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PHARRELL WILLIAMS

F O O D + FA S H I O N + T R AV E L + Y O G A + W E L L N E S S + D I Y + T E C H

SUMMER 2015

WE MAKE

PHARRELL ECOZINE SUMMER 2015

HAPPY

WITH OUR (SMOKING HOT!) SUMMER ISSUE

POWER WALL

JAMIE OLIVER GETS FRESH WITH US!

BEAT THE HEAT WITH HIGH TECH GREEN GADGETS TO GO

OCEAN HEROES

MAKING WAVES FOR MARINE

TESLA IS CHARGING AHEAD IN THE ENERGY RACE

BEACH BREAKS ECOZINE.COM

TO TAKE YOUR BREATH AWAY

CAPTAIN PAUL WATSON EXCLUSIVE Q & A WITH DR. SYLVIA EARLE

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SHAWN HEINRICHS ART INSPIRED CONSERVATION


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CONTENTS

84

ON THE COVER

22

24 DR. SYLVIA EARLE Join her blue mission 32 WATER GADGETS Don’t leave home without ‘em 34 PHARRELL WILLIAMS Our environmental superstar 48 OCEAN HEROES Local wavemakers 56 JAMIE OLIVER Spice things up this summer

64 UNDERWATER ART Shawn Heinrichs photography 83 ULTIMATE ESCAPES Eco-luxe by the beach 98 CHARGED UP Tesla raises the bar 103 CAPTAIN PAUL WATSON An Ecozine exclusive 24

98

THE SOURCE

FEATURES

LIFE + HOME

18 LISA LOVES...

34 EXCLUSIVE: PHARRELL WILLIAMS

56 SAUCY SUMMER

20 THE LIST: SUNSCREENS

40 BLUE MATTERS

58 WELLNESS MEETS WANDERLUST

Ecozine’s Founder and CEO Lisa Christensen shares her summer picks

Protect your family from UV rays with these six great formulas

22 DIY COCONUT (MIRACLE) OIL RECIPES From hair smoothing to throat soothing and more

24 Q&A WITH SYLVIA EARLE

On her love affair with the deep blue sea

The whole package: pop star, entrepreneur and environmental advocate

Why are we trashing a US $24 trillion asset?

46 OCEAN HEROES

We salute these steadfast sea saviours

54 SEA THE CHANGE

Ocean Conservancy inspires us to protect our blue planet

Our favourite celebrity chef Jamie Oliver is at it again with a new light bite this season

Expert Kate Reardon’s top travel essentials for a smooth, serene trip

60 ZERO WASTE FAMILY ACTIVITIES

Ten great ideas to max out your summer holiday without the rubbish

62 HANGING OUT

Fabulous finds for your home, roof and garden

28 BOOK AND FILM MATTERS

These inspiring selections will feed your mind and your heart

30 OBJECTS OF DESIRE

Hit the beach – we’ve got you covered!

32 WATER GADGET DIRECTORY

From frivolous to functional, get aquatic with these cool toys 8

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56

62

64 40

72

103

82

STYLE

TRAVEL

PERSPECTIVES

64 MAIDENS OF THE DEEP

82 ECO LUXE CITY GUIDE: SAN FRANCISCO

103

PAUL WATSON

105

PAUL CONNETT

107

CYRILL GUTSCH

Renowned conservation photographer Shawn Heinrichs makes underwater magic

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NAMASTE THE ECO WAY

Yoga gear that your mind, body, soul, and the planet will love

74 STYLE FILE: FESTIVAL CHIC

Get festival-ready with these boho babe selections

76 MEN’S TREND: JUNK HUNK

This carefree and comfortable look is perfect for long hot summer days

78 MY ESSENTIALS

Ocean conservationist Tracey Read shares her must-have items

80 THE LOOKBOOK

Five designers who are redefining waste with fabulous results

Explore the laid-back California city

84 11 ULTIMATE BEACH RETREATS Your summer blissout travel guide

90 ESCAPE + EXPLORE: CAVALLO POINT A stunning eco heritage resort at the base of the Golden Gate Bridge

Sea Shepherd’s founder knows what it’s going to take to save the fish – and humanity

The global zero waste expert offers insight into our plastic folly

TECH

Design plus collaboration equals conservation success at Parley for the Oceans

93 APP-LAUSE

ET CETERA

Get ocean-savvy with these aquatic apps

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OWN THE ROAD

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POWER PLAY

Motoring with style and sustainability this summer

Elon Musk’s latest energy innovation is game changing

101 TOP COMPOSTERS

12 CONTRIBUTORS 16 EDITOR’S NOTE 108 WHERE TO FIND US 109 SUBSCRIBE TO WIN 110 ONE MORE THING

Food waste goes high-tech and we have the lowdown Ecozine.com

Summer 2015

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.com FOUNDER, CEO

LISA CHRISTENSEN | lisa@ecozine.com

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EDITOR IN CHIEF

NISSA MARION | nissa@ecozine.com

EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR Alex Andersson | alex@ecozine.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Cyrill Gutsch, Jamie Oliver, Karry Lai, Kate Reardon,

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Kristine Basilio, Paul Connett, Paul Watson, Nicholas Mallos editor@ecozine.com

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CREATIVE GRAPHIC DESIGN Andy Lai, IndeeDesign COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Courtesy of G-Star RAW FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY Shawn Heinrichs EDITORIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Sean Baylis, Danny Lee ILLUSTRATION Tanya ‘Pirate’ Bennett

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CONTRIBUTORS

< Cyrill Gutsch

< Jamie Oliver

Cyrill Gutsch is the Founder of Parley for the Oceans – an organisation that facilitates industry partnerships for a sustainable future. The company played an instrumental role in connecting Sea Shepherd, G-Star and Bionic Yarn for the recycled collection RAW for the Oceans, and has just announced a long-term partnership with Adidas. Cyrill was previously a designer.

Jamie Oliver is on a major mission: to bring fresh, healthy food back into our daily lives. The world-renowned chef, TV host, cookbook author, mentor and restaurateur has inspired thousands of people to spend more time enjoying cooking delicious food from fresh ingredients.

Eco tip: Make an effort to learn about the food you’re eating – where it comes from and how it affects your body.

Eco tip: Become part of the global cleanup network, and go remove trash and discarded fishing nets from our beaches and the high seas!

Kate Reardon >

Mike Hill >

Kate is a naturopath, nutritionist, intuitive healer and coach who has worked with clients across the globe. These days, Kate spends most of her time running, fasting, detoxing, eating raw food and doing yoga at her healing space in Bali, Natural Instinct Healing.

Mike is a Hong Kong-based financial professional with 20 years of finance experience in the USA and Asia, including investment management, capital markets trading, and investment banking. A lifelong sailor with a love of the ocean, Mike has an MBA from the University of Rochester’s Simon School and BA from the University of Pennsylvania.

Eco tip: Try yoga for holistic, eco-friendly fitness. You don’t need any special machines or gear and the basic principles are tens of thousands of years old.

Eco tip: Walk to your destination whenever possible. If you need to drive, consider an electric vehicle.

< Nicholas Mallos

< Paul Connett

Nicholas is Director of the Trash Free Seas Program at Ocean Conservancy. Nick has spent the past decade researching the ecological, economic and behavioural components associated with ocean plastic pollution. Nick is inspired by the ocean and by determined people around the globe who are working tirelessly to protect our blue planet.

Dr. Paul Connett is a graduate of Cambridge University and holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from Dartmouth College. He specialises in Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, and over the past 30 years his work on waste management has taken him to 64 countries, where he has given over 2,500 pro-bono public presentations. Ralph Nader said of Paul Connett, “He is the only person I know who can make waste interesting.”

Eco tip: Stay away from coral jewellery and tortoise shell hairclips, and instead opt for more ocean-friendly products.

Eco tip: The opposite of over-consumption is community development. We need more people in our lives and fewer objects. Make friends not waste!

Paul Watson >

Sean Baylis >

As the Founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and Co-founding Director of Greenpeace Foundation, Paul has been at the forefront of environmental activism for many ecologically decisive decades. His campaigns focus on direct action against trawling ships, whale and seal hunters, long-line fishing techniques and other damaging practices.

Sean was given a Kodak 124 Instamatic Camera for his fifth birthday, and the rest is history! His passion for photographing the world around us spans some 40 years, and over that time has developed into his dedicated profession. He is also an involved supporter of ocean conservation and recycling initiatives. Eco tip: Please don’t throw anything into the ocean. Think before you buy something wrapped in plastic, shop at the wet market and take your own bags. And drink the tap water – it’s good for you!

Eco tip: Everyone can protect the oceans! It can be as easy as not eating seafood, removing trash from beaches, or avoiding plastic, especially single-use plastics.

< Shawn Heinrichs

< Tanya Bennet

Shawn is an Emmy Award winning cinematographer, acclaimed photographer, and marine conservationist. His work has featured in National Geographic, BBC, CNN, The New York Times, Washington Post, and numerous other publications. Shawn is on a mission to capture inspiring and dramatic imagery that connects the global community to the beauty and vulnerability of threatened marine species.

Tanya Bennett, AKA Pirate, combines her skills in digital imagery and fashion illustration to create unique paintings, multimedia installations and commercial projects for high-profile clients such as Lane Crawford and Tumi. UK-born, the talented artist is now based in Hong Kong, where she spends her free time exploring its hill trails.

Eco tip: Eat less seafood and a more plant

Eco tip: Get outside! There’s nothing like a long hike in the wilderness to remind you why we must protect it.

based diet – scientists predict a collapse of all seafood fisheries by 2050.

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EDITOR'S NOTE

hey say time flies when you’re having fun, and the past year this has certainly held true. We’re excited to be celebrating our first anniversary, with a spectacular Summer Issue! First up: We are incredibly “happy” to have the illustrious Pharrell Williams gracing our cover. A passionate ocean ambassador, he’s been working with Bionic Yarn to create fashion out of recycled plastic collected from the oceans, partnering with everyone from Timberland to G-star RAW. He is also the Creative Director of Live Earth: Road to Paris, the massive climate action campaign launching later this year. We’ve got the scoop on his connection with the ocean, Live Earth, the power of creativity and more. Find it on page 34! Meanwhile, the heat of the season has settled in, and when Mother Nature turns it up, what better way to cool off than a dip in the sea? We’ve made sure that our oceanthemed Summer Issue offers plenty of deep blue goodness for your reading pleasure. Kicking off with the grande dame of marine conservation, Dr. Sylvia Earle (pg 24), we

go from the serious (Blue Matters, pg 40, explores the major issues facing our seas today) to the useful (Ocean Conservancy serves up their top 10 marine conservation tips on pg 54) to the inspiring (Ocean Heroes, pg 46) and fun (Water Gadgets, pg 32). So go on… dive in! There’s more to summer than frolicking in the sea, of course. It is also a fine time for escaping everyday life in the city for a while. To this end, we happily did a little research on summer holiday destinations, and we know you’ll swoon over our picks for 11 Ultimate Beach Retreats, pg 84. Or, experience the laid-back coastal California vibe in San Francisco (pg 82). Just remember to bring sunscreen (pg 20) and some soothing travel essentials (pg 58)! Plus, as of this year, June 21st is the International Day of Yoga; so we’ve teamed up with the Asia Yoga Conference to bring you a selection of gorgeous, eco-friendly yoga gear for the occasion (pg 72). The Summer Solstice, also on June 21st, marks the longest day of the year – derived from the Latin sol (sun) and sistere (stillness).

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Apart from sparking celebrations and festivals across the globe, it also marks a significant time to reflect on what we truly want, and to release old habits and approach life with renewed vigour and sense of gratitude. For us at Ecozine, gratitude comes easy, as we are continually thankful for the many people and companies that are supporting and sharing our journey of growth. And we sure are growing – inevitably. We hope you will enjoy this issue as part of your summer reading, be it on holiday, at the beach this weekend, or in the cool comfort of your home. As always, we would love to hear from you, so please feel free to email me at editor@ecozine.com with your questions, feedback and ideas. Namaste. Gratefully, Nissa Marion Editor in Chief

ecozinemagazine

Ecozine.com

Photography by: Lisa Christensen

T

A summer sunset yoga moment , captured by my bestie.


LISA

Loves..

STUFF YOU WANT TO KNOW

From travels, treasures and inspirations to body, mind and spirit, Ecozine’s Founder Lisa Christensen shares a few of her favourite eco things

In m y ha p p y p la ce ... su n, sa nd , se a an d sere nit y ! THE SUMMER ISSUE

BIONIC EFFORT

Pharrell’s gone and done it again! The Creative Director of Bionic Yarn has teamed up with G-Star RAW and Parley for the Oceans to create collection made entirely out of recycled ocean plastic! This ultimate trendsetter is showing us, and everyone, that wearing trash – and saving our seas – is the epitome of casual cool. Check out his new collection! rawfortheoceans.g-star.com

As the saying goes, the cure for anything is salt water, sweat, tears and the sea. Let us all respect, honour and take care of what takes care of us – the oceans. Without them, there would be no life on earth.

BREATHE EASY

Dyson has applied all its expertise at keeping living environments clean in its latest innovation: the Dyson Pure Cool Air Purifier. This bladeless purifier removes 99.95 per cent of harmful ultrafine particles, even as tiny as 0.1 microns – a must-have for those of us living in polluted mega cities! dyson.com

NO EXCUSE FOR SINGLE USE!

Everything tastes better with non-disposable cutlery! Outdoor dining is enhanced by knowing that you’re not adding to the gyres of garbage in our oceans. The ‘No Excuse for Single Use’ set from Plastic Free Seas contains a fork, spoon, chopsticks and a stainless steel straw with a cleaning brush. I carry mine around everywhere, and the best bit about it is that every purchase supports solution-based education programmes! plasticfreeseas.org

CHARGE IT UP

Now you can charge batteries while you get your tan on! This bikini, designed by Andrew Schneider, is covered in thin, flexible photovoltaic film strips and USB connectors! The high-tech two-piece is also hand-stitched – hence the US $200 price tag. Totally worth it though! andrewjs.com

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BALLIN’ IN BODRUM

Maçakızı is located in the town of Türkbükü, southwest Turkey, on the Bodrum peninsula. This property is utterly surrounded by the sparkling Aegean seascape, and does it ever make the most of it! The sea is a constant presence at this high-end eco-luxe hotel, from the open-air, ocean-level restaurants to the fleet of luxurious yachts available for your nautical pleasure. They even take you out on sunset cruises to the Greek islands! Whether sunbathing on the expansive seaside deck, or relaxing in a Turkish bath, this place delivers in a big way. I just checked this off my bucket list, and highly recommend it! macakizi.com

FILM AND BOOK FAVES

THE PLASTIC AGE

This uplifting documentary follows Pharrell’s inspirational and pioneering initiative to turn the Pacific Garbage Patch into bionic yarn. Ever the original thinker, Pharrell sees the 700,000 tonnes of plastic littering our ocean as a resource to be tapped and profited from. The short documentary is available for viewing on i-D.co

DRIFTERS

A fellow surf rider, I first met Pam at a Marine Debris conference in Hawaii, and absolutely love her work. Drifters is a collaboration between art, science, activism and like-minded groups that begins with the assumption that there is only ONE big blue conscious ocean. Pam recycles marine debris into hauntingly beautiful art installations and photos, making this quite the coffee table conversation piece! driftersproject.net

GET YOUR FREAK ON

These Volt Green ‘The Freak’ performance socks take your athletic abilities to freakish new heights with a ribbed leg, grid-padded ankle, vented top and thicklypadded foot. It’s basically a second skin that allows you to tackle the tallest mountain at your fastest speed! The company also sponsors Chi Fan for Charity Hong Kong, which donates 100 per cent of gala dinner proceeds to causes such as Enlighten-Action for Epilepsy – a cause that lies close to my heart. Bonus: they’re made in a zero waste factory! legendshongkong.com

UV RAY, GO AWAY

The Cellular Protection Sun Cream from Clarins takes the scientific approach – packing in tonnes of natural ingredients, including zinc oxide, which is designed to sit on the surface of your skin and reflect the sun’s harmful UV rays. Just pure protection baby. theorganicpharmacy.com

RE-LIGHT MY FIRE

Heat it up, baby! When out on those summer camping trips I highly recommend that you equip yourself with the BioLite Camp Stove – the outdoorsman’s best friend. This multifunctional device allows you to cook, charge gadgets and illuminate your surroundings, all without burning pesky fossil fuels. It creates smokeless fire from twigs, and then harnesses the power generated from the flames to power both a battery and an LED light. biolitestove.com

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THE SOURCE

The

LIST

SUNSCREENS

1

Safeguard your skin from UV rays with these top quality, natural options CAUDALIE SOLEIL DIVIN ANTI-AGING FACE SUNCARE Turn back the clock while you sunbathe! The main ingredient of this face cream is grape seed polyphenols, Caudalie’s top anti-ageing weapon. On top of that it has a transparent, matte, non-sticky finish. US $36

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LUSH SUNBLOCK SOLID SUNSCREEN WASH Naturally rich in zinc oxide and packed with sesame oil, chamomile and cocoa butter, this bar is easily applied – simply glide it on in the shower! US $20

BADGER BALM KIDS SUNSCREEN CREAM Your kids will want to eat this, it smells so good – and they probably could! It’s made from 100 per cent natural and 95 per cent organic ingredients, and has a delightful tangerine and vanilla scent. It’s also biodegradable and safe for ocean ecosystems. US $15.99

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CLARINS UV PLUS ANTI-POLLUTION Perfect for the urban jungle, this translucent, multi-protection formula protects your skin cells from the harmful toxins in our atmosphere, as well as UV rays. Plus it has a divinely smooth and oil-free finish. US $48

COOLA ECO-LUX SPORT SUNSCREEN SPRAY Say no to stickiness with this clean, natural, unscented spray. It contains 70 per cent certified organic ingredients such as cucumber, algae and strawberry extract, applies evenly, and is water resistant for 80 minutes! US $36

INVISIBLE ZINC TINTED DAYWEAR From bum to beach babe in a second! This bronze-tinted product is made from nature’s own sun block – micronized zinc oxide. And the award-winning Aussie sunscreen also works as a daily moisturiser and foundation. US $36

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THE SOURCE

DIY 6

COCONUT (MIRACLE) OIL RECIPES

The humble coconut is rich in healthy fats and packed with nutrients – perfect for homemade remedies, cooking and even as a sealant!

