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Photo courtesy of IMC FH Krems

Cultural Diversity in Music Therapy Practice, Research and Education 14. World Congress of Music Therapy Vienna/Krems, Austria, July 7-12, 2014 Rose Fienman, MSW, MT-BC Editorial Assistance, imagine Marcia Humpal, M.Ed., MT-BC Contributing Editor, imagine Kumi Sato, MS Student Representative for Western Pacific, World Federation of Music Therapy Talia Girton, Music Therapy Intern Recipient, 14. World Congress of Music Therapy Scholarship Award for Students

The 14th World Congress of Music Therapy in Austria was a vibrant international event. With over 1000 music therapists from 46 countries in attendance, it was an excellent opportunity to connect with and learn from professionals, interns, and students from various backgrounds. The following reports summarize eight paper sessions, workshops, and roundtables that were presented on topics relevant to early childhood.

imagine 5(1), 2014

Using the Pacifier Activated Lullaby (PAL) with Infants Diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) D.DeLoach and E. Hamm (USA) Summarized by Rose Fienman This presentation discussed some preliminary research on the Pacifier Activated Lullaby (PAL) with infants diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). Infants born with NAS are addictive to substances that the mother had taken during her pregnancy; these addictive substances include cocaine, marijuana, and narcotics. In addition to other symptoms and general fussiness, the NAS babies generally are not successful at feeding; their latching on is weak and their sucking motion is too rapid. The PAL works by providing an infant with a musical stimulus (reward) when the infant sucks properly on the pacifier; the baby must perform an effective suck to start the lullaby. The PAL, developed by Jayne Standley, is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States, and is the first music therapy tool to have achieved this recognition. This pilot data has shown that infants generally begin learning that an effective suck starts the music within the first session with the PAL. Additionally, more than 95% of the infants studied were able to fall asleep in their crib during the session without being held. This second outcome is of great interest to neonatal nurses, as the NAS babies generally require much of their time and attention, especially when trying to calm the babies into sleep. These preliminary findings seem quite promising for increasing music therapy work with the PAL in the NICU. The presenters hope to publish this data in the coming months.

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...