Page 1

Emily Lin M.Arch Selective Works 2006 - 2010


KHH MARINE AND POP CENTRE

Scale: XL • Program: Theatre + Park + Marina+ Museum • Location: Kaohsiung City, TW • Duration: 3 Weeks KAOHSIUNG MARINE CULTURE AND POP MUSIC CENTER INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION | MAY, 2010 Credits: Emily Lin + Scott Ling + Danny Tseng Loh Architects

In order to complete a submission package for phase-one of this majour international design competition, a local Toronto architect hired a team of three to assist in the development of a digital model, as well as the presentation design drawings, renderings, and diagrams. The team worked together to transform rough-plan sketches and verbal directions from the architect into a design that linked all the required programmatic elements of the competition into a chain of formally expressive waterfront structures. Despite a daughting deadline, within just three weeks the team was able to complete this design as well as deliver the presentation drawings, diagrams, and renderings required for the architects submission package.


REFERENCE SKETCHES TO TRANSFORM INTO DESIGN


Helipad Outdoor Performance Area Small Performance Halls Pop Music Exhibit Area - Hall of Fame Tower Connection Structure and Viewing Stand Amphitheatre

5

Pop Music Industry Incubation Center

A

A

Large Performance Hall 4

3

1

Scenic Landmark Marine Culture Exhibit Center Solar Energy Conversion System

100m

2

Harbour Wharf and Passenger Service Center

Yacht Wharf - Service Area Recessed within Podium

Administration Area Music and Marine Culture Commercial Area

SITE GROUND FLOOR PLAN WITH COMPETITION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS


VIEW 1 - GATHERING PLAZA

g oin w tg Vie Ouwer ing To ome to Incruis C iew ur r V bo we ar Tover H o

6

Views into Harbour

SITE VIEW STRATEGY DIAGRAM

VIEW 3 - EAST PROMENADE

VIEW 4 - EAST PROMENADE


SECTION A:A - LARGE PERFORM MANCE HALL

7

SITE LANDSCAPE INTEGRATION STRATEGY DIAGRAM

VIEW 2 - SEASHORE RD. GREEN WALL

VIEW 5 - WEST PROMENADE


PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS PR Large Performance Hall (A) La Pop Po Music Industry Inc Incubation Center (E) Po Pop Music Exhibit Area (D) - Hall of Fame Tower Sm Small Performance Halls (B) Ou Outdoor Performance Area (C) Sce Scenic Landmark (J) Ma Marine Culture Exhibit Center (F) Ha Harbour Wharf and Passenger Se Service Center (G) Mu Music and Marine Culture Co Commercial Area (H) L Am Aministration Area (I) 9 So Solar Energy Conversion System (N) Yac Yacht Wharf (M) (service area recessed within podium) Co Connecting Structure (K) an and View Stand AmphitheatreHelipad (L) Sit Site Parking (O)

E

D

B

8 A

K

C M I

J

H

O

G

VIEW 4 - EAST PROMENADE F

O

O

N

O

VIEW 3 - EAST PROMENADE

VIEW 6 - OBSERVATION TOWER

VIEW 8 - CONNECTING STRUCTURE AND AMPHITHEATRE

VIEW 2 - SEASHORE RD. GREEN WALL

VIEW 7 - OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE SPACE

VIEW 9 - OUTDOOR CONCERT


BLUE TORONTO

Scale: XL • Program: Housing + Recreation + Ecology • Location: Toronto, Ont • Duration: 12 Weeks Master of Architecture Thesis Credits: Emily Lin Advisor: Mason White “Toronto is a port city that turned it’s back from its own water.”

NINA-MARIE LISTER for Hydro City Symposium Associate Professor of Urban + Regional Planning at Ryerson University

Toronto’s historical economic importance was based in its connection to the rural hinterland, specifically in the importing of goods and their dispersal to hinterland. This relationship necessitated a railway emphasis and not a maritime emphasis in terms of freight transportation. Pull of manufacturing away from waterfront by late 1890s into suburbs such as New Toronto and Leaside. Recently, due to the growing concerns regarding the sustainability of automobile dependent suburban living, Toronto finally turned its’ attention back to the harbourfront as a key area in the densification of a growing downtown core. A surge of landscape development proposals, have begun to line the waterfront’s shoreline. Within the context of recent proposals and the long history of shoreline manipulation, my project explores the possibility of urban development through the creation of islands in Toronto’s Harbour. Through the analysis of aviation and nautical paths, my research outlines a total of 563,362 acre of space in the inner harbour area. Through empirical observation, I also identified the existing government operated Toronto ferries as an underused transportation system that's itching to be exploited. The main thrust of vision of a land-water integration utilizes the ferry system as the major mode of transportation to create car-free urbanism within the inner harbour.


250 YEARS OVERLOOK OF SHORELINE MANIPULATION As city that has never mastered its harbour resource, Toronto has been investing hefty energy on manipulating its waterfront to satisfy its land thirst. Utilizes technologies such as clean fill, dredging and garbage fill, Toronto has added a total of 8.3 km2 of land mass into its inner harbour, with no gain in quality land-water interface. At the current rate of land-growth, combined with the disinterest in creating a vision of land-water integration, it is not improbable to predict Toronto might lose its entire inner harbour in the not-so-distant future.

1851

1818

1889 reet

reet

Line representing the total coast line

Circle representing the total area of the harbourfront (roughly lands south of front street)

1912 reet

t St Fron

t St Fron

+2.7 km

+7.8 km

0 km2

+2.2 km2

-0.6 km2

1970 reet

1981 reet

t St Fron

t St Fron

-2.7 km

(Increase in Harbourfront Area)

1965

reet

t St Fron

1995 reet

t St Fron

reet

t St Fron

t St Fron

-1.2 km

+5.0 km

+16.7 km

+4.5 km

+0.7 km 2

+1.1 km 2

+0.3 km 2

+0.4 km 2

100 YEARS OVERLOOK OF DEVELOPMENTAL HISTORY

Portlands 1918

Wards Island Carfree Neighborhood 2009

Simcoe Wave Deck 2009

Toronto Harbour 1919

Toronto Harbourfront 2009

Queensquay Future Masterplan

Island FirestaĆ&#x;on RelocaĆ&#x;on circa 1965

Toronto Island Park 2009

Portlands Future Masterplan


1918

1921 reet

1931 reet

t St Fron

1954 reet

t St Fron

reet

t St Fron

t St Fron

+4.1 km

-4.1 km

-2.4 km

-7.7 km

+2.8 km 2

+0.5 km 2

+1.0 km 2

+1.0 km 2

2050

2050

2009

et t Stre Fron

reet

reet

t St Fron

t St Fron

+5.8 km

0

+0.0 km 2

1.0

2.0 km

0

1.0

2.0 km

INNER HARBOUR DEVELOPMENTAL OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS Within the context of recent proposals and the long history of shoreline manipulation, my project explores the possibility of urban development through the creation of islands in Toronto’s Harbour. Through the analysis of aviation and nautical paths, my research outlines a total of 563,362 acre of space in the inner harbour area. Through empirical observation, I also identified the existing government operated Toronto ferries as an underused transportation system that's itching to be exploited. The main thrust of vision of a landwater integration utilizes the ferry system as the major mode of transportation to create car-free urbanism within the inner harbour.

LAKE AKE TA TTANK ANKER AN N P PASSG E

CTED TED D BOA OAT SIZE

0

100

8 ME METTER ER RD DEPTH DEPTH DEP TH FER FE ERRY ROU ROUTE RO OUTE OU TEE

FER ERRY Y WA

CARGO CAR O RO ROUTE

CARGO CA RGO OW

A AY A AY

SMALL ALL BO BOAT ROUTE ROU U

MALL AL B BO O

AVI A VIATION ROUTEE

BOATING PROH PROHIBITED P PR OHIBITED OHIBIT HIBITE HIBITED TED ED D ZONE ON ON

200

300

400

500m

TER WAY TACL CLE FREE ZONE ON NE


HYDROLOGY AND ISLANDS FORMATION

AIRPORT RP P

R RE RES ESI SID SIDEN ENT ENT NTIA NTIAL RESIDENTIAL

RECRE R E RECREATION/EDUCATION/ INFRAS INFR FRAS RUCTU RUC INFRASTRUCTURE

CUTS

0

100

200

300

400

500m

PARKS OR BEACHES DEVELOPABLE ZONES

5 mins walk

SOFT EDGE HARD EDGE

0

100

200

300

400

500m

0

100

200

300

400

500m


PRECEDENCE STUDY: IJBURG, AMSTERDAM Higher Education

CBD

Amusement Park

Port of Entry

Low Rise

Aquarium

Major Hospital

Mid Rise

Swim Zones

Government

Major Shopping

Exhibition Hall

Heritage Site

Industrial Pier

Recreational Pier

Concert Venue

Airport

Green House

Beach

Marina

Arena

VIEW TERMINISTS


ISLAND URBANISM

URBAN DENSITY REFRENCES Walkable City Density Studies

Urban Walkable Walkable City

University Campus

Institutional

Urban Park

Old Montreal FAR: 3

University of British Columbia FAR: 1.2

NYC FAR: 2

Toronto Centre Island FAR: 0.1 Toronto Centre Island

Roosevelt Island Density

Island Density

FAR: 0.1

FAR: 1 FAR: 2

FAR: 0.1

FAR: 2

FAR: 2 FAR: 1 FAR: 1.2

FAR: 1


i

2 +2 = 4

$

H2O

e = mc²

i $

$

H2 H2O

Community Centre

Police Station

Fire Station

High Bridge

i

Medium Bridge

Low Bridge

Wind d Power

e = mc²

2 +2 = 4

Sewage g Treatment

Wading Zone

Playground

Library

Education Centre

Community College

High School

Elementary School

Child Care

Tennis

Basketball

Doctor’s Office

Pharmacy

Water Ambulance

Wards/Rehab Centre

Hospital

Senior Care

$

Change Rooms

Park

Beach

Other Offices

Post Office

Bank

Shops

Restaruants

Swim Zone

Ice Hocky

Cycling

Paddle/ Canoe Only

Marina

Helicopter Pad

Ferry Dock

Airport


A B

D

B

A

F

G D

D

b’

b

G

C

D

D

a’

a

E

G

C C

D D

B

d’

C

G

D

c

c’ E

d E

A

WETLAND COMMUNITY SEWAGE TREATMENTAND WIND POWER Energy Output H2O

i

Energy Distribution Sewage Energy Output Energy Distribution Treatment Pond Sewage

Fresh Treatment Water Pond Fresh Water

Hot Water Output Hot winter Water Output *prevent freezing *prevent winter freezing


B

FERRY DOCK

Access Routes

Form Manipulation

TY

CI

TY

CI

Access Routes

C

Views

COMMUNITY CENTRE

Roof Plaza

Utilization Scenarios

Raised Corners Summer Sun Bathing

Summer Night Romance

Throughfare

Winter Tree Market

Special Event

Material Finish Possibilities

Wood

D

Grass

E

Bounce 1 (rubber)

Bounce 2 (cork)