1

SOFT, SHINY HAIR Easy frizz-free tresses Coconut oil > Apply a coin-sized amount of pure coconut oil to the ends and mid-section of your hair, making sure to apply evenly. Leave in for an hour, or overnight for really stressed locks. Then shampoo as normal, and once it dries your hair will be smooth and bouncy.

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EGG PROTECTOR Preserve shelf life naturally Coconut oil > Melt some coconut oil in the microwave. Then roll a dry, roomtemperature egg in it, or use a brush to spread the coconut oil evenly over the eggshell surface. Let the egg dry and store in a cool, dry place. This can increase an egg’s shelf life up to tenfold by creating an impermeable natural seal around it.

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JUST LIKE BUTTER Indulgent dairy-free alternative 1 jar of shredded, unsweetened coconut or coconut flakes Pinch of salt > Put the ingredients in a blender, and blast. Stop intermittently to push down any stray flakes on the sides of the blender. You can add microwave-melted coconut oil to soften the texture to your desired consistency. You can also add vanilla, cinnamon or maple syrup for a sweet twist! Store at room temperature in an airtight container. This makes a divine spread and provides a punch of (healthy) fat when cooking.

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THROAT SOOTHER Restore your voice 4 parts honey 1 part coconut oil A pinch of cinnamon (optional) > Put the honey, cinnamon and coconut oil in a pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until the mix reaches 150 C (about 20 minutes). Pour the mix onto a tray lined with greased baking paper. When the mix has cooled to bendy consistency, pull off small sections and roll them into balls. Leave to harden.

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SUN PROTECTION Non-toxic UV protection 6 parts coconut oil 2 parts beeswax BRIGHT LIKE 1 part zinc oxide MOISTURE ON-CALL A DIAMOND 3 drops of raspberry Replenish and soothe dehydrated skin Lips looking lifeless? seed oil, carrot seed 2 parts olive oil Dull cheekbones? Smear on a oil or vitamin E oil 1 part coconut oil hint of coconut oil and it works > Put all the ingredients 1 part beeswax as a highlighter – accentuating except the zinc oxide Dash of vitamin E oil the areas and making them in a jar. Fill a saucepan > Put all the ingredients in a glass jar. appear smooth, supple and with about 5cm of Fill a saucepan with about 5cm of water oh-so kissable. water and heat to medium and put it on the stove at a medium heat. temperature. Place the jar with Place the jar in the water, allowing the mix the ingredients in the water. Stir inside to melt. Stir the contents every so often, the mix intermittently until a smooth and add some vanilla extract or jasmine oil if you consistency is achieved. Add the zinc want added fragrance. Once it has reached a desired oxide, stir, pour into another jar and consistency just pour it into a separate container and store for summer outings! store at room temperature. Ecozine.com


THE SOURCE

Sadly, some losses are irrecoverable. I remember meeting one of Florida’s most charismatic animals, the Caribbean monk seal, a playful St. Bernard-sized creature that once lolled on beaches throughout the region. The last one was sighted in 1952. The species is now officially listed as extinct.

Tell us about Mission Blue.

Q

My dream is for everyone to use all means at their disposal to spark a movement to create a global network of marine protected areas – “Hope Spots” – large enough to save and restore the ocean, the blue heart of the planet. That’s why I founded Mission Blue. Currently, less than three per cent of the ocean is protected in any way, and 99 per cent is open to commercial fishing. By designating Hope Spots around the world, [our goal is to] safeguard at least 20 per cent of the ocean by 2020.

&A

Sylvia Earle

O

cean advocate Dr. Sylvia Earle has been at the forefront of deep sea exploration for more than four decades and is not planning to stop any time soon. Having led over 50 undersea expeditions and spent over 6,000 hours underwater as both a highly respected field scientist and a National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence, her life’s mission is to save our oceans and the creatures that live in them. Read on, and be inspired.

Your work for the oceans has been significant. Was there a particular moment that ignited your passion for ocean conservation?

My first encounter with the ocean was on the Jersey Shore when I was three years old and I got knocked over by a wave. The ocean certainly knew how to get my attention! It wasn’t frightening. It was more exhilarating than anything else. Life in the ocean had captured my imagination, and it has held it ever since.

You’ve spent so many hours in the water during your impressive career. Have you witnessed any notable changes over the years?

I have personally witnessed a time of unprecedented discovery – and unprecedented loss. Half a century ago, it seemed the ocean was too vast, too resilient to be affected by our actions. Now we know: coral reefs, kelp forests, numerous kinds of fish and other ocean wildlife have declined sharply and even disappeared, owing to pressures we have applied. Dead zones have appeared. Oxygenproducing plankton is declining. The ocean is in trouble – and that means we are in trouble, too.

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What can Ecozine’s readers do to support your mission?

Look in the mirror, consider your talents, and think about how you might use them to make a difference. Some have artistic skills; others are good with numbers or have a way with words. Everyone has power to make a difference as an individual. The key is in knowing that what you do matters, including doing nothing! We need to convey a sense of urgency because the world is changing quickly. We have options that we are going to lose within ten years, unless we take action now.

What is your all-time favourite dive spot, or diving experience you’ve had?

Oh, there are so many. One dive that comes to mind is at a place called Marion Reef in the Coral Sea, diving in 21 metres of water, and these grey reef sharks circled us. I couldn’t count them, there were so many – at least 100. They were forming a great wheel around us but were quietly curious, not aggressive. It was a little hair-raising – had they chosen to gang up on us, they could have easily consumed us. But they were just looking.

What’s a typical day in the life of an ocean conservation icon?

There is no such thing! Part of the joy of doing what I do is that nothing is “routine,” not even sleeping. I spend about 300 days out of the year travelling for expeditions and scientific conferences. I give lots of lectures, sometimes from dawn until dusk. It’s one of my favourite things to do besides diving, which I also do frequently.

What’s your top conservation tip?

Our giant appetites have consumed 90 per cent of our big fish in just a few decades. How long before those fish are all gone, if we keep eating them this way? Everyone can make a difference just by changing what they consume. Less demand will mean less support for huge commercial fisheries. It isn’t too late to shift from the swift, sharp decline of ocean systems in recent decades to an era of steady recovery. It’s time to take care of the ocean as if life depends on it, because it does.

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THE SOURCE

Screening Room

Books

That Matter All released last year, these three aquatic page-turners are informative, entertaining and thought provoking. The Reef: A Passionate History

(Scientific American/FSG 2014) Iain McCalman describes the history of the Great Barrier Reef, starting from its discovery by Captain James Cook in 1769 right up to 2009 when marine scientist Charlie Veron gave his infamously dire warning that “the Great Barrier Reef is dying”. This book is a poignant and beautifully written look at what we stand to lose.

Deep: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves

(Eamon Dolan Books/ Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2014) This book delves into the science and spirituality of freediving. Testing the limits of human endurance, freedivers are able to experience the ocean in a way the restrictions of scuba don’t allow. Author James Nestor meets freedivers from all walks of life, and even tries his lung at the discipline himself. He shares the experience with whales, the ultimate freediving experts, and learns about the physiological changes our bodies undergo at depth.

Killing Keiko: The True Story of Free Willy’s Return to the Wild

(Callinectes Press 2014) A first-hand account of the release programme for Keiko, the orca whale from the blockbuster 90s movie Free Willy. Following the film’s popularity, citizens raised funds to make the movie a reality, and release Keiko for real. But setting free a whale that had been captive for 18 years turned out to be a naïve endeavour. Mark Simmons writes of the botched operation, spurred on by emotion rather than sense, which ultimately led to Keiko’s tragic death.

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SEVEN FILMS Worth Watching

Hey you, don’t feel blue! Take inspiration from these ocean documentaries about amazing individuals and organisations, and their efforts to save our seas. From overfishing and pollution, to captive cetaceans and deep water drilling – these films explore the complex relationship between man and the marine. Black Ice (2015)

Black Ice follows a Greenpeace mission to halt environmentally catastrophic drilling in the Arctic Ocean. It documents the harsh conditions of the mission, and how the ‘Arctic 30’ team were eventually arrested, detained and tried for piracy. Ultimately, it demonstrates how the human spirit is tougher than arctic conditions, prison walls, and corporations, concluding that: “Giving up is not an option. Turning the arctic into a gas farm is not an option.”

Blackfish (2013)

If you haven’t heard of Blackfish, you’ve been living in a black hole! This powerful and game-changing documentary has brought mega conglomerate SeaWorld to its knees since its release, which opened the world’s eyes to the cruelty of cetacean captivity. It focuses on the tale of Tilikum, a performing killer whale who attacked his trainer in 2010.

Mission Blue (2014)

For over six decades, visionary ocean icon Dr. Sylvia Earle has studied our seas and its living organisms, and seen with her own eyes how climate change is taking its toll. Mission Blue follows her most important operation to date – a move that could resuscitate what Dr. Earle calls our “dying ocean”. Beautifully shot, this film takes underwater exploration to new depths – and brings you along!

Pirate Fishing (2012)

Discover the industrial scale of modern day pirate fishing, which puts extra strain on our already-besieged oceans. Scouring the oceans around impoverished nations, the multi-million dollar trade is devastating the environment and also depriving those most in need of valuable marine resources. This film is an eye-opener.

Plastic Paradise: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (2013)

Travel to Midway Atoll, which is effectively a floating trash dump. Here, a colossal accumulation of marine debris is forming a literal (and man-made) stain on our planet. In one of the most powerful visual testaments to the effects of our throwaway culture, Plastic Paradise blows denial of right out of the water by interviewing scientists, industry leaders, legislators and activists.

Revolution (2015)

This epic adventure takes the viewer from the evolution of life on earth to the revolution underway to save it. Revolution was filmed over four years in more than 15 countries, by acclaimed Sharkwater filmmaker Rob Stewart. Not only is it an exquisite showcase of our world’s spectacular wildlife, but it also exposes the ugly truths about Canada’s oil sands, which are a real and impending threat to human survival.

North of the Sun (2012)

Follow young Norwegian explorers Inge Wegge (25) and Jørn Ranum (22) as they spend an entire Nordic winter – nine long months – in an isolated, uninhabited bay in the Arctic Circle. The vast Atlantic Ocean becomes their most valuable resource, providing everything from driftwood for shelter, to the waves they surf as their main entertainment. Ecozine.com


THE SOURCE

OBJECTS of DESIRE

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Head to the beach with these smart summer essentials

My Stunna Shades

Look the part when you step out in the sun. These sleek aviator style bamboo sunglasses are born sustainable, and even come packaged in recycled paper printed with soy-based ink. Best part? A portion of the sale will be donated to plant a tree. US $95 | Bambooki

p Happy Feet Make a splash this summer in these fun flip flops. The wearer of this particular pair can have an added spring in their step knowing that seven per cent of the sales from this limited edition Conservation International model will go to Brazilian marinebiodiversity conservation projects. The collection comes in three different prints; the design pictured is inspired by purple anemone. US $35 | Havaianas

p Beach Mat-ters This beautiful handmade beach mat is the epitome of quality craftsmanship. Available in three vibrant hues to effortlessly match your summer look, it is easily portable and durable enough for the littles to play on for many seasons. US $77 | House of Anli

p Sit Back And Relax Chill out on this handcrafted folding beach chair with custom fabric woven in France. It’s stained with natural, eco-friendly oil for superior outdoor protection and is sturdy yet lightweight and portable. US $149 | Negril

p Bag It Up Grab this gorgeous beach bag from Ro&Mo’s AFRO Blush line for style that comes with a real story. It’s functional, fabulous and ethical! The bag is handwoven in Mozambique, and lined with traditional Capulana fabric – a bold-coloured sarong traditionally worn by women in Africa. US $67 | Ro&Mo

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Roll On

Be a boho beach bumpkin with this Beach Break peshtamel design towel. Versatile, large and oh-so-plush, peshtamel towels are flat-woven and traditionally used in Turkish baths. This particular range comes in an array of beautiful hues, is super absorbent and made from sustainably sourced material! The organic Turkish cotton is also handwoven rather than industrially produced, minimising emissions. US $93 | The Fabulous Towel Company

p For The Little Ones Made from corn, not petroleum, and safer not only for our kids but also for our oceans, these fun and fantastic toys are the perfect companions for a family beach day.

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US $22 | Zoe B Organic

Water You Doing?

Don’t forget to stay hydrated! Proud partner of WaterAid, S’well bottles are not only helping spread a message that plastic bottles are completely inappropriate, they also give back to society – and are extremely functional. They are made of stainless steel and keep your beverage hot for 12 hours, or cold for 24 hours! Plus they come in a variety of cool colours and sizes. US $25-45 | PhatRice

p Hats Off To You This modish yet comfortable hemp fedora is ideal for a chic beach date. Designed to be light and breathable, you won’t want to leave the house without it this summer. US $38 | Echo New York

p Speak Easy Be a DJ with a difference! The eco-amp is made out of 100 per cent recycled material, and comes in a do-it-yourself, fold-out kit. You can request a personalised motif on it, and there are models to fit most iPhones, and the iPad. When it’s time to go home, just fold this baby back up and take it home for reuse – or chuck it in the compost as it’s 100 per cent biodegradable! US $10 | eco-made

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THE SOURCE

WATER GADGET

DIRECTORY 2

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From tough underwater cameras and watches to shower savers and water-powered clocks, we’ve rounded up the coolest aqua gadgets for your home and beyond!

Shower Saver

This futuristic self-powered water and energy meter from Amphiro makes it fun to save, with adorable animations to motivate you. Displaying water and energy consumption in real time, the device lets you keep track of your usage and set saving targets via a free online portal. US $59.90 | amphiro.com

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Wakey Wakey No batteries or electricity required for this water-powered alarm clock from Bedol. Simply pop open the cap and fill up with ordinary tap water every six months or so to get perfect time. Ions in the water are converted into clean energy to power the clock. US $26 bedolwhatsnext.com

1-2-3, Say “Seal!”

