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ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM THESIS

INNOVATIVE ARTS CENTER

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY | ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO VIII | SPRING 2018 | EDDIE GARCIA


©2018 Department of Architecture, College of Architecture, Planning & Design, Kansas State University All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reprinted, reproduced, or utilized in any form or by any means without written permission of the copyright owners. This book is not for resale and may not be distributed without consent by the Department of Architecture at Kansas State University or its representatives. All of the photographs and other images in this document were created by the author – Eddie Garcia in ARCH 808 Architectural Design Studio VIII, Prof. Bob Condia, AIA, Spring 2018 – unless otherwise noted. Every effort has been made to ensure that credits accurately comply with information supplied.


ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAM THESIS

INNOVATIVE ARTS CENTER

EDDIE GARCIA


Preface

The Mind in Architecture has been the subject of the studio’s investigation through most of the semester. The phrase, Mind in Architecture is derived from the neurological base in which people experience architecture. This base was developed through collaborative efforts from cognitive neuroscientists, architects, and philosophers on aesthetics. Together they have established a model of aesthetic experience of architecture dependent on embodied feelings and precognitive emotions that are the result of our bodies sensing relevant potentials for behavior in space. This culmination of relevant behaviors creates an atmosphere, which is the qualitative essence of architectural space. The Mind in Architecture can be further dissected into three main elements Affordances, Embodiment, and Atmosphere. Affordances are the nature of experience. Every living being is given basic biological systems needed to perceive the world as relevant potentials of what an object can afford. Philosopher, Mark Johnson, defines the meaning of architecture as what it affords me, meaning architecture is experienced as a qualitative whole, out of which we perceive meaningful potentials for behavior. Embodiment is known as the feltbody experience. Philosopher, Alberto Perez

Gomez, states that perception is something we do when our bodies interacts with the world, therefore to experience architecture it must be measured through the body. Vittorio Gallese, professor of human physiology, takes this concept a step forward and proposes that we understand objects, people and space by way of activity in the same neurological areas that we use to manipulate objects, feel emotions, and understand our position in space; this is referred to as embodied simulation. Finally, Atmosphere is that which we leave behind. Pritzker winning architect, Peter Zumthor, defines architectural atmosphere as the sum of all physical characteristics of a place. However, Philosopher Tonin Griffero expands on this idea, that in order to fully grasp atmosphere we need to understand that it is everywhere and is a quasi-real thing that can be perceived by the body of the beholder. Meaning, atmosphere becomes not only the physical but also the qualitative essence of any object, situation, or place; it is what’s in the space before we arrive and what we leave behind. The atmosphere is measured through the body and affords people different emotive responses. This atmospheric element is what architecture aims to design; the medium through which architects express ideas.


I would like to acknowledge my family, friends and past professors for supporting me through the obstacles of my educational career and inspiring me to keep my ambition. But most importantly for motivating me to dream. “Un Sueño a la Vez”


TABLE OF CONTENTS 01 SECTION 01 | THESIS INTRODUCTION 03 Introduction 04 02 SECTION 02 | THESIS STATEMENT 07 Concept Statement 08 Program Development 10 Program 11 03 SECTION 03 | SITE DATA AND ANALYSIS 13 Site Introduction 14 Site Characteristics 16 Conceptual Arrangements 20 04 SECTION 04 | CONCEPTUAL DESIGN PHASE 23 Design Focus 24 Reflection 26 05 SECTION 05 | SCHEMATIC DESIGN PHASE I 29 Design Focus 30 Reflection 34 06 SECTION 06 | SCHEMATIC DESIGN PHASE II 37 Design Focus 38 Reflection 42 07 SECTION 07 | DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PHASE 45 Design Focus 46 Reflection 60 08 SECTION 08 | APPENDIX 63

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 1.0 Thesis Introduction

SECTION 01 | THESIS INTRODUCTION

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

1.1 Introduction

The neurological background of aesthetics in architecture laid the foundation for this Architectural thesis: The Innovative Arts Center. The goal of the project was to understand the role empathy has in the creation of art and how it affects the observer through physical and cognitive methods. Studies have shown that mirror neurons are activated when a person witnesses the creation of art, in which they mentally mimic the motion of the artist (see appendix section 03). Architecture and technology can also influence the collaboration and development process of creative expression. People utilize the whole body to perceive the world, meaning the senses play a crucial role in the interpretation of art. Art is much more than a single sensation: It is a full body experience. Artists use a wide variety of mediums to convey certain moments and feelings, which viewers interpret through vision, movement, sounds, touch and any creative expression that can be sensed. The Innovative Arts Center should be able to provide a stage for the art, as well as a platform for art to be developed. It is a place where the community can come to see the creative process of an artist and learn the techniques they use to solve problems, while simultaneously admiring their current creations that are displayed in an adaptable gallery.

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The Innovative Arts Center is a way to further explore how architecture can help create a space that showcases the art in way that engages more than one sense. Combining a wide variety of art forms, such as dancers with poets, painters with filmmakers, or sculptors with musicians, The Innovative Arts Center aims to provide a variety of stages in which the resident are free to explore the collaboration of different arts in a way to leave an imprint on the community. This wave of collaboration between artists is an effort to push forward a new agenda of art.


Section 1.0 Thesis Introduction

Figure 1.01 ArchTechouse

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 2.0 Thesis Statement

SECTION 02 | THESIS STATEMENT

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

2.1 Concept Statement

The Innovative Arts Center is to be designed with the mindset of showcasing the creative process of an artist. In this scenario, Thompson Hall will be renovated into an artist residency, which will act as the core component of the program, while also offering studio spaces for the various arts. The later portion of the program will focus on offering a variety of stages for innovative minds to freely express their artistic expression through the use of technology. This will be included in the new additions of the design as it wraps the boundaries of Thompson Hall. These new additions include a Performance Hall and a New Age Tech Box. The intention of the Innovative Arts Center is to create a dialogue between the neighboring art buildings, McCain which holds music, Nichols Hall which holds dance, and the Beach Museum which showcases art, in order to develop a thriving arts district with a strong relationship to the community. The community itself plays a critical role in this relationship for it is the element that can help distinguish Kansas State University’s art district from others.

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This thesis projects explores how the relationship of architecture and technology can be designed to create a space that encourages artist to collaborate amongst each other and the community to craft art that is ‘innovative’.


Section 2.0 Thesis Statement

Figure 2.01 Artist Studios

INNOVATIVE ARTS CENTER

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Historic

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Arts

Museum

Community

Innovation

Figure 2.02 Alignment of the Arts

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

2.2 Program Development

When most artists are crafting or exploring their art, few of them start off famous or performing to a very large audience. An artist residency program is essential, for it is usually the first step for many artists to gain the experience and confidence needed to explore art. The Innovative Arts Center can offer this program in a way that lets them freely pursue their creative media. The Innovative Arts Center can be broken down into three major components: The artist residency, performance stages, and a sculpture park. The development of these three entities came from the needs of the artists and the community.

will be a more traditional recital hall that holds 250 people. This hall will be a multi-functional space, with a stage that can be arranged in varying formations with the help of a state of the art hydraulic lift system. The technologically advanced gallery will work like a typical black box theater, however, it will be more packed with technology to allow the artists to incorporated different methods to an experience. The reflective theater offers the artists a more intimate venue to express themselves; the space allows the audience to focus on only a small stage emphasized by a skylight.

Artists are the main users of the building, so the bulk of the building will be shaped around their individual needs. The living quarters will be the biggest percentage. In addition to the living necessities, a grand communal kitchen shall be a major element in the program because the kitchen plays a major role in the gathering of people. It is the place where the artist can relax, gather, and share ideas with one another. Furthermore, the residents will also have private access to other spaces throughout the building. However, the most important part for the artists is their studio, a proper space will be designed to accommodate the needs of painter, musicians, dancers, poets, sculptors, and filmmakers. These studios will be arranged in a way that people can pass by and see the arts in the creative process while also admiring their art in a gallery. The gallery space becomes the essential area where artists showcase their creation.

