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Holistic Approach in MT and Its Specific Features in Children Group Therapy S. Drlícková and M. Friedlová (Czech Republic) Summarized by Kumi Sato The presenters began this workshop by playing spiritual music. This was an effective starting place, as the unique quality of the music captured the audience's attention and piqued their curiosity. The presenters then talked about the five principles of holistic music therapy: 1) respecting the human being as a whole; 2) using high quality instruments made from natural materials; 3) incorporating vocal/instrumental improvisations; 4) providing live music only; and 5) sensing breath, voice, and body. Next, the presenters showed a variety of instruments such as a Bolivian flute and a Tibetan bell. One case study and two activities were introduced. The attendees were encouraged to experience an exercise at the end of the session, making them aware of own breath, voice, and body. This workshop suggested the importance of the quality of sound we create in sessions as well as the therapist’s skill to lead by music. Microanalysis Research for Autistic Children S. Valchová, Z. (Czech Republic) and G. Collavoli, G. T. (Italy) Summarized by Kumi Sato This presentation discussed some practical ways to record client’s behaviors during sessions. First, the presenters showed an example of a handwritten session note. On one sheet, a timeline was drawn horizontally, and a basic description of activities as well as behavior symptoms of social interaction was written along the timeline. They indicated clear criteria for social interaction, such as use of nonverbal communication or engaging in the same activity. The session note also included technical memos and information on music. Presenters noted that although it is easy to add information to a handwritten session note, analyzing the data may take a longer time. Dartfish Easy Tag software for the iPhone/iPad or Android devices help avoid this

imagine 5(1), 2014

problem. Therapists choose target behaviors and create a tagging panel, and then simply tap the panel every time the target behaviors occur during a session. This app lets therapists see when each target behavior occurred later. Exploring more practical ways to record sessions and spending less time analyzing the data may allow therapists to spend more time preparing sessions. Music Therapy and Neuroscience: Clinical Applications for Children C. Zamani (Argentina) Summarized by Talia Girton Zamani's workshop consisted of the presentation of videos and interventions from her own private practice, and the theoretical underpinnings upon which she designs and implements her therapy. She discussed neurocognitive evidence-based clinical practices such as utilizing a simple melodic line, structured rhythmic patterns and simple harmonies, as well as verbalizing and reflecting the child's and the therapist's actions. Music therapy techniques such as non-verbal instrument play dialogues, joint singing, structured music activities and the imitation of rhythmic patterns were presented, discussed, and demonstrated for the group. Highlights included a game with finger cymbals where the therapist and child play together like a hand clap game, an activity with bells in which two sets of handled sleigh bells were joined so the therapist and children could play together, and a castanet intervention in which the instruments had faces so the child could be encouraged to create a musical story. Culturally Transformed Music Therapy in the Perinatal and Paediatric NICU H. Shoemark (Australia), M. Ettenberger (UK), M. Filippa (France), C. Flower (UK), D. Hanson-Abromeit (US), F. Haslbeck (Switzerland), J. Loewy (USA), M. Kwan (Singapre), J. Kim (Korea), S. Mori-Inoue (Japan) Summarized by Talia Girton This roundtable session was a unique opportunity to hear from NICU music therapists from around the world. In Switzerland, Germany and Austria, Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU) music therapy focuses on live music making with soft instruments, and the recorded voice of the

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...