Olympus’ Tough TG-320 is aptly named for its resilience in extreme environments – the sleekly designed camera is waterproof, shockproof and freezeproof. From the tranquil to the turbulent, this camera offers reliable, high-quality shooting in most conditions. A unique feature is the 3D photo shooting function, which helps to recreate a sense of depth in photos. US $160 | olympus.com

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Tune In

Sing along to your favourite radio tunes in the shower with this water pressure powered radio from Tango Group. Fitted directly on the faucet of the shower, the water flow powers a turbine generator in the radio for excellent reception and clear sound. Just make sure you don’t waste water by going overtime when your favourite tune comes on! US $50 | tangogroup.net

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Watch This

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Water-resistant to 100 metres, the Deep Sea Chronograph Cermet Waterproof Watch is designed to guarantee absolute reliability in aquatic environments. Resistant to shock, pressure and extreme temperatures, the watch is made from a ceramic and metal composite, making this super-stylish timepiece lightweight and comfortable as well. US $18,194 | jaeger-lecoultre.com

Power Up

For outdoor enthusiasts who spend time away from the electricity grid, myFC’s PowerTrekk Water Powered Charger provides instant portable power from water anywhere, for electric equipment compatible with the common USB standard. From mobile phones and digital cameras to GPS devices, charge your devices without ever needing a wall socket. US $149 | myfcpower.com

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EXCLUSIVE

CLEANS UP

Pharrell Williams is turning sea trash into trendy threads, and conducting a global chorus to end climate apathy. And people are listening.

Photo courtesy of G-Star RAW

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Words by Alex Andersson

e’s an undeniable style icon and acclaimed music producer, and he has an eternally youthful face. This we know of Pharrell Williams. But what most don’t know is that he’s also a mastermind mogul on an environmental mission. Most recently, Pharrell has been involved in two major conservation initiatives. He’s the Creative Director of climate change awareness mega-event, Live Earth, and co-designer of G-Star’s RAW for the Oceans clothing line, made of recycled ocean plastic. Cynics have him pegged as a pawn, being enlisted by the green movement for nothing more than to direct a millisecond of his behemoth fan base’s attention to environmental causes. How wrong they are. In truth, these initiatives are natural progressions of an impossibly successful career, and a remarkably down-toearth superstar. In Pharrell’s case, the ubiquitously overused term ‘creative genius’ could not be more appropriate. He founded and operates the ‘i am OTHER’ media venture, which includes a record label, a production company, numerous fashion brands... the list goes on. He’s bagged 11 Grammys, curated international art shows, and personally designed everything from jewellery to furniture. He’s also produced hits for the Backstreet Boys, Britney Spears, Kelis, Nelly and Jay-Z, and worked with Kanye, Madonna, Shakira,

J-Lo, Gwen Stefani, Justin Timberlake and everyone in between – and we haven’t even got to Happy yet! It’s this penchant for networking, passion for creation and innovative multi-talent that has positioned Pharrell perfectly for his most meaningful endeavour yet: contributing to our planet’s protection. In a similar way to his extensive musical collaborations, Pharrell has teamed up with partners to pursue this goal – including Parley for the Oceans, Sea Shepherd, and Al Gore’s Climate Reality Project, among others. Pharrell’s experience and proven skill in collaborating has contributed enormously to the popularity of these efforts, and their successful direction. And it’s not just on a whim. Protecting our earth is something that’s part of Pharrell’s very core beliefs. It’s part of who he is, and what he has achieved. “I just have a connection with the ocean. It yields so much life, including our own, so we owe it,” says Pharrell. “When I was a little boy the first neighbourhood I lived in was called Atlantis, right off the Atlantic Ocean. That’s where I discovered my love for music – through the motion of water. My imagination ran wild”. And what an imagination it is. The son of a handyman and teacher, Pharrell and his best friend from school formed a band and went on to establish Neptune, a record production company that saw the singer-songwriter create 90s hits you know you remember, such as Tonight’s the Night (Backstreet Boys), I’m a Slave 4 U (Britney Spears) and Hot in Herre (Nelly). On songwriting, Pharrell waxes poetic: “You treat the air as a canvas, and the paint is the chords that come through your fingers, out of the keyboard.”

“I DISCOVERED

MY LOVE FOR MUSIC THROUGH THE

MOTION OF WATER

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usic isn’t his only avenue for fantastic creativity. Aesthetically, Pharrell creates a narrative through his unique clothing, and the message is – I’m artistic, I’m an individual, and so are you. His clothing lines Billionaire Boys Club and Ice Cream Apparel echo these sentiments, as does his jewellery collection for Louis Vuitton, and most of all the G-Star RAW for the Oceans collection. In his own words, “I need to give back to what is responsible for giving me this life. Bionic Yarn is a way to tie everything together and give back to the universe.” In 2008, a then-nascent Bionic Yarn and its Co-founder and CEO Tyson Toussant entered Pharrell’s life, giving him the perfect opportunity to deliver this intergalactic payback. It was that year he became Investor, Brand Ambassador and Creative Director of

the company behind the fabric for the G-Star RAW collection, and many other subsequent brand collaborations, including GAP and Adidas. In 2011, a collaboration with Timberland saved 1.7 million plastic bottles from landfill. Partnership facilitator for sustainable fashion, Parley for the Oceans, recognises the significance of this feat. “When we looked at the ocean plastic pollution problem, we came to one key idea: to turn ocean plastic debris into an asset. Into an amazing material for the fashion industry. Something that is sexy, something that has a story. We found Bionic Yarn, and realised they are the perfect partners because they can turn low-grade plastic into a high profile material,” says Cyrill Gutsch, Founder of Parley for the Oceans. TRASH TO CASH

Pharrell hopes the recycled ocean plastics collection will help people see marine debris as a valuable resource.

IT’S WEIRD THAT PLASTICS COULD HAVE SUCH A PROFOUNDLY

DARK EFFECT

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NYC FASHION WEEK

Left to right is Tim Coombs, Co-founder of Bionic Yarn; Tyson Toussant, Co-founder and CEO of Bionic Yarn; Cyrill Gutsch, Founder of Parley for the Oceans; Shubhankar Ray, Global Brand Director for G-Star RAW and Pharrell Williams, Creative Director of Bionic Yarn during ‘Ocean Night’.

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pon establishing the partnership with G-Star RAW, Ever the optimist, Pharrell believes that innovation, adaptation Pharrell’s collaborative and creative design skills went and creativity can overcome even challenges as heavy as this into overdrive. The spring collection features washed- one. Bionic Yarn is just one of the expressions of this vision. down denim bombers and distressed jeans embossed with the “It’s bionic. It’s life. It’s consideration for life,” he says. And ocean health is a complicated thing to consider. Pollution, endearing cartoon octopus that serves as both the logo of the line, and a symbolic nod to its origins. The message of sea conservation though a severe problem, is not the only threat. Pharrell acknowledges and takes on a deeper issue at play here: changing is literally woven into the DNA of this multi-faceted fabric. “Aesthetically there are some interesting things that I feel like ocean chemistry. Melting ice caps and higher carbon dioxide concentrations are suffocating our seas, and we are accomplishing, but when you realise exposing its organisms to such a rapid change what it is we are trying to do – pulling the WE ARE PULLING in environment that many creatures are unable roughage from the ocean, recycling the plastic to cope. bottles to make yarn versus making new These are the less obvious, more polyester – what it represents is what makes it FROM THE complicated connections that need to be so special,” says Pharrell. made. Not just by scientists or activists, but Parley for the Oceans connected Bionic Yarn by everyone. In order to deliver that message with Sea Shepherd, which collects discarded TO MAKE NEW to as many people as possible (and ensure fishing nets from the high seas that are some 70 they listen), we need to use entertainment and kilometres long! That’s a lot of potential fabric. popular culture. Pharrell knows this. Al Gore Bionic Yarn then produces high performance also knows this. yarn from the materials, and partners like And so another environmental dream team is formed – this G-Star RAW make it into clothes, market it, and sell it. Meanwhile, Parley for the Oceans continues to refine the search and extraction time for Live Earth 2015. Al Gore brings his experiences running techniques for sea plastic, as well as finding new fashion brands to the last Live Earth event in 2007, while Pharrell brings his unparalleled showbiz network, creative vision and colossal fan partner with – the most recent being Adidas. “It’s weird that plastics could have such a profoundly dark base. Together, they plan to engage and inform over one billion effect on our future,” says Pharrell, and this is by no means an people all over the world through music and social media, and understatement. Currently 288 million tonnes of plastic are being thereby deliver a strong message to the decision-makers who will dumped into the oceans every year, and the Great Pacific Garbage be at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris Patch now contains 600 times more plastic than plankton. Terrifying. this winter.

Top Image: Photos Craig Davidson courtesy of G-Star RAW (opposite) and Parley for the Oceans (this page)

PLASTIC OCEAN YARN

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Photo: World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos 2015

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e are literally going to have humanity harmonised to change the world. It can only happen by each of us recognising all at once,” says Pharrell. “This is the year of our worth and working together. Nowhere is this clearer than in the climate,” adds Al Gore. “We must demand ‘i am OTHER’ manifesto, written by Pharrell, where he describes climate action now. The Paris negotiation is crucial. If we’re to ‘the others’: “We are curious, ambitious, energetic and have every intention ensure success, we need the political will.” This fall, a free mega-concert will be held in Paris near the of squeezing the most out of life… a diverse group of optimistic, Eiffel Tower. As the event’s Creative Director, Pharrell remains bright minds connected by technology and a desire to make our tight-lipped about the lineup. “There are some interesting surprises mark, who together can advance culture and even humanity.” Last, but certainly not least, we are: coming up,” he says. The first Live Earth “people who push society forward. The concert series, in 2007, was an epic WE ARE LITERALLY thinkers. The innovators. The outcasts. event involving over 150 internationally GOING TO HAVE HUMANITY History has proven that it’s the rule acclaimed artists, from Leonardo breakers who have the power to change DiCaprio to Duran Duran, Madonna, the world.” The Police, Red Hot Chili Peppers, ALL AT ONCE This attitude, combined with Metallica, Alicia Keys and many other Pharrell’s passionate call to action and A-list supporters. And it’s this that is Pharrell’s unique, and most valuable, huge societal following, will, without a doubt, deliver momentum ability. Whether it’s songwriting, creating sustainable designs or to the growing green movement. His efforts will reach our youth, organising a global event, he is able to identify the strengths of encourage cooperation, and ultimately facilitate global change. It’s individuals, bring them together with other specialised, talented undeniable that he is passionate about making a positive difference, people, and then unify and amplify everyone’s expertise to reach and we can’t wait to see what comes next from the game-changing a common goal with expert efficiency. That is – definitively – how “Happy” environmentalist.

HARMONISED

dutiful Duet

Al Gore and Pharrell are masterminding the highly anticipated Live Earth concert event this fall.


BLUE MATTERS

What have we done to our ocean, and how can we save it? Words by Nissa Marion and Karry Lai

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ceans. For hundreds of years, and even now, we have viewed them as an endless resource for human needs. The sea provides food for millions, convenient routes of transport and, very often, a vast dumping ground for the detritus of civilization. The recent World Wildlife Fund (WWF) report Reviving the Ocean Economy: The case for action pegged the value of ocean assets at US $24 trillion, which ranks it the seventh largest economy in the world – a conservative estimate. But the oceans are sending us glaring alarms that a breaking point is nigh. Overexploitation is rampant, and the threats to ocean health are many. From deep-sea mining to shark-finning and heavy pollutants, we continue to abuse our privileges and overstep nature’s boundaries, despite an increasingly large body of scientific research warning us of the ocean’s limitations. Among the greatest five threats are: overfishing, coastal development, plastic pollution, rising mercury levels and acidification due to climate change.

The good news is that the ocean is self-healing and resilient, when given a chance. Solutions to the major ocean health issues include: stricter fishing regulations, designated marine protected areas, minimising single-use plastics, regulating chemical runoff from agriculture, and switching to renewable energy. There are a host of marine conservation NGOs dedicated to pushing for such diverse, multi-tiered and complex changes, and they are making headway with policy-makers in both local and international arenas. High level conversations are happening around the world, among everyone from politicians to pop stars. For example, The Economist’s World Ocean Summit brings together corporations, foreign policy ministers, United Nations Environment Programme directors and even presidents to discuss one thing and one thing only: the importance of our ocean. Powerful individuals are now publicly acknowledging the value of the ocean – both economically and ecologically – as a fundamental part of our future that needs to be protected. Because healing our oceans isn’t just about saving fishes and turtles. It’s about our own survival, too.

“NO WATER, NO LIFE. NO BLUE, NO GREEN. ” – SYLVIA EARLE 40

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Photo: C. Ortiz Rojas

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ccording to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 53 per cent of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited, while 32 per cent are overexploited, depleted or recovering from depletion. Stocks of all species currently fished for food are estimated to collapse by 2048, if business continues as usual. Fish and other creatures such as turtles, sharks, and sea mammals are disappearing rapidly due to a combination of factors such as poor fisheries management, massive by-catch of juvenile fish, destructive fishing practices by pirate fishers, and weak fisheries agreements that allow foreign fleets to overfish in the waters of developing countries. Poor fisheries management is a major problem, with few internationally binding regulations. A whopping 64 per cent of the oceans fall outside of the territory of coastal countries, and activity such as commercial fishing is regulated little on the high seas. Pirate fishing – or ‘Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated’ (IUU) fishing – is also a major issue that needs attention. By-catch is increasingly a problem, as the advancement of fishing gear means catching many species over an extensive area, rather than selectively catching targeted species. The WWF estimates that at least 40 per cent, or 38 million tonnes, of annual global marine catch is by-catch. Each year, over 300,000 small whales, dolphins and porpoises die from entanglement in fishing nets. Meanwhile, 100 million sharks are caught and killed each year in targeted fisheries and as by-catch. In general, unsustainable fishing practices stemming from greed and waste are having an enormous impact on our oceans.

FEATURE Not only is this affecting global marine biodiversity, but it is also a source of economic loss and will lead to the eventual demise of fisheries for human sustenance, because supply is not limitless. Through the work of organisations such as The Nature Conservancy, Sea Shepherd and Mission Blue, high seas areas that are in need of protection, especially ecosystems particularly vulnerable to human activities such as key migratory corridors and areas with high species diversity, are being identified as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). One example is the MPA off the South Orkney Islands in the Southern Ocean, covering an area of 94,000 square kilometres, which has been protected from fishing and rubbish dumping since 2010. To reduce by-catch, long-line fisheries, in which millions of baited hooks are set on long lines to catch fish, need to be targeted, as well as the trawl nets being used to catch the majority of the world’s shrimp supply. Smarter fishing gear such as turtle excluder devices – metal grids that allow shrimp to pass into the main part of a trawl net – can be used to help reduce turtle mortality by up to 90 per cent. Traceability is essential when it comes to identifying pirate fishers. With improved monitoring, control and surveillance of IUU fishing, fishing activity by vessels that are not part of an organisation and vessels that are not reporting their catches to authorities can be targeted. Countries such as the United States are closing their borders to illegally caught fish, but being aware as a consumer of species that are likely to come from illegally fished sources is also key. OVER FISHING

Trawling techniques sweep the seas clean of marine life, altering the ecosystem profoundly.

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COASTAL DEVELOPMENT

Fragile marine habitats such as mangroves are battered by human encroachment and chemical runoff.