The final component is the sculpture garden, which emphasizes the connection of the Innovative Arts Center with the community. Triangle Park will be the entrance to the sculpture garden, connecting the community with the campus and making it the first element seen as people enter the campus. From Triangle Park, the sculpture garden will transform into a plaza that sits between Nichols, McCain, and the Innovative Arts Center, to help create a stronger dialogue between the neighboring buildings. Using Triangle Park as the entrance of the sculpture garden stresses the importance of the relationship between Kansas State University’s art district and the community. Overall, the combination of these three elements, the artist residency, performance stages, and a sculpture park, help define the Innovative Arts Center as a place of creative and artistic ambition.

The Innovative Arts Center offers three unique platforms in which artists can showcase their creation: A multipurpose auditorium, a technologically advanced gallery, and a reflective theater. These venues allow the artist to engage the audience through different a spectrum of different senses, creating an experience that, as a whole, becomes multi-sensory. The performance hall 10


Section 2.0 Thesis Statement

2.2 Program Artist Residency Sub-Total 21,200 sq. ft. Artist Residency 6,000 sq. ft. Kitchen 1,200 sq. ft. Exhibition/ Gallery Space 4,500 sq. ft. Art Studios/ Workshop 1,500 sq. ft. Music Studio/ Practice Room 1,200 sq. ft. Dance Studio 1,200 sq. ft. Faculty Arts Office 1,000 sq. ft. Interactive Classroom 800 sq. ft. Post Production Rooms 500 sq. ft. Screening Room 800 sq. ft. Rooftop Terrace 2,500 sq. ft. Performance Stages Sub-Total 15,000 sq. ft. Recital Hal 9,000 sq. ft. Experience Lab 1,000 sq. ft. Reflective Theater 1,000 sq. ft. Lobby/ Pre-Function 1,200 sq. ft. Dressing Rooms 1,000 sq. ft. Performance Suite 800 sq. ft Control Rooms 700 sq. ft. Reception 300 sq. ft. Support Backroom Sub-Total 8,800 sq. ft. Mechanical Room 4,000 sq. ft. Emergency Generator 800 sq. ft. Electrical Service Room 800 sq. ft. Server Room 800 sq. ft. General Storage 2,000 sq. ft. Custodial Closet 400 sq. ft. Restrooms Sculpture Park Sub-Total 80,000 sq. ft. Sculpture Garden 40,000 sq. ft. Arts District Plaza 30,000 sq. ft. Exhibition Courtyards 10,000 sq. ft. Parking Overall Innovative Arts Center Proposal Total AVG. Building Gross Factor Factored Size Innovative Arts Center Building Efficiency

45,000 sq. ft. 1.35* 60,750 sq. ft. 75%

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 3.0 Site

SECTION 03 | SITE DATA AND ANALYSIS

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

3.1 Site Introduction

The proposed location of the Innovative Arts Center is 1428 Anderson Ave, Manhattan, KS, otherwise known as Thompson Hall. Thompson Hall is located at the center of Manhattan next to the city’s busiest intersection of Anderson and Bluemont. This intersection is the cornerstone of Kansas State’s campus and often acts as the gateway between the community and campus. Thompson Hall is nestled in the heart of the Arts District and has a historic record, unlike most buildings. Built in 1921, it is one of the first ten buildings to breathe life into a once empty field. Thompson’s original purpose was a Home Economics and Cafe Building but has since then been modified to serve as a kitchen, dormitory, and currently as the Geo-Science College. However the Geo-science College has plans to relocate leaving a void in the building. Because this building has long played a critical role in the growth of the campus, it is important to renovate the building with a more appropriate purpose. With Thompson being located in the Arts District, and an abundance of artistic talent surrounding the campus, the next step is to create an artistic hub in which both the community and campus can utilize.

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Section 3.0 Site

Figure 3.2.02: Historical Image of Thompson Hall

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

3.2 Site Characteristics

Figure3.2.01: View from east side

Figure 3.2.02: View from north side

Figure 3.2.03: View from the south side

Figure 3.2.04: View from the west side

Thompson Hall is located at the busiest entrance into campus, and therefore becomes the first image that people have of the culture at Kansas State University. Kansas State prides itself in the walkability and strong relationship that the campus has to nature. To walk through the trees, with the transition from the community into the arts district invokes emotions of peace and tranquility. The materiality of the building

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focuses on using limestone, which complements the peacefulness of the site. However, contrary to these elements, most people tend to just walk by in a hurry as they speed to class and are unable to appreciate the atmosphere. For the design to push forward, it is key to keep some of the pockets for people to relax.


Section 3.0 Site

Thompson Hall Existing Exterior

Figure 3.2.05: Thompson Hall East Side Entrance

Figure 3.2.06: Geology Plaza South of Thompson

Figure 3.2.07: Thompson Hall Southern Facade

Figure 3.2.08: Thompson Hall Northern Facade

Figure 3.2.09: Thompson Hall Western Facade

Figure 3.2.10: Thompson Hall Eastern Facade

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

Thompson Hall Existing Edge Conditions

Figure 3.2.12 Southern Facade of the Beach Museum

Figure 3.2.13 Southern Facade of the Beach Museum

Figure 3.2.13 Southern Facade of McCain Auditorium

Figure 3.2.14 Eastern Facade of Nichols Hall

Figure 3.2.15 Western Facade of the Beach Museum

Figure 3.2.16 Lawn to the East of Thompson Hall

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Section 3.0 Site

Figure 3.2.17 View through the Class of 1911 Gate

Figure 3.2.18View across Anderson Avenue

Figure 3.2.19 View across Anderson Avenue

Figure 3.2.20 View across Anderson Avenue

Figure 3.2.21 Western Facade of the Beach Museum

Figure 3.2.22 View across Anderson Avenue

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

3.3 Conceptual Arrangements

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Section 3.0 Site

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 4.0 Conceptual Development Phase

SECTION 04 | CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT PHASE

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

4.1 Design Focus

Figure 4.01 Proposed Site Plan

In the conceptual design phase of the thesis, an emphasis is placed on three major elements, the artist residency, performance hall, and sculpture garden. In addition, I had to considere how to situate them in the chosen site. I took into consideration how these three elements can be arrange to create a stronger dialogue between the present buildings and help transform Kansas State’s art district into a artistic hub that rivals that of Dallas. I explored many iterations of the arrangement of these three elements, considering how the placement of these elements help tell a greater story about the overall campus and and the paths importance, and found that the performance hall was more naturally suited in the neighboring courtyard of Thompson. This location brought the performance hall closer to McCain and Nichols, which houses the music and dance students. As a result of placing the performance hall there, it allowed 24

for the development of a sunken plaza to run in between these buildings, thus creating a pocket of gathering. The artist residency would then be renovated into Thompson Hall, making it the central focus of the Innovative Arts Center. The sculpture garden would wrap around the new additions, thus serving as an exterior stage that promotes the creation of art. I explored how the element of exterior plazas and stages can transition into the interior of a building, creating a unified experience that emphasizes the importance of the relationship between the building and the community. Blurring the lines of the stages, allows artists to perform with the arts district as a backdrop. Offering the artists a variety of stages allowed me to envision the relationship the exterior places had in correlation to the interior. On the interior spaces artists are


Section 4.0 Conceptual Development Phase

able to create and the public is able to see the creative process, while on the exterior the public is given a sunken plaza and a sculpture garden that allows them to pause and enjoy the transition from community campus, as they find smaller peaceful nooks to sit and read. Another important element of an artist residency is the gallery space, for that reason I placed a central gallery that can open up to the sculpture garden, placing studios around said gallery. This was the key element of the building’s design, a central gallery that opens up to the sculpture garden with surrounding studios that acts a backdrop to the stage.

The sculpture garden became one of the main emphases in this phase, because the sculpture park became the bridging element of the arts district, campus, and community. With the artist residency having such strong potential to engage the community and influence the way people enjoy art, creating a literal link was important. That is when I made the decision to utilize Triangle Park as a smooth transition from Aggieville into campus; with hopes of transforming the now empty park into an iconic feature. Furthermore, this park is important because it can be used as phase one of a future proposal to activate green pockets along Manhattan Avenue thus creating a green link to Manhattan’s City Park.