F

BRIDGE HEIGHT CONTROLLED WATER ACCESS


G MOTOR BOAT RESTRICTED ZONE

Summer Recreation

VIEW TOWARDS CITY

Winter Recreation


Form Origin: Courtyard

Form Manipulation Views

Form Origin: Adjacent Couryards

Form Manipulation Views

Form Origin: Row Housing

Form Manipulation Views

Form Origin: Single Family Housing

Form Manipulation Views

Form Origin: Row Housing

Form Manipulation Views

TYPE 1: EXCLUSIVE AQUA-COURTYARD MULTI-FAMILY UNITS

TYPE 2: MULTI-FAMILY UNITS

TYPE 3: EDGE MULTI-FAMILY ROW HOUSING

TYPE 4: EDGE SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING

TYPE 5: SINGLE-FAMILY EXCLUSIVE EDGE-HOUSING

$

Form Origin: Row Housing

TYPE 6: ISLAND BOULEVARD COMMERCIAL

Form Manipulation Views


SECTION a - a’ Island Boulevard

SECTION b - b’ Secondary Commercial

SECTION c - c’ Residential

SECTION d- d’ Hospital


HYDROLOGY EXPERIMENT Duration: 1 second

Duration: 5 Seconds

Duration: 10 Seconds


1:500 MODEL


TURKEY

GREECE

Androoos

Tinos Tin

Kea ea

Mykonos Myko y s Syross

Kyt yythnos t

Do Donousa SSerif Seri rifos f Paros oss Anndiiiparos And An paaros pparos Sifno nos no

KKim im molo molos m olo Milo M ilo los

0

10

20

30

40

50 km

Naxooos Koufonisi KKou ooufon ufoon uufon Sch Sc chi hhinoussa i ouss s Am Am Amorgos IIraklia rrak ak Ioss

SSik ikinos ik Folegandros Foleg gandd Sant San Santo Sa annttori orini

Anafi

WASTED LANDSCAPES Scale: XXL • Program: Recreation + Infrastructure • Location: Cyclades, Greece • Duration: 12 Weeks Credits: Emily Lin + Scott Ling Advisor: Mason White A Greek archipelago in the Aegean Sea, the Cyclades’ recently improved transportation has given rise to a substantial boost in popularity in tourism. While this boost has improved the islands’ economy, the visitors are contributing to a growing wastemanagement crisis as the islands do not have the infrastructure to safely dispose of the waste generated by the municipality and the frequent visiting cruise ships. As a result, the prevailing illegal costal dumping threatens to destroy the eco system and the natural beauty of the islands. It is the goal of this project to create a waste management facility in the Cyclades that explores the port as a site for infrastructure and tourism. This proposal combines waste-to-energy technologies and tourist attractions at the scale of a cruise-port and beach landscape. The island of Santorini is chosen as the site due to its’ touristic popularity and unique geographical advantages. In the shallow waters of its’ caldera, a waste-management facility designed just below the surface supports a beach landscape with views of the breathtaking Santorini scenery above. Within the landscape small zones are designed to utilize heat recovery systems during the winter months to create micro-climate areas that will extend the islands’ tourist season to the full year, thus ensures the future strength of Cyclades tourism and the local economy.


ISLAND WASTE TYPES Using Santorini as an example, the approximate waste produced per household is 8,000 tons/year in 2004. 60% of the waste is produced during the tourist season. This number is expected to increase with the growth of tourism on the island to almost 12,000 tons/year in 2005. The composition of waste is as follows. Organic 36%, paper 13%, agricultural 13%, plastics 9%, sludge 7%, other 7%, glass 4%, metals 3%, fuel/oil residues 3%, grid riddlings 3%, and aluminum 2%2. 2. School of Planning, University of CincinnaƟ. Santorini: Sustainable Regional Development Study: Phase A - Analysis. Santorini: The Thera FoundaƟon, 2004.

DomesƟc

Animal

Sea Vessel

ConstrucƟon

Agricultural

Sewage


CURRENT CYCLADES WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Currently, illegal dumping on quiet shores and the country side is the most popular way to deal with waste. Only unsanitary landfills are present on the islands, they are unsightly for tourists and often catch fire. A recycling program3 is currently implemented on some islands. It utilizes separation at source strategy, then ships the recyclables to mainland and metals to Syros for the shipyard. According to the officials, this system is inefficient and costly. The citizens on the islands lack correct recycling knowledge and the local government has little incentive to implement local waste treatment facility since the management costs exceed available funds4.

Illegal Dumping

Unsanitary Landfill and Spontaneous Firing Scale Comparison of PsyƩalia to Santorini: PsyƩalia is Europe’s biggest water treatment plant.

Legal Shipping to Athens

Andros

TO PIRAEUS (~80km)

Kea

Serifos

Sifnos Iraklia

Kimolos Ios

Milos Folegandros

Anafi 0

10

20

30

40

50 km

“As the tourism is the main economic activity, the rational waste management (reflected in the cleanliness of coasts and streets) constitutes the main parameter that the tourists take into account for selecting their holiday’s destination. Consequently, local authorities often have to make a relatively greater effort in the field of waste management than local authorities on the mainland, irrespective of the fact that islands usually have to pay more for the same result.” Solid Waste Management in the Greek Islands - A. Karkazi, S. Skoulaxinoy, A. Mavropoulos, E. Fagogeni 3.Ecological Recycling Society . Recycling Project in Schools of Paros. 10 02 2009 <http://www.parosnature.com/index-recycling.html>. 4. Karkazi, A., A. Mavropoulos and E. Fagogeni. Solid Waste Management in The Greek Islands. Athens: EPEM S.A. Department of Solid & Hazardous Waste Management, 2003.


CRUISE SEASONALITY AND CURRENT CRUISE WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Oceanic cruise vessels, carrying massive quantities of waste, frequently visit Mykonos and Santorini -- the only two stops for the size type in the Cyclades. Cruise tourism has become the highest growth component of the tourism industry in Cyclades. For example, in 2002, 375,000 tourists arrived on Santorini via cruise ships . This represents a remarkable 35% increase from the previous year. This increase follows increases for the previous three years before that5. As the size and range of the cruise vessels increase, the less deviation in visits between the seasons occurs. This is because the larger ships usually adventure to destinations in the warmer climates surrounding the East Mediterranean and Africa during winters, while some makes stops in Cyclades. By offering waste management services to vessels as well as providing attractions to the winter cruise tourists, the Cyclades could entice these southern cruises to the islands on a more consistent year round basis, thus balancing the seasonal fluctuations. While some cruise vessels have committed to safely disposing waste at their port of call, many others simply purge their waste at sea while at an ‘acceptable’ distance off-shore. Not only unsightly, this dumping has assisted to the developement of ‘garbage soup’ areas where large quantities of waste have devistated marine cultures. 5. School of Planning, University of Cincinnati. Santorini: Sustainable Regional Development Study: Phase A - Analysis. Santorini: The Thera Foundation, 2004.

Daily Waste Production by a 3000-People Cruise Ship: Gray Water: 255,000 Gallons Black Water: 30,000 Gallons Bilge Water: 8 Metric Tonne Garbage 2: Tonne DATA SOURCE - DATA SOURCE - U.S. Environmental ProtecƟon Agency Oceans and Coastal ProtecƟon Division. "Cruise Ship Discharge Assessment Report." 2008.

‘Garage Soup’

Coastal Garbage Soup

Impact

“Brown Water” Discharge


OUR GOAL IS TO PROVIDE AN INCENTIVE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOCAL WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES IN THE CYCLADES. We propose a system that utilizes waste-to-energy technologies in the design of waste-management micro-climate cruise attraction within the Archipelago. Since ports are the point of interface between the cruise vessel and the island, they will be the site to host the waste management facilities. The infrastructural under-belly of these projects will facilitate the safe disposal of waste generated by the islands and cruise-ships visiting them. Meanwhile, a programmed landscape topping will strategically exploit the heat recovered from the management process in order to create a year-round outdoor destination for tourists and locals alike, thus balancing the seasonal fluctuation problem that greatly challenges the local waste management programs and tourist industry.

CRUISE PORT TYPES -CONCRETE PERIMETER WALL WITH FILL

-CONTOUR LINES -LAND

-CONTOUR LINES

-NATURAL SHORE-LINE

-NATURAL SHORE-LINE -BASIN

-ANCHORED VESSEL

-MOORING EDGE

-TRANSPORT VESSEL

-CONVENTIONAL FERRY

Mykonos - Basin Forming

Santorini - Anchoring Cove

CRUISE ADVENTURE TYPES

AEGEAN / ADRIATIC High Season: 83% Low Season: 17% Sample Route:

MEDITERRANEAN High Season: 62% Low Season: 38% Sample Route:

OCEANIC High Season: 0% Low Season: 100% Sample Route:

- Piraeus - Mykonos - Ephessos - Patmos - Rhodes - Crete - Santorini - Piraeus

- Eygpt (3) - Lebanon (1) - Syria (3) - Turkey (5) - Russia (1) - Ukraine (2) - Bulgaria (1) - Greece (4 - Mykonos / Santorini)

- Ft. Lauderdale, USA (1) - Portugal (1) - Turkey (1) - Spain (3) - CroaĆ&#x;a (1) - France (1) - Monaco (1) - Italy (2) - Malta (1) - Greece (10 - Mykonos / Santorini)


CYCLADES NETWORK DIAGRAM

TO VOLOS

TO INSTANBUL

TO IZMIR, CANAKKALE

TO EUPHESUS

PORTS ALL CRUISE TYPES PORTS

TO RHODES, PATMOS, BODRUM, EUPHESUS, SAMOS

Andros

TO ATHENS

CRUISE PORTS Tinos

Kea TO GYTHION, ATHENS, CORITH CANAL

Syros Kythnos

Donousa Naxos

Serifos

TO HYDRA, NAUPLION, ATHENS, DUBROVNIK

Santorini

Paros

AnƟparos Sifnos Amorgos

Ios Milos Folegandros

TO KOTOR

Cruise Ship = 2 tonnes per day per vesselAverage Cruise Length: 7 daysAverage Waste to Purge 14 tonnes

TO BODRUM

Mykonos

Mykonos

Santorini

ISLAND PLUS CRUISE WASTE

0

10

20

30

40

50km

TO ROME, OLYMPIA, NAPLES, CORFU, VALLETTA

LOW SEASON ISLAND WASTE LOW SEASON ISLAND AND CRUISE WASTE HIGH SEASON ISLAND WASTE HIGH SEASON ISLAND AND CRUISE WASTE

CRUISE ROUTES ALL TYPES HIGH SEASON

5+ TRIPS/WEEK

ALL TYPES LOW SEASON

2-4 TRIPS/WEEK

MEDITERRANEAN HIGH SEASON

WEEKLY

MEDITERRANEAN LOW SEASON

MONTHLY

AEGEAN / ADRIATIC TYPES HIGH SEASON

BI-MONTHLY

AEGEAN / ADRIATIC

SEASONAL

TYPES LOW SEASON

CYCLADES TOTAL Santorini Mykonos Paros Syros Naxos Tinos Andros Kea Milos Ios Sifnos Amorgos An paros Serifos Kythnos Folegandros Kimolos

HIGH LOW SEASON SEASON 87,516 53,831 (tonnes)

ANNUAL

22,385 10,494 12,190 11,660 8,374 4,028 3,752 2,788 2,756 1,887 1,802 1,272 975 742 583 445 265

31,118 18,905 20,235 18,901 14,152 6,807 6,341 4,702 4,658 3,189 3,045 2,150 1,648 1,254 985 752 448

