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Services and Products OAKE publishes the Kodály Envoy four times annually, holds a national conference each year, awards grants to local chapters for special projects, has various resource publications available to members and the general public, offers a free video library to its members, and advocates for excellence in music education. Key Elements of the Program The Kodály approach has four key elements: singing, folk music, music literacy, and curriculum sequencing. Kodály believed that singing is the foundation to learning music as it allows for self-expression and trains the musical ear. He also believed that folk music, children’s songs and games, and pedagogical exercises by master composers provide the richest source of musical material to learn from. Folk music from the child’s home culture is seen as a tool to help the child understand the musical language of his or her homeland and to connect to national identity. The "moveable do" tonic sol-fa system, highly developed in English choral training, and the use of rhythmic duration syllables, developed by music theorist Emile Chevé, were both advocated by Kodaly as tools for teaching musical literacy. Hand signs adapted from John Curwen provide a visual representation of pitch. Teachers can use these techniques to provide aural, visual, and kinesthetic experiences of musical elements. The Kodály approach uses the pentatonic scale extensively in the early stages of musical development because of its predominance in folk music and absence of half-steps, aiding the development of accurate intonation. Rhythmic, melodic, and metric elements are extracted from the literature, sequentially arranged from simple to complex, and then methodically prepared, presented, and practiced. Music Therapy Applications Kodály’s belief that music is for all children aligns very well with music therapy philosophy. The Kodály approach is ideal for music therapists who work in school systems or collaborate with music educators to adapt music curricula for children with special needs, as well as for music therapists in private practice who provide adapted music lessons. The developmental approach and multisensory experiences that make up the Kodály approach make music learning accessible to those with

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special needs. Goals that can be addressed by music therapists through the Kodály approach include improving perceptual-motor skills, temporal and spatial abilities, language and social skills, and general cognitive skills. The Kodály curriculum includes a sequential process to teach children “sound before symbol.” During preparation, children are exposed to varied and multisensory experiences of musical concepts through songs and activities. In the next phase, the musical elements are made conscious and children are guided through discovery of the musical concept. During reinforcement, children go back to songs learned previously and identify the musical concepts and gain more practice. During assessment, the child applies what he or she has learned to new songs and improvisations. The sequential strategies can be adapted and presented at the appropriate pace for any given client or group and can be used to shape client behavior. The reinforcement and assessment phases mirror techniques that music therapists already use in their practice. Example

https://videotorium.hu/hu/recordings/details/ 7447,Demonstration_Lesson_with_the_children_of_th e_Bocskai_Nursery_School_Kecskemet

Watch video Kodály'Pedagogy'

References Brownell, M. D., Frego, R. J. D., Kwak, E. M., & Rayburn, A. M. (2008). The Kodály approach to music therapy. In A. A. Darrow (Ed.), Introduction to Approaches in Music Therapy (2nd ed., pp. 37-46). Silver Spring, MD: American Music Therapy Association. About the Author Kelly Foster Griffin is a National Board Certified Teacher and received her Kodály certification from Kodály Musical Training Institute, University of Hartford, and her MA Mus. Ed with Kodály Emphasis from Holy Names University. Contact: tomkelhay@gmail.com

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...

imagine 2014  

The focus of imagine 2014 is on family-centered practice – a trend taking hold in music therapy circles worldwide. While many practitioners...