Figure 4.02 Atmospheric Vignettes

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

4.2 Reflection

Though most agreed with the orientation of the building elements, there were some concerns on whether the sunken plaza was a success or a distraction. The site itself already contains such a tremendous grade change in the courtyard next to Thompson, that the incorporation of a sunken plaza had proven to be too complex. Also, one of the points that I emphasized was the relationship that Triangle Park would have as an entrance sequence into campus, transforming the empty lot into an iconic element for both the city of Manhattan and K-State.

Figure 4.04 Framing Moments

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Figure 4.03 Atmospheric Vignettes


Section 4.0 Conceptual Development Phase

Figure 4.05 Aerial Vignettes

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 5.0 Schematic Design Phase I

SECTION 05 | SCHEMATIC DESIGN PHASE I

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

5.1 Design Focus

Figure 5.01 Proposed Site Plan

From the previous critique, I attempted to further push the idea of arranging the elements of performance and stages to wrap Thompson Hall. I began by taking Thompson Hall and placing a performance hall in the neighboring courtyard, so that it sits closer to Nichols and McCain theater. I placed this element based off a rhythmic grid system that was followed throughout the building’s structure. At every 50 feet is a building element that responded to the context of the surrounding arts district. For example, the plaza was 50 feet away from Nichols, the performance hall itself was set at 50 feet, and the pre-function atrium is at another 50 feet. This placement allowed me to emphasize the entrance to McCain, in which the glass pre-function space created a frame to McCain. This rhythm was also expressed in the spatial arrangement inside Thompson Hall. The next step was to build a connection between these elements, I achieved this by creating a low bridging gallery that was able to expand onto the sculpture garden. To further 30

emphasize the placement of this rhythm, I extruded the edges of the building elements and used limestone to relate the building to its context. In addition this rhythmic placement, or division, of the building can also be expressed on the interior choreography of spaces. Deciding to move forward with the component layout allowed me to more thoroughly investigate the building’s form and choreography of spaces. The main focus was on how the artists would utilize the space, which lead to crafting an atmosphere that embodies the idea of innovation in the arts. The artists that would live here would bring forth an array of talents ranging from painters, musicians, dancers, poets, and filmmakers. Each one of these artistic ventures would require their unique working environment. This leads to a corresponding bedroom and studio space for each artist, with locations surrounding the gallery, to emphasize that the gallery space shall be at the heart of the program,


Section 5.0 Schematic Design Phase I

a showcase for all the creative expression for each of the artists together. The sequence of the studios should activate other senses as people move through the building. An example of this was having narrow pathways that surround the gallery, thus, acting as a speaker for the music studios.The sequence of the studios and the placement of the gallery at the heart is meant to have people enjoy the gallery while simultaneously enjoying the creation of different arts. The gallery will extend into the second floor, into the living quarters of the artists, giving each individual artist a space to oversee people admire their work. Each resident was equipped with a 500 sq ft. room, where they would share amenities such as a communal living space, kitchen, and restrooms. The kitchen, communal living space, and restrooms would serve as smaller retreats for the artists, where they could greet and be with one another, to create a small community overseeing the creative process and gallery spaces. However, the main stage for artists to showcase a creative act will be the performance hall that contains a state-ofthe-art fly system that allows for the adaptation of different stage formations. Considering the

strengths from the conceptual phase in which the performance hall is in relation to Thompson, it was clear that the performance stage needed to be separate based on how the artists would utilize the Innovative Arts Center by living and creating. To emphasize the importance of Thompson Hall, I created a glass atrium volume that served as a linking element, connecting the artist studios. This glass box would emphasize the northern facade of Thompson Hall, which is the most iconic face of the building; it is the view that students see when they walk along the Beach Museum. For that reason, the arched windows of Thompson would be preserved with the music studios being behind the window. Thus, as people walk by, they are given a glimpse of the creative act of music, and can also hear the beautiful sounds as they look into a plaza that connects Thompson to McCain. The glass atrium would act more as a framing element of the buildings facade design. In addition, this volume could also hold a large sculptural element that would glow and brighten up the plaza, that would hang off the structural trusses creating an iconic facade.

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

SPATIAL CHOREOGRAPHY

2 8

10 11

1

10 10 4

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5 6 6

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The Innovative Arts Center will offer living spaces that overlook the studio workshops, in order to create a dialogue between the artist residents, students, and community. It will also offer a Maestro program in which students can learn the skill set of an artist to create art.

0’

These spaces will be used to display artworks and shall be flexible with a strong connection to other public spaces. This becomes a stage where local, visiting artist, or k-state’s private collection can be showcased to the city of Manhattan, public access is important.

100’

EXPERIENCE LAB

SCULPTURE GARDEN

PERFORMANCE HALL

The Sculpture Garden should primarily afford connection throughout the Art’s District of the campus. It is among the most important of programmatic pieces as it brings the art to the people, as opposed to people having to seek out the art, and it can also begin to help direct people into the new and existing gallery spaces in the Forum and the Mariana Kistler Beach Museum. Benches should be located for extended viewing of the sculptures. Shelters may also be added in the forms of pavilions if desired.

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STUDIOS

GALLERY

These spaces will be used to display artworks and shall be flexible with a strong connection to other public spaces. This becomes a stage where local, visiting artist, or k-state’s private collection can be showcased to the city of Manhattan, public access is important.

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ARTIST RESIDENCY

1. LOBBY 2. RECITAL HALL 3. EXPERIENCE LAB/FLEX 4. EXPANDABLE GALLERY 5. DANCE STUDIO 6. CLASSROOM 7. ARTIST WORKSHOP 8. STUDIO 9. FABRICATION SHOP 10. PRACTICE ROOM 11. STORAGE 12. RESTROOM 13. ARTIST RESIDENCY

Multi-art center with plug and play program. Spaces for new technology, visual and performance art, and unprecedented control over the artist’s needs. The purpose of this theater is to offer artist a technologically advance black box that can be manipulated to expresses an artist creative act.

The recital hall is a place for musical performances by a soloist or a small group of performers. The seating can be either fixed or movable, but must accommodate for the minimum of 300 people.


Section 5.0 Schematic Design Phase I

Figure 5.02 Atmospheric Vignette

Figure 5.03 Proposed Green Link

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

5.2 Reflection

The main problem with the proposal was that it was too ambitious. There are a lot of opportunities for artist to create something, almost too many options. In addition, the living quarters of Thompson seemed to be lacking a truly communal atmosphere. The spaces were arranged similarly to a hotel, creating more private spaces. Another flaw was the rhythm set up throughout the building, it was not expressed successfully; it had no real relation to the site and set up a wierd interior rhythm that was too inefficient. This inefficient design was also evident in the excessive amount of building square footage, over 100,000 sq ft.Trying to preserve the arts by housing them in Thompson was unsuccessful, mainly because the studio spaces in Thompson started to break away until the building became just the southern facade wall. Wrapping the building in glass, took away the historic nature of Thompson Hall, alienating it from the rest of the arts district instead of creating a jewel.