8,733 8,411 8,045 7,241 5,778 2,779 2,589 1,924 1,902 1,302 1,243 878 673 512 402 307 183

141,347

CRUISES ANNUAL (HS), (LS) w CRUISE 160, 97 34,716 209, 122 23,539 1,0 20,249 0,0 18,901 0,0 14,152 0,0 6,807 0,0 6,341 0,0 4,702 18,9 5,036 0,0 3,189 6,2 3,157 7,1 2,262 0,0 1,648 0,0 1,254 0,0 985 0,0 752 0,0 448

TO RHODES, ANTALYA, DAYLAN RIVER, BODRUM, KOS

OTHER PORTS


PROPOSED WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES WASTE --> ENERGY HEAT

HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM

METHANE

REFINERY

MICROCLIMATE ZONE

ELECTRICITY

CRUISE

ISLAND

WASTE

HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM

HEAT

ISLAND

INPUT STORAGE TANK

MICROCLIMATE ZONE CRUISE BIO-FUEL

SUNLIGHT

ANAEROBIC DIGESTER

EXTRACTED OIL

ALGAE POND

CO 2

ISLAND BIO-REFINERY

PHOSPHATE

WATER TREATMENT

WATER

HEAT

HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM

MICROCLIMATE ZONE

PORT FACILITIES

FERTILIZER

AGRICULTURAL USE

LANDFILL

RECLAIMED LAND PROJECTS

LEGEND PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURAL PUBLIC / INFRASTRUCTURAL INTERACTION

WASTE MANAGEMENT PROCESS

WASTE TO ENERGY: ELECTRICITY POTENTIAL Currently, the Cyclades’ waste totals could generate enough methane to refine electricity for 1,590 hotels during the high season and 530 during the low season.

1 Waste Water Treater

Refrigerators 43 small 1 industry 1 deep freezer

Lights 110 Indoor 30 Outdoor

7.8kWh

8kWh

15 Insect Zappers

1 Pressure Pump

18kWh

1.5kWh

469 kWh = Daily Electrical Need

55 Air Condioners

36kWh

A Mid-size 40 Room Cycladic Hotel

400kWh

Other Appliances

4.4kWh

865 kWh = Electricity from Methane for every Tonne of Waste

1,590 = Hotels can be powered from waste during high season 530 = Hotels can be powered from waste during low season DATA SOURCE - G. Mihalakakou, B. P. (2002). ApplicaƟon of renewable energy sources in the Greek islands of the South Aegean Sea. Renewable Energy CALCULATION BASED ON: A. Karkazi, S. Skoulaxinoy, A. Mavropoulos, E. Fagogeni. Solid Waste Management in The Greek Islands. Athens: EPEM S.A. Department of Solid & Hazardous Waste Management, 2003. Åsa Davidsson, Björn Appelqvist, MarƟn Hallmer. "Anaerobic digesƟon potenƟal of urban organic waste: a case study in Malmö." Waste Management & Research (2007): 162–169. Joon Pyo Lee,Jin Suk Lee, and Soon Chul Park. "Two-Phase MethanizaƟon in Pilot Scale." Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (1999): 585-593.


CONCEPT DIAGRAM We propose to combine waste-to-energy technologies and tourist attractions at the scale of a cruise-port and beach landscape. The island of Santorini is chosen as the site due to its’ touristic popularity and unique geographical advantages. In the shallow waters of its’ caldera, a waste-management facility designed just below the surface supports a beach landscape with views of the breathtaking Santorini scenery above. Within the landscape small zones are designed to utilize heat recovery systems during the winter months to create microclimate areas that will extend the islands’ tourist season to the full year, thus ensures the future strength of Cyclades tourism and the local economy.

DO NOT ENTER

WASTE MANAGEMENT: HEAT RECOVERY POTENTIAL It requires 1 Kilo-calorie of energy to heat 1 litre of water by 1 °C. Based on the projected 2011 waste production in the Cyclades6 , If a Two-Phase Methanization system7 is utilized, the potential of heat recovery from anaerobic digesters8 and sanitary incinerators9 is 1,991,360 kwh (1,712,670,465 Kilo-calorie) -- enough to heat 358,444,801 litres of water from 4°C to 24°C! This heat can be collected to create a microclimate zone adjacent to the waste management factory that will be a destination for tourists and locals alike all year round. CRUISE WASTE ISLAND

INPUT STORAGE TANK

ANAEROBIC DIGESTER

METHANE

REFINERY HEAT

HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM

MICROCLIMATE ZONE

6. A. Karkazi, S. Skoulaxinoy, A. Mavropoulos, E. Fagogeni. Solid Waste Management in The Greek Islands. Athens: EPEM S.A. Department of Solid & Hazardous Waste Management, 2003. 7. Joon Pyo Lee, Jin Suk Lee, Soon ChulL Park. "Two-Phase MethanizaƟon in Pilot Scale." Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (1999): 585-593. 8. Zafar, Salman. Anaerobic DigesƟon of Biomass . 25 08 2008. 02 03 2009 <hƩp://www.alternaƟve-energy-news.info/anaerobic-digesƟon-biomass/>. 9. Hampshire County Council Waste & Resource Management Team. "An IntroducƟon to Household Waste Management: Energy-from-waste incineraƟon." Project Integra. 27 03 2009 <hƩp://www.integra.org.uk/facts/extrafacts/energyinc.html>.


SANTORINI - CYCLADES WASTE TREATMENT HUB Santorini is a site charged with geological significance. The island is a fractured edge of a formerly complete volcano crater. In the middle of the sunken zone is a new island composed of metamorphic rock emerging from the volcanic cavity below. This little island is growing, and the water level between it and Santorini grows increasingly shallow -- creating possible danger for large cruise vessels10 but an opportunity for off-shore construction.

TECHNOLOGICAL COMPONENT MICRO-CLIMATE BEACH

WASTE

DOME STRUCTURE

GREENHOUSE DOME

ELECTRICITY HEAT RECOVERY

CO2

FERTILIZER BIOFUEL WATER FACTORY

FLOATING PLATFORM

ALGAE POND

PLATFORM

ALGAE GREENHOUSE CORAL-BREAK

SAND SUPPORT TARPS

REEF STRUCTURE

CABLES

SEA FLOOR

SEA FLOOR


CRUISE PORT - ANALYSIS Santorini does not have a port sufficiently large for cruise ships to dock. Instead, vessels drop anchor off the edge of the caldera, a small fleet called Lantza then transport tourists to the port. Only 8 lantzas are serving this area with the capacity of 88 person each. Once at the port, the tourist can then either walk, ride a donkey, or take the cable car up the caldera to Fira. To further the congestion and confusion, if cruise ship passengers want to go on excursions throughout the island, they must take a transfer boat to Athinios- where the tour buses park. The closest beach is located on the opposite side of the island, currently it can only be reached by land transportation.

5.0km

Donkey Cruise

Lantza

Fira

Athinios

Beach

Cable Car

LAND GROWTH STUDY

10. A year a er Cyprus-based Louis Cruise Lines blamed a faulty map for the grounding and subsequent sinking of Sea Diamond oďŹ&#x20AC; the island of Santorini in April 2007, new evidence from a hydrographic survey has emerged to support the claim. Palo , Melissa Baldwin. Map Found to Be Erroneous in Sea Diamond Case. 19 11 2008. 28 03 2009 <h p://www.cruisecri c.co.uk/news/news.cfm?ID=2943>.

Santorini 1848 0

5km

Santorini 2009


ONE-DAY CRUISE SHIP TOURISM SHIP

NON-EXCURTION ROUTE EXCURSION ROUTE

ABOUT 60 - 70% DISEMBARK

TEN

ABOUT 50%

R

DE

ABOUT 50%

PORT OF FIRA - THE CURRENT MESS

AR

BOATS

PORT OF FIRA

ORGANISED EXCURSIONS

BUS

LE C CAB

Y

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DO

BUS

ATHINIOS

FIRA FOR SHOPPING

SOURCE: School of Planning, University of Cincinna . Santorini; Sustainable Regional Development. Santorini: The Thera Founda on, 2005.

PROPOSAL: A WASTE-TO-ENERGY PORT

11


SITE PLAN Guided by the location of the three waste receptacles, two ports and a restaurant, the facility is divided to three identical zones. Each zone is capable of treating waste independently during low waste season, or work together to treat larger supply of waste during high season. Thus, greater amount of energy would be generated during high season and help offset the elevated energy demand.

N 0

200m

600m

1km


SITE NETWORK DIAGRAM

FARM LAND

ISLAND WASTE TRANSPORT

PORT

FIRA

PROGRAM

MIRCO-CLIMATE BEACH LEGEND RESOURCES

CRUISE

WASTE MANAGEMENT

WASTE HEAT FUEL ELECTRICITY FERTILIZER

PEOPLE TOURISTS ISLANDERS WORKERS


STRUCTURE The proposed structure is derived from the Mega-float technology to resist the impact of waves and frequent earthquakes. The structure has other advantages such as: utilization of the sea area regardless of depth or subsoil condition, easy re-location, and minimal impact on the natural environment. To further the environmental benefit, a system of structural artificial reef is designed to the support the breakwaters and promote marine lives.


TREAMENT PLANT

TREAMENT PLANT S

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WASTED LANDSCAPES IN NORTH AMERICA This proposal is applicable to other areas in the world, for example the Southern Ontario, where 13 million tones of waste is produced annually. About 10 million tonnes of this waste is disposed through landfill or incineration and 4 million tonnes are exported to the U.S., with 90 per cent of it being sent to Michigan landfills. A possible site for a Wasted Landscape is at this area’s most popular destination: The Niagara Falls. Utilization of the described strategies will create a yearlong outdoor destination that extend its’ winter tourism beyond just the casinos.

TREAMENT PLANT

OR ST E

AG

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S

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E

AG

OR Y ST DR

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S

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JAMBALAYA CO-OP

Scale: S + L • Program: Residential + Community Design • Location: New Orleans, LA • Duration: 12 Weeks This project was submitted to two competitions, the “Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 2008-2009 Green Community Design Competition” and the “2009 Urban SOS Open Ideas Competition”. Both required urban, landscape, and architectural design representation, and an essay outlining the core issues to the project. In both cases, Our work was recognized as amongst the top submissions out of 260 and over 300 respectively.

Citation: 2008 - 2009 ASCA Green Community Competition Top Twenty: 2009 AECON Urban SOS Open Ideas Competition Credits: Emily Lin + Scott Ling Advisors: Janett Levitt Sponser: David Lieberman After visiting New Orleans in the fall of 2008, my partner and I found ourselves critical of the rebuilding efforts we observed, including Brad Pitt’s “Make It Right” housing initiative and Tulane University’s two programs: GREENbuild and URBANform. While we agreed these programs were commendable, especially in their commitment to ecologically sustainable housing , we felt there was insufficient emphasis on building sustainable communities. NOLA’s population had been declining since Hurricane Betsy in 1965, and that the city suffered from the same problems plaguing most shrinking cities: Insufficient municipal funds to properly maintain infrastructure, unemployment, abandoned (often contaminated) ex-industrial sites, empty homes and vacant lots peppered within neighbourhoods hindering social networks, are just some of the problems already rooted in New Orleans prior to Katrina. Therefore, in addition to the horrific loss of life and damage brought by Katrina, the Hurricane and resulting flooding also amplified the problems developing in the city for forty-years. In order to inject new life into New Orleans, my partner and I set out to design a project that looked beyond replacing lost homes with privately-subsidized cutting edge ecologically responsible homes, by seeking to address New Orleans’ deeprooted shrinking city problems in order to create socially, economically, and ecologically responsible communities.