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ome of the world’s most pristine and biologically Also linked to development is the problem of dead zones. There diverse coastal areas are also some of the most are currently 400 dead zones around the world covering about productive and attractive, bringing tourists from 250,000 square kilometres. These are areas in the water that are all over the world and massive developments for completely deprived of oxygen and nothing can survive. Massive human habitation, commerce and enjoyment. algae blooms are created when eutrophication occurs from According to the United Nations, nearly two-thirds of the world’s nitrogen and phosphorous – key ingredients in fertiliser – entering population now lives within 60 kilometres of the coast. Valuable the marine environment. When algae dies it sinks to the seabed and sensitive habitats such as coral reefs are often the victims of and is broken down by oxygen-consuming bacteria, using up all such development. Although coral reefs occupy less than one per the dissolved oxygen in the water that sustains its living organisms. One of the largest dead zones is cent of the ocean surface, they in the Gulf of Mexico, where are home to a quarter of all THERE ARE CURRENTLY 400 the conversion of forests and marine life. With the close wetlands for agricultural and proximity to human populations, urban developments has resulted other critical areas such as COMPLETELY DEPRIVED OF OXYGEN in destructively high nutrient mangroves, swamps, marshes, levels in the water. estuaries and wetlands, which Developments along the shoreline will continue to grow as are often breeding grounds and nurseries for marine species like sea turtles, are also being affected. Wetlands are often dredged the world’s population increases. But the way we develop can be and filled in with concrete to accommodate urban developments changed. Stricter laws can target runoff, sewage and ecological along coastlines. The problem is especially evident in coastal areas maintenance, so that damage can be dramatically reduced and even reversed. Countries such as Indonesia have begun to without strict development standards. Tourism along coastline areas brings in snorkelers, scuba implement mangrove rehabilitation programmes following the divers and boaters that come in direct contact with fragile reef destruction of over half its mangrove forests to make room for ecosystems. Problems such as sediment stirring, dropping of fish and shrimp farming. Safeguarding vital ecosystems such as coral reefs through anchors, disturbances of animals by boats, collection of marine souvenirs and humans touching sensitive corals have a huge impact. marine protected areas and parks can bring awareness and While a sandy beach break is an attractive holiday for many, it can the resources needed to defend vulnerable marine and coastal come at the expense of mangrove forests and coral reef systems. environments. For tourists, stronger education on the message As tourism booms in coastal areas, it adds to the pressure on local of smart, sensitive holiday behaviour is vital, as is limiting infrastructure, waste and water, such as in Australia’s Great Barrier the number of tourists entering fragile ecosystems to reduce Reef, where 85 per cent of the 1.8 million people who visit there the impact on marine habitats and development pressures on each year are concentrated in Cairns and the Whitsunday Islands, coastal infrastructure. which only have a local population of about 130,000.

OCEAN DEAD ZONES

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Photo courtesy of Living Lamma

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ne of the deadliest problems for our oceans is the monumental amount of plastic litter floating into its ecosystem. Ocean Conservancy estimates that 8 million metric tonnes of plastic enters the sea each year, and the amount is increasing. Dirty beaches and pieces of floating debris are just the surface of the problem. What lurks beneath is a soup of plastic at all stages of degradation, being swallowed by animals and creating massive garbage patches that are trapped by ocean currents and suspended in uninhabited areas of the planet where no garbage should exist. The majority of items collected by volunteers participating in beach cleanups around the world is plastic trash, according to Ocean Conservancy’s latest report. And the stats are staggering. These include 441,493 plastic bags, 940,170 plastic bottles and 555,007 straws and stirrers – and that’s just what manages to get collected and counted by volunteers. Given that an estimated 70 per cent of ocean debris sinks below the surface never to wash up on shore, this represents a fraction of a fraction of the marine debris that is out there. But it certainly highlights the key culprit – plastic. Particularly disposable plastic. While discharges of plastic are spread around the globe, the largest quantities are estimated to be originating from a relatively

small number of countries in Asia and a few middle-income, rapidly developing countries. Twenty countries account for 83 per cent of the mismanaged plastic waste that is entering the oceans. China tops the list of worst offenders at 28 per cent. Legislation such as pay-as-you-throw schemes and banning single-use plastic items go a long way in mitigating the buildup of plastic debris. Meanwhile, organisations like Ocean Conservancy and, locally, the Hong Kong Cleanup are mobilising millions of volunteers to clean up waterways and the oceans, and contribute to scientific databases for better understanding of the problem. Many NGOs are also developing collaborative partnerships with companies and governments, to find cooperative solutions. Clearly, efforts must be made by all stakeholders – all people – to reduce waste at its source. The most immediate and simple answer is to cut down on plastic disposables, and to rethink our behaviour towards waste in general. Individually, we must look beyond plastic because there are better solutions to the things that make life convenient. From sustainable packaging solutions to clothing made from recycled post-consumer plastic, creative thinkers are scaling up the workability of innovations that can help tackle the plastic problem. Voting with our dollar will further motivate producers to take steps in the right direction. PLASTIC POLLUTION

People add 8 million metric tonnes of plastic to the ocean each year.


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cidification is exactly what it sounds like – the pH levels of our oceans are dropping and the water is becoming more acidic. When carbon dioxide is absorbed by seawater, chemical reactions reduce the carbonate ion concentration and pH of the water. Calcium carbonate minerals are essential when it comes to building the skeletons and shells of marine organisms. When these minerals become undersaturated, it affects organisms’ ability to produce and maintain their shells. According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the pH of surface ocean water has fallen by 0.1pH units since the Industrial Revolution. While 0.1 might seem like a small number, the change is logarithmic, meaning a 30 per cent increase in acidity for each drop. This change has taken place faster than any other known change in ocean chemistry in the last 50 million years. With current carbon emission scenarios, it is estimated that by the end of the century, waters could be nearly 150 per cent more acidic. Coral reefs, a vital marine organism, are especially impacted by this effect. Research included in the recent WWF report shows that at the current rate of warming, coral reefs that provide food, jobs and storm protection to several hundred million people will disappear completely by 2050. Shelled organisms such as mussels and oysters are also affected, since they must spend more energy building skeletons, meaning they have less energy left over for reproduction. They may struggle to adapt, or even go extinct. Linked to climate change, ocean acidification is just one of the many ways in which the earth is being affected by increased greenhouse gas emissions. The oceans are an amazing ‘lung’, currently absorbing one-third of human-related carbon dioxide emissions, around 22 million tonnes a day. If the enormous demands on its carbon-absorbing abilities were reduced, it could even restore its own balance over time. The answer is simple, yet also enormously challenging. There are a multitude of things that need to take place to cut down on carbon emissions, from less fossil fuels burning to creating more carbon sinks through actions such as tree planting and re-growing

of mangroves and sea grass beds. Even so, it will take humans hundreds of years to mitigate the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and for the oceans to stabilise again. Now is the time to commit to such action, before it becomes too late.

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ercury levels in the upper ocean have tripled since the industrial revolution due to fossil fuel burning and mining activities, reports a study published in Nature. The oceans currently hold between 60,000 to 80,000 tonnes of mercury from pollution. But the deep water’s ability to sequester mercury has a limit, and mercury levels are predicted to rise by 50 per cent in the next few decades at current emissions levels. Mercury levels magnify with each progression in the food chain, with top predators such as tuna accumulating as much as 10 million times the mercury level of the surrounding seawater. In humans, increased mercury levels have been linked to a rise in neurodevelopmental problems in children. In animals, mercury levels negatively impact the reproductive health and fertility of fish and birds, threatening overall marine biodiversity as well as our own food sources. Heavy metal pollution has come to the forefront of research in the past decade, and we have begun to develop a better understanding of its effects on human health. Mercury standards for industrial facilities need to be stricter to reduce the amount of it entering the atmosphere, ground, and, eventually, the sea. While the oceans can buffer the mercury up to a certain extent, our precious waters are gradually losing this ability as levels continue to rise at an unnatural rate. What concerns scientists most is that mercury toxicity is not always immediately obvious in our bodies, and it can linger in the system – affecting organs such as the brain. Even more dangerous is that mercury bio-accumulates and gets passed down to the next generation through childbirth. The short-term solution for now is to stop consuming high-risk seafood, such as swordfish and tuna.

ACIDIFICATION & MERCURY

Warmer waters and changing chemistry is altering ocean organisms irreversibly.


OCEAN Hong Kong’s movers, shakers and wavemakers in marine conservation Story by Lisa Christensen Photography by Sean Baylis and Danny Lee

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very cause has its hero – and the ocean, rightly so, has many. From oil spills to plastic pollution, reef restoration to shark conservation, there are enough issues to keep everyone busy on the long path to marine sustainability. And many have answered the call; we could fill a phone book with the passionate people across the globe that are working committedly to save our blue seas. In Hong Kong, we have a special relationship with the ocean. As a region comprising over 260 islands, much of the population lives within a few dozen kilometres of the coastline. We have

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long depended on the sea for shipping, food, transportation and recreation. So it’s not a stretch to imagine that a considerable number of people and organisations would be working on ocean issues. Yet, perhaps surprisingly, the world of marine conservation is still nascent in this region, with ocean campaigns and NGOs still numbering fewer than in other countries with similar amounts of coastline. The community is growing however, and like any important movement, it has its leaders – the passionate people at the forefront of the game. Over these pages we introduce some of them.

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HEROES

SEA KEEPERS

COASTAL WATCH This strategic partnership was launched in 2014 by WWF-Hong Kong in partnership with the Hong Kong Cleanup, Living Lamma, Plastic Free Seas, Ocean Park Conservation Foundation, Green Council and EcoMarine, with the support of the Environmental Conservation Fund. Coastal Watch is citizen science for the seas. Over a two-year period, members of the public volunteer to assist in cleanups and data collection surveys at different coastal habitats. Later, the data will be analysed to better understand the issue. In view of the adverse ecological and economic impacts of marine litter, the project aims to trace the origin of the trash across the territory and offer solutions to tackle it. Ecozine.com

Left to right: Roz Keep, Living Lamma; Patrick Yeung, WWF; Nissa Marion, Hong Kong Cleanup; Karson Yau, Green Council; Candy Lee, Ocean Park Conservation Foundation; Dana Winograd, Plastic Free Seas. Recycled Plastic Sculpture by Gareth Dunster for the Ocean Artwalk, commissioned by Youth Arts Foundation.

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DOUG WOODRING Founder, Ocean Recovery Alliance Ocean Recovery Alliance is a non-profit organisation that spearheads positive social action to protect the health of our oceans, working with both UNEP and the World Bank on plastic pollution issues. Doug has been named a UNEP Climate Hero for his efforts.

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lastic does not go away, and is known to be mistakenly consumed by all types of wildlife – from the largest whale to the smallest shellfish. Plastic pollution is also one of the most solvable problems facing the ocean today, so the fact that it is within our ‘reach’ to make a big impact, makes it one of the most urgent tasks to accomplish. Our new ‘Global Alert – Floating Trash’ platform is a powerful tool for tackling this. Communities around the world can report, and manage, trash hotspots in waterways and coastlines.


DR. ANDY CORNISH Leader, WWF & Traffic Shark and Ray Initiative Andy co-authored the field-guide Reef Fishes of Hong Kong and was instrumental in introducing Hong Kongâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first sustainable seafood guide, shark fin corporate programme and the Save Our Seas campaign (which led to the trawling ban) while working for WWF-Hong Kong. The global programme he now leads is focused on conserving sharks and rays.

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he ocean provides food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people, yet most politicians view marine conservation as an optional luxury. As a result, ocean management receives low priority. We have to change this. There is compelling evidence that demonstrates the critical importance of using our oceans sustainably not only for livelihoods and food security, but also for natural disaster mitigation and buffering climate change. Only by communicating in these terms are politicians and business leaders likely to give the oceans the full attention they deserve.

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LIINA KLAUSS Artist Liina Klauss is a German-born, Hong Kong-based activist and artist. She organises regular cleanups and workshops on plastic pollution, and turns marine debris into beautiful art installations. Her works has been exhibited throughout Southeast Asia and Europe.

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ur civilisation will be remembered by the immense accumulation of waste we leave behind, unprecedented in the history of mankind. The trash-land-art installations I make turn the spotlight onto a throwaway culture that has literally gotten out of hand. When picking up trash on beaches I’m constantly in touch with nature and the human leftovers therein. What you touch, touches you – the moment you touch something, in your heart you start to care. You fall in love. Then naturally you want to help. The solution is so much bigger than avoiding disposable cups or calculating your carbon footprint. We have to fall in love with nature! Everything else will follow: awareness, responsibility and action – and last but not least, art.


GARY STOKES Asia Director, Sea Shepherd Global Sea Shepherd uses direct action to protect marine life. In Hong Kong, its focus is on safe guarding the resident Chinese White Dolphin population, and exposing the shark fin trade. Earlier this year, Gary instigated the rescue of an injured Chinese White Dolphin, and he spearheaded the plastic pellet spill cleanup in 2012.

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e have ocean conservation laws in place, but sadly we see a serious lack of political will to enforce them. Whether it’s poaching, pollution or trans-national wildlife crime – until law enforcement agencies of the world start dealing with these eco-terrorists, the responsibility will fall upon concerned citizens. The solution is clear and simple: no compromise. Zero tolerance, with maximum fines for these pirates of greed. Currently countries do not want to take on the responsibility for fear of upsetting trade partners, but the arrest and confiscation of vessels and catches will send a swift signal to organised crime syndicates behind much of the exploitation of our natural world. Sink them economically!


SEA the CHANGE

Confronting ocean plastic pollution on a global – and personal – scale

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alk along a beach or waterway and you’re apt to see a food wrapper floating on the water, or glimpse a beverage bottle made of plastic hovering near the shore. Read an article about the ocean gyres, the so-called “garbage patches,” and you’re likely to hear about the vast amounts of plastics that are polluting the seas. Three years ago, researchers at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) set out to quantify – for the first time – the amount of plastic waste entering the ocean from land-based sources. Their research shows staggering results – with annual plastics inputs into the ocean exceeding 4.8 million tonnes, and possibly as high as 12.7 million tonnes. Because the quantities are growing rapidly due to increases both in population and in plastics use, there may be as much as 250 million tonnes of plastic in the ocean within another decade. These findings were published in the February issue of Science and provide more in-depth information about what is happening with plastics in the ocean. Once plastics enter the marine environment they disperse across the planet’s ocean. There is no one single entry point for ocean plastic pollution. In fact, the global problem is comprised of a myriad of local inputs from beaches and waterways around the world. But the recent research shows that the largest amounts of plastic in the ocean come from a relatively small number of rapidly developing economies. In fact, 83 per cent of the plastic waste entering the ocean comes from just 20 countries; chief among them are China, Indonesia, and the Philippines, with the United States rounding out the top 20. The economies where plastic

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inputs are greatest are those where population growth and plastics consumption is severely outpacing waste management capacity. In many of these geographies waste collection is simply nonexistent. While the results of the study are daunting, there is a silver lining: the science produced at NCEAS suggests that the tide of plastics entering the ocean can, indeed, be reversed. Solutions to the growing problem of plastic pollution are achievable, given sufficient resources and commitment. Reduction in plastics use, especially of single-use disposable products, and recycling of plastics in developed countries can help to reduce the amount of plastic waste that enters the ocean. Catalysing locally appropriate waste systems in rapidly growing and developing economies is also a critical strategy to turn the tide on ocean plastic pollution. As a marine scientist working on the issue of marine debris, I have been humbled by the realisation of the scale and scope of plastic inputs to the ocean. The time is now, however, to move from a place of problem admiration and move to a place of intervention. And I am optimistic, because these findings point to a solution. Tackling the problem of plastic in the ocean begins on land, and this research confirms that. By cutting in half mismanaged waste in the top 10 countries alone, we could reduce plastic waste by more than 30 per cent. Ocean Conservancy and its Trash Free Seas Alliance are working with businesses and NGOs to identify the most effective ways to do just this and support improved waste collection in these high priority countries. Stopping the avalanche of plastic isn’t just good for the ocean – it’s good for the health, economics and well-being of the communities where the trash originates. Ecozine.com

Photos: Ethan Daniels (this page); Bryan Clark, Jeremy Sterk, Stuart Ganz and Susanne Skym (opposite, clockwise from top left)

Words by Nicholas Mallos


FEATURE

10 OCEAN SAVING TIPS 1 2 3 4

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Green Getaways. When planning a vacation, make sure to select travel methods and destinations that have a low environmental impact.

Short Showers. Installing low-flow shower heads and cutting down on shower time reduces the amount of water you consume.

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Smart Gardening. Reduce or eliminate fertilisers from your home garden to prevent harmful runoff.

Be a Good Mate. When you are boating, keep your cans and bottles to recycle, and never dump trash overboard – that includes cigarette butts! Choose Sustainable Seafood. Minimise your impact on ocean species by asking where your seafood originates and how it was caught. Less is More. Purchase items with minimal packaging to reduce waste; especially avoid individually wrapped food items.

Photos: Ethan Daniels (this page); Bryan Clark, Jeremy Sterk, Stuart Ganz and Susanne Skym (opposite, clockwise from top left)

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Reuse and Recycle. Swap out single-use items like plastic bags and water bottles in favour of reusable ones whenever possible.