Residents Surrounding the Core (Second Floor Plan)

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Shaping Thompson

Gallery at the Core (First Floor Plan)


Section 5.0 Schematic Design Phase I

Figure 5.04 ‘The Jewel’ Glass framing element that serves as a unifying volume between studios

Figure 5.05 Sequential Experience

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 6.0 Schematic Design Phase II

SECTION 06 | SCHEMATIC DESIGN PHASE II

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

6.1 Design Focus

Figure 6.01 Proposed Site Plan

PROPOSED SITE PLAN In order

The opportunity for artists to present their to progress from the previous work also decreased in size from the previous critique, I looked back at the original concept iteration. Instead of having a bunch of smaller and began from a new perspective. Instead of PLAZA PLAZA stages, the goal became to create more refined obliterating Thompson, I took an approach in theaters that would instead focus on a large which I arranged the artist residence inside the crowd--the performance hall, a smaller crowdcurrent Thompson Hall scheme. In this scheme, -the reflective stage, and a hightech gallery. the goal was to arrange the living quarters, this The performance hall will still be located on limits the space per resident while also trying the west wing of Thompson, but the stage itself to offer each resident their individual amenities. shrunkCIRCULATION in size. The recital hall would now seat BLENDING THE P After many trials of having each resident with GATEWAY TO CAMPUS REGULATING 200, however, the addition of a balcony was an individual room and amenities, I decided to added to wrap the stage, creating more seating engage in the process of combining the rooms in a smaller area. There was also a new element into subunits. For each subunit there would be that was added in this phase and that would be shared amenities between residents. I then used the tech box which would house the technology the same pattern of dividing Thompson into gallery and the smaller reflective stage. In an smaller subunits, organizing the studio spaces attempt to link the three components, the gallery for the artists, unlike before, with the living increased in size. This allows people to use the and work spaces were separated to create a gallery as a bridge from the tech box to the stronger distinction between artists space and reflective stage, creating a path that showcases a work area. By using these methods i was able the studio spaces. to preserve Thompson. 38


Section 6.0 Schematic Design Phase II

In this phase, I also began to explore the development of the facade and what kind of materiality would compose the wall systems. One of the materials that caught my attention was translucent concrete because of the contrast that it has to the limestone and for the ability to be interpreted as lightweight. The way sunlight penetrates the materiality is important to help create an airy interior atmosphere as the walls glows. This idea of how light interacts also encouraged me to use channel glass throughout the design of the building, which would obstruct the view of the public into the studios and offer artist a sense of privacy but also allow the public to interpret the figural movement of people at work. This can best be represented with dancing studios as their creative expression deals with fluent motions. Taking it back to the idea of engaging the audience through multiple senses, and encouraging artist to pursue this collaborative effort.

through the space. Using the neurological studies from last semester, I was able to delve deeper into the exploration of how these different materials were felt by the audience. Emphasizing again, that the Innovative Arts Center holds an atmosphere that aims to inspire innovation between artists; this can be seen in the use of wall systems, such as backlit marble panels, translucent concrete, channel glass curtain walls, and ETFE film. Utilizing this array of materials allowed the technology gallery to create a unique aesthetic. A heavy concrete mass would be the central high-tech gallery space that contrasts the glowing, exterior gallery. This creates a moment of contrasting elements, a central dark heavy concrete mass that is wrapped by a light warm glowing marble walls. Using this marble facade system as the exterior cladding of the performance hall and tech box, highlights that these spaces will hold innovative performances.

Finally the design of spatial choreography, the development of the atmosphere inside the Innovative Arts Center began to be refined. At this point, I started to understand the structural components of the building more, which allowed me to start giving walls texture, color, and function. Focusing on the details allowed to closer analyze the interior spaces and what emotive senses are activated when walking

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio PLAZA

RFORMANCE HALL SECTION

and with the beach museum being a representative of Artist Residency Alliance. These residencies are valuable to an artist for it affords the ability to explore their craft and allows them to engage the community by teaching them the creative process while also encouraging many to pursue their own vision. However most residency programs can be extremely competitive and this Interactive Arts Center offers many young artists the initial experience needed to propel their careers. With K-state losing a lot of talent to bigger cities, the Innovative Arts Center can help build a arts community in Manhattan, Kansas. Here artists are offered a unique opportunity to engage the community and explore the limitations of their imagination. Housing the different arts under one roof, the goal is to inspire collaboration between varying artistic minds and the community. This not only pushes the limitations of collaboration but also enforces the ambition for innovation.

TECH BOX SECTION

Figure 6.02 First Floor Plan

MAIN FLOOR PLAN ARTS CENTER SECTION

SOUTHERN ELEVATION Eddie Garcia | Innovative Arts Center | Kansas State University | Architectural Design Studio VII | Spring 2018

Figure 6.03 Second Floor Plan SECOND LEVEL PLAN

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and ability to be arranged in 5 different states, offering artist directors creative flexibility in engag the audience through a broad or intimate spectrum. This same mantra is repeated throughout the smaller ‘stages’ in which the studio/workshops can be re-arranged depending on the artist desire this environment the way an artist interacts with an audience is limited only by their imagination.

Section 6.0 Schematic Design Phase II

As of 2018, the state of Kansas is lacking in proper artistic representation, there are only 2 residencies in Kansas, this comes to a shock with the amount of talent seen throughout the college, and with the beach museum being a representative of Artist Residency Alliance. These residencies are valuable to an artist for it affords the ability to explore their craft and allows them to engage th community by teaching them the creative process while also encouraging many to pursue their ow vision. However most residency programs can be extremely competitive and this Interactive Arts C offers many young artists the initial experience needed to propel their careers. With K-state losing lot of talent to bigger cities, the Innovative Arts Center can help build a arts community in Manhat Kansas. Here artists are offered a unique opportunity to engage the community and explore the limitations of their imagination. Housing the different arts under one roof, the goal is to inspire collaboration between varying artistic minds and the community. This not only pushes the limitation collaboration but also enforces the ambition for innovation.

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s hops, core tal media, hnology gaging he esire. In n.

PLAZA

PLAZA

PERFORMANCE HALL SECTION

ege, cies ge the r own rts Center sing a nhattan, he s ations hops, of core tal media, hnology gaging he esire. In n.

TECH BOX SECTION

ARTS CENTER SECTION

PERFORMANCE HALL SECTION

TECH BOX SECTION

ege, cies ge the r own rts Center sing a nhattan, he

ations of

ARTS CENTER SECTION MAIN FLOOR PLAN

SOUTHERN ELEVATION SECOND LEVEL PLAN Eddie Garcia | Innovative Arts Center | Kansas State University | Architectural Design Studio VII | Spring 2018

NORTHERN ELEVATION

SECOND LEVEL PLAN Figure 6.01 Technical Drawings of Innovative Arts Center

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

6.2 Reflection

The main critique I received for this submittal, was the complexity of the added elements that still seemed to be lacking a cohesive design. The gallery space, when measured in a linear distance, measured over 500 sq ft., but the program wasn’t utilizing most of this space. Incorporating the gallery with the circulation pathway was interesting, but the circulation component of it was too complex. People would encounter difficulty navigating the building because the layout resembled a maze, with sprawling, scrambled hallways, with no hierarchy order. This would cause people to wander and actually get lost, creating an unpleasant experience. One of the questions brought up was how would I structure this box and supply the support systems, such as hvac, plumbing and electrical. If it is a high-tech gallery, how will I hide or show the system needed to power this space. When considering the orientation of the living quarters of Thompson, the idea of using subunits was a good thought, but it still needed some work. No real communal atmosphere was being designed, and the stairs were too close to each other making a faulty living design. When considering the design of the stages, theREGULATING critics agreed that they did offer a CIRCULATION unique atmosphere, however, it didn’t seem to belong here. They encouraged me to keep exploring this relationship between materiality and scale to create something that seems more innovative.

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Section 6.0 Schematic Design Phase II

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 7.0 Design Development

SECTION 07 | DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

7.1 Design Focus

Figure 7.01 Proposed Site Plan Proposed Innovative Arts Center Plaza

For the final presentation of the Innovative Arts Center, I focused on strengthening the weaker components of the Innovative Arts Center, re-imaging them in a way that ties back to the conceptual idea, a place that pushes the innovation of art. For this process, I began again by analyzing the living quarters of Thompson, finding a way to create a more efficient floor plan that serves the artists and creates a communal environment that encourages collaboration. I uncovered some older floor plans of Thompson dating back to 1921, when the building was constructed, to better understand how the cafe and dormitory was organized (see Figure 5.02). This research lead me to place the kitchen at the heart of the floor, emphasizing this idea that the kitchen is the heart of the residency; the most important place for artists to gather (see Figure 5.03). The kitchen can be split into two moments, with one side emphasizing the commercial cooking element 46

of the kitchen, and the other half emphasizing the gathering. The kitchen will hold state-ofthe-art appliances and a large pantry, but most importantly the communal side will have a wine wall. After all, the wine allows the for a fluid flow of artistic creativity. Then I looked into using subunits for the residents, this time pairing two similar artists in each of the five wings of Thompson. Each subunit contains two bedrooms, a bathroom, storage and a stackable washer dryer unit. Essentially, all the private amenities of living would be subdivided, and the public moments encourage this gathering of artists. For an artist resident, the most important space is their studio, for it is the place where they let their imagination wander and create.