October, 2005, New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin expected the city budget to fall from $600 million to $230 million because of the evacuation of residents and the widespread damage from Hurricane Katrina. With as many as 250,000 homes uninhabit-ableand some neighborhoods still lacking basic services, Nagin estimated the city's shattered infrastructure could support 250,000 to 300,000 residents. Four years after Katrina, the population of New Orleans had grown above 300,000 – a number that’s less than 50% of its peak, yet, difficult for its shattered infrastructure to handle. By the year of 2015, the UN predicts NOLA’s population will grow at an annual rate of 0.5%, comparable to a growing city like Toronto. Responded to this re-growth, New Orleans needs smart design proposals that reach beyond simply rebuilding lost homes by seeking to de-centralize infrastructures while creating socially and economically productive communities.

300k

200k

=

$200 Million: Road Repair

Hurricane Katrina

Lake Pontchartrain Causeway Construction

400k

Purification and Pumping Plant Opens

1.4 k

1.2 k

1k

800

6 600

400

100k

200

R River Land Levee C Construction by C City

2010

2005

2000

1990

1980

1970

1960

1950

1940

1930

City Hurricane Levee Construction

1920

1900

1890

inag g City Drainage cctio Construction

1880

1870

1860

Mississippi Levee Construction by City

1850

1840

1830

1820

1810

Mississippi Levee Construction by Landowners

1910

Population

500k

Flood Control Act

Swamp and Overflow Land Act

600k

Orleans Levee District, Board of Levee Comissions

Annual Spending on Infrastructure (2008 USD) 700k

+

$629 Million: I-10 Twin Span Repair

$635 Million: Drainage Sy Syste System yt Repair

$365 Million: Drainage System Repair

$10 Billion: Drainage System Repair

+

Pumping Station Constructed Drain Canals Sub-Grade Drain Canals Natural Drain Waterways

Interstate-10 Twin Spans Constructed Hurricane Betsy Drainage System Repair Damaged Road Repair

+

Mississippi River Flood Lake Pontchartrain Levee Construction

+

Billion USD 11.89 k

0

1893 - New Orleans Drainage System

Pumping Station Constructed Drain Canals Constructed Drain Canals Natural Drain Waterways

THE CHALLENGE Research shows that global warming will lead to increased storms and flooding around the world. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, rendering significant portions of the city vacant. Seeking to help, architects used this vacant land as a testing ground for new approaches to sustainable and ‘affordable’ housing and communities, including Brad Pitt’s “Make It Right” housing initiative and Tulane University’s GREENbuild and URBANform program. While these programs are commendable, during a visit to New Orleans we discovered that most of the Tulane design homes were left un-purchased. What was more alarming was that the houses, which we felt possessed an unfortunate resemblance to the suburban houses common in cold-climates, have been met with hesitation from locals who are not seeking ‘visionary designs’.


The population of New Orleans reached its peak during the 1960s with over 625,000 residents. In 1965 Hurricane Betsy marked the start of a steady population decline, falling to approximately 450,000 prior to Katrina (just over 2/3 of its’ former self ). The decline of the population impacted the economic strength of the city as a greater burden was laid upon each tax-payer to maintain the city’s expensive infrastructural systems. Also, the decline in population left homes abandoned throughout communities, impacting social networks. The economic, population, and social problems that existed prior to Katrina saw an instant magnification of intensity after the storm. The population dwindled to under a mere 250,000, further emptying neighbourhoods and breaking social systems. The federal government was relied upon to repair (and improve) the city’s infrastructure as the tax-base of the city was far too weak to maintain the network.

THE SITE The chosen site is located in a typical New Orleans neighborhood called Midcity, that has an average household income of less than 50% of the national average. The block was once occupied by a factory but abandoned long before Katrina and stood empty for years. Adjacent to it is a residential block consisted of rows of double shotgun houses. Katrina gave the houses some minor damages but rendered the foundations unsafe for occupancy. These homes are abandoned because there are insufficient funds to repair, the negligence has further decayed many of them. The presence of abandoned industrial sites within residential neighborhood is found in most parts of the city.

Site Restaurants Emergency Food Closed Busy Traffic Casual Traffic Bike Path

BUS

7 MIN WALK

12 MIN WALK

BUS

Katrina Depth

CENTRAL SITE BLOCK: ADJACENT ABANDONED SHOTGUN HOUSES: ORIGINAL DESIGN ELEVATIONS

Beyond Repair

Recyclabe

Beyond Repair Beyond Repair

Recyclabe

Recyclabe

Beyond Repair

Recyclabe

CENTRAL SITE BLOCK: ADJACENT ABANDONED SHOTGUN HOUSES: POST KATRINA CONDITION

Beyond Repair

Recyclabe


NOLA IS A SHRINKING CITY "Urban withdrawal creates vacant spaces. Wasteland, forests and fields creep back into the city and increasingly determine its look and its structure. Typical landscapes thereby undergo change and absorb urban elements and functions."

Typical Block: 1960

FROM SHRINKING CITY TO GROWING CITY This proposal explores and exploits the vacant spaces within the typical block of a shrinking city by utilizing landscape and architectural elements to create a de-centralized network to replace the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shattered infrastructure the shattered infrastructure. Neighbourhoods can be re-organized with emphasis on urban agriculture and community gardens can generate new social networks and form the basis for local economic stability.

WASTE = FOOD

Typical Block: 2005 (Pre-Katrina)

Typical Block: 2009 (Post Katrina)


SUSTAINTABLE HOUSING According to the Greater New Orleans Community Data Centre, approximately 59,000 (31%) of residential addresses in the city are blighted or represent empty lots, a percentage that is amongst the highest levels for any American city. Within these residential address, a portion of the actual homes are beyond repair, while several could be recycled if their existed sufficient social and economic incentive to do so. Today, approximately 300,000 citizens call New Orleans home, up 50,000 over population numbers directly after Katrina. This growth is expected to continue as the UN predicts that New Orleans will have a population of approximately 400,000 by 2015 (a growth rate of 5% annually, which is comparable to growing cities such as Toronto). We believe that this growth, after the long decline, requires that the existing housing be studied to determine whether new housing is required, or existing housing can be recycled in the creation of new socially and economically productive sustainable communities.

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY

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Most of the design proposals for New Orleans have fails because they do not address the problems plaguing the city beyond the physical damage left by Katrina. The city’s population and economy had been in decline since Hurricane Betsy hit in 1965. As the population shrunk in total, the infrastructure did not shrink in size, but simply decayed. When Katrina hit, the shrunken and fragile nature of the city amplified the ruthless impact of the storm on New Orleans. We believe that responsible designs for New Orleans must go beyond replacing lost homes and neighbourhoods; we must design socially and economically productive sustainable communities. The urban withdrawal of a shrinking city creates vacant spaces throughout the city that facilitate the introduction of wastelands, forests, and fields within the urban fabric. This reintroduction of landscape zones provides an opportunity to utilize these spaces to absorb infrastructural functions (for example, water retention). However, it is difficult to exploit the productive capacity of these empty-lots as they are chaotically scattered throughout the city’s neigbhourhoods. We believe that these potentially productive spaces have the capacity to be reorganized. We propose to explore and exploit these spaces to utilize landscape and architectural elements to create a de-centralized system to replace the city’s shattered infrastructure. We feel this approach has the capacity to allow a new system of social systems that can serve as a prototype for sustainable local economies.


PRECEDENT STUDY Viet Village is an existing urban farm operated by a Vietnamese-American community located in New Orleans East. The design team assisted the community with the design of the environmental infrastructural systems needed to support an organic urban farming operation. This proposal for Midcity Urban Farm will use it to guide the design of spatial and structural organization. Viet Village

Viet Village Urban Farm by Mossop + Michaels

N

01 02 A. small plots 03 04 05 06 B. market 07 08 09 parking 10 D. lifestock 11 12 C. large plots 13 14 Residen al

=

Midcity Urban Farm

Area in M²

%

Program Area

%

4147

4%

U lity Space

18%

24153

22%

Small Plots

22%

14372

13%

12009 14372 936 20340

11% 13% 1% 19%

Vehicle Lifestock and compost

11% 13%

Large plots

19%

17582 108306

16% 100%

Residen al

16%

central reservoir + community pavilion community pavilion central Boardwalk/linear market children's play area pedestrian entrance from street public vehicular entrance secondary reservior/market pond market buildings rain gardens for market runoff grasspave event parking with bio swales livestock farm opera on/compos ng central bio-filtra on canal commercial plots service entrance Residen al Total

Mid City Urban Farm Design Data

x 11.5

Programe U lity Space Small Plots Circula on Lifestock and compost Large plots Residen al

% 18% 22% 11% 13% 19% 16%

Area in M² 2452 2996 1498 1771 2588 2179

Total Ground Area: 9569 M²

DescripƟon Reservoir + Restaurant + Bio Canal Par al Ground + Roof Plots + Ver cal Garden SideWalk + Street The Area Below Housing Units Aqua Farm for Rice and Crawfish 7 Duplex Units + 5 Double Shutgun

ONSITE – BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER To explore the described proposal, we choose a neighbourhood in Midcity, located 3km north-west of the famous French Quarter. This region exhibits all the typical signs of New Orleans decline: the average household income is less than 50% of the national average and many vacant homes scattered around the vicinity. The central bock of the site possessed a long-abandoned factory because Katrina forced the clearing of the block save for one building that was used for a (now retired) bike rental business. Adjacent to the block is a row of abandoned double-shotgun homes, some critically damaged while the rest require some repairs, all standing upon unsafe foundations ruined by Katrina’s flood. The central block, and the adjacent shotgun homes are left abandoned because there is insufficient incentive to repair them - a typical situation for New Orleans. We believe that this site is the ideal setting for a new economically productive sustainable community in New Orleans through the combination of empty lot spaces, and both new and recycled housing. In order to create production within the community a vegetation strategy is utilized to manage storm water, treat soil, repel insects, provide shading, and yield crops. Taking advantage of New Orleans’ year-long harvesting power (a gift from the hot and humid climate) we propose introducing agricultural activity in order to transform neglected waste-lands into productive spaces. In order to ensure each citizen of the community will work together, we propose that the community accept a ‘co-operative’ governance model. We believe this model will allow the community to work together to harvest the specific crops necessary to prepare a meal that can be sold by the residents.

mer

mer

Sum

Sum Sun

Sun Sun ter Win

Sun ter Win

Prevailin g Summ er Wind

1

2

3 4

5

2

3 4

1 1 2 2 3

5

SITE PLAN DEVELOPMENT DIAGRAMS

Rearrangement to Maximize Cross-Ventilation

1

5

2

3

4

Shadow Analysis for Vertical Gardens and Plots

5

N

Construction of New Foundation, Reservoir and Bio-filtration Cannel

4 5

N

N

N

Existing Site Plan X Indicates Not Re-usable

1


SITE PLAN

2

6 10 8 3

7 11 1 1

12 1 2

2 1 1 13 14

4

5 9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

25m

1 15

50m

N

0

Service Road / Weekend Market Traffic Mediating Rain Garden Main Bio-Swale Rice Field Small Yield Crops Field Rain Gardens Roof Garden Solar Panel Planter Seatings Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Playground Bamboo Garden Sewage Treatment Crops Main Reservoir Restaurant / Indoor Market / Community Centre Community Gardens