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Skip the Straw. Cut back on your plastic consumption by forgoing the straw in your drink the next time you’re out to eat. Visit a Beach. Let your love for the ocean grow by visiting your local beach – and leave it a little better than when you arrived by snagging any plastics or debris you see sitting on the sand! Accessorise Appropriately. Leave the coral jewellery and tortoiseshell hair clips at the counter, and instead opt for ocean-friendly products.

BEAUTIFUL BLUE

This bountiful ecosystem needs safeguarding, and there are a number of things we can do to help.

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SAUCY SUMMER Heat things up in the kitchen this season with this aromatic fried spaghetti dish straight from Jamieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian


LIFE + HOME

SPAGHETTI FRITTI WITH ARRABBIATA SAUCE Serves 4

• 3 eggs • A handful of grated parmesan, plus a little extra to serve • 60g ricotta • Grated zest of 1 lemon, plus 4 lemon wedges to serve • A small bunch of parsley, leaves picked • 2 deseeded red chillies, 1 finely chopped, the other finely sliced lengthways • 250g spaghetti, cooked, drained, rinsed and tossed in olive oil • Olive oil Arrabbiata sauce • 60ml olive oil • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced • 1½ red chillies, thinly sliced • 400g tinned tomatoes (crushed with your hands)

For the arrabbiata sauce, heat the olive oil in a pan and fry the garlic with the chillies over a medium heat until softened but not coloured. Add the tinned tomatoes and cook gently for 20-25 minutes, until the olive oil splits the sauce. Season to taste. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, parmesan, ricotta, lemon zest, parsley leaves and chopped chillies, and season well. Toss in the spaghetti so everything is well integrated, then use a fork to twirl the spaghetti into 12 little nests. Heat 1cm of olive oil in a small pan. When it’s hot, very carefully fry the nests of spaghetti, in batches if necessary, on both sides until crisp and golden. Use tongs to gently squeeze them back into shape if they start to go flat. Very carefully remove the fritti from the pan and leave to drain on kitchen paper. While the fritti are warm, transfer to plates and sprinkle with a little parmesan and sliced chilli. Serve with the arrabbiata sauce on the side and lemon wedges for squeezing over.

SUMMER LOVIN’

Jamie’s Italian in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, has added a selection of light, summery dishes to its menu! New starters include a Fresh Crab Bruschetta, dressed with fennel, lemon & chili, while debuting mains include the marinated Lobster al Forno served with a parmesan sauce and spaghetti pomodoro. Cool down with a tangy Pineapple and Frozen Yogurt, made from macerated pineapple and pomegranate in lime and mint with a splash of poppy seed snaps in a refreshing natural yogurt – yum! Ecozine.com

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WELLNESS meets

WANDERLUST

Keeping a healthy body, mind and spirit when travelling Words by Kate Reardon

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s soon as I was old enough to leave the nest I bought a one-way ticket to Europe and started my epic love affair with travel. As I boarded that first ‘long flight’ at 18 years old, something deep inside me ignited – a thirst for adventure, for discovering new lands and cultures. I have since travelled in many different ways, across many different countries. From a shoe-string backpacker selling my handmade

jewellery on the beach for beer money, to flying first class with champagne and VIP customs clearance, I’ve loved every minute and learned a lot along the way. So here are my favourite tips and travel must-haves. They help ease jetlag, support the body through the physical challenges of air travel, and make me feel safe and comfortable no matter where I am in the world.

FOR ALL OF YOU WHO, LIKE ME, HAVE THAT NEVER ENDING DESIRE TO GLOBETROT

I WISH YOU ADVENTURE, PROTECTION AND HEART-OPENING EXPERIENCES BEYOND YOUR WILDEST IMAGININGS

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PACKING SMART

GETTING OVER JETLAG

SNACKS I always carry food. Nuts, seeds, fruit, raw chocolate – whatever I am allowed. At times when I’m really not feeling the airplane/airport/hotel food, my snacks have saved me.

SCENTED CANDLE There are so many amazing travel candles available – I suggest soothing lavender to induce sleep, or an uplifting citrus to lift your spirits, and energy, after a long haul!

ADAPTER It’s a real pain in the you-know-what when you can’t charge your electronics. Sometimes when travelling I love to disconnect – but by choice, not because I can’t get any juice for my laptop!

STAY OFF THE COMPUTER AND PHONE The lights can affect your brain chemicals, specifically melatonin, and interfere with your sleep patterns. I let everyone know I am safe and sound via email or text and then turn everything off until I am in a normal rhythm again. It helps immensely.

JOURNALS Even though I carry my Macbook everywhere, I also have two journals that come with me too. One is for my left brain (work stuff, to-do lists, brainstorming) and the other for my right brain (creativity, doodles, poetry). They are my faithful travel companions.

IN THE AIR

Photos: Kate Reardon, PWRDF

HYDRATION SPRAY I love this stuff and am slightly addicted. It just makes you feel good, freshens you up, hydrates the skin and smells divine. My favourite brands include Jurlique and Apivita, or I make my own with calendula, witch hazel, essential oils and flower essences. THAI SOM MUOR SMELLING SALTS I’ve been using these for years, ever since I lived in Thailand. They keep your nasal passages nice and clear (perfect for planes), are great for dizziness or nausea and help you feel refreshed. I use them every couple of hours on a plane, and they work wonders. SOCKS AND A SCARF Why is it always so cold on planes? I always travel with these. It’s important to keep your throat and feet warm. Tip: make sure you lower back is well covered, so you don’t deplete your kidney chi.

YOGA Stretch your body out and get your circulation going. Not only does this feel fantastic for stiffness after a long journey, but the gentle physical exertion will help you to sleep better, too.

FOR THE BODY

SPIRULINA depending on where I am going my diet can change dramatically when I travel, especially if I am in Europe. I take Spirulina capsules to help alkalise my body and make sure I am getting some greens in amongst all the red wine, bread and cheese experiences. DIGESTIVE ENZYMES AND PROBIOTICS These help the digestive system adjust to new foods and make sure everything is flowing nicely in the gut. There is nothing worse than an upset tummy on holiday, so I take preventative measures so I can experience local cuisines more easily. WATER They call me the ‘water police’ when I am teaching at my retreat centre in Bali because I am always telling our detox guests to drink up. I make sure I take my own advice, especially when travelling, as hydrated cells make for a clear, healthy mind and body. GREEN GOODNESS

Taking Spirulina helps alkalise the body when travelling and experiencing new foods that may be rich, acidic or unfamiliar to your system.


ZERO WASTE family ACTIVITIES

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Ten ideas to inspire your kids (and you!) this summer Words by Karry Lai and Alex Andersson

Have fun without making trash! This summer take the opportunity to share the values of waste reduction with your family, friends and 2 loved ones. It’s important for our future society, and ultimately for each one of us! Creating a circular economy is not only more environmentally friendly; it’s also economical, and can be very inspiring, creative and engaging! The following ten fun zero waste family activities are great ways to get your kids out of the house, away from their smartphones, and into the real world.

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CLEAN A BEACH Have a fun day at the beach while learning about the issue of ocean pollution. Equip your offspring with a garbage bag and some gloves, and send them off on a treasure hunt and top-tier mission to save our seas! They’ll get some exercise, a great sense of accomplishment, and leave a sparkling clean beach behind! The Hong Kong Cleanup has been organising beach cleaning sessions for 15 years now, so why not get a group of friends together, make a day of it, and let the experts support you on your worthy endeavour? hkcleanup.org

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VISIT A FARM 4 Are your kids obsessed with angry birds and apple gadgets? Teach them about real life birds and apples by taking them to a farm! Connect them with the processes behind where our food comes from – a rare experience for kids living in urban centres. Visiting a farm is also a great way to learn more about locally grown food and support local farmers. Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden is a fabulous option for Hong Kong families, showcasing organic farming terraces, indigenous fauna, and wildlife – and it’s good for birdwatching too! kfbg.org.hk

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MAKE FRUIT POPSICLES Trips to the dentist becoming a little too frequent? Reduce the amount of processed sugars in your family kitchen by making organic snacks! Make your own frozen treats using just fruit puree, Greek yoghurt and some reusable popsicle molds. IKEA’s Chosigt Ice Pop Maker is durable and comes in fun, bright colours that the kids will love. ikea.com

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PICNIC IN THE 5 PARK Enjoy a great day at the local park with a picnic. Pack some power picnic snacks like fruit salads and veggie quesadillas, and of course a reusable and water-resistant outdoor blanket and cooler to keep everything nicely organised. Why not give your outdoor dining experience that extra wholesome edge by getting your groceries from local, down-to-earth, organic online delivery service Homegrown Foods? They’ve got everything you need, from eggs to veggies to wine! homegrownfoods.com.hk Ecozine.com


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CYCLING FUN Hop on a bike for a two-wheeled adventure in the great outdoors. It’s a perfect opportunity for family bonding, exercise, and connecting with nature. Opt for something flat and easy if you have small tots, or choose more varied terrains if your family is up for the challenge. The rural landscapes of Hong Kong’s outlying islands are perfect for such excursions, particularly Lantau – which has beaches, hidden waterfalls and even a feral (but very 6 docile) cow population! You don’t even have to bring your own bike, just rent one at the Friendly Bicycle Shop in Mui Wo. Tel: 2984 2278

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GO CAMPING Few things are more exciting for kids than a summer camping trip! Pack a guitar for sing-alongs, and a torch for midnight wildlife spotting. You can even enjoy some stargazing – a modern luxury for those living in the concrete jungle. What a wonderful way to rejuvenate the mind, body and soul. Take in the crystal-clear water and beautifully fine sand at Tai Long Sai Wan. Avoid having to haul the gear around and just rent it instead from On Kee Store restaurant in the nearby Ham Tin Wan, which has tents, sleeping bags, and even surfboards! Tel: 2328 2262

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CREATE UPCYCLED ART Planning to throw away items that seem useless, such as juice boxes, used clothes, and egg cartons? Why not make trash into treasure by creating upcycled art! It’s a great way to spark creativity while making use of things that would otherwise end up in landfill. Get the kids extra excited by incorporating finger paint into the 7 mix! Ecozmo Natural Paint is made with nontoxic raw materials, and is available via Natural Living. Go on, get messy. naturalliving.hk

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GO HIKING Breathe some fresh air and get a change of scenery by going on a hike. With a plethora of health benefits, hiking is a great activity that exercises the whole body. Be sure to use sunscreen and mosquito repellent, and bring plenty of water to avoid getting dehydrated. If you want some top tips on hidden gems that are, quite truly, ‘off the beaten track’, the book The Leisurely Hiker’s Guide to Hong Kong is a great companion for you and your clan. Available at Bookazine and

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PLANT A TREE Planting a tree not only helps offset emissions and support reforestation, it’s also a symbolic and fruitful (literally!) activity that will keep the whole family active, outdoors and together. Over the years you can watch it grow, and spend many a special family moment under its shade. Local conservation champions Ark Eden have a wealth of experience providing tree-planting services to interested parties through developing eco-centres on Lantau Island, Hong Kong’s ‘green lung’. Contact them to get involved. arkedenonlantau.com

VISIT A NATURAL MUSEUM Looking for an indoor activity on a rainy summer afternoon? Explore exhibits of the natural world while learning about the diversity and value of the great wilderness – awesome, and educational! The Hong Kong Museum of History is a clear contender here, as it relates the natural history of the territory back as far as 400 million years. Truly fascinating and enriching. lcsd.gov.hk Summer 2015

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HANGING OUT

Everything is more fun outside, so we’ve rounded up some fabulous and environmentally friendly outdoor furnishings for you and your loved ones to enjoy

Gardening Glory

No more bending or kneeling! The medium-sized VegTrug can hold 60 litres of compost and stands at a comfortable height. It’s made from sustainable plantation grown fir, and comes with add on covers that allow optimum, year-round gardening pleasure. vegtrug.com

p Get Stuck In Grab a good book and sink in to TREE’s Nice Chair – inspired by the general attitudes of Southern France. It’s part of the Vincent Sheppard Outdoor Collection, made from FSC-certified kraft paper, twisted by hand in a method unchanged since 1917, and sustainable rattan. tree.com.hk

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LIFE + HOME

Get Together

The Split Dining Table features table top slats made from sustainably sourced teak, and cut in an uneven fashion to add an organic, quirky element to the design.

Cute Cube

The cheeky little ‘Tangier’ stool from Fab Habitat is woven by hand from 100 per cent recycled plastic and is weather and mildew resistant. Sturdy enough to balance food and drinks or seat guests, it’ll add a pop of sunny colour to any outdoor ensemble!

everythingunderthesun.com.hk

fabhabitat.com

All-Rounder

The stunningly simple Tamburo Seat from Bamboa is perfect for those that want to integrate a natural element to their rooftop or terrace. Hand-crafted by female artisans in a village in Vietnam, the versatile stool is made using local and sustainable bamboo. bamboahome.com

p Soothing Swing Laze away in the relaxing sway of the Pablitto Hanging Chair, artisan-crafted from recycled pine wood and produced by DecorWorks. decor.works

Shine On

Get back to basics with IKEA’s cable-and-plugfree Solvinden LED solar-powered garden light. This jolly little item allows you to maximise outdoor chill time with minimal environmental impact – just pop it in a pot or stick it in the ground. ikea.com

p Storage With A Story These vintage, upcycled cabinets from Inside are special and stunning in equal measure. Aged at least 20 years and originating from India, all the items are hand painted and made from teak that can weather any storm! inside.com.hk

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MAIDENS of the

DEEP

People protect what they love. Shawn Heinrichs creates art inspiring conservation through connecting the global community to the beauty and vulnerability of endangered marine species. Director of Photography Shawn Heinrichs Model Hannah Fraser Creative Direction Shawn Heinrichs & Hannah Fraser Makeup Maria Teresa Charvez, Fazli Krasniqi Production Support Taro Smith


Temple of the Goddess


Rising Goddess


Manta Embrace


Ocean Voyagers


Celestial Giant


NAMASTE the

ECO WAY

Stock up on good karma while you bend, stretch, inhale and exhale with environmentally friendly yoga gear No Excess Baggage

This lightweight bag is 100 per cent made from recycled plastic bottles… need we say more?! The interior lining is fungus retardant, and contains a waterproof bag for sweaty stuff. There’s also a convenient outside pocket for essentials, and a mat-holder strap on the outside. The perfect bag, basically.

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JoBird Yoga Carryall US $85

Cool Kids On The Block

Cork is a wonderfully diverse material – smooth to the touch, lightweight yet sturdy – providing perfect traction when a pose or stretch requires it. These blocks last at least ten years and are 100 per cent biodegradable, so just put ‘em in the compost when they’re (eventually) done.

Get Leggy

Made from recycled plastic bottles that have been cleaned, shredded, melted, and stripped into thread, these yoga leggings are super soft and sustainable, not to mention snazzy! The material is also surprisingly lightweight and breathable – excellent for those pretzel-style poses. RUMI yoga leggings US $77

p Heads Up! Made from 79 per cent recycled plastic bottles, and printed using low-energy, long-lasting sublimation methods, you’ll never want to take this beauty off! Designed by Amanda Sage, this headband showcases some of her stunning art work – of which there are plenty more funky patterns to chose from. Amanda Sage headband | US $22

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Photo, top right courtesy of PURE International

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Barefoot Yoga’s cork blocks US $15.99 (s) US $18.99 (l) each


STYLE

Wear Your Intentions

Shivaloka’s spiritually charged jewellery is handcrafted with carefully sourced stones. Each piece is blessed and empowered with a specific intention; the Hanuman (shown here) endows its wearer with heightened insight and clarity. It’s strung on silver with lotus seeds, lava stones, tiger eye, and a powerful and rare 11-mukhi guru bead – for that extra oomph when you ohm.

p Don’t Sweat It For every one of these ethical towels sold, Jade Yoga – popular with celebrities and yogis the world over – provides one month’s worth of clean drinking water for one person in the developing world through The Water Project. So sweat away!

Hanuman necklace US $725

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Jade Yoga’s microfiber yoga towel | US $39.95

Toxin-free Treading

This is one of the most durable environmentally friendly mats out there. It’s made from non-Amazon-harvested, natural tree rubber (so it’s fully biodegradable, yet strong) as well as non-toxic foaming agents and non-azo dyes – keep your toxins outta this temple, thanks!