Section 7.0 Design Development

Built in 1921, Thompson Hall’s original purpose was the Home Economics and Cafeteria Building for K-State

Placing the kitchen at the heart of the plan creates a valuable space that affords the artists to connect, inspire and exchange ideas with one another.

The artist residents are then divided into sperate units that affords them privacy, however the main spaces are communal to encourage collaboration between artsits.

UP

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Figure 7.02 Kitchen at the Heart Original floor plan of Thompson Hall’s second floor, with the new proposed residency scheme

S t Suite 200 Kansas City MO 64105

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Figure 7.03 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

Figure 7.04 Communal Kitchen Layout

Figure 7.05 Proposed Kitchen Elevations

Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core

Elevations of kitchen

Figure 7.06 Kitchen Render Proposed Kitchen Design

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Section 7.0 Design Development

The relationship between the subunits was important for that reason, and the main floor of Thompson was arranged in a similar way as the residency, in which the studios are placed directly below the living quarters. Placing them directly below the living subunit allowed for easier access for the artists and also a better understanding of the placing of each studio. It was also important to incorporate the idea of a mixed circulation. The circulation of the main floor served as a gallery to showcase the process of creativity, while having an adjacent wall for the showcasing of the finished product. This way, the artist studio itself can also become an exhibition, or a work space. Understanding that these two elements are important to the artists led me to also push how the mechanical systems would operate. The studios need a

system independent of the living space, so each unit has control over their space, this led to a split air forced hvac system, able to accommodate the residents, artists space and gallery spaces (see Figure 5.12). Artists also need a sense of privacy, so I replaced the glass in the bottom floor with channel glass to offer the artists a sense of privacy. When people walk by, their vision inside the studio is obstructed to a blur, creating an artistic expression in the movement of people painting, sculpting, and especially dancing. All this was achieved while keeping Thompson intact, altering only the interior experience. This strengthen my initial find that Thompson has historical value and potential in fitting a unique artist residency inside Thomson Hall.

Figure 7.07 Proposed Sub Units

Figure 7.08 Proposed Artist Studio

Each sub unit will contain two 300 sq.ft. bedrooms, a bathroom, and sufficient storage space

The Artist Studio has the ability to open up allowing the public to pass by and see the creative process of art.

1 Main Floor - Callout 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

Figure 7.09 Rendering of Typical Room Layout

Figure 7.10 Rendering of Painter’s Studio

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Section 7.0 Design Development

Figure 7.11 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

The second floor of Thompson Hall is transformed into the private residency sector where each artist is offered a sub-unit above their studio/work space. To accommodate the different function of spaces the HVAC system is split to provide proper ventilation to the artists studios without disturbing the sub-units.

The first floor of Thompson Hall is transformed to the artist studio with an accompanying gallery that showcases their craft to the public. The circulation that is adjacent to the studio spaces offers the public the ability to see creative act of an artist while also showcasing some of their finished art pieces Figure 7.12 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

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Second Floor Plan print | 2.1-12 1. Artist Studio 2. Resident Showcase Gallery PHASE | BNIM Project No. 00000.00 | 03/28/18 3. Artist Classroom 4. Dance Studio 5. Music Studio 6. Reception 7. Permanent Collection Gallery 8. Performance Seating 13. 9. Stage/ Backstage 10. Orchestra Pit 13. 11. Private Green Rooms 14. 15. 12. Private Restrooms 16. 13. Mechanical 13. 14. Digital Media Box 17. 15. Main Office 16. Control Room 17. Adaptable Gallery 18. Film Room Copyright © 2013 BNIM Architects

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Section 7.0 Design Development

Figure 7.13 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

The New Tech Box will be associated with the modern movement of artist as they discover technological methods to express themselves trough mixed medias.

The Artist Residency program shall rest between the New Tech Box and Performance Hall showcasing the artist creative act while utilizing the gallery as a bridge between the three components

The plinth of both new additions creates a datum that will be constructed with dark natural fiber cement panels that emphasizes the light frame structure of the translucent concrete facades.

The Performance Hall will compliment the arts district by providing a much needed recital hall for smaller venues and usage of students.

The Performance Hall will also be lifted to accomaate for the site’s slope and also help emphasize the importance of performances in the arts district.

Figure 7.14 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

Performance Top 34' - 10 3/8" Thompson Roof 28' - 0"

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Level 11 13' - 10 3/8" Level 13 7' - 11"

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

After understanding the relationship of the artist residency and crafting places, the next step was to refine the stages in which the artist are able to showcase their art. To achieve this, I refined the three main stages from previous iterations. The performance hall was updated in both the programmatic elements and the structural exterior facade. The new facade system would again try to push innovation by utilizing a typical steel beam system and a light frame system to support the translucent concrete cladding. Utilizing a translucent concrete cladding allowed me to manipulate the amount of daylight entering the building by adjusting the consistency of fiberglass per panel. This concentration mix then can be arranged in a grid system that correlates to the interior function of the space. To further push the innovation of this material, I included a backlit LED system that can be manipulated by a server control room and can be adjusted so that the facade of the building can emit a glow that can pulsate when a performance is happening, adding to the imagination as people see the building at night. Programatically, I reduced the number of seats to 200, added much needed dressing rooms and offices that serve the building. Both elements are located on the northern part of the hall so that I am able to manipulate the exterior facade with views to the Arts District Plaza. This new arrangement has services that were pushed to the north and south end of the building, allowing the stage and setting of the recital hall to be the core function of the performance hall. 54

The other element added to the Innovative Arts Center was the new age tech box, which is orientated towards the Higgenbottom Gate, emphasizing the experience people have as they enter the K-State campus. The tech box is a structure that will house two smaller stages for the artists. An adaptable high-tech gallery, in which the artists are given full control of the atmosphere to transport the audience in other world experiences using projectors and high definition OLED screens walls that surround the audience. The reflective theater is the opposite, in which the space is stripped to the bare essentials, its walls are made up of a reflective golden copper that allows the artists to see their blurred reflections. The audience sits close to this smaller stage, offering seating to ten people. That stage is below a skylight emphasizes the creative expression, whether it be poetry or a dance. These elements create a truly intimate atmosphere, in which the audience is within arms reach of the art. In order to simplify the stages, the service components had to be hidden. The best solution I found for this was to create a cavity between the heavy mass that sits within the light frame of translucent concrete. The heavy mass that sits in the middle is essential in that it serves the spaces, the systems, and the structure of the tech box. Surrounding the heavy mass, will be a gallery that uses the translucent concrete as a backdrop to the art. The art displayed here will be more contemporary and interactive, using section of the building to explore the relationship between art and technology.


Section 7.0 Design Development

Figure 7.15 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

Figure 7.16 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

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Section 1.0 Program Introduction

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Elevation 3 - a

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Figure 7.19 Eastern Elevation

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Figure 7.21 Artist Studio as a Gallery

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Figure 7.20 Western Elevation


Section 7.0 Design Development

Figure 7.21 Proposed Wall System The Translucent concrete cladding would be on a steel lightframe

Figure 7.22 Anatomy of Tech Box Fiber Optic Compound Mix Percentage 15%-20% 5%-10% 0%

The Translucent concrete facade is layed out in a grid that corresponds to the interior function of the space with the lighter blue representing a public function. In addition the percentage of fiber optics in the concrete pannel increases making it easier to read the backlight system that immitates the interior movement of the building parallel to a performance.

