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development, and Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). With a look at the future, a lively discussion ensued with audience members on the current highlights and pitfalls that will influence early childhood education as student assessments are pushed down to a preschool age while children are at a stage in their lives when play IS their work. Further symposium highlights included The Power of Movement and Music Using Nursery Rhymes with Infants/Toddlers led by Christine Roberts of Nurturing Pathways, which focused on the importance of sensory motor development in young children and how music and movement nurture that development. Board-certified music therapist Wendy Zieve presented Music Therapy for Facilitation of Social Communication in Early Childhood as participants expanded their knowledge of techniques to foster social skills in young children with impairments. David Knott, MT-BC, led an Early Childhood Panel consisting of himself, Annie Dillon, MTBC, and Patti Catalano, MM, MT-BC in A Discussion of the Use of Music Therapy to Address Neurological and Medical Issues in Early Childhood. Panelists discussed research and treatment models used with young children in Seattle Children’s Hospital and Music Works Northwest, a community music school in Bellevue, WA. Marcia Humpal and Ronna Kaplan both presented in unopposed sessions in the afternoon, further sharing their expertise. In her session Early Childhood Music Therapy and Autism Spectrum Disorder…Making and Substantiating Meaningful Music, Marcia reviewed the DSM-5™ changes in the definition of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the importance of using Evidence-Based Practice when working with young children with ASD, the progress and recognition music therapy is gaining as the National Autism Center (NAC) lists music therapy as an emerging practice (which is NAC’s second level of effectiveness), and what is needed for music therapy to reach NAC’s first level of effectiveness – “established.” Participants pondered the question: Should Music Therapy be evaluated as a Comprehensive Treatment Model or should it be evaluated as a therapy that can reinforce many focused interventions and comprehensive treatment models?

Ronna Kaplan introduced participants to the Music Settlement’s Lullaby 101: A Program for At-Risk Expectant and Parenting Teens and Adults. Within this project, music therapists found that young parents who were considered at-risk were not familiar with lullabies from their own childhood and needed to be taught lullabies to sing with their babies. Highlights regarding the justification of using lullabies were shared, including the universal care giving nature of lullabies across cultures, calming strategies for both parent and child, stimulation of early language development, fostering attention behaviors, and the social importance of making music. Ronna shared The Logic Model to be used as a template for program planning including needs, interventions or activities, and anticipated outcomes. Teens and adults in the Lullaby 101 program were guided through music therapy interventions, ways to choose calming music for their babies and coordinate the music with calming activities, songwriting, and generalization of their learning outside of class. Looking at the MTAW 2014 Symposium: Emerging Trends in Early Childhood from the perspectives of monetary and time-intensity was it worth the investment to offer in-person training in these specialized areas? Attendees of the symposium have the final say through their evaluations. Evaluations were overwhelmingly positive with high marks made by music therapists and non-music therapists alike. When asked what about the event participants liked and what would be most useful in their clinical practice, one participant said, “Meeting Ronna and Marcia and hopefully continuing a professional relationship with all of the wonderful people I’ve met today.” About the Author Patti is a Board-certified music therapist and Neurologic Music Therapy Fellow. She is the Music Therapy and Early Childhood Program Manager at Music Works Northwest, a community music school in Bellevue, WA. Contact: pattic@musicworksnw.org

imagine 5(1), 2014

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...