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Want to work in a

BRILLIANT BUSINESS?

You need:

DAVID GILBERTSON’S

WINE BAR THEORY Want to be

SUCCESSFUL? Striving for

and enjoy your

FREE TIME?

EXCELLENCE?


This is a book about how to work smarter: how to do an excellent job in business without stress and without needing huge amounts of time to do it. Follow Wine Bar Theory's 28 simple rules and they will make you and the business you work in smarter and more effective. Wine Bar Theory is also flexible. It will work for an existing business or a new one you want to start. It can help you succeed personally, too, whether you are the boss or the doorman.

Wine Bar Theory also saves time. It shows you things you could do better and things you don’t need to do at all. So then you can stop doing them, win back time and do something fun. Like go to a wine bar and enjoy yourself. Or play ball, knit, go fishing. Or, maybe, take time out just to think. If you work in a business where wonderful things jump out of a box as if by magic, this is not a book for you. Put it down and find another book. Sorry, hold up a second. I just realised something. If you work in a business where things just jump out of a box, you might like something to read while you are guarding the box. Maybe give this book a go after all. It will tell you what everyone else is doing while you are sitting there.


The rules 1

Make your business sustainable

15

Be brave, not reckless

2

Keep it simple

16

Get a distinction

3

Keep asking

17

Insist on the best

4

Surround yourself with specialist excellence

18

Reason to believe

5

Be better at standing things up than knocking them down

19

If talent exists, promote it

20

Beware the Plausible Idiot

21

Do the job with the right resources, quickly

6

Know where you are going

7

Aim to do more, not the same

8

Don’t increase profits at the expense of growth

22

Buyer beware

9

Enrich your customer

23

Think big, keep nimble

10

Cut smart

24

Lead more, manage less

11

Invest in winning marketing

25

Recognise real success

12

Don’t guess ...

26

Say sorry

13

... and don’t invite guesses

27

Stand in the other person’s shoes

14

Be more responsible: give away responsibility

28

Enjoy


4 Surround yourself with specialist excellence A smart business is a team. Teams are made up of people who do different jobs toward one goal. If you are trying to build a smart business, be wary of generalists when you choose new people to join it. Generalists are quite good at several things. Specialists are very good at something. A team made up of people who are quite good at several things will always lose to a team of people who are very good at what they individually do, all playing in their own position, understanding the part they play in the overall success. Ask someone you are thinking of hiring, ‘What are you truly excellent at?’ Have them show you the evidence. If you are convinced by it and need that special excellence for your team, hire it.

Build your team on excellence in every function. Never compromise on quite good, unless that’s what you aspire to be. Once in a blue moon you stumble across a genuine polymath: someone who is very good at everything. They can play in almost any position in your team. Be happy. You have done well. They are very hard to find. Don’t be tempted to spend your life looking for them though. Target instead people who are excellent at one (or two) things and play to their strength.


16 Get a distinction A central bank economist who became a school headmistress once told me something very smart, and it was not even a little bit economic. This is what she said: ‘When you pick a school for your child, remember no child should be in the bottom 25 per cent of the class.’ Excuse me? What she meant was, don’t put your child in a place where he or she will be consistently outshone. Choose somewhere he or she can consistently shine. It’s the same with business. Don’t be an also-ran. Don’t be in the bottom 25 per cent of a class. Find something you can do better than others. For your business to be sustainably successful it has to stand out well. If you do the same thing as others, what you can achieve will be determined by them and not you.


“CONFORMITY IS THE JAILER OF FREEDOM AND THE ENEMY OF GROWTH” JOHN F KENNEDY (1917–63) PRESIDENT OF THE USA FROM 1961–63

Wine Bar Theory  

WINE BAR THEORY: Arbeiten Sie weniger, aber erfolgreicher!

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