Figure 7.23 Proposed Residency Layout Proposed floor plan layout, where the kitchen is the core element and surrounding sub units offer private bed rooms

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7.2 Reflection

For this round the comments were more subtle and less in number than usual. One of the things I was asked to push forward was the innovation of wall systems, to really understand the construction and details of how the backlit translucent screen will work. Also, the relationship to the entrance sequence is strong, but the building itself is now monumental. Limiting the places where the translucent concrete occurs will help emphasize that this cladding system is interactive to the performance, so maybe instead of the system wrapping, it would focus on the main views to the arts district. I received compliments on the atmosphere in that the artist studios are becoming more like the meshed idea of work and exhibition atmosphere I was aiming for. For the next step of refinement to the Innovative Arts Center, I would like to address the issue of the gallery space needing more attention to further push on this idea of innovation. Asking questions, like what is the atmosphere found here that makes the gallery so special, helped push the development of an atmosphere that stands out. Considering how I could bend

60

the light to enter the building, highlighting certain pieces of art added emphasis towards certain art styles and pieces. In addition to the gallery, I would like to explore the possibility of the tech box and the performance hall, utilizing a high performance glass face with perforated metal shading screens that run on a parametric system, and like the translucent concrete responds to the interior function of a space. Thus, creating a dynamic facade that seems imitates movement, similar to the movement of the creative act. Delving deeper to the interior atmosphere as people walk around the building, creating a place that again invokes curiosity as people explore the creative process and collaboration between artist to create a place of innovation, building an atmosphere unlike any other here at Kansas State University.


Section 7.0 Design Development

Figure 7.24 Translucent Concrete Sample Build

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Architectural Program Thesis |Innovative Arts Center


Section 8.0 Appendix

SECTION 08 | APPENDIX

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8.1 Executive Summary Schematic Design Innovative Arts Center

1.0 Introduction

XYZT, ARTECHOUSE

The Innovative Arts Center is an Artist Residency program offered at K-state that showcases and develops the freedom of creative expression through a variety of high tech studios, workshops, and stages. It is a renovation of Thompson Hall in which the Artist Residency will serve as the core programmatic element with the addition of a flexible and sophisticated technology based recital hall. Based on the current need of the college, the Recital Hall shall be adaptable to different media, expressive arts and audience sizes. The Recital Hall shall be equipped with state of the art technology and ability to be arranged in 5 different states, offering artist directors creative flexibility in engaging the audience through a broad or intimate spectrum. This same mantra is repeated throughout the smaller ‘stages’ in which the studio/workshops can be re-arranged depending on the artist desire. In this environment the way an artist interacts with an audience is limited only by their imagination. As of 2018, the state of Kansas is lacking in proper artistic representation, there are only 2 residencies in Kansas This comes to a shock with the amount of talent seen throughout the college, and with the beach museum being a representative of Artist Residency Alliance. These residencies are valuable to an artist for it affords the ability to explore their craft and allows them to engage the community by teaching them the creative process while also encouraging many to pursue their own vision. However most residency programs can be extremely competitive and this Interactive Arts Center offers many young artists the initial experience needed to propel their careers. With K-state losing a lot of talent to bigger cities, the Innovative Arts Center can help build a arts community in Manhattan, Kansas. Here artists are offered a unique opportunity to engage the community and explore the limitations of their imagination. Housing the different arts under one roof, the goal is to inspire collaboration between varying artistic minds and the community. This not only pushes the limitations of collaboration but also enforces the ambition for innovation. Alignment of the Arts

Kansas State University | Architectural Design Studio VII | Spring 2018

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Section 8.0 Appendix

Schematic Design Innovative Arts Center

2.0 Innovative Arts Center Spatial Components ARTIST RESIDENCY Artist Residency Exhibition/ Gallery Spaces Art Studios/ Workshops Dance Studio Music Studio/ Practice Rooms Sculpting Studio Post Production Rooms Faculty Arts Office Screening Room Rooftop Terrace / Outdoor Stage

SUB-TOTAL 21,600 SQ. FT. 8,000 sq. ft. 4,600 sq. ft. 1,500 sq. ft. 1,200 sq. ft. 1,200 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft. 500 sq. ft. 1,000 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft. 2,000 sq. ft.

RECITAL HALL Recital Hall Experience Lab Lobby/ Pre-Function Control Room Dressing Rooms Performance Suite

SUB-TOTAL 11,500 SQ. FT. 9,000 sq. ft. 1,500 sq. ft. 1,500 sq. ft. 1,200 sq. ft. 1,000 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft.

SUPPORT BACKROOM Mechanical Room Emergency Generator Electrical Service Room Server Room General Storage

SUB-TOTAL 9,400 SQ. FT. 4,000 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft. 800 sq. ft. 3,000 sq. ft.

SCULPTURE GARDEN Sculpture Garden Showcase Courtyards Arts District Plaza

SUB-TOTAL 91,000 SQ. FT. 36,000 sq. ft. 15,000 sq. ft. 40,000 sq. ft.

OVERALL INNOVATIVE ARTS CENTER PROPOSAL TOTAL AVG. BUILDING GROSS FACTOR FACTORED SIZE INNOVATIVE ARTS CENTER BUILDING EFFICIENCY

42,500 SQ. FT. 1.22* 51,850 SQ. FT. 81%

Sketched Moments

Kansas State University | Architectural Design Studio VII | Spring 2018

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8.2 Studio on Affordances, Embodiment, and Atmosphere

The following section provides definitions of building area and definitions of terms used throughout this programming document. This appendix references the Postsecondary Education Facilities Inventory and Classification Manual 2006. Affordance: This refers to the action potential perceived from the qualia of things and quasi-things Atmosphere: a surrounding emotional influence of an object, form, being or environment Building Service: This includes rooms used for building protection, care, and maintenance, such as custodial closets, trash rooms, guardrooms, custodial locker rooms, and custodial storage/supply rooms. Equipment storage areas are Assignable Areas. Circulation: This is space that provides physical access to assignable rooms. Included are corridors, public stairways, elevators, escalators, loading platforms, tunnels, bridges, fire towers, etc. Walls do not always bound circulation areas. Exceptions are halls in office suites and similar settings that are used to circulate form room to room and are not general access space. This space is part of the Assignable Area. 66

Embodiment: the process of feeing into an object, form, being or environment. Embodied Simulation: The understanding of objects, people, and space by way of activity in the same neurological areas that we use to manipulate objects, feel emotions, and understand our position in space Gross Area (GSF): Gross area is the sum of all areas on all floors of a building included within the outside faces of its exterior walls, including all vertical penetration areas, for circulation and shaft areas that connect one floor to another. This area is computed by physically measuring or scaling measurements from the outside faces of exterior walls, disregarding cornices, pilasters, buttresses, etc., that extend beyond the wall faces. Such area excludes light wells, or portions of upper floors eliminated by spaces or lobbies that rise above single-floor ceiling height. GSF = Net Usable Area + Structural Space Mechanical: This includes areas that house mechanical equipment, utility services, and shaft areas. Examples are mechanical service shafts, air ducts, IT closets, mechanical rooms, etc.


Section 8.0 Appendix

Net Usable Area: Net usable area, or Net Usable Square Feet (NUSF), is defined as the aggregate interior area of a building and is the sum of the Assignable Area and Non-Assignable area. Net Usable Area = Net Assignable Square Footage + Non-Assignable Area Net Assignable Square Footage (NASF): Net assignable square feet (NASF) is the sum of floor space within interior walls of rooms that is assigned to, or available for assignment to, occupants for use, excluding Non-Assignable spaces defined as building service, circulation, mechanical, and structural areas. NASF is determined by Space Use Codes and Functional Category Code data fields. All rooms not specifically excluded are assignable and must be measured and coded according to academic discipline or administrative assignment, Space Use Codes, and Functional Category Codes. Rooms that are specifically excluded are Non-Assignable Areas. The ten major Assignable Space Use Categories are as follows: Classrooms, laboratories, offices, study areas, special use space, general use areas, support rooms, health care, residential, and unclassified space. Not all of the categories are utilized in this building.

