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WHAT ADMINISTRATORS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT EARLY CHILDHOOD MUSIC THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC HEALTHCARE SETTING

Healthcare administrators face many challenges, including balancing cost control and value creation while boosting productivity and improving quality of services within their hospitals (Begun, White, & Mosser, 2011). Administrators are responsible for determining which programs will be best for their hospitals and patients and therefore need accurate and concise information on proposed services. Although some healthcare administrators already recognize the value of music therapy services, there is little research on administrators’ perceptions of music therapy within pediatric settings. The suggestions offered in this article are based on the research literature and experiences of the authors (two music therapists and a hospital administrator) with the intention of helping music therapists work with healthcare administrators to develop pediatric music therapy programs. This article will focus on a) research outcomes and neurological foundations, b) cost effectiveness, and c) professional advocacy in music therapy. Research Outcomes and Neurological Foundations Music therapists must be able to communicate to others best practices based on research and clearly and concisely provide basic information about the psychological and neurological effects of music. Compiling a summary of research outcomes can help provide information about potential benefits of music therapy at-a-glance (see Figure 1).

Altering Perceptions: Research, CostEffectiveness, and Advocacy Ashley Miller, MT-BC Olivia Swedberg Yinger, Ph.D., MT-BC University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts Lexington, Kentucky Joseph Zwischenberger, MD University of Kentucky Department of Surgery Lexington, Kentucky

DEPARTMENT General Pediatrics

Neonatal Intensive Care

Oncology

RESEARCH OUTCOMES • •

Reducing pain/anxiety Decreasing respiratory distress • Maintaining developmental milestones (Standley, Gooding, & Yinger, 2014) •

Regulating physiologic measures • Increasing tolerance to stimulation • Reinforcing non-nutritive sucking (Standley, 2014) • •

Increasing positive coping Increasing active engagement (Robb, 2000) •

Rehabilitation

Facilitating functional movement • Regulating attention/memory/ executive functioning • Improving communication skills (de l’Etoile & LaGasse, 2013)

Surgery and Other Medical Procedures

• Decreasing distress (Gooding, Yinger, & Iocono, 2015)

Table 1. Example Research Summary.

imagine 7(1), 2016

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2016  

In this issue, over 70 authors from 12 countries share their dedication and passion for early childhood music therapy with imagine readers....

imagine 2016  

In this issue, over 70 authors from 12 countries share their dedication and passion for early childhood music therapy with imagine readers....