Manduka eKO yoga mat US $88

p Support With Soul This delectable ‘sushi roll’ bolster has serious eco credentials. The coverings are made from upcycled vintage Japanese silk kimono obi sashes! The unique matching bolster set (one for your back, another for the legs) comes either filled or empty.

Photo courtesy of Exquisitely Joy

Exquisitely Joy Sushi bolster from US $200

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STYLE

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STYLE FILE

Festival Chic

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Feathery fringes, worn-in denim and peasant accents weave together perfectly for a festivalfriendly look. Nail the indie vibe this sunny summer! 1. THESE BOOTS are made for walking, and they’re also flat vegan. They go well with leggings, skinny jeans and midi skirts! FC Vegan Charlotte Pointed Ankle Boots. US $99 | fashion-conscience.com

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2. IBIZA FEEL embrace the bright shades of beach living in this comfy, carefree summer dress. Zalando Best Mountain Summer Dress. US $61.20 | zalando.co.uk 3. SWING, BABY with this versatile, easy-carry tassel fringe bag that brings a touch of boho to any summer outfit. Fancasen Fringe Tassel Faux Suede Tote Handbag. US $14.99 | polyvore.com

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4. BOLDLY BEAUTIFUL is this Italian artisanal necklace, inspired by colours and vibrations generated by light. Wear all the shades of summer on your neck. Maiden-Art SS 2013 Necklace. US $117.24 | maiden-art.com 5. SPREAD YOUR WINGS in this adorable lightweight crochet kimono with short loose batwing sleeves. Apricot Stone Diamond Knit Fringe Kimono. US $12.29 | apricotonline.co.uk 6. CHILL OUT in high-waisted denim ombre dip shorts that are sure to beat the heat in even the sunniest weather. Plaino Vintage Levi High-Waisted Denim Shorts. US $25 | etsy.com 7. DANCING QUEEN show them how it’s done in these killer leopard print wedges, suitable for day and night. Chinese Laundry Vegan Hot Desert Wedge Ankle Boots. US $152 | chineselaundry.com 8. HATS OFF to ethical fashion. Complete your outfit with this vintage Stetson cowboy hat. Authentic Vintage Men’s Stetson Hat Black. US $129.50 | etsy.com 9. FLOAT AROUND in this graceful yet casual number. The warm colours have been digitally printed onto the 100 per cent silk top, reducing the waste associated with traditional silkscreen printing processes. Partimi Sarasota Tiles Silk Shirt. US $178 | partimi.com

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STYLE

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MEN’S TREND

Junk Hunk

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Summer days, driftin’ away! Take to the high seas donning some of this laid-back, eco-friendly boating gear 6 1. DON’T FADE AWAY in this easy-to-wear patterned t-shirt for that soft, worn, familiar feel. Topman Washed Rose High Roll T-Shirt. US $40 | topshop.com 2. FLOWER POWER is where it’s at with this quality handcrafted snapback that will become a summer staple. Marshal Apparel Snapback. US $37 | marshalapparel.com 3. TURN IT UP and get out your favourite sunglasses. We love these patterned ones, for that extra summer vibe! Proof Eyewear Pledge Sunglasses. US $67.97 | iwantproof.com 4. BE A HIP OCEAN HERO in this t-shirt made completely out of recycled marine debris. G-Star RAW for the Oceans Occotis Graphic Tee. US $88 | g-star.com 5. ZERO TO HERO with a stylish and fun printed tank top that you’ll want to live in. Celebrity Cotton Batman Vintage Tank Top. US $17.99 | celebritycotton.com

7. WALK IT OUT in these classic all-white Chuck Taylors. Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Sneaker White. US $59 | converse.com

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8. DIVE DEEP in this watch that absorbs light from any source to recharge the battery, has a glow-in-the-dark dial, and is water resistant up to 200 metres. Citizen Eco-Drive Promaster Aqualand. US $941 | citizenwatch.com 9

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9. STEP INTO your comfort zone with these ergonomic flip flops – and feel good about it too! KEEN supports NGOs that encourage outdoor activity such as cleanups and tree planting. KEEN Class 5 Flip. US $50 | keenfootwear.com

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Photo, bottom left courtesy of Mazu Swimwear

6. GET COMFY and settle in for the weekend with casual yet sophisticated chino shorts. Uniqlo Men Chino Shorts. US $29.90 | uniqlo.com


My ESSENTIALS Passionate ocean conservationist and founder of the Plastic Free Seas initiative Tracey Read tells Ecozine what she can’t go without

TSHIRT

This Plastic Free Seas smiley face logo shirt was designed for our Youth Conference to inspire positive actions, and is made from recycled plastic water bottles. plasticfreeseas.org

FACECLOTH

After a beach cleanup or even just a day in the city my skin care routine is a thick face cloth and hot water. No need for a facial scrub full of plastic micro beads to give my face a good clean – any simple cloth will do the trick! Organic Pharmacy Muslin Cloth US $8.50

BAMBOO TOOTHBRUSH

I don’t know how many plastic toothbrushes I have used over my lifetime, but I’m reducing the impact of my future brushes by using bamboo – so I’m happier. Using LUSH’s plastic-packaging-free Toothy Tabs as well makes brushing my teeth entirely guilt free. Environmental Toothbrush US $27 Lush Toothy Tabs US $4.95

NURDLE RING

This was given to me by a good friend after the 150-tonne plastic pellet spill cleanup in 2012. The ‘jewel’ is an upcycled blue plastic pellet removed from the sands of a US beach. Katelin Gibbs ring US $420 (set of 6)

COFFEE

STAINLESS STEEL WATER BOTTLE I’m never without my reusable water bottle. Plastic drink bottles are one of the most commonly found items littering beaches and hiking trails, and untold millions are sent to landfills every day. Hong Kong has quality drinking water, so for many people it is an easy switch. Kleen Kanteen bottle US $29.95

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I like making coffee without making waste, so my Chemex glass coffee pot sits proudly on my bench with a stainless steel reusable filter. If my day is starting early then it’s home brewed coffee that goes in my travel mug. I buy my coffee at Arabica (in my own container) and the coffee pot and filter are from Loveramics. Chemex coffee pot US $41.50

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STYLE

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LOOKBOOK

These skillful designers find beauty in everything from old bottle caps to wood scraps and repurpose them into whimsical products t MARCEL DUNGER

Product designer Marcel Dunger ‘repairs’ broken pieces of maple wood with translucent bio-resin, and transforms them into beautiful, minimalistic accessories. Bioresin is derived from plant-based material and is energy efficient, which complements the nature theme of his collection perfectly. dunger-design.de

p ELISA CAVANI

Believing that every object has its own story, Italian designer Elisa Cavani’s creativity is often sparked by old and abandoned objects found around the city, where she gives them a new life by turning them into furniture. Not only does she integrate recycled materials into her creations, but all her products are also handmade and one-of-a-kind.

BRUNNO JAHARA u

Brazilian designer (and recycler!) Brunno Jahara is known for his Multiplastica Domestica series, where he turns bottle caps into fruit stands and lamps that are both contemporary and eye-catching. He has also garnered praise for his Neorustica furniture collection, where he uses scrap wood and colorful paint to create containers, tables and benches.

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ALVARO CATALÁN DE OCÓN u

p WILLEM HEEFFER

Dutch designer Willem Heeffer is most famous for his collection of lamps made from used cans and washing machine parts, and stools made of scrap wood. His creations are unique and colorful, and constantly bear ecology in mind. willemheeffer.nl

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Barcelona-based designer Alvaro Catalán de Ocón has a highly sophisticated and clean touch to his designs, but what makes him one of the up-and-coming sustainable designers is his involvement with the PET Lamp Project. The project addresses the plastic waste problem in the Colombian Amazon by combining plastic water bottles with ancient artisan textile weaving to create unique lamps. catalandeocon.com

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Eco Luxe City Guide

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA All things bright and beautiful in the enchanting “Golden Gate City”

San Francisco is so captivating that it even inspired Tony Bennett to write a song about leaving his heart there! Currently speculated as the “world’s first true 21st century city”, San Francisco is all about its vibrant culture, lively energy, and – perhaps most importantly – its clean, green infrastructure. It’s even on an impressive mission to become a completely zero waste city in just five years! Now that’s real cosmopolitan chic.

EAT & DRINK

San Francisco offers up a wealth of local, organic, artisanal and vegetarian fares, and is known for its excellent eateries, from opulent fine dining to sublime street food. The biggest challenge is merely choosing!

ANANDA FUARA

1298 Market Street Highly praised and widely known for its creatively vegetarian/ vegan menu, Ananda Fuara provides ‘vegetarian food for the masses’. From sandwiches to pancakes, vegan sausages to pasta salads, its kitchen is dedicated to delivering much-loved ‘American diner’ flavours using sustainable ingredients.

SCOMA’S

Al Scoma Way This landmark restaurant on Fisherman’s Warf is regularly listed among the top seafood restaurants in the beautiful bay. Moreover, Scoma’s commercial recycling and composting systems have paved the way for San Francisco’s zero waste mission. It serves delicious, 82

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quality seafood dishes with ingredients caught sustainably by local fishermen. The menu changes regularly to reflect the season’s freshest catch, so go on, indulge in some guilt-free gluttony!

STAY

Chooosing the right place to recharge for the night is vital on any trip. Thankfully, in the socially vivacious and welcoming city of San Francisco, there are many to choose from. Here are some earth-friendly options.

THE ORCHARD GARDEN HOTEL

466 Bush Street Committed to an environmentally responsible way of business, the Orchard Garden Hotel prioritises the health of its guests and staff as well as that of the planet, choosing organic, natural and non-toxic wherever possible, from room fittings and cleaning supplies to the locally-sourced organic dishes in its restaurant. Certified as one of the most eco-friendly hotels in the country, it is a perfect marriage of sustainability, hospitality and comfort.

THE W HOTEL

181 3rd Street The W San Francisco combines glam luxury lifestyle with green credentials. With a sleek LEED Silver-certified exterior, its ecofriendly efforts behind the scenes include energy-efficient lighting and cooling, motion sensors to save power, and a kitchen stocked with locally-sourced and vegetarian menu options.

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SHOP

Get a taste of San Fran’s lively creative and artistic community and bring a bit of it home with you! The city is full of picturesque artisanal spaces retailing products that are ingeniously out of this world. Make sure you visit these spots.

URBAN BAZAAR

1371 9th Avenue If you’re looking for the perfect souvenir or gift for a loved one, you’re guaranteed to find it here. Everything is locally designed and hand-made with care. With a wide range of products, from baby stuff to candles, plants to accessories and other arts & crafts, this place is a treasure trove.

RICKSHAW BAGWORKS

904 22nd Street The rave reviews start to make sense as soon as you catch a glimpse of this locally-owned store’s uniquely rugged yet artistic entrance. Combining infallible customer service and extremely well constructed locally-made canvas bags with durability and style, Rickshaw never fails to make its customers happy.

EXPLORE

With its bright personality, rich history and friendly local vibe, San Francisco has truly got something to offer for every taste, from the outdoorsy to the urbanite. Don’t miss these great spots for the perfect day out!

DOLORES PARK

Located two blocks south of Mission Dolores at the western edge of the Mission District, Dolores Park offers several features including sports courts, soccer complexes, children’s playgrounds, and a dog play area. Named after Miguel Hidalgo, the father of Mexican independence, the park’s history adds to its unique personality.

TRAVEL

THE EMBARCADERO

This area is a popular tourist spot for good reason, and should be on every visitor’s itinerary. The Embarcadero is the eastern waterfront and roadway of the Port of San Francisco, California, along the world-famous San Francisco Bay. You’ll find here the striking Ferry Building with its 74-metre tall clock tower and wealth of delicious shops and eateries, and from the pier-side you’ll be able to oversee Treasure Island, Yerba Buena Island, and the Bay Bridge in the background. Picture perfect.

RENEW

With so much for visitors to see and do, exploring San Francisco can take a toll on even the most adventurous among us. While there, why not take time to indulge in some of the city’s beautifully appointed rejuvenation spots.

EARTHBODY

534 Laguna Street Truly green from beginning to end, the owners of this humble day spa in Hayes Valley have applied a thoughtful and creative green approach to each aspect of the spa experience. With considerations made to everything from massage tables made of eco-harvested wood, to towels made from bamboo and organic skincare products, Earthbody offers truly holistic care for the body and spirit.

AVRA ORGANICS

505 Beach Street, Suite 130 With “Pampering Without Excess” as their running tagline, Avra Organics Day Spa believes in simplicity when it comes delivering a truly luxurious and reviving spa treatment. It’s not just the treatments that echo this mindset, either; reclaimed and recycled materials are integrated into the spa design, and natural materials are used throughout.

SAN FRAN-TASTIC

Clockwise from top left: vegan fare at Ananda Fuara, fun in the sun at Dolores Park, treatments at Earthbody Day Spa, comfortable accommodation at The Orchard Garden Hotel, and artisanal treasures at Rickshaw Bagworks.


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ULTIMATE

BEACH RETREATS

Stay the eco-friendly way at these stunning seaside establishments Words by Alex Andersson


THE PHILIPPINES Property: Villa Solaria Location: Siargao Island Good for: Surfers This new Swede-run six-bungalow resort is located on ‘the surfing capital of The Philippines’, and prides itself on being low-impact and zero waste. The huts have palm leaf roofs, and are otherwise made from locally produced brick and native trees. The resort runs a staff educational programme that helps them operate a number of environmental measures – including building the island’s first recycling station! There is also a strict no single-use policy, with plastic cups, straws and bags banned. After a day out on the surf, Villa Solaria also serves organic and locally grown fare to its visitors – cowabunga! Rates start at US $35 per night villa-solaria.com

AUSTRALIA Property: Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort Location: Great Barrier Reef Good for: Divers Situated in a highly protected ‘Green Zone’ of the Great Barrier Reef, Lady Elliot Island is a sanctuary for over 1,200 species of marine life and unspoilt coral reefs. Tourism is allowed in green zones, but operators must have a permit from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, which outlines strict conditions to keep impact to an absolute minimum. In this respect, Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort delivers outstanding results – without compromising guest enjoyment. Guests can take part in exceptional diving, snorkelling and glass-bottom boat rides, as well as birdwatching and guided ‘climate change walks’. 128 solar panels provide power, and waste is recycled and composted. Drinking water is filtered in a reverse osmosis desalination plant. Rates range from US $129 to US $265 per night, and include breakfast, dinner and activities ladyelliot.com.au

TANZANIA Property: Chumbe Island Coral Park Location: Zanzibar Good for: Down-to-earth chilling Located in an award-winning nature reserve, this property takes zero-impact very seriously. The comfortable, open-air huts collect rainwater and store it in underground cisterns, where it is pumped through a solar-powered heating system for use in the bathroom. Nothing goes to waste, and no non-renewable energy burns here. Water from the showers is filtered and recycled to water the garden. Solar power fuels the light fixtures, and the reef sanctuary below is protected from seeping sewage and runoff through special eco-toilets. Such are its eco credentials that Chumbe Island has even been recognised by the UN for its protection of coral reefs, and for promoting sustainable livelihoods and development. Rates range from US $260 to US $280 per night chumbeisland.com Ecozine.com

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INDIA Property: Alila Diwa Goa Location: Goa Good for: An exotic experience This elegant 153-room resort on Gonsua Beach blends seamlessly into its natural surrounds. The regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brick red laterite stone is used throughout, and painstaking effort was taken to preserve old trees during the construction process. Alila Goa also has a sewage treatment system with the latest membrane technology that recycles wastewater for irrigation and flushing. Ozone generators are used in the pool filtration system, eliminating the need for chemicals, and energy efficient lighting and air conditioning systems are installed everywhere. The resort also supports the local community through programmes such as life skills workshops for underprivileged Goan children. Rates range from US $125 to US $355 a night alilahotels.com

INDONESIA Property: Puri Dajuma Location: Bali Good for: Connecting with Balinese culture This family-run resort in Ubud takes a pioneering role in sustainable hospitality on Bali island, sourcing food locally, purifying wastewater and even going so far as to have its own glass bottle recycling machine! It also excels in social commitment; 90 per cent of its employees come from the surrounding villages, and they are provided with benefits and programmes unprecedented in Baliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business environment. This inevitably results in a happy, welcoming atmosphere with a deep and authentic connection to Bali, its people, and their culture. Management liaise with village heads regularly, and support traditional dance and music schools, orphanages and a sea turtle conservation project. Rates range from US $115 to US $450 per night dajuma.com