COMMUNITY VIEWS

N

WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN


SURVIVABILITY DIAGRAM - NORMAL CROCK-POT K JAMBALAYA M

INGREDIENTS I 12 ounces c of skinless l chicken 1 pound d shrimp orr crawfish * 1 1/3 cup rice 2 bell peppers e chopped 2 celeryy stalks chopped 1 can whole h tomatoes 1 can beef e broth 1 1/2 tsp dried basil 1/2 tbsp salt DIRECTIONS In a crock-pot add all together except shrimp. Cook on high for 4 hours. Add shrimp and cook for an additional 30 minutes. It can be served over cooked rice or

SURVIVABILITY SURV SU RVIV IVAB ABIL ILIT ITY Y DIAGRAM DIAG DI AGRA RAM M -- FLOOD FLOO FL OOD D SURVIVABILITY DIAGRAM FLOOD In order to attract tourists that are seeking traditional New Orleansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cuisine, we propose that the community harvest each of the ingredients required to prepare Jambalaya. Rice, peppers, celery, tomatoes, basil, onion, garlic, parsley, and oregano will be grown, harvested, and cooked on site. Finally, space will be incorporated for raising livestock in order to produce various types of Jambalaya. By introducing an industry and selling a product onsite, the Jambalaya Co-Op becomes a new type of economically productive sustainable community. This scheme utilizing a combination of agricultural lots, new housing and recycled housing is developed in creating the socially and economically functional community. The introduction of new homes is required within the community as the availability of recyclable houses adjacent to the site does not provide sufficient housing to operate the Jambalaya Co-Op. For both types of housing, a sustainability strategy is developed.


- PASTALAYA

8 serving i s Prep Time: 30 minutes Cook Time: 4 hours, 0 min Ready In: 4 hours, 30 min

breast cut in 1” cubes (optional) 1 pound smoked sausage 1 onion chopped 3 garlic cloves minced 1/3 cup tomato paste 1 tbsp dried parsley 1/2 tbsp oregano 1 tbsp Tabasco combine with enough rice to the desired consistency. For Pastalaya, instead of rice, prepare your favorite pasta and serve over pasta.

The traditional pier foundations of New Orleans homes are modified to create a small community scale thermal labyrinth that provides thermal comfort and household water storage. Furthermore, the homes are elevated above Katrina’s flood plain to ensure the safety of the inhabitants. The new house unit is designed with concept of edible architecture as maximize the food production upon the house itself in order to assist the goals of the community. Its’ form is based on the small footprint of a double shotgun, but with increased height to accommodate more inhabitants. Solar panels, solar water heaters, rainwater collectors, and grey-water recycling units, and roof-top gardens are the sustainable building technologies used in the design. Meanwhile, the recycled homes areretrofitted to incorporate these same sustainable technologies, with the addition of hollow core ventilation floors to further cool these retrofitted shotguns, and vertical gardens that provide solar shading and additional surface area for the growth of vine based food plants. The incorporation of agricultural space within the design of each house allows for the potential expansion of the neighbourhood with sacrificing its’ agricultural aspirations. Finally, the housing and agricultural plots are arranged within the site to maximize cross ventilation within the homes, and agricultural growth in the fields.


NEW SUSTAINABLE DEVELPMENT Solar Energy Inversion

Solar Irradiance Panel Module Inverter

Charge Controller

Battery

A/C

D/C

Vertical Garden Solar Shade

Rainwater Collection Rainwater

Architecture to spread for maximum water collecting sruface these surfaces can be combined with pv surfaces smart catchment to eliminate entrance of other matter

system to reject first flow

parcle filtraion Drinking Water

Hollow Core Ventilation Floor + Thermal Labyrinth Foundation Sewage Fresh Storage Water Storage

Hot Air Intake

Human Energy Utilizers

CONCLUSION AND FURTHER APPLICATION We believe this strategy can be adapted to other areas of New Orleans by creating communities that produce and sell other local products such as po-boys, Cajun spice, local crafts, etc. Furthermore, it can be modified to help other shrinking cities by creating neighbourhoods that harvest local renewable resources to generate and produce brand-able local products.


RECYCLED HOUSE RETROFIT STRATEGIES EXPLODED AXO

Low-Impact Sustainable Stormwater Management

Solar Water Heating Diagram Solar Irradiance

Grey Water Loop

Controller

To Taps

Tank

Pump Water Feed

Solar Panels

Solar Water Heating Solar Panels Rain Water Collection Channels

Wood Framing and Opennings

Grey Water Recycling Sink Washing Machine Wash - Basin Bathtub Shower Toilet Garden Use Cleaning

Toilet Garden Use Cleaning Surplus

Rainwater and Greywater Storage Solar Energy Inverter

Grey Water Recycling

Double Shotgun Cross Ventilation

Hollow Core Slabs

Columns and Beams


SLN CULTURAL MARKET

Scale: M • Program: Market + Office + Museum

• Location: Toronto, Ont

• Duration: 12 Weeks

2008 - Canadian Institute of Steel Construction Ontario Regional Fellowship Credits: Emily Lin + Scott Ling Advisors: Steven Fong, Margaret Graham, Christos Marcopoulos, Brigitte Luzar, Garth Norbraten This project proposes a context-sensitive comprehensive design for St. Lawrence North, a site resting between two of Toronto’s few renown historical buildings: St. Lawrence Market and St. Lawrence Hall. The design of the proposed building recognizes and embraces the rich history of the site both in form and program. The building’s form is kept very low to allow for an accessible roof-scape to serve as a public plaza. This multi-functional plaza frames views of St. Lawrence Market, St. Lawrence Hall, the nearby St. James Cathedral, and the Front Street view corridor. The surface of the roof-scape is detailed for adaptability in order to facilitate temporary design arrangments of paving and vegetation to reveal graphic expressions that can be observed from the nearby towers of downtown Toronto. The interior of the building is programmed primarily as a museum for Toronto’s history. A corridor connecting exhibition and supplimentary spaces wraps around central spine for the building, which houses the secdonary market program. This market spine, which reaches beneath Front Street, and changes levels within the building via double-height escalators, connects the basement of St. Lawrence Market with the ground floor of St. Lawrence North. A final wing of the building holds administrative office spaces to support the museum and market programs. The design of St. Lawrence North embraces the site’s history in order to accentuate the rich character of Toronto’s St. Lawrence neighbourhood.


Stt. Lawr wrence Hall


To St. Lawr T wren nce Mark rket


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Final Step: Level


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Roof-Form

Summer Day

Winter

Summer Night

Special Event

zzz

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SLN: ADAPTABLE ROOF-SCAPE SURFACE DETAILING Graphic Example: Image of John Simcoe


2” x 4” Wood Panels 236

Framing as Required 235

Grass Topping 212 232

2” Soil Cover 231

230

3mm Aluminum Caping Drainage Mat 100mm Rigid Insulation A/V Barrier Cast-in-Place Concrete Edge Finish Rebar Connection

Concrete Roof Slab

Connectors Silicon Caulking Interior (above grade)

C-Channel

plaza edge

Glazing Sandwich Exterior 6mm Pain 6mm Argon Filled Space 6mm Pain 13mm Air Separator 6mm Inner Pain Interior Vertical Clamped Plate Connectors (1m O.C.) C-Channel Silicon Caulking 100mm Cast-in-Place Concrete Topping Exterior Plaza Steel Grate (removable) Plaza Slab

3mm Aluminum Caping

2nd Floor Plan

Drainage Trench Debris Catch 100mm Drainage Pipe (1000mm O.C.) Foundation Wall

200mm Layer Crushed Stone Connectors A/V Barrier 50mm Rigid Insulation Drainage Mat Timber Shoring

Interior Ramp Slab

Reinforced Flexible Membrane Flashing (Lapped & Sealed)

Interior (Parking Garage)

Sealant Smoke Seal Cantilevered Slab at Various Depths Along Ramping System Grass Topping 2” Soil Cover

2” x 4” Wood Panels Framing as Required

6mm Shatter Proof Clear Glass Guard Silicon Caulking C-Channel Concrete Slab

Connectors Steel Footing 3mm Aluminum Caping Drainage Mat 100mm Rigid Insulation A/V Barrier

ROOF GUARD AT ROOF TYPE TRANSITION DETAIL 1:10

3rd Floor Plan


SLN: PLANS, SECTIONS, AND VIEWS B

C

A

7 Jarvis Street

8

-2 Plan

3 1 5 2 6

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C’

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Ground Plan

-1 Plan


1 Museum Main Entrance

3 Museum Resource Centre

5 Museum Library

7 Office Reception

2 Museum Lobby

4 Museum Gallery

6 Museum Bookstore

8 Market Beneath Front Street


9

10


Section A - A’

Section B-B’

RENAULT

Section C - C’

TIME

EVENT

EVENT


Fan n Room o Radiant Cooling Earth Air Tube Intake akee

Cold H2O

Cold Waterr fo or Radiant HeaƟ e ng ((Deep p Lakee Water Cooling o g) Thermal Maass sss - Soil Interior Elevator e o Room o

2m Constant

Summer Cooling System Section Diagram iagram 1:100

Exhaust Fan n Earth Air Tube Intake akee

Hot H2O

Hot Waterr forr Radiant HeaƟ e Ɵng

Filter Interior

Elevator le t Room o

2m Constant

Winter Cooling System Section Diagram 1:100

Exhaust Operable p ablee Windows Win nd w - Exterior rior and a d on A Air Light Cores r s as Req quired q r

Fan n Room o Earth Air Tube Intake akee

OFF OFF

Elevator le t Room o In nterior

Fall / Spring Ventilation System Sectional Diagram 1::100

EVENT


HSR INITIATIVE - SCALE COMPARISONS Scale: G for Global • Program: Research

In 2008 a small team of students set out to question the astuteness of Canada investing in a high-speed rail connection between Windsor and Quebec City, linking Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and several other cities along a single infrastructural spine. Given that trade barriers between Quebec and Ontario had been recently eliminated, the corridor suddenly was able to function as a single megaregion. Therefore, the purpose of this project became comparing the Quebec-Windsor corridor with other megaregions around that world that either currently possessed, or had proposals to construct, high speed rail networks. The selected megaregions were compared by area, population, density, growth rate, national population share, and national GDP share. Analysis of the Quebec-Windsor Corridor’s performance within these criteria allowed us to conclude that a high-speed rail network is astute for Canada’s megaregion. Below is a summerized arguement from the essay component of the study, and sample pages of the studies graphics are provided. Statistically, an astonishing 60% of Canada’s

• Duration: 6 Weeks

A Comparative Analysis of the Quebec Windsor Corridor with Selected High Speed Mega Regions throughout the World. Credits: Emily Lin + Scott Ling + Danny Tseng Advisor: Carol Moukheiber population lives along the Corridor, generation 61% of the country’s GDP. Canada must realize that providing the best possible infrastructure for the country’s only megaregion is critical to ensure it can compete in the global economy. France, Italy, and Spain similarly only possess one megaregion, yet each has operated a high speed rail network for 27, 30, and 5 years respectively. The speed and volume of movement allows multiple cities to function as a single productive entity. The predominant argument against investing in a high speed rail for the QuebecWindsor Corridor is that the track length required is longer than any other linear high speed rail network. However, our study shows the megaregion’s population and density remain comparable to megaregions already utilizing the networks, and a healthy rate of growth ensures that the Quebec-Windsor Corridor will only further exceed the population and density that has proved sufficient for other high speed rail network to operate efficient, or in many cases (most notably France) profitably. Through comparative analysis with other megaregions throughout the world, it becomes clear that an investment in a high speed rail network to connect the Quebec-Windsor corridor would be an astute political decision. While other factors beyond the scope of comparative analysis surely play a roll in determining the feasibility of such a project; the myth that the region is geographically too big, with too small a population, to support a high speed rail network can be disputed by this study.


