people navigate by providing views to familiar landmarks and at intersections, allow them the choice of direction down one of the pathways. People often meet where public transportation routes intersect. Especially when placed close to a popular destination.

Market & Castro

th

18 & Church

ERIC FURA ARCH 103


STREET ELEVATION

ERIC FURA ARCH 103

Vital areas often contain multi use buildings. Retail/Restaurants are most effective when placed at street level in multi use buildings. Signage placed above the first floor can be seen from further away without disrupting the residences above. When multiple storefronts line a street with no breaks, placing trees between the buildings help to separate the identities. Providing places for bikes promotes vitality by encouraging people who ride bikes to frequent the neighborhood and feel safe, parking their transportation while they enjoy the neighborhood.

Valencia Street Castro Street

Street lights can serve as place makers when adorned with flags that identify the community that embraces the area. Without spaces between buildings, continuous storefronts create a feeling of connected space similar to a mall. Groups of similar businesses reinforce that feeling. Three stories seems to be an ideal height for getting necessary density while maintaining a quaint feel.


ONE LANDFORM: DISTRICT EXAMINED IN DEPTH

Emphasis on research and quantitative data.

MESSAGES TO REINFORCE:

Districts with large block patterns must use alleyways to break up the blocks. ● These alleyways result in residential enclaves giving a less urban feel to a neighborhood. ● Districts' vitality are highly related to historical preservation ● The history of a district determines the demographics of it's inhabitants and therefore the needs of the community. ● District edges are determined by major interruptions in traffic direction (breaks in the grid.) ● District desirability is enhanced by these clear boundaries. ● The vitality of a district relies greatly upon the diverse activities supported along it's paths. ● These activities must be no further away than a block between to encourage a continuous pathway of mixed use. ● Pathways within a district must connect landmarks. ● Districts must provide parking for non-residents to visit. ● A district's distinct quality must be reinforced by the continuity of design standards. ● Residential areas must be broken up into mini neighborhoods w/limited vehicular access. ●


AN URBAN UTIOPIAN VISION 1ST ITERATION


AN URBAN UTIOPIAN VISION 2ND ITERATION: SMALL TOWN IN A BIG CITY COMMNUNITY VALUES


URBAN UTOPIAN VISION: SMALL TOWN IN A BIG CITY COMMUNITY VALUES

OWNERSHIP

RELIGION

SMALL PARCELS OF VISIBLE YET PRIVATELY OWNED LAND

SPACES FOR RELIGIOUS EXPRESSION

HIGHER EDUCATION

SAFETY

ENLIGHTENMENT WITHIN REACH

HISTORIC PRESERVATION APPRECIATION OF THE PAST AND THE NOSTAGIA IT INSPIRES

ERIC FURA ARCH 103 2.26.13

VISIBLE PROTECTION AND SAFE HAVENS

WELCOMING ALWAYS FEEL WELCOME AND RIGHT AT HOME


AN URBAN UTIOPIAN VISION FINAL ITERATION:

(PUT IT ALL TOGETHER)


MISSION BAY SOUTH: SITE RESEARCH


MISSION BAY SOUTH: SITE PHOTOS


ERIC FURA ARCH 103 SPRING 13

INDOOR/OUTDOOR PAVILLION

STILTED/ELEVATED

CARVED EARTH

MISSION BAY SOUTH: 3 DESIGN PROPOSALS


FINAL THOUGHTS: This first half of the semester has been one of becoming as resourceful and self motivating as possible. More so than I think any of the previous studios have been. I believe the reason for this is basically the nature of advancing in the studio progression. More and more, information isn't spoon fed and as a result we are forced to research more and more on our own and directed by our own ambitions. It's become even more apparent that the harder you work, the more you will actually gain. No longer is it about satisfying minimal requirements, but more about discovering what you're really facinated by, and acting on it. Another challenge studio has presented for me this semester is taking advantage of digital tools. It's been a journey of taking the basics about software knowledge and graphic design and applying them to effectively communicate the points that we've found to be relevant during the exploration of urban design. I know that I found myself having to find ways of laying out presentations in a way I never have before and using software in ways I never have before either. It's been confidence building though because I know that I'm getting better and better at it each time. I think that it was important for us to approach this semester the way we did by breaking down the city forms and examining them in detail which gave me a new lens through which to view the city. My perspective changed when thinking about vitality in the urban context when my views shifted from those of the everyday urban actor to those of a more analytical observer. I do wish that we would have moved slightly faster through the Kevin Lynch, “Image of the City� study so that we would have had more time to compare and contrast his views with those of Oscar Newman and David Garhame Shane. One of the issues I had with the Utopian vision project is something that I brought up in class and Instructor Lum addressed it right away. That issue was about the approach of developing a vision for the project after having a good deal ff the process already started. I thought it was a bit backwards from the approach we took last semester in 102 where we developed a clear vision before getting into the project. After the discussion we had I understand that sometimes you may not always know 100% exactly what the vision is until you can piece together the fragments that are all coming together like puzzle pieces. I think there is value to both approaches and it just goes to show you that there is no one correct formula to the creative process. You simply acknowledge what's working and build on it. I'm looking forward to the second half of the semester as we get closer to designing our proposals for the Mission Bay site. It feels like its gonna be a crazy undertaking. with the scale of the project, but I'm always up for a challenge! -Eric Fura


ARCH 103 Midterm Learning Portfolio