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Developing Communication, Socialization, Creativity, and Musical Skills in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders C. Zamani (Argentina) Summarized by Rose Fienman This informative session began with some background information on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The presenter informed attendees that the current rate of autism incidence is 1 in 68 births, and that the current trend in practice is the integration of approaches. Best practices include the family-centered approach, the strengths-based approach, and working in natural and inclusive environments. The presentation then progressed into a clinical vignette featuring a client that Zamani has worked with since 2008. The client was just 3.9 years old when music therapy began, and he displayed many common features of ASD including few verbalizations and atypical rhythm of speech. Through video clips, Zamani recounted the changes observed in the music therapy environment. Around age 5, the client began to add spontaneous verbalizations to familiar songs, and Zamani noticed an increase in his creativity. 2012 brought an increase in his language comprehension and changes in melodic and prosodic speech for the then 8 year old client. Currently, this client is enrolled in piano lessons (separate from music therapy) and is fully included in the recitals.He enjoys playing the piano for his friends. Zamani concluded the presentation by drawing on her experiences with this client, as well as with other clients with autism, and expressing her belief that working with children with ASD requires all people and available resources to be working together and in agreement on various issues of treatment. Good, Better, Best: Recommendations on EvidenceBased Practice for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder P. Kern, M. Humpal, J. Whipple, L. Martin, A. M. Snell, D. DeLoach, J. Carpente, H. Lim, L. Wakeford (USA) Summarized by Marcia Humpal

Disorder was presented on Tuesday, July 8th.The roundtable addressed various chapters of the book, Early Childhood Music Therapy and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Developing Potential in Young Children and their Families (Kern & Humpal, Eds., 2012). Chapter authors Petra Kern, John Carpente, Marcia Humpal, and Darcy DeLoach each responded to three predetermined questions about their chapters. Video appearances by additional authors Jennifer Whipple, Linda Martin, Angela Snell, Hayoung Lim, and Linn Wakeford added to the clarification of additional aspects of the book’s content. The roundtable featured the latest developments surrounding ASD and its increase in prevalence rate across all cultures and nations. Evidence-based practice, research-based knowledge, assessment and goals, and approaches and techniques for young children with ASD and their families were topics addressed by the panelists. Questions and comments from the audience added to the discussion of the topic at the end of the presentation. The Color of Us: Music Therapy for Children and Families in Europe P. Kern (USA), S. Lindahl Jacobsen (Denmark), K. Tuomi (Finland), E. Georgiadi (Greece), K. Stachyra (Poland) , C. Flower (UK), T. Stegemann (Austria) Summarized by Marcia Humpal On Friday, July 11th, music therapists from throughout Europe joined in the roundtable The Color of Us: Music Therapy for Children and Families in Europe. Moderated by Petra Kern of the United States, the panel consisted of Stine Lindahl Jacobsen of Denmark, Elizabeth Georgiadi of Greece, Krzysztof Stachyra of Poland, Claire Flower of the United Kingdom, and Thomas Stegemann of Austria. Kirsi Tuomi from Finland was a virtual participant. Presenters gave a brief snapshot of their country and its early childhood services, selected publications, background information (relating to federal regulations, educational and cultural influences, and predominate clinical approaches) and a brief case summary. They engaged the audience in delightful musical examples from each country to start off each segment. In closing, panelists discussed what they would like to see happen in the future and how international collaborations can be increased to address cultural diversities and practices.

Good, Better, Best: Recommendations on EvidenceBased Practice for Children with Autism Spectrum

imagine 5(1), 2014

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...