Top 150 Richest Cities by GDP

Top 150 Largest Cities in the World Ranked by Population

Montreal Toronto

Montreal Toronto

New York

New York Tokyo

Tokyo

Year 2006

> 30 million

Year 2005

20 - 30 million

> $1,000 billion USD

10 - 20 million $100 - $999 billion USD 5 - 10 million $30 - $99 billion USD

< 5 million

<30 billion USD

Year 2020

Year 2010

> 30 million > 1,000 billion USD 20 - 30 million 10 - 20 million 5 - 10 million < 5 million

Top Cities 1. Tokyo 2. Mexico City 3. Mumbai 4. New York 5. Sao Paulo 6. Delhi -

Top Cities 35.53 million 19.24 million 18.84 million 18.65 million 18.61 million 16.00 million

7. Kolkata 8. Jakarta 9. Buenos Aires 10. Shanghai 48. Toronto 81. Montreal -

14.57 million 13.67 million 13.52 million 12.63 million 5.16 million 3.53 million

$100 - $999 billion USD $30 - &+$99 billion USD <30 billion USD

1. Tokyo 2. New York 3. Los Angeles 4. Chicago 5. Paris 6. London -

1,191 billion 1,133 billion 639 billion 460 billion 460 billion 452 billion

Source: http://www.citymayors.com/statistics/urban_2006_1.html

Source: http://www.citymayors.com/statistics/richest-cities-gdp-intro.html

Top 70 Richest Cities by Personal Net Earnings

Top 70 Richest Cities by Purchasing Power

7. Osaka / Kobe 8. Mexico City 9. Philadelphia 10. Washington DC 21. Toronto 39. Montreal -

341 billion 315 billion 312 billion 299 billion 209 billion 120 billion

Montreal Toronto

Montreal Toronto

Zurich

Zurich

New York

New York

Year 2008 - New York = 100

Year 2008 - New York = 100

> 140.0 100.0 - 139.9 60.0 - 99.9 20.0 - 59.9 < 20.0

> 140.0 100.0 - 139.9

Top Cities 1. Zurich 2. Dublin 3. Oslo 4. Geneva 5. Luxembourg 6. Copenhagen -

140.3 132.3 131.7 130.4 120.0 114.1

7. London 8. Helsinki 9. Frankfurt 10. Munich 19. Toronto 21. Montreal -

110.0 108.7 102.4 101.4 91.6 87.7

60.0 - 99.9 20.0 - 59.9 < 20.0

Source http://www.citymayors.com/economics/richest_cities.html

Top Cities 1. Zurich 2. Geneva 3. Luxembourg 4. Berlin 5. Dublin 6. Frankfurt -

143.7 135.8 130.6 128.6 125.7 124.3

7. Auckland 8. Los Angeles 9. Munich 10. Oslo 15. Toronto 18. Montreal -

121.8 119.8 119.5 117.3 113.8 109.7

Source: http://www.citymayors.com/economics/usb-purchasing-power.html

1000 km

0

London - Paris Paris - Lyon

Quebec - Windsor

Jing-Jin-Ji

Florence - Rome - Naples Bos-Wash Sevilla - Madrid - Barcelona

San-San

Tokaido

Yantze River Delta Kyushu Ganges River Delta

Pearl River Delta

Lagos - Kano

Sao-Rio

AREA COMPARISON SaoRio (BRAZIL)

Ganges Delta (INDIA - BANGLADESH)

Jing-Jin-Ji (CHINA)

Yangtze River Delta (CHINA)

Pearl River Delta (China)

Sevilla Madrid Barcelona (SPAIN)

Quebec Windsor (CANADA)

San-San (USA)

Paris Lyon (FRANCE)

Florence Rome Naples (ITALY)

BosWash (USA)

Tokaido (JAPAN)

Lagos Kano (NIGERIA)

274.36%

206.56%

163.68%

161.20%

154.20%

124.25%

100%

97.47%

78.52%

64.74%

60.19%

56.03%

49.49%

London Paris (BRITAIN FRANCE)

Kyushu (JAPAN)

36.15%

34.67%


HIGH SPEED MEGAREGION IDENTIFICATION PROCESS Two or more majour cities (over 1 million each) with a combined population of at least 10, 000, 000.

A contiguous network of metropolitan and micropolitan areas.

Connected by a High Speed Rail network (or proposed to be so).

Niagara Region

Links with global networks of goods and services flows through infrastructural hubs.

Consists of county (or comparable regional boundary) as the basic edge forming unit, allowing for large scale urban development

MEGAREGION STATISTICS LEGEND

XXXXMEGAREGION NAMEXXXX Land Area Comparison

Population Comparison

Land Area Comparison

1995 Annual Population Growth Comparison http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=2

- Solid Red: Featured Megaregion - Outer Ring: World’s Geographically Largest Megaregion (SaoRio: 318,488 sq. m)

Population Comparison - Solid Red: Featured Megaregion - Outer Ring: World’s Most Populus Megaregion (Ganges Delta: 220 Million)

Growth Rate Comparison - Solid Red: Featured Megaregion - Outer Ring: World’s Fastest Growing MegaRegion (Lagos - Kano: 2.15%)

Megaregion Country Population Share

Density of the Megaregion

- Solid Blue: Megaregion Population - Outer Ring: Megaregion’s country population

60%

Population of the Country

60%

GDP of the Country

Megaregion Density - Solid Blue: Number of People - Outer Ring: Square Kilometre

Megaregion Country GDP Share - Solid Blue: Megaregion GDP - Outer Ring: Megaregion’s country GDP Population Distribution Along the Railway

Highspeed Rail Status

Estimated External Cost of Regional Transportation Patterns

http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=2

- Green: Year Built - Red: Year Proposed

Space for Additional Information - Where available and applicable

Population Distribution Along the Railway - Solid Red: Population 2006 - Solid Blue: Population 2025 -Faded Colours: Connection Hub of Adjacent Megaregion

Scale 1 : 575,000 1 cm on the map corresponds to 5.75km on the ground

http://www.railway-technology.com/projects

0

10 m


PARIS - LYON

1981

Population Comparison

Land Area Comparison

Annual Population Growth Comparison

Population in 2006: 24 million

Total Area: 91,148 sq. km

Annual Growth Rate over 20 years: 0.43%

Density of the Megaregion

38%

Density in 2006: 264 / sq. km

Population of France in 2006: 63,292,515

40%

Population of the Country

GDP of the Country

Regional GDP in 2007: $830 Billion USD

Paris

Le Creusot Geneva Macon

Population Distribution Along the Railway

Evolution of Passenger Traffic on Paris South-East Routes

http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=2 http://www.worldbank.org/ http://www.demographia.com/

(in million of passengers per year)

http://www.jrtr.net/jrtr03/pdf/f26_ard.pdf http://www.railfaneurope.net/tgv/map.html

25 22.9 22.5

Lyon

Total Traffic

20

18.9

17.5

TGV Traffic

15 12.5 10 7.5 5

Traffic Carried by Conven onal Train

4.0

2.5 0

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

The construction cost of this segment of TGV has paid-back within its first 12 years of operation, with a profit of €382M in 1991. The present profitability of the South-East TGV is greater than 15%. The Socio-economic profitability, combining the money and time saved by passengers and also the losses caused to competing transportation modes, is 30%. See Appendix A for further information.

100 km

http://www.railway-technology.com/projects

0

0

QUEBEC CITY - WINDSOR CORRIDOR

10 m

1995

Population Comparison

Land Area Comparison

Annual Population Growth Comparison

Population in 2006: 19 million

Total Area: 116,085.12 sq. km

Annual Growth Rate over 20 years: 0.765%

Quebéc City

Trois-Rivières

Density of the Megaregion Density in 2006: 164 / sq. km

Ottawa

60%

61%

Population of the County

Population of Canada in 2006: 32,656,679

GDP of the Country

Regional GDP in 2007: $550 Billion USD

Montreal Sherbrooke

Kingston

Toronto

Kitchener

Population Distribution Along the Railway

Estimate Annual External Cost of Regional Transport Activity

http://esa.un.org/unup/index.asp?panel=2 http://www.worldbank.org/ http://www.demographia.com/

($billions USD)

19.76

2030

Sarnia

1990

13.48

St CatharinesNiagara

Detroit Windsor

9.5

6.24

Total

Total if all Switched to Rail

7.75 4.26

3.26

1.98 0.91

0.03 0.01

0.02 0.01

0.82

Data based on MAKING TRANSPORTATION SUSTAINABLE: A CASE STUDY OF THE QUEBEC CITY-WINDSOR CORRIDOR by Environmental Canada. http://www.ec.gc.ca/cleanair-airpur/CAOL/transport/publications/tos406/makingsustrans2.htm Other resources: http://www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/research/pubs/1020-lee.p http://www.tc.gc.ca/pol/en/report/anre2007/add/table-a16.htm also see Appendix 1 for Emission Factors and other information

100 km

http://www.railway-technology.com/projects 0

0

10 m


A high speed rail network is of superior quality and safety than other modes of transportation. Rides are more comfortable, and far less fossil fuels are required thus improving air quality. Utilizing data gathered on existing travel patters between the cities within the Quebec-Windsor Corridor, it can be calculated that implementation of a high speed rail service to replace automotive, bus, and conventional train, as well as airline service would reduce emissions by over two-thirds.