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OMAN Property: Six Senses Zighy Bay Location: Zighy Bay Good for: Adventurers Six Senses is a major brand in the eco-luxe world, and this exquisite property showcases why. Surrounded by the rugged Hajar Mountains and fronting a 1.6km pristine powder beach, it is exoticism and environmentalism combined to perfection. The resort’s 82 accommodations all come with private pools, and are made from locally sourced materials. The resort manages its own reverse osmosis water filtration, and grows its own produce – including 12 varieties of dates – in a 2,500sqm organic garden, for use in everything from welcome smoothies to spa scrubs and amenities. Waste material is reused and recycled wherever possible. The resort also supports the local Dibba Girl’s School, Sharjah Charity International and Sukarina bin Al Husain School. Rates start at US $567 per night sixsenses.com

MALDIVES Property: The Barefoot Eco Hotel Location: Hanimaadhoo Island Good for: Chic conservationists The Barefoot is just a few months old, but is already making waves in the world of minimal-impact hospitality. The property is made entirely from ecologically grown wood and uses solar panels to generate electricity. It produces drinkable water onsite, and has developed a conservation centre that provides eco-friendly activities for guests to join. On snorkel tours and responsibly-managed dolphin monitoring trips, marine biologists accompany guests and identify areas of top importance for hawksbill and green turtles, bottlenose and spinner dolphins, manta rays, eagle rays and coral reefs on the remote Hanimaadhoo Island. The Barefoot has also developed waste sorting and recycling education programmes for the local school. Rates start at US $200 per night thebarefoot.com Ecozine.com

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USA Property: The Breakers Palm Beach Location: Florida Good for: Families Situated on 56,000sqm of oceanfront property in the heart of Palm Beach, this historic property has 450 spacious rooms and an array of eco merits. The hotel recycles 700,000 kg of waste a year, and 75 per cent of its energy comes from renewable sources. All food served in the eight restaurants is from local organic farmers, and supplemented by a 185sqm organic herb and vegetable garden. Only Florida-native plants feature in the expansive grounds, which also contain a 330-metre well and water facility that converts almost 2 million litres of undrinkable water a year into clean water for irrigating the grounds. Rates range from US $300 to US $2,050 per night thebreakers.com

FIJI Property: Laucala Island Location: Taveuni Good for: High-profile travellers Laucala treasures two things: serious environmental commitment, and exclusivity. It’s no wonder this ultra-luxurious resort is favoured by celebrities, political figureheads and elite business leaders – it delivers absolute perfection, and does it all with utmost consideration for the natural world. The resort’s executive chef uses produce grown in the onsite hydroponic rainwater garden and in the wilderness that covers 80 per cent of the island, and supplements it with seafood caught within a mile of shore. Coconut oil, honey, vanilla, pepper and other ingredients are also grown organically here. All amenities and spa products are handmade from these ingredients, and the resort even has its own water bottling plant (using glass containers, of course). Rates range from US $5,520 to US $7,920 per night laucala.com

THAILAND Property: Chiva-Som Location: Hua Hin Good for: A health kick Chiva-Som is a veritable stalwart in the (now very on-trend) wellness scene. Having been open for 20 years – and with more treatment rooms than guestrooms – the property takes wellbeing very seriously. The staff provide individual consultations upon arrival, and hand-pick a personalised programme for you from the over 200 treatments and activities on offer. The hydro management system is circular, reusing as much water as possible, and heating it up via solar panels. Chiva-Som also has a programme dedicated to restoring the damaged mangrove nearby, and the Head Chef (who specialises in anti-ageing gastronomy) only uses local, organic produce from the on-site garden and surrounding villages. Rates start at US $1,500+ per night and include meals and activities chivasom.com

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THE SEYCHELLES Property: Fregate Island Private Location: Fregate Island Good for: Wildlife enthusiasts Surprisingly, the main attraction at this exclusive destination is not the 16 exceptional residences, or the beach so stunning itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consistently ranked among the best in the world. Instead, the real stars here are the 2,200 Giant Aldabra Tortoises that freely roam the island. This thriving population is only one of the many conservation success stories spearheaded by the resort. Fregate also safeguards the nests of critically endangered Hawksbill Turtles, has brought the Seychelle Magpie Robin back from the brink of extinction, and has planted tens of thousands of trees. Not bad for a world-class luxury resort! Rates start at US $4,693 per night fregate.com 86

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TRAVEL

ESCAPE + EXPLORE ffering a sweet escape just 15 minutes from the thrum of the beautiful city of San Francisco, Cavallo Point – the Lodge at the Golden Gate is a special place that defies easy definition. It’s a sprawling resort, an award-winning spa, a Michelin-starred restaurant, a historic site, and a nature retreat – sitting, as it does, in a national park at the base of the Marin Headlands and beside the the Golden Gate Bridge. The icing on the cake? Epic views across the harbour to San Francisco, available from almost anywhere on the horseshoe-shaped property. Although the Cavallo Point has only been open since 2008, its immaculately restored historic buildings lend it a charming authentic quality. The lovingly maintained Colonial-style structures, previously officers’ quarters on the Fort Baker military base, form the foundation of the resort complex. These are complemented by 74 light and airy contemporary rooms and suites, each featuring radiant floor heating, bamboo furnishings and floor-to-ceiling windows, and all housed within a twostorey complex built to exacting green standards, right down to the solar power panels and low-VOC paints and carpets. Both the historic and modern accommodations feature thoughtful amenities such as organic bedding and deliciously cosy robes and slippers, as well as Cavallo Point’s own signature spa products in the bathroom. And, for those of us with furry travelling companions, petfriendly suites are available.

Cavallo Point’s own Healing Arts Center is a beautifully appointed spa with an outdoor meditation pool and fire pit, all surrounded by fragrant eucalyptus plants, where one can relax and breathe in the fresh air with a herbal tea or healthy snack prior to a holistic treatment. The resort follows guiding principles to make it as environmentally responsible as possible, while giving visitors a truly memorable stay and maintaining the historical and cultural significance of Fort Baker. The re-use of historic materials, meticulous landscape restoration with native plants, and plenty of green building elements all contribute to the resort’s LEED Gold certification, awarded in 2010, as well as the Green Seal Environmental Standard for US Lodging Properties. It doesn’t stop at the certification, however. Throughout the property small measures are taken to help educate visitors about environmental issues, without intruding on the relaxing holiday experience. The meeting rooms are named after local rare, threatened and endangered species; eco-friendly clothing, books and local artisan designs are featured in the Mercantile shop; and a variety of informative guided hikes and walkabouts are offered for guests. The art on the walls is from local artists, and the popular cooking classes often feature local produce and healthy recipes. As part of Cavallo Point’s commitment to sustainability, The Institute at the Golden Gate was created in partnership with the Golden Gate National Parks

Conservancy and National Park Service. The Institute’s purpose is to promote dialogue, collaboration, shared problem solving and action through the gathering of global leaders in the nonprofit, government and business sectors. Its programmes focus on sustainability, national parks, protected areas, environmental arts and communication, and resource conservation. Groups are invited to host meetings at special rates, and local residents in the Bay Area are also invited to discuss environmental topics and attend lectures. There’s more. Cavallo Point is also a partner of The Good Night Foundation, which is based on the concept that a guest’s hotel night can contribute to doing good in the community and beyond. A fourdollar charitable donation is deducted from each guest’s nightly charge, and contributed to funding programmes that improve health, education, poverty and the environment. Ultimately, the guest experience is paramount for any resort, and Cavallo Point nails it by balancing genuine concern for the environment and community with impeccable accommodation, service and style. Awards: Winner – ‘Sense of Place’, National Geographic World Legacy Awards 2015; #1 – Best Hotels in the San Francisco Bay Area, Travel + Leisure World’s Best Awards 2015 From US $399 per night cavallopoint.com

Photos by Kodiak Greenwood

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CAVALLO POINT, SAN FRANCISCO


THIS SUMMER VISIT THE AEGEAN ON LAND AND SEA, MACAKIZI’S BOAT VANILLA WILL TAKE YOU ON A 3 DAY TRIP TO THE GREEK ISLANDS. (FIXED ITINERARY: ARKI, MARATHI, PATMOS & LEROS) COMBINE THE WONDERFUL CRUISE WITH YOUR STAY AT MACAKIZI HOTEL AND RECEIVE 25% OFF ALL ROOM CATEGORIES DURING WEEKDAYS & 15% DURING WEEKENDS. FOR MORE INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CONTACT MACAKIZI@MACAKIZI.COM THIS OFFER IS VALID THROUGH THE 2015 SEASON & IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. MACAKIZI HOTEL, KESIRE MEVKII NARCICEGI SK. 48400 GOLTURKBUKU (BODRUM) TURKEY WWW.MACAKIZI.COM


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Oceans: Heart of Our Blue Planet

Get up close and personal with our oceans, no matter where you are. This fantastic e-book is filled with beautiful photographs and interesting facts about our planet’s marine ecosystems and how to help keep them healthy.

Global Alert

Use this international online tool and mobile app to report, rate and map plastic pollution levels in rivers, along ocean coastlines, and underwater on reefs. It’s user-friendly, developed by Hong Kong’s own Ocean Recovery Alliance and allows anyone to be an environmental watchdog!

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The Magic School Bus: Oceans

Play and learn. This interactive storybook is perfect for any youngster to learn and discover underwater plant and animal life, coral reefs, the ocean floor and more. Infused with science facts, videos, photos, and games, they’ll learn something new with every tap!

APP-LAUSE! ECO APPS TO GET OCEAN-SAVVY

9 5 Magic Seaweed

A favourite among surfers, this app serves as social media’s top online surf forecast provider for over 2,500 beaches worldwide. With a forecast of up to ten days, you can check wind gust speed, atmospheric pressure, wind strength, swell direction and period surf size. Surf’s up!

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Nemo’s Reef

Fun with fishies! This educational adventure will keep any curious and fun-seeking little tyke entranced for hours. Continue Nemo’s story and learn how to build a permanent home for him and all his charismatic sea friends on the reef.

Duke University created this encyclopedic digital novel that covers all forms of marine megafauna, from Hawaiian spinner dolphins to killer whales to Magellanic penguins. This app provides easy reading for the public, and you can even access some of Nat Geo’s Critter Cam video shots! Ecozine.com

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Cachalot

TECH

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Sustainable Seafood Guide by WWF

Now available at a click, WWF has developed this regionspecific guide to help people know what is safe to buy and what should be avoided, with easy-to-understand red, yellow and green coded seafoods. Simply whip out your smartphone next time you’re in a restaurant or supermarket considering seafood choices!

Ocean Blue

Virtually ‘dive’ into the ocean with the 3D ocean education experience offered by this innovative app. You can customise your ‘dive’ by adding sea creatures and interact with them directly through tapping, pinching, dragging and tilting your smartphone to virtually feed or scatter them.

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In an effort to change habits and to promote a more sustainable and money-saving lifestyle, Rippl is an app developed by Ocean Conservancy to help everyone take little steps toward making the world greener (and bluer). It delivers day-to-day tips, simple lifestyle advice, and much more.

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TECH

OWN the ROAD

Four luxury cars that deliver speed, style, sustainability and sunshine Words by Alex Andersson

THE ULTIMATE SUPERCAR The Porsche 918 Spyder is about as high-end as they come; with an eye-watering top-speed of 340km/h and a US $845,000+ price tag to match, this is not your ordinary supercar. This limited-production model boasts racetrack power with an ecologically sound return. The elegant hybrid Porsche is equipped with a 4.6-litre V8 gasoline engine and two electric motors – one mounted up front and another at the rear. All are placed as close to the ground as possible to ensure a low centre of gravity, delivering top-performance handling when turning corners. The engines provide a combined output of 887 horsepower, and are controlled via a dual-clutch gearbox and a fixed gear. The latter provides electric drive power to the front wheels at speeds of up to 265km/h. On top of this, the Spyder provides five drive mode options – electric, hybrid, sport, race and hot lap. It is able to operate in a divinely smooth and completely silent electric mode up to speeds of 150km/h before the gas engine kicks in, and for a total non-stop stretch of about 16-30km. With a 6.8kWh lithium-ion battery energy storage system positioned behind the passenger cell, the car can be charged via a plug-in charge port, and also by regenerative braking and excess output from the coasting engine. So effectively, you charge the car with its own momentum. If you want to really connect with the 918’s furiously fast, sledgehammer horsepower, you’re in luck – this Porsche has a detachable roof for that added exhilaration. Ecozine.com

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MUSTANG FORCE This modernised version of Ford’s classic model delivers all the horsepower associated with Mustangs, combined with an added environmental edge. The Ford Mustang EcoBoost Premium Convertible is brand new to the market this year, and boasts a 2.3-litre EcoBoost engine that improves fuel efficiency by 20 per cent and reduces emissions by 15 per cent, while also achieving a total of 310 horsepower! This results in an exceptionally efficient consumption of 30-50km per litre. There are many impressive elements integrated into the body of this new beautiful beast that allow for such performance. The EcoBoost combines turbocharging, direct gasoline injection, and variable valve timing to great effect. The Turbo Power feature actually allows energy from the engine’s exhaust – which would have otherwise been wasted – to be used to rotate a turbine wheel. Together, these elements works to reduce engine displacement, and thus improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions. The new eco-friendly characteristics are aligned with other performance-enhancing developments, such as an adjustable suspension and a six-speed manual transmission that allows for outstanding handling, an aggressive and powerful launch, and exceptional noise and ride quality even with the top down. In short, the Ford Mustang EcoBoost Premium Convertible is cost-effective and environmentally friendly, and all without sacrificing speed! It starts at market-competitive US $34,800, and does 0-100km/h in about 5.5 seconds – proof of what streamlined technology can produce.

FEATHERLIGHT AND FAST Made using ultra lightweight aluminum technology, the Audi Roadster TT really lets you fly down the highway! The slim exterior means very little drag and a low curb weight of 1,515kg, as well as impressive acceleration and braking times – not to mention fuel economy rates. Price-wise its also economical, starting at US $43,350. The Audi Roadster TT is classified as an Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (ULEV) category II car, which explains the relatively low fuel consumption rate of about 15km per litre. The soft top comes down at just the touch of a button, providing instant summer satisfaction. The top folds away automatically, and has added noise dampening properties. The turbocharged 211 horsepower TFSI engine, meanwhile, allows you to reach speeds where you really feel the wind in your hair. The aforementioned acceleration, for example, takes it from 0-100 in under 5.7 seconds. Top speed, meanwhile, comes in at just under 210km/h – not far behind other models that are in an entirely different price class. Wielding that type of power is made easy with its quick-shifting, six-speed dual clutch transmission, allowing you to shift both quickly, and seamlessly. Additional signs that this speedster is committed to reduced environmental impact include LED exterior, indicator, and interior lights on the car, allowing for low-energy illumination.

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ZERO EMISSIONS SPEED Offering supercar performance on zero emissions, the Tesla Roadster is engineered for efficiency. So pioneering is its design that it gained Elon Musk the Global Green award in 2006 – and testament to that is the fact that this model really stands the test of time. The hand-built, carbon fibre Roadster raised the bar for electric cars when it was in limited-issue production between 2008 and 2012. Today, it has gained legendary status as a highly sought-after collectors item. In 2010 it had a base price tag of US $109,000, but that’s not counting the cash you save going completely oil-free. As it’s a Tesla, the extensive one-charge distance comes as little surprise, being able to cover almost 400kg without having to plug back in once. Moreover, it plugs into nearly any outlet, anywhere in the world. Up to 300 horsepower is produced as the car smoothly accelerates from 0 to 96km/h in an impressive 3.7 seconds! It also has a centrally mounted video display screen that informs the driver of estimated range and the number of oil barrels saved, among other details. Expect a next-generation Roadster to be rolled by Tesla out in the not-too-distant future, but we don’t see the classic going out of fashion any time soon. It’s sublimely smooth, totally silent, and fully electric – and it allows for alfresco freewheeling to boot!

