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As an example of this organization, the first chapter, devoted to the role of assessment in pediatric medicine, reviews the importance of selecting appropriate music and monitoring a child’s responses to procedural support interventions. Discussions and simulations cover the factors that may affect a child’s listening choices and charge the reader with articulating the importance of assessment in pediatric music therapy. The list of materials includes an inventory of equipment needed to conduct comprehensive music therapy evaluations. Also included is a list of suggested discussion points to help clinicians approach parents before carrying out an assessment. Fieldwork activities include preparing materials prior to conducting the assessment and following through with the assessment procedures (e.g., CMPAC, MASA, and SCRIBE) outlined in the chapter. Finally, clinician checklists provide the developing clinician with the opportunity to reflect on the role of assessment in music therapy and evaluate his/ her competency in carrying out the assessment procedures. Of particular note in this chapter on assessment is the Computer-based Music Perception Assessment for Children (CMPAC) – a tool available to clinicians carrying out evaluations in the pediatric arena. As a child’s responsiveness to music is an important variable to consider in designing effective interventions in pediatrics, CMPAC provides the clinician with a method for sampling children’s music listening behaviors and gathering preliminary information about a child’s familiarity and preference with certain genres of music. Ultimately, CMPAC output data on the sequence, duration, and frequency of listening can then be used to develop childcentered, music-based interventions for use during painful or anxiety-provoking medical procedures. Another important feature of this manual is the inclusion of detailed instructions used to guide specific interventions during invasive procedures. Located within the appendices, these protocols provide an overview of the intervention, a listing of related materials (including visual aids and music), and detailed verbalizations/instructions for carrying out the intervention. Furthermore, these protocols provide a foundation (i.e., a consistent manner in which to carry out an intervention) for developing a body of evidenced-based practices in pediatric music therapy. Finally, in addition to

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these detailed protocols, the appendices also include outlines for carrying out music therapy activities in the pediatric playroom, visual aids for use during assessments and invasive procedures, suggested musical excerpts and recordings, forms for use in documenting progress, and brochures to assist readers and clinicians in designing and carrying out programs in pediatric settings. Reference Wolfe, D. E., & Waldon, E. G. (2009). Music therapy in pediatric medicine: A guide to skill development and clinical intervention. Silver Spring, MD: American Music Therapy Association. About the Authors Eric G. Waldon, Ph.D., MT-BC is a boardcertified music therapist and licensed psychologist working in the Department of Psychiatry at Kaiser Permanente’s Stockton, California facility. Additionally, he serves as adjunct faculty at Brandman University’s Modesto, CA campus where he teaches courses in research methods and neuropsychology. Contact: egwaldon@aol.com
 David Wolfe, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus and past Chair of the Department of Music Therapy and Coordinator of Graduate Studies, University of the Pacific; previous Chair, Department of Music Therapy, Utah State University; and currently Acting Director of the Music Therapy Department, Chapman University. Dr. Wolfe has been the recipient of numerous awards including the AMