Page 27

mother. In Italy, Maternal Vocal Intervention (MVI) is implemented to promote musical communication between mothers and hospitalized preterm infants. Most interventions involve live, musical interactions, but the effectiveness of live vs. recorded music is debated in this country. In the UK, NICU music therapy is an emerging field, and there are about 10 music therapists working in neonatal units. Moving to the other side of the world, NICU music therapy was established in Singapore as a new healthcare profession in 2007. MTs are employed as Allied Healthcare Professionals, and any team member in the hospital can make a referral with a doctor’s approval. Live music, such as personalized lullabies, is provided to increase tolerance to stimuli, promote developmental milestones, and decrease agitation. In Korea, music therapists work with infants after they are discharged from the NICU to improve sensory, motor and social skills, and to facilitate parent-child bonding. Infant directed singing and Korean lullabies paired with the mothers' voices are employed. In Japan, NICU music therapy is focused on family-centered care. Music therapy is provided to facilitate the development of communication skills through music to aid parents in communicating with their baby. There is just one NICU music therapist practicing in Colombia. Music therapy is combined with Kangaroo care, and live music (guitar, harp and voice) and composition are the techniques implemented to provide care. In the United States, music therapists work in 30 out of the 50 top hospitals in the country; 12 of those hospitals employ a NICU music therapist. There are two main approaches: the Armstrong model and the biomedical model. Finally, in Australia, a music therapist is employed in every oncology unit of every pediatric hospital in the entire country. NICU music therapy has existed in Australian hospitals for over 20 years. Music therapists from each country represented in the roundtable expressed concerns about lack of training in the medical setting, lack of public awareness, lack of funding and lack of quality assurance in training and practice.

About the Authors Rose Fienman, MSW, MT-BC, imagine editorial team member is a Program Director with Arts & Services for Disabled, Inc., and the WFMT Chair of the Public Relations Commission. She also practices at the Music Therapy Wellness Clinic at California State University, Northridge, where she supervises undergraduates completing fieldwork placements. Contact: rose.fienman@gmail.com

Marcia Humpal, M.Ed., MT-BC maintains a small private practice and continues her involvement with young children and their families. She was co-founder of AMTA’s Early Childhood Network, and currently serves on the imagine editorial team and several committees and projects for AMTA. She is the co-editor of Early Childhood Music Therapy and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Developing Potential in Young Children and Their Families.

Kumi Sato, MA was trained as a music therapist in the U.S. Now living in Japan, she is a Ph.D. candidate at the Tsukuba University researching the use of music to support children with special needs.

Talia Girton is a music therapy intern at UK HealthCare in Lexington, Kentucky, USA and previously attended the University of Louisville. She is one of the seven recipients of the 14. World Congress of Music Therapy Scholarship Award for Students.

imagine 5(1), 2014

27

Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...