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POWER PLAY Tesla has developed a battery that is one giant step for mankind towards weaning the world off fossil fuels Words by Alex Andersson

Of course, batteries are not an entirely new concept. Companies in China, South Korea and Japan have been developing large-scale batteries for energy storage for many years. So what’s different now? What’s different is that Tesla is doing it. “The issue with the existing batteries is that they suck,” says Elon. And he’s right. So far, battery designs have been ugly, expensive, unreliable, inefficient, and not scalable. But in the same way there were electric cars before Tesla entered the scene, the arrival of this pioneering tech company to energy storage pushes the whole concept to a new level. Tesla is uniquely positioned to develop a game-changing battery because of both its technical experience and market positioning. Tesla is smart. Tesla is hot. People make note of what Tesla does. What’s more, it is a company with renewables at the forefront of every design, so naturally its battery has been designed to work best when coupled with solar.

“ OUR GOAL IS TO FUNDAMENTALLY

CHANGE THE WAY THE WORLD USES ENERGY... WE’RE TALKING AT THE TERAWATT SCALE ELON MUSK

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Photos by Tesla Motors and Nick Stockton

‘W

e have this handy fusion reactor in the sky called the sun. You don’t have to do anything, it just works, turns up every day, and produces ridiculous amounts of power,” says Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors. But the only problem with solar power is that the sun does not shine at night – a flaw that was, for a long time, the greatest roadblock for mainstream, home-grown renewable energy. Not any more. Tesla has designed a battery that allows zero-emissions power generation 24 hours a day. Now, you can store renewable energy and dispense it when the sun isn’t shining, and the wind isn’t blowing. You can also rely on it as backup when the grid goes offline, or in a natural disaster. You can even use it to regulate energy price fluctuations by ‘load-shifting’ – charging the battery up when demand is low (and prices cheap), and using it when prices spike during peak hours. It effectively frees you to be your own utility company!


TECH

‘P

art of the reason that Tesla is able to launch the new solution is our experience in developing the battery for Roadster and Model S,” a Tesla representative told Ecozine. “Although the cells are not exactly the same, we are leveraging the same architectures, battery management systems, and technologies as the Model S battery.” Enter “the missing piece that’s needed to transition to a sustainable energy world,” as Elon calls it. Tesla’s home battery, the Powerwall, is a rechargeable lithium-ion battery designed to store energy for solar power generation. The unit can be mounted on a wall, and is integrated with the grid to give users the flexibility to draw energy from their own reserve. It costs US $3,500 for a 10-kilowatt hour version, and US $3,000 for a 7kWh unit (the average US home uses 30kWh of energy a day, according to the US Energy Information Administration). It’s also relatively thin and light – just under 100kg and 18cm deep – and it’s designed so you can stack up to nine together. It sounds like nothing short of a revolution in energy generation. And judging by the barrage of Powerwall reservations (at the time of press, units were sold out until mid-2016), it might just be one. Even more so since household energy is not the only area where Tesla Power is showing signs of impending domination. Tesla is looking to establish a veritable storage empire, and in order to do so has also developed the Powerpack – a battery designed for commercial and utility-scale storage. They come in 100kWh blocks that can be stacked, clustered, and scaled infinitely. This has attracted an enormous amount of interest from big business, including Walmart, Amazon and Target – confirmed customers of Tesla Energy Storage just a few days after the battery

GAME CHANGER

Clockwise from top: power your home and car with sunshine; banks of Powerpack blocks ready to rock; Elon Musk lays out his plan for transforming the power sector.

announcement. One nameless utility had even ordered 2,500 Powerpack towers before the product was unveiled publicly! And of course they are. It makes sense. Utilities and big business want it for the same reason you would want it in your home, but on a bigger scale. They can now gather practicallyfree alternative energy, store it, and send it out to their clients when they need it. Tesla itself is even developing a US $5 billion ‘Gigafactory’ in Nevada for such needs. In typical visionary fashion, Elon is dreaming big. Very big. “The goal is complete transformation of the entire energy infrastructure of the world,” he says. But he understands it cannot be done alone. With this newest development – as with his others – Tesla has made the patent design for its battery technology, and gigafactory, open source. It is actively encouraging, and hoping, that other companies emulate this on a corporate and global scale. In his speech at the Powerwall release, Elon shared a remarkable statistic. It would take 160 million Powerpacks to transition the entire US to solar-powered electricity run households, and it would take 900 million Powerpacks to transition the entire world as such. “This is within the power of humanity to do. We have done things like this before,” says Elon. “It is something that we must do. We can do. And we will do.” POWER UP You can reserve the Powerwall Tesla home battery on Tesla’s website, and it will be available for delivery in Asia Pacific at the beginning of 2016. The commercial battery is available today for businesses and utilities. teslamotors.com/powerwall


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TECH

01

NatureMill Ultra

Sleek-looking and solidly constructed, the NatureMill Ultra is a popular composter in many households. Having received positive reviews from trustworthy sources like Forbes and the New York Times, the machine is praised for its effectiveness and reliability. The system mixes, moisturises, and aerates the food scraps for very thorough compost output. Yay: Minimal odour, full featured Nay: Uses electricity; may be noisy for a small living space

TOP COMPOSTERS Here’s what you need to know before getting down in the dirt – literally

US $399 | naturemill.net 02

All Seasons Indoor Composter Kit

About the size of an office wastebasket, the All Seasons Indoor Composter Kit (formerly sold as Happy Farmer Kitchen Composting Kit) is compact, convenient and portable. It comes with Bokashi, a brown powder that looks like sawdust and is basically fermented wheat bran. Some food remains physically intact in the end rather than turning into uniform brown compost, but this can be added to your garden to increase the soil’s nutrient content. Yay: Small and easy-to-use; non-electric Nay: Smelly end product can be less appealing

01

02

03

04

US $48 | scdprobiotics.com 03

Food Cycler Kitchen Composter

The Food Cycler composter machine is known for its speediness. It can turn all kinds of foods, as well as bones or shells, into compost in just three hours with minimal labour required to get the finished product. The interior bin is also dishwasher safe, which makes cleaning the contraption a piece of cake. Yay: Efficient and easy to clean Nay: Some reviewers found it noisy US $529 | nofoodwaste.com

04

Green Good Composter GG-02

Size, speed, and odourlessness make this a favourite for many families. It is slightly more sizeable than most of its competitors, but takes about twice the load so you can avoid situations where waste piles up waiting for its turn to go in. Able to process up to 2kg of food waste per day, it plays a significant role in reducing daily food waste per family. Yay: Suitable for larger households; relatively quiet Nay: Takes up space US $680 | greengoodcomposter.com

Ecozine.com

NatureMill Ultra

All Seasons Indoor ComposterKit

Food Cycler Kitchen Composter CS-10

Green Good Composter GG-02

51 x 31 x 51cm

22 x 22 x 66cm

28 x 36 x 36cm

40 x 40 x 79cm

10 kg

0.5 kg

10.8 kg

27 kg

Capacity >

15 L weekly capacity

18 L

1 kg per 3-hour cycle

Up to 2 kg per day

Warranty >

1 year, lifetime filter

No warranty needed

1 year warranty

1 year factory warranty, parts & labour

3-4 hours

More than 24 hours

About 3 hours

12-24 hours

Dimensions > Weight >

Processing Time >

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perspectives

HIGH SEAS FISHING MUST BE STOPPED Words by Paul Watson

F

or three decades I have been calling for an international ban on high seas fishing. Now finally, reputable ocean scientists are calling for just such a ban. Before founding Sea Shepherd Conservation Society in 1977, I was with Greenpeace during the first seven years of the seventies, and slowly we became aware that not only the whales and the seals were in trouble – but so were the fish. And I became aware of it because for the first time fishermen were speaking ill of the seals, the seabirds and the dolphins, accusing them of being too plentiful and of stealing “their” fish. At the same time huge factory trawlers, gill-netters and longliners were replacing traditional fishing boats. The era of the romantic fisherman was coming to an end and was being replaced by industrialised fishing corporations that began to systematically plunder the seas in a manner never undertaken before. Over the last 30 years I have led campaigns to protect bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean, sea cucumbers and lobsters in the Galápagos, and sharks off Central America. I have been trying to hammer home a strong warning to the world that humankind continues to devastate biodiversity in our ocean through overfishing. The price of fish has skyrocketed and I am amazed when I look at what is being sold in fish stores at the incredible prices being asked. In an effort to continue its exploitation of rapidly diminishing fish populations, the fishing industry throws around terms like “sustainable” and “wild-caught.” There are simply not enough fish in the sea to continue supplying an ever-increasing human population plus our domestic animals like cats, salmon, pigs, fur-bearing animals and chickens, who together consume some 40 per cent of the fish taken from the sea. The solution? All heavy-gear fishing must be banned. All

super-trawlers, trawlers, gill netters, long liners, drift netters and industrialised fishing operations must be banned. All plastic gear, i.e. nets, lines and traps should also be banned. Immense by-catch results from practically every major fishery, and especially from these massive and destructive operations. Bycatch is the unintended and unwanted catch of non-target species caught in the nets and on the long-lines, ranging from fish species to turtles, birds and marine mammals such as dolphins and whales. Foreign fishing trawlers need to be banned from fishing within the territorial waters of other countries. Illegal fishing vessels must be seized and destroyed. So-called legal fishing is bad enough, but illegal fishing takes about the same amount of tonnage worldwide. The focus of the pirate fishermen is to secure endangered and threatened fish beyond the limits of the unenforced laws. Step into a restaurant anywhere in the world and order Chilean sea bass and you may be eating a Patagonian or Antarctic toothfish captured by poachers in the Ross Sea. All subsidies by governments to fishing corporations must be ended. Fisheries are heavily subsidised with government monies, and fisheries ministers worldwide under pressure from fishermen – and especially from fish corporations – are awarding quotas much higher than recommended by their own scientists. If fishing is restricted to artisanal fishing by small communities there may be hope for oceanic ecosystems. If not, the oceans will be dead zones by 2048. No fish for anyone, anywhere. No fish for orcas and dolphins. No fish for seals. No fish for the species that depend upon them for their survival. When the fish die, the ocean dies – and when the ocean dies, we die. That is the reality that we face this century and the choices must be made. Action must be taken now.

INTO A RESTAURANT ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD AND “ STEP ORDER CHILEAN SEA BASS AND YOU MAY BE EATING A

PATAGONIAN TOOTHFISH CAPTURED BY POACHERS

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perspectives

OUR PLASTIC FOLLY A CASE FOR ZERO WASTE Words by Dr. Paul Connett

N

ature makes no waste. She makes no persistent things. In biological systems she builds up and breaks down all constituent components and recycles everything. We humans on the other hand want things to last, and the dream material for that desire is plastic. But that dream is turning into a nightmare as we discover that 8 million metric tonnes of this everlasting material enters our oceans every year, with horrible consequences for marine life. A short time ago I watched the movie Plastic Paradise. That movie contains one of the most disturbing images of man’s interaction with nature that I have ever seen: an albatross feeding its young plastic bottle caps. I very much doubt that in 1951, chemists Paul Hogan and Robert Banks, the inventors of polypropylene, had any notion that their brilliant discovery would have such tragic consequences. Captain Charles Moore was the first to discover the plastic ‘island’ created in the gyre in the Pacific. On a recent visit he found things have grown far worse. He estimates that there are up to 600 times more plastic pieces by weight in the gyre than zooplankton. Worse still, he has found evidence that pieces of plastic are entering the small lantern fish, which comprise 55 per cent of the biomass of all fish in the ocean and serve as the staple food for many aquatic species. Are we, too, ingesting this plastic? Whether or not we can mitigate the escalating damage from our plastic folly is questionable, but we have to try. We have to find better ways of handling materials on our finite planet. We all make waste, and thus we are all part of an unsustainable way of living. But with good political leadership we could each be part of a movement towards Zero Waste, a key step in achieving sustainability.

The Zero Waste programme is a concrete strategy to convert our linear society into a circular one. A linear society involves five steps: extraction of raw materials, transporting these materials around the world, manufacturing products from these raw materials, consuming these products and finally, disposing of the products and packaging after we have done with them. All five of these steps have enormous consequences for our planet, ranging from habitat destruction and extinction of species to air, water and soil pollution, rapid use of fossil fuels, and climate change. All these add up to non-sustainability on a large scale. How we manage our waste will indicate how seriously we wish to mitigate this global damage. Traditionally we have used two main methods: landfilling and incineration. Neither addresses the problems inherent in the linear system. Far more energy is saved globally when materials are reused, recycled or composted. At the community level we have to deliver this message to industry: “If we can’t reuse, recycle or compost it, you shouldn’t be making it.” In short, we must add the fourth R of Redesign (industrial responsibility) to the traditional three Rs of Reduce, Reuse and Recycle (community responsibility). Compared with traditional waste management methods, not only is the Zero Waste programme a better way of protecting our oceans from plastic debris, but it is also better for our economy (more jobs), our health (fewer toxins), our universities (more relevance), our planet (more sustainable) and our children, because it offers hope for the future. Read more about the ten steps to zero waste in The Zero Waste Solution: Untrashing the Planet One Community At a Time

“ THE CENTRAL ISSUE HERE IS USING

LONG-LASTING MATERIALS ON OBJECTS THAT ARE ONLY IN OUR HANDS FOR A VERY SHORT TIME

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perspectives

FASHIONING

HEALTHIER SEAS Words by Cyrill Gutsch

Photo: Ralph Wuerth

P

roblems have always been highly inspiring for me. If something breaks down, a structure is falling apart: then there is opportunity. I was a designer before I started Parley for the Oceans. I specialised in launching new brands or turning around companies that were struggling. Collaboration has always been the nucleus of my work. I am used to working with the best talent and bringing them into an environment that allows “cross intelligence”. Before, my professional life was spinning around improving my skills and making enough money to satisfy my creative ego. But then I decided to dedicate my services to the oceans. In a sense, they are the new client. The oceans are dying. Dr Boris Worm once projected that the most important fisheries will collapse by 2048. That was nine years ago, and today I would say that this prediction is optimistic. Most of the important species are facing extinction already, to mention just a few: sharks, whales, dolphins, and tuna. And what we don’t catch and eat gets toxified with ocean plastic pollution, and other substances that don’t belong in the belly of a fish or bird. There is more plastic in our oceans than plankton and more plastic particles than fish eggs in our lakes and rivers. We are destroying the most important life support system of our planet. And if we succeed in doing this, we will not be able to live on this earth. Humankind is at war with nature. And Parley is the space where truce is being negotiated, solutions developed, alliances forged. Parley for the Oceans is a collaboration network for the creative industries, brands and environmentalists. Our mission is to raise awareness for the beauty and fragility of our oceans and to run projects that can help end their destruction. We bring people and organisations together that normally don’t speak to each other –

who often even fight each other. The glue, the connecting link, is creativity. A good idea, a vision can unite opponents and be the basis for strong alliances. And right now we are focusing on ocean plastic pollution, overfishing and climate change. I believe we can solve most of our problems with imagination, collaboration and innovation. And this puts the responsibility on the creative industries that pretty much design the reality we live in. Artists, designers, musicians, actors and scientists – just to mention a few creative disciplines – have the tools to change the economic systems that run our planet, and help synchronise them with the eco system of nature. We have to make it more lucrative to protect our oceans than to destroy them. It’s human nature to always move forward, to advance. It’s unrealistic to think we can just turn the clock back. We have to think our way out of this. It is the job of Parley to provide the knowledge and inspiration to our partners in form of talks, workshops and conferences. We also develop ideas, concepts and run projects in the fields of education and communication, research and development, and direct actions. But, I don’t believe in superheroes. No one person can solve this mess alone. We all have to participate, contribute, and play a role. Everybody loves the ocean, most of us have simply lost our connection with it. Living far away from the sea, often not being able to even spend vacations on the beach or diving makes it hard to fall in love with this beautiful blue universe. I can’t live with the fact that we are destroying the oceans and so I see it as my responsibility to get the word out and to do as much as I can. And I just know that no one gets out of bed in the morning and decides consciously to destroy the sea. Nobody does that. If people know and are given alternatives, they do the right thing. Learn more at Parley.tv

“ WE HAVE TO MAKE IT MORE LUCRATIVE TO ACTUALLY PROTECT OUR OCEANS THAN TO DESTROY THEM ” Ecozine.com

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