DENSITY COMPARISON DOTS

NATIONAL POPULATION SHARE COMPARISON DOTS

BosWash (USA) 790 / sq. km

Florence -Rome -Naples (ITALY) 200 / sq. km

Ganges Delta (INDIA - BANGLADESH) 917 / sq. km

BosWash (USA) 26%

Florence -Rome -Naples (ITALY) 10%

Ganges Delta (INDIA - BANGLADESH) 6%

Jing-Jin-Ji (CHINA) 510 / sq. km

Kyushu (JAPAN) 328 / sq. km

Lagos - Kano (NIGERIA) 584 / sq. km

Jing-Jin-Ji (CHINA) 7.4%

Kyushu (JAPAN) 13.5%

Lagos - Kano (NIGERIA) 33.6%

London - Paris (BRITAIN - FRANCE) 691 / sq. km

Paris - Lyon (FRANCE) 264 / sq. km

Pearl River Delta (CHINA) 631 / sq. km

London - Paris (BRITAIN - FRANCE) 23%

Paris - Lyon (FRANCE) 38%

Pearl River Delta (CHINA) 8.6%

Quebec - Windsor (CANADA) 164 / sq. km

San-San (USA) 281 / sq. km

Quebec - Windsor (CANADA) 60%

San-San (USA) 10.6%

Sevilla - Madrid - Barcelona (SPAIN) 122 / sq. km

Tokaido (JAPAN) 772 / sq. km

Sevilla - Madrid - Barcelona (SPAIN) 43.6%

Tokaido (JAPAN) 40%

SaoRio (BRAZIL) 178 / sq. km

Yangtze River Delta (CHINA 353 / sq. km

Appendix A: EXPANSION OF FRANCE’S TVG NETWORK Map 1: TVG Network in 1994

SaoRio (BRAZIL) 30%

Yangtze River Delta (CHINA 5%

Appendix B: MAKING TRANSPORTATION SUSTAINABLE: A CASE STUDY OF THE QUEBEC CITY-WINDSOR CORRIDOR - A Study by Environment Canada

Map 2: TVG Network in 2000 Business-as-Usual Emissions Factors - Passenger Transportation (grams per passenger-kilometre) Source: hƩp://www.ec.gc.ca/cleanair-airpur/CAOL/transport/publicaƟons/tos406/makingsustrans2.htm CO2 Intercity Auto Intercity SUVs Intercity Bus Intercity Rail Air

NOx

1990 147 197 36 58 179

2030 113 151 31 39 108

1990 0.8 0.88 0.42 1.15 1.1

VOCs 2030 0.32 0.4 0.09 0.7 0.66

1990 1.23 1.29 0.05 0.05 0.1

2030 0.35 0.47 0.03 0.03 0.06

Business-as-Usual Projected Transport Activity Source: hƩp://www.ec.gc.ca/cleanair-airpur/CAOL/transport/publicaƟons/tos406/makingsustrans2.htm Canada

Source: hƩp://www.jrtr.net/jrtr03/pdf/f26_ard.pdf

Car Light Truck Bus Rail AircraŌ total

1990 144 34 0.5 0.8 22 2191.3

Quebec-Windsor Corridor

(esƟmated by Canada x 60%)

2030 231 73 0.9 1 49 2384.9

1990 86.4 20.4 0.3 0.48 13.2 120.78

2030 138.6 43.8 0.54 0.6 29.4 212.94

Timeline: High Speed Service Lines Openning Dates 1981: First LGV openned: LGV Sud-Est (Paris Gare de Lyon to Lyon-Perrache)

Million Grams of Pollution in Each Mode CO2

1990: LGV Atlantique openned (Paris Gare Montparnasse to Tours and Le Mans) 1992: LGV Rhône-Alpes openned (Lyon to Valence) 1993: LGV Nord opened (Paris Gare du Nord to Lille and Brussels and on towards London, Amsterdam (HSL-Zuid) and Cologne) 1994: LGV Interconnexion Est openned (LGV Sud-Est to LGV Nord Europe, east of Paris) 2001: LGV Méditerranée openned (An extension of LGV Rhône-Alpes: Valence to Marseille Saint Charles) 2003: Phase 1: High Speed 1 openned (Channel Tunnel to London St Pancras International) 2007: Phase 2: High Speed 2 openned (Channel Tunnel to London St Pancras International) 2007: LGV Est openned (Paris Gare de l'Est-Strasbourg)

NOx

VOCs

Intercity Auto Intercity SUVs Intercity Bus Air Intercity Rail

1990 12,700,800 4,018,800 10,800 27,840 2,362,800

2030 15,661,800 6,613,800 16,740 23,400 3,175,200

1990 69,120 17,952 126 552 14,520

2030 44,352 17,520 49 420 19,404

1990 106,272 26,316 15 24 1,320

2030 48,510 20,586 16 18 1,764

Total If all switched to rail

19,121,040 7,005,240

25,490,940 8,304,660

102,270 138,897

81,745 149,058

133,947 6,039

70,894 6,388


Scale: N/A

Location: Toronto, Ont

MODULA •

Duration: 6 Weeks

Digital Explorations In Form, Organization, and Ornament Credits: Emily Lin + Scott Ling + Neu-Wa O’Neill Curator - Tom Bessai MODULA exhibited a sampling of the ongoing experimental digital design work being conducted by graduate level architecture students at the University of Toronto’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. The six distinct projects exhibited are iterative design explorations that extend digital design practices of parametrics and simulation into real space through fabrication and construction. The projects are not finished works, nor are they strictly architectural in nature. Rather each represents a conclusive moment within an ongoing collaborative research investigation amongst student teams and design faculty. The following objectives are common to the MODULA projects: - to theorize and experiment with computation with computation techniques in the context of architectural design. Techniques include digital modeling, scripting, parametric modeling and time-based design simulations; - to explore concepts and techniques for spatial subdivision and differentiation; - to investigate emergent properties and characteristics in computationally defined systems; - to create 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional representations, diagrams and fabricated mock-ups of computationally generated design schema.


The project I contributed to explored the theoretically architectural interface between one set of parameters and another through paired surfaces. At the most basic level, these surfaces can be read as a wall dividing interior spaces from an exterior environment, with material treatment (ie: shingles for the exterior, drywall on the interior) marking the primary response to the given parameters. Fenestration, in the form of windows and glazing, is introduced as a response to further inputs; views, lighting, transparency, etc. These two responses, cladding and fenestration, are typically deployed as relatively static systems, applied uniformly across a surface (cladding, glazing) or as singular responses to specific programmatic exigencies (windows). Grasshopper, as a parametric modelling tool, allows for a more heterogeneous means of addressing this interface. An exploration of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;attractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; based scripts, in which the attractors can be stand-ins for a variety of programmatic, environmental, or phenomological inputs, reveals the potential of this tool towards the design of paired surfaces.


Our exploration began with the concept of multiple paired surfaces governed by a series of linked parametric attractors, such that a primary surface was controlled by one attractor and each subsequent surface functioned as the attractor for the surface to follow. This exploration led to a simplified version of two paired surfaces, both globally responsive to a primary external attractor. The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;exteriorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; surface, the ones closest to the attractor, is operated on by any given set of inputs (coordinates, dimensions, etc.) that govern its formal structure, and by the primary attractor, which opens, closes, and morphs a series of fin-like plates deployed along a surface grid. The secondary, or paired surface, is governed by the same formal logic, but is parametrically controlled by the normals of each fin set, which function as a series of attractors that open and close a set of elliptical perforations along that surface. The exploration reveals the potential of Grasshopper as a tool for more diverse and responsive designs of paired surfaces.


OTHER WORKS A COLLECTION OF SHORT PROJECTS: Bloor Central Market | APRIL, 2007 Of Other Spaces Mapping | June, 2007 Scarborough Town Centre Site Study Model | October, 2007 National Ballet School Detail Study | December, 2007 Detroit: A Shrinking City | January, 2008 MarathonDonut Storage Design | July, 2009 Thesis Rendering For Scot Ling | April, 2010 Thesis Rendering For Danny Tseng | April, 2010


Bloor Central Market | APRIL, 2007 The chosen site for Bloor Central Market Complex (BCM) is currently a parking lot on the south side of Bloor Street, between Bathurst and Spadina. On the south boarder of the Annex neighborhood, adjacent to city landmarks such as Earnest Ed and ROM, proliferated with shops, restaurants and bars; this area exhibits Torontonian’s most exuberant metropolitan life. Situated in such an exciting location, BCM, a complex with restaurants, market, underground parking, live-work studios and a gallery, strives to bring this multifaceted character under one building. The site is first divided up to define zones for each program. Then, through a system of slight sloping, bridging, and framing, the zones are united to form a collective whole while each zone maintains its own identity. Visitors are provided an experience of traveling through the space via multiple routes and entries, as well as an intense visual and physical connection among the market’s different programs. kitchen

kitchen

Bar / Takeout

Bar / Takeout

Lounge

Lounge

Main Floor Plan +1500 mm

Gallery

South West Bird’s Eye Axo

Program/CirculaƟon Diagram

Commercial Circulation Residential Circulation Vehicular Circulation

Nightmarket +Restaurant

Top Floor Plan +12100 mm

Lofts

Market Zone I

Market Zone II

Park + outdoor Market

Gallery Market Zone III

Storage

Structural Concept To construct a structure that would simultaneously define and unite the transparent, opaque, public and private volume, existing tress are used to derive a system with naturally rational force flows. By overlapping the silhouettes of trees an inherent rational structure is created to allow large openings at the market level, at the same time, a tighter, smaller arrangement for the more intimate residential level.

Loading

Basement Plan -800 mm

Grocery Pick-up Zone

Food Court

N

©2008 Google - Imagery ©2008 DigitalGlobe, First Base Solutions, GeoEye - Terms of Use

Office / Mechanical


Night Rendering of North Facade

Day Rendering of North Facade

Residential

Gallery

1:100 Model for Bloor Street Market Market

Parking

1:50 Model for Bloor Street Market

Cross SecĆ&#x;on A

+ 12100 mm

B

+ 5000 mm +_ 0 mm

C

- 8000 mm

Longitudinal SecĆ&#x;on


OF OTHER SPACES MAPPING Re-emergence and Unfolding of a Treasured Site | JUNE, 2007 The siting of Chinese temples, si and miao, has revealed profound concern for harmony with nature. They manifest certain properties which influence the fortunes of those who build upon the site. Today, under Chinese government’s religious policies, temples in Beijing are institutionalized. This changes the traditional balanced economy maintained by its devotees. This research explores the physical and social relationships within the developing context of the 卧佛寺 (Wo Fo Si, the Sleeping Buddha Temple). Sited at Fragrance Mountain, the popular retreat has been re-zoned as Beijing Botanic Garden since 1956. People who farmed there for generations were relocated to the adjacent agricultural dan-wei. During recent years, much of the farm land was sold collectively to developers for privileged housing, which changed the fundamental economic structure of the context from agricultural to service/labor.


SCARBOROUGH TOWN CENTRE SITE STUDY MODEL | OCTOBER, 2007 Team: Emily Lin, Scot Ling, Peter Bjorn Odegaard, Neu-Wa O’Neill, Taryn Sheppard


1701 01 - Detroit

0

1836 - Detroit Riverfront

1920: South Detroit Riverfront

1898: Detroit Riverfront

1929 - Ford Rouge Plant

A utomobile industry persuades Highland Park to incorporated as a city, protecting the industry from taxation (AB) Automobile

Ford halts employee turnover by implementing “five dollar per day” program

Ford goes international, opens assembly plants in England and France

Automotive industry expands as GM opens headquarters and factory in nearby Flint Ford Motor Company’s constructs first assembly line in Highland Park, North of Detroit

Ford and his competitors comp petitors (Chrysler, (Chry ysler,, Durant and the Doge Dog ge Brother)) establish Detroit as the world’s automotive capital Population growth increases, drawing a black work force from the south

D Detroit

Suburbs

Population of Detroit doubled and exploded in Highland Park by 1100%

1930 - Detroit Skyline

Prohibition Period, smuggling business established between Windsor and Detroit

3 5

The "color blind" promotion policies of the auto plants resulted in racial tension that erupted into a full-scale riot M-8, The World’s first depressed Freeway

Ford F ord tto oa agree gree to to a collective collective b bargaining argaining agreement agreement with with the the UAW UAW Hydra-matic transmission plant opens in Warren, Michigan GM’s Hydra-matic

Violent exerted by security guards in “The Battle of the Overpass”, as UAW A seeks $8 six hour day for workers

The United Auto Workers (UAW) was founded as one of the first major unions that organize black workers

Current Welland Canal opens with 8 locks (w: 24.4m, d: 7.6m)

In Dearborn,, Ford opens p the “Rouge g Plant”,, the world’s largest g and first full service factory. y Raw materials were delivered by lake barges, then manufactured and assembled there for country-wide distribution

Racial tension escalates,, as black Detroit p physician y acquitted q of murder after p protecting his home from white mob seeking “defending” the purity of their neighborhood (AB)

2

1940

Henry Ford, leader of the Ford Motor Company, builds his first automobile

1

1930

4

4

2

1920

13

The Third Welland Canal open with 26 locks (w: 13.7m, d: 4.3m)

Housing Prices 2000

1910

4

Fort Detroit destroyed by fire; Fort Lernoult was renamed Fort Detroit British reclaims Detroit Americans recaptures Detroit; renames Fort Lenoult Fort Shelby Detroit incorporated as a city First Welland Canal opened. It is extended to l:44m, w: 6.7m, d : 2.4m with 50 l ocks by 1833 Welland Canal made public. Second canal fished with 27 locks (w: 8.1m, d: 2.7m) The Republican Party founded in n earby Jackson Eureka Ironworks successfully mass produces steel economically Detroit referred to as the “Paris of the West” for its “gilded age” mansions. The electrification of Washington Blvd. and manufacturing industries flock to the area, spurring population growth.

French off f icer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac founded Fort Détroit Fort Detroit surrendered to the British First Nation leader Pontiac siege s Fort Detroit Fort Lernoult constructed just south of Fort Detroit Fort Detroit and Fort Lernoult surrendered to the Americans Detroit was the Capital of Michigan

Although residential suburbanizzation was first made possible by inexpensive developed property, today the re elation of reall estate prices i b between the h city ci and d suburbs is competely reversed

1900

1701 1760 1763 1779 1796 1805 1847 1805 1812 1813 1815 1824 1848 1851 1854 1870 1900 1887 189 2 1896

DETROIT: A SHRINKI SHRINKING NG CITY | JJANUARY, 2008

Team: Emily Lin, Scott Ling g

Median Value e of Owner-occup p pied housing unitss

$ 190 000 - 850 000 $ 130 000 - 190 00 00 $ 65 000 - 130 000 $ 0 - 65 000

Inhab bitants b in million

WWIII iindustrial d ti lg growth black workers recruits more bla despite housing sshortage

Using ng g Na National De cover, er, th the auto in federal fu funding in

2007 - South Downtown Detroit


Detroit 15

2007 - Ford’s Highland 2007 - Park 2 Ford’s Highland Park

2007 - David Stott2007 Building - David Stott Building 2007 - International Riverfront 2007 - Michigan Theater Parking Theater 2007 -Parking Hart Plaza2007 - Hart Plaza 2007 - International Riverfront 2007 - Michigan 15 5

MotorCity Casino Resort and temporary MGM Grande Casino open GM op pens Transmission plant in Romulus, Michig gan Greektown Casino opens Comerica for Detroit Tigers GM purchases the Renaissance CentrePark as itsconstructed new world headquarters

GM opens Transmission plant in Romulus, Michigan GM as its new world headquarters C ompurchases erica Towethe r at Renaissance Detroit CenteCentre r Purchasing 50%for of Proposal Mazda Motor Manufacturing (USA) Ford creatis venture AutoAlliance International with its management Michigan votes E, authorizing the development of threejoint casinos in Detroit

13

15

9 10

16

15

Michigan votes for Proposal E, authorizing the development of three casinos in Detroit Ford Field constructed of renewable and recyclable products for the Lions Ford opensCasino Greenroofed-Dearborn TruckMGM PlantGrande in Dearborn, MIopen ; GM opens Highperformance engines plant in Wixom, MI MotorCity Resort and temporary Casino Cadillac Square andopens CampusComerica Martius Park as part of Greektown Casino Parkopen constructed forDetroit DetroitRenaissance Tigers The 2004 New master plan outlines ten clusters of neighborhoods and commercial districts. Proposal acknowledges the growing youth population as a future resource of young professional. In 2007, Detroit opens Hart Plaza, a mostly hard surfaced parkfor located where Cadillac landed in 1701, intended to reconnect the Ford Field constructed of renewable and recyclable products the Lions city with the Greenroofed-Dearborn Riverfront. It also opensTruck a portion $599 million (an 8.8 km walk connecting various Ford opens Plantofinits Dearborn, MI International ; GM opens -e Riverfront Highperf r ormance engines plant in Wixom, MI parks, venues, high rises, shops, and restaurants) between the Riverfront Towers and the Renaissance Centre. According to “The World Cadillac Square and Detroit Campus Martius Park open as part of “Old Detroit Renaissance is Coming", a Metro public information campaign: buildings in the city are being transformed into lofts, condos, and The 2004 planunits outlines ten clusters ofpace neighborhoods and commercial districts. acknowledges the growing luxury highNew risemaster residential at an accelerated along with new Formstone and brick Proposal rowhouses construction.” youth population as a future resource of young professional. In 2007, 2007 Detroit opens Hart surfaced park located where Cadillac landed in 1701, intended to reconnect the city with the Riverfront. It also opens a portion of its $599 million International Riverfront (an 8.8 km walk connecting various parks, venues, high rises, shops, and restaurants) between the Riverfront Towers and the Renaissance Centre. According to “The World is Coming", a Metro Detroit public information campaign: “Old buildings in the city are being transformed into lofts, condos, and luxury high rise residential units at an accelerated pace along with new Formstone and brick rowhouses owhouses constr construction.”

8

2000

11

Chrysler’s Chrysler y s Highland g Park Plant closed down and eliminates 70 p percent of the city’s city y s tax Mazda purchases Ford's unused former Michigan Casting Center, for reopening as Mazda Motor Manufacturing (USA). Comerica Tower at Detroit Center Purchasing 50% of Mazda Motor Manufacturing (USA) Ford creatis joint venture AutoAlliance International with its management 6

2000

Riverfront Towers built Chrysler’s Highland Park Plant closed down and eliminates 70 percent of the city’s tax Mazda purchases Ford's unused former Michigan Casting Center, for reopening as Mazda Motor Manufacturing (USA). Rioting in the wake of the Detroit Tigers' World Series championship left 3 dead and millions of dollars in property damage 6

1990

Foreign smaller fuel Foreign efficient g smaller cars fuel enterefficientt cars enter U.S. market after U.S. Oil crises. High-paying market after Oil crises. High-paying g p manufacturing jobs become scarce manufacturing jobs become scarce Acute Heroin andAcute crack Heroin use affect andthe crack city.use Drug affect related the city. violence y Drug gand related property violence and p proper p rty crimes increase. Abandoned homes demolished to prevent havenstofor crimes increase. Abandoned homes demolished prevent p drug havens for drug g dealers, creating sizable of urban-prairie where wild animals migrate. dealers,tracts creating sizable tractsland of urban-prairie land where wild animals migrate.

Second oil crises Rioting in the wake of the Detroit Tigers' World Series championship left 3 dead and millions of dollars in property damage Detroit hosted the Republican National Convention which nominated Reagan to a successful bid for US Presidency

11

1990

Second oil crises GM oDetroit pens Ehosted ngine pthe lantRepublican in RomulusNational , MichigaConvention n which nominated Reagan to a successful bid for US Presidency Ford constructs the $500 million Renaissance Centre,, the world’s largest g p private development p with seven tow wers, including the 73-story central tower (tallest in Michigan), anchoring the east end of Detroit’s skyline Riverfront Towers built 14

1980

1980

Corktown redevelop pment cleared167 busing acres,, some sites were never Twelfth Street Riot and court-ordered accelerated white flightredevelop from theped. city(AB)). Detroit builds Lafayette Park, a Mies designed 78 acre neighborhood of town houses short towers

14

Detroit Renaissance founded by business leaders to formulate solutions to restore urban development GM opens Premium V engine plant in Livonia, Michigan Twelfth Street Riot and court-ordered busing accelerated white flight from the city GM opens trucks and busses assembly centre in Pontiac, Michigan First oil crises Coleman Young elected as the city’s first black mayor Detroit Renaissance founded by business leaders to formulate solutions to restore urban development GM opens Premium V engine plant in Livonia, Michigan GM opens Engine plant in Romulus, Michigan GM op pens trucks and busses assembly centre in Pontiac, Michigan Ford constructs the $500 million Renaissance Centre, the world’s largest private development with seven towers, First oil crise es 73-story central tower (tallest in Michigan), anchoring the east end of Detroit’s skyline including the Coleman Young elected as the city’s first black mayor

18

Corktown redevelopment cleared167 acres, some sites were never redeveloped. (AB). Detroit builds Lafayette Park, a Mies designed 78 acre neighborhood of town houses short towers

New Master Plan proposes highways as a solution to urban congestion problems Master Plan counts Corktown as an industrial area, earmarked as the City’s first industrial redevelopment area (A ( B)

The regional planning commission finds that the manufacturers leave the city due to high taxes and limited space (A ( B)

New Master Plan proposes highways as a solution to urban congestion problems Master Plan counts Corktown as an industrial area, earmarked as the City’s first industrial redevelopment area (AB)

The "color blind" promotion policies of the auto plants resulted in racial tension that erupted into a full-scale riot M-8, The World’s first depressed Freeway The regional planning commission finds that the manufacturers leave the city due to high taxes and limited space (AB) Pennsylvania Railway and the Detroit Real Estate Board lobby to transform Corktown from residential into industrial (A ( B)

18

1970

1970

1960

1960

1950

1950

‘Big 3’ build 20 plants ‘Big g 3’ in’ build bu Detroit 20 p plants plant in Detroit Region, none in the city (AB) Region, none in the city (AB) 1, 17, 20 1, 17, 20 efense asational its alibi Defense efens and as its alibi and ndustry lobbies he autofor industry y lobbies for highways (AB) in highways (AB) unding “White flight” ligh ght”results to the suburbs, bs,, rresults “White flight” to the suburbs, Extensive nsive freeway y system y Extensive freewayE system rowth th inner-city yp population t inner-city population decline leading todecline lleading to constructed to facilitate commuting constructed to facilitate commuting s ack workers blight urban blight between the suburbs and the between the city suburbs andurban the city shortage

Pennsylvania Railway and the Detroit Real Estate Board lobby to transform Corktown from residential into industrial (AB)

8

16

16

2

15

13 3

15

9 10

16

2

?

2007 - Residential2 Ruins 2007 - Residential Ru u uins

2007 - Globe Trading 2007Lofts 2 - Globe Trading g Lo ofts f


MARATHON DONUT STORAGE DESIGN | JULY, 2009 A mini face lift for a twenty-year old donut shop in Scarborough. By re-designing the minuscule 6'9 by 4'5 storage room, the clustered space transformed into a room that has simultaneous multiple usages: storage, office and rest.

REST

STORE

View T oward s Fron t Door

$$$

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WORK


THESIS RENDERING FOR DANNY TSENG | APRIL, 2010


THESIS RENDERING FOR SCOTT LING | APRIL, 2010

Emily Lin's Portfolio  

Emily Lin's Architectural portfolio from 2006-2010

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