Net Assignable Square Footage = Sum of the Ten Major Space Use Categories of Assignable Space Non-Assignable Areas: This space is not assigned directly to support programs but is essential to the operation of the building and not assigned directly to people or programs. The three major space use categories are building service, circulation and mechanical. (Non-Assignable Area = Sum of the Three Major Space Use Categories of Non-Assignable Space) Quasi-thing: term used to show that something is almost, but not completely, the thing described. In terms of atmosphere as a quasi-thing, it is understood that atmosphere exists as a concept but has no definite physical characteristics. Structural Area: Structural area is the difference between the exterior or Gross Area and the interior or Net Usable Area, the floor area upon which the exterior and interior walls sit and the unusable areas in attics and excavated basements. Structural Area = Gross Area – Net Usable Area

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8.3 Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts

Figure 8.3.01: Aeriel of Logan Arts Center

PROJECT CREDITS Client: University of Chicago Illinois Architect: Tod Williams and Billie Tsien Architects Location: Chicago, Illinois Architectural Website: http://www.twbta.com/ Structural Engineering: Severud Associates MEP Engineering: Ambrosino, DePinto, and Schmeider Lighting Design: Renfro Design Group Civil Engineering: David Mason & Associates Landscape Architect: Hargreaves Associates General Contractor: Turner Construction 68


Section 8.0 Appendix

PROJECT DATA • 184,000 GSF New Construction • 170 ft. Tower Performance Penthouse • LEED Gold Certification • Awards: 2017 AIA Institute Honor Award for Architecture, 2015 AIANY Architecture Merit Award, 2014Light and Architecture Award, 2013 ENR Midwest Best Project Award: Higher Education/ Research • Gathered the once scattered art disciplinaries in one building PROJECT BRIEF Serving as a landmark on the south end of campus at the University of Chicago in Illinois, the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts gathered all of UChicago’s sqattered artistic disciplinaries and housed them under one roof, it contains creative arts such as creative writing, music, theater, performance studies and visual arts. PROGRAMATIC COMPARISON Because of its broad programmatic components the Logan Arts Center is a perfect example for the Innovative Arts Center. From this Case study we can begin to understand how the flow and spatial requirements for some of the main functions of our proposed building will work.

Figure 8.3.02: Sunset of Logan Arts Center

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

EXTERIOR CONDITIONS

Figure 8.3.09: Exterior Plaza

Figure8.3.10: Exterior Tower

Figure 8.3.12: Logan Arts Center Green Roof and Plaza Interaction

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Figure 8.3.11: Logan Arts Center South Entrance

Figure 5.1.13: Logan Arts Center South Entrance


Section 8.0 Appendix

INTERIOR ATMOSPHERE

Figure 8.3.14: Artist Workshop

Figure 8.3.15: Black Theater Box

Figure 8.3.16: Logan Arts Center Artist Classroom

Figure 8.3.17: Tower Performance Suite

Figure 8.3.18: Logan Arts Center Fabrication Shop

Figure 8.3.19: Logan Arts Center Recital Hall

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8.4 McColl Center for Visual Art

Figure 8.4.01: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior

PROJECT CREDITS Client: McColl Center for Visual Art Architect: FMK Architects Location: Charlotte, NC Architectural Website: http://www.fmkarchitects.com/home/

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Section 8.0 Appendix

PROJECT DATA • 30,000 SF Renovation • 9 Artist Studios • 5,000 SF Gallery Space • Community Engagement through innovation PROJECT BRIEF Originally built in 1926 the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church has been a staple to the Uptown Charlotte up until the 1950 when it suffered a decline in membership post-war. Eventually the building was abandoned and it wasn’t until 1999 that the building was re purposed. However, since opening it’s doors the McColl Center for visual arts has become a nationally acclaimed contemporary art center dedicated to connecting art and artist with the community. It currently houses 9 artist studios and a flexible gallery space, over 5,000 sq ft. , the purpose to offer the public an opportunity to explore the exhibit through various workshops. PROGRAMATIC COMPARISON This Case Study is relatable to the Innovative Arts Center for its adaptive reuse of the original church structure. It had been re-imagined to house a newly formed program for artist residents. The primary design objective was to maximize on the flexible studio space without destroying the historic shell.

Figure 8.4.02: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

EXTERIOR CONDITIONS

Figure 8.4.03: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior

Figure 8.4.05: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior

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Figure 8.4.04: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior


Section 8.0 Appendix

INTERIOR ATMOSPHERE

Figure 8.4.06: McColl Art Center for Visual Art Interior Circulation

Figure 8.4.07: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior

Figure 8.4.08: McColl Art Center for Visual Art, Exterior

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8.5 ARTECHOUSE

Figure 8.5.01 ARTECHOUSE

PROJECT CREDITS Client: ARTECHOUSE Architect: ARTECHOUSE Location: Washignton, D.C. Architectural Website: https://artechouse.com/ PROJECT DATA • Immersive and Interactive Art Instillation • Technology rich atmosphere • Promotes the usage of multiple sense • Pushes the idea of Innovation PROJECT BRIEF Even though this Case Study is actually an art Gallery and not a building it still plays a valuable role in the program because of its atmospheric qualities and ability to captivate the imagination of the audience with interactive technological artworks. This engagement with the audience will benefit the innovative arts center to create an experience that immerses the audience into art. 76


Section 8.0 Appendix

Figure 8.5.02 ARTECHOUSE

Figure 8.5.03 ARTECHOUSE

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8.6 Artist Workshops ATMOSPHERIC DESCRIPTION The majority of these spaces will be incorporated into the renovation of Thompson Hall, creating a strong central hub in which emphasizes the creative process. The spaces are meant to be open and flexible to adjust to the variety of artistic interpretations. Another key element is the priority to link these spaces to the rest of the stages around the program in order to enhance the idea of collaboration between different artist minds. Art Studios/ Workshops 1,500 sq. ft. These spaces will be used to display artworks and shall be flexible with a strong connection to other public spaces. This becomes a stage where local, visiting artist, or k-state’s private collection can be showcased to the city of Manhattan, public access is important. Artist Residency 6,000 sq. ft. The Innovative Arts Center will offer living spaces that overlook the studio workshops, in order to create a dialogue between the artist residents, students, and community. It will also offer a Maestro program in which students can learn the skill set of an artist to create art. Dance Studio 1,500 sq. ft. These studios include large and small studios with high ceilings. Dancers need spaces that are well ventilated, daylit, and silent. (portion of total storage needed) Music Studio/ Practice Rooms 1,000 sq. ft. These are rooms in which people learn and record musical instruments or engage in the production and engineering of music. The spaces shall also be acoustically sound and should incorporate technological equipment for practice or production purposes. Recording Rooms 500 sq. ft. This room shall be adjacent to the music studio and will contain all the vital equipment needed to professionally record or craft music. Post Production Rooms 1,000 sq. ft. Typical computer lab with adequate computers capable of running the necessary post-production tasks. These labs shall vary in sizes depending on the usages. Smaller labs will hold at least 4 computers with a projector and cabinet storage while larger rooms shall hold 10 computers with dual projectors, surround sound, VR setup and cabinet spacing. Faculty Arts Office 1,000 sq. ft. Typical office spaces for faculty, these spaces shall be near the art studio/workshop to facilitate interactions between students and faculty. They should be design to accommodate one to three people. TOTAL ARTIST WORKSHOP SQ. FT.

78

24,300

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Section 1.0 Program Introduction

Figure 3.1.01: Artist Workshop, Logan Arts Center

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

8.7 Exhibition Spaces ATMOSPHERIC DESCRIPTION The exhibition spaces of the program deal with creating an open space which offers the visual arts to be put on display. The goal is to keep a strong connection to the Artist Workshops as a way to encourage the collaboration between artist and the audience. Exhibition/ Gallery Space 3,000 sq. ft. These spaces will be used to display artworks and shall be flexible with a strong connection to other public spaces. This becomes a stage where local, visiting artist, or k-state’s private collection can be showcased to the city of Manhattan, public access is important. Rooftop Terrace 2,000 sq. ft. Exterior Rooftop Terrace that offers the audience an opportunity to gather outside, offer student a pocket to relax, and can double as an exterior gallery spaces for larger exhibits, fully flexible function. TOTAL EXHIBITION SPACES SQ. FT.

Figure 3.2.01: Lenfest Center for the Arts, Renzo Piano

80

5,300 SQ. FT.


