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rhythm and movement. Students learn to improvise movement first, before improvising musically and on instruments. Improvised performances help to improve response time, communication accuracy, and spontaneity of expression. Eurhythmics consists of participants moving purposefully and spontaneously to music that is usually improvised on the piano. Partner and small group activities are used in sequential lessons to teach the various elements of music, to cultivate good ensemble skills, and to promote social engagement. Dalcroze practitioners are trained to use exercises and games that feature improvised music and movement. In their training, they also learn how to attune their vocal and instrumental improvisations to their clients’ and students’ physical actions. The practitioner can then exert an influence over listeners’ attention, directing it to specific events in the music as obvious as changes in tempo or dynamics or as subtle as the nuanced inflections that distinguish one kind of skipping rhythm from another. Participants have multiple sensory-motor experiences with specific musical elements before learning the theoretical concepts and notational symbols used to represent them. Music Therapy Applications Jaques-Dalcroze was a proponent of adapting curriculum to the individual and using music as a way to educate the whole child, mirroring many music therapy philosophies. His initial idea to train conservatory musicians was expanded to the music education of young children and those with special needs. He believed that sensory experiences and kinesthetic learning were vital for the learning process. The portion of the Dalcroze hierarchy that incorporates hearing to moving to feeling to sensing to analyzing can be translated into goals set by music therapists. By tapping into the power of physical movement, the Dalcroze approach offers therapists a set of tools for bringing their clients to higher levels of musical understanding and skill. The Dalcroze experience satisfies our instinctual desire to move in synchrony with others and find our place in a community. Eurhythmics also has the ability to improve self-regulation and interpersonal attunement (Foolen, 2012). Music therapists have used eurythmics to address goals such as body and spatial

awareness, self-expression, improving mental alertness and attention, fostering creativity and imagination, fostering peer acceptance and group inclusion, and to provide relaxation experiences. Example

Watch video Dalcroze Eurhythmics class https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOEditUWK54

References Black, J. and Moore, S. (2003). The Rhythm Inside: Connecting Body, Mind and Spirit Through Music. Van Nuys, CA: Alfred Music. Foolen, A., Lüdtke, U. M., Racine, T. P., & Zlatev, J. (2012). Moving ourselves, moving others: Motion and emotion in intersubjectivity, consciousness and language. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Frego, R. J. D., Liston, R. E., Hama, M., & Gillmeister, G. (2008). The Dalcroze approach to music therapy. In A. A. Darrow (Ed.), Introduction to Approaches in Music Therapy (2nd ed., pp. 25-36). Silver Spring, MD: American Music Therapy Association. About the Author Current President of the Dalcroze Society of America, William R. Bauer, Ph.D. teaches music full time at City University of New York’s College of Staten Island and is a member of the CUNY Graduate Center’s musicology faculty. Dr. Bauer holds the Dalcroze License and Certificate. Contact: Bill.Bauer@CSI.CUNY.edu

dalcrozeusa.org

imagine 5(1), 2014

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...