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Orff-Based Songwriting Orff-based music therapy is grounded in the use of elemental (simple, basic, natural) and culturally relevant music, and provides intrinsic opportunities for autonomy and involvement in the therapeutic process (Colwell, 2009), easily allowing parents to participate musically. Furthermore, the creation of an original Orff-based lullaby with a NICU-MT can easily align with the appropriate NICU music characteristics listed above (Detmer, 2015). The music file below provides an example of an original, Orff-based parental lullaby. This was created by a NICUMT and a premature infant’s mother days before the infant’s discharge. The mother had experienced many personal medical issues during her child’s hospital stay and at the time of the music therapy referral, reported increased anxiety as she faced the prospect of transitioning home with her child. The intended outcome of this project was to increase the mother’s feelings of control and contribution through cognitive processing and emotional expression, thus decreasing her feelings of anxiety. The NICU-MT used the following Orff process outlined in the sidebar to assist the mother in creating her personal lullaby. Miamore Recorded 2016 by Michael Detmer

ORFF PROCESS FOR CREATING A PERSONALIZED LULLABY 1. Introduce music therapy services and the idea of an original lullaby recording project. 2. Prompt mother to write down pleasant thoughts or create a

poem about her child. (a day later…) 3. Work with mom to form thoughts/poem into a chant. 4. Add body percussion to chant (i.e., patting to mimic bordun). 5. Teach mom C-G bordun and play with chant. 6. MT-BC improvises in a pentatonic scale during bordun with chant. 7. MT-BC and mom switch instrument parts and repeat chant.

Playing Recorded Music If parental lullaby recordings are to be played while in the NICU, it is imperative the NICU-MT educate staff and parents on appropriate recorded music provision as well as stress cues or overstimulation of premature infants. Per Standley and Walworth’s (2010) research-based recommendations, music can be played: For infants who have reached at least 28 gestational weeks and are approved by nursing staff; 30 minutes at a time, for a maximum of four hours/ day; No louder than 65-75 db (scale C); With speakers on each side of the infant’s head or feet so music is received binaurally; and Should be discontinued if the infant exhibits persistent overstimulation or physiological instability.

imagine 7(1), 2016

8. Discuss and create a vocal melody based on common themes present during the improvisation. 9. Mom plays bordun while she sings, choosing how/if she wants MT-BC to participate during recording (e.g., intro, chorus, interlude, outro). 10.Record, burn to CD, and provide to mother along with guidelines for music playing in the NICU.

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2016  

In this issue, over 70 authors from 12 countries share their dedication and passion for early childhood music therapy with imagine readers....

imagine 2016  

In this issue, over 70 authors from 12 countries share their dedication and passion for early childhood music therapy with imagine readers....