Section 1.0 Program Introduction

8.8 Performance Hall ATMOSPHERIC DESCRIPTION The Performance Hall portion of the program deals critically with the design of a more intimate stage. The goal of this is to create a more immersive experience for the audience and the artist, most of the spaces will be used to highlight the performing arts. Another key element to these spaces is the ability to stimulate more than a visual reaction, through methods of design the goal is to create these spaces around the multi-modal attributes of perception. Activating more than a single sense is key to achieving the immersive experience. Recital Hall 3,000 sq. ft. The recital hall is a place for musical performances by a soloist or a small group of performers. The seating can be either fixed or movable, but must accommodate for the minimum of 500 people. Experience Lab 2,000 sq. ft. Multi-art center with plug and play program. Spaces for new technology, visual and performance art, and unprecedented control over the artist’s needs. Reflective Theater 2,000 sq. ft. Smaller stage allowing for more intimate audience engagement through improved theater or dance recitals. Lobby/ Pre-Function 2,500 sq. ft. This is a space that includes common space outside of the recital hall - allowing guest to register with a receptionist and walk about freely and comfortably. This space is ideal for intermissions, cocktail parties, and other social gatherings. The pre-function area must include adequate space for banquet tables and exhibit booths for events and merchandise sales. Theater Control Room 1,000 sq. ft. This room shall be adjacent to the recital hall and will contain all the vital equipment needed to professionally. Dressing Rooms 1,000 sq ft. Dressing rooms shall be located adjacent of the Recital Hall creating less interference in the backstage movement of scenery and actors. The size is mainly dependent on the number of actors in the show. TOTAL PERFORMANCE HALL SQ. FT.

12,300 SQ. FT.

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Innovative Arts Center | Architectural Thesis Portfolio

8.9 Support Spaces ATMOSPHERIC DESCRIPTION The Support Spaces will focus on housing the necessary mechanical systems needed to operate the facility. While also including other necessary support functions such as circulation. Mechanical Room 8,000 sq. ft. Emergency Generator 1,000 sq. ft. Electrical Service Room

800 sq. ft.

Server Room

800 sq. ft.

General Storage 1,000 sq. ft. Custodial Closet TOTAL SUPPORT SPACES SQ. FT.

Figure 3.4.01: Georgia Tech School of Architecture

82

24,300 SQ. FT.


Section 1.0 Program Introduction

8.10 Sculpture Park ATMOSPHERIC DESCRIPTION In the final portion of the program the focus is creating a stage for sculptural art. While also engaging the current landscape of the site, nestled in the heart of the arts district, in order to create a stronger connection with not only the college but the community of Manhattan, KS. With a future goal of creating a green link to the City of Manhattan Park. Sculpture Garden 40,000 sq. ft. The Sculpture Garden should primarily afford connection throughout the Art’s District of the campus. It is among the most important of programmatic pieces as it brings the art to the people, as opposed to people having to seek out the art, and it can also begin to help direct people into the new and existing gallery spaces in the Forum and the Mariana Kistler Beach Museum. Benches should be located for extended viewing of the sculptures. Shelters may also be added in the forms of pavilions if desired. Amphitheater 5,000 sq. ft. Gallery Plaza 5,000 sq. ft. Landscape Elements The Sculpture and arts Garden shall also provide additional landscape elements such as paved walking paths, retaining wall adjacent to Anderson Ave, campus entrance off of Anderson Ave, significant campus trees, bicycle racks, Parking lot south of the Beach Museum.

TOTAL PERFORMANCE HALL SQ. FT.

50,000

SQ. FT.

Figure 3.5.01: Exterior Nasher Sculpture Center

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8.11 Image Credits The All figures are credited to the author unless otherwise noted below. I would like to thank all of the individuals and organizations that gave me permission to reproduce material for this book. I have made every effort to properly acknowledge all copyright holders. Section 1.1 | Introduction ARTECHOUSE, Hakanai, Photograph Retrieved From https://artechouse. com/?exhibition=hakanai Section 2.0 | Thesis Statement https://www.creativebloq.com/photography/10-ways-improve-your-photography-21514301 Section 8.0 | Appendix | Logan Arts Center Fig. 8.3.01: Tom Rositier , Logan Arts Center Aerial View, Photograph Retrieved from https://www.archdaily. com/296212/logan-center-for-the-arts-university-of-chicago-tod-williams-billie-tsien-associates 02: Tom Rositier , Sunset of Logan Arts Center, Photograph Retrieved from https://www.archdaily. com/296212/logan-center-for-the-arts-university-of-chicago-tod-williams-billie-tsien-associates 03: TWBT Architects, Logan Arts Center Site Plan, retrieved from http://twbta.com/work/reva-and- david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts 04: TWBT Architects, Logan Arts Center Floor Plan, retrieved from http://twbta.com/work/reva- and-david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts 05: Ibid, 06: Ibid, 07: Ibid, 08: Ibid, Section of Logan Arts Center, Diagram retrieved from http://twbta.com/work/reva-and- david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts 09 Tom Rositier , Exterior Plaza, Photograph Retrieved from https://www.archdaily.com/296212/l ogan-center-for-the-arts-university-of-chicago-tod-williams-billie-tsien-associates 10 Ibid, Exterior Tower, “” 11 Ibid, Logan Arts Center South Entrance, “” 12 TWBT Architects, Logan Arts Center Green Roof and Plaza Interaction, retrieved from http:// twbta.com/work/reva-and-david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts 13 Ibid, Logan Arts Center South Entrance 14 Ibid, Artist Workshop 15 Tom Rositier , Black Theater Box, Photograph Retrieved from https://www.archdaily. com/296212/logan-center-for-the-arts-university-of-chicago-tod-williams-billie-tsien-associates 16 Ibid, Logan Arts Center Artist Classroom, “” 17 Ibid, Tower Performance Suite, “” 18 Ibid, Logan Arts Center Fabrication Shop, “” 19 TWBT Architects, Logan Arts Center Recital Hall, retrieved from http://twbta.com/work/reva-


and-david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts | McColl Arts Center Precedent Fig.8.4.01 FMK Architects, McColl Arts Center for Visual Arts. Photograph retrieved from http://www. fmkarchitects.com/home/fmk_architects-portfolio.php?project_id=4 02 Ibid, “” 03 McColl Center for Visual Art, McCall Art Center for Visual Arts Main Entrance, http://twbta. com/work/reva-and-david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts 04 Ibid, McColl Art Center for Visual Art Exterior Drop-Off, “” 05 Ibid, McColl Art Center for Visual Art Exterior,”” 06 Ibid, McColl Art Center for Visual Art Interior Circulation, “” 07 FMK Architects, Artist Residency Photograph retrieved from http://www.fmkarchitects.com/ home/fmk_architects-portfolio.php?project_id=4 08 Ibid. Art Gallery Space, “” | ARTECHOUSE Precedent Fig.5.5.01 Williams Rawn Associates, 62 Center for Theater and Dance Sectional Diagram, Photograph 01 ARTECHOUSE, Hakanai, Photograph Retrieved From https://artechouse. com/?exhibition=hakanai 02 Ibid, ““ | Program Components and Space Lists Fig.8.6.01:z Manchester School of Architecture, Gallery Space, retrieved from https://fcbstudios.com/work/ view/manchester-school-of-art Fig.8.7.01: Tod Williams, Logan Center for the Arts Workshop, Photograph retrieved from http://twbta.com/ work/reva-and-david-logan-center-for-creative-and-performing-arts Fig.8.8.01: Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Lenfest Center for the Arts. Retrieved from http://www.rpbw. com/project/lenfest-center-for-the-arts Fig.8.9.01: Georgia Tech, Georgia Tech School of Architecture. Photograph retrieved from https://arch. gatech.edu Fig.8.10.01: Nasher Sculpture Center, Exterior Nasher Sculpture Center. Photograph retrieved from http:// www.dallasartsdistrict.org/visual-arts/nasher-sculpture-center/

Profile for Eddie Garcia

Architectural Thesis_Innovative Arts Center  

Kansas State University_Spring 2018

Architectural Thesis_Innovative Arts Center  

Kansas State University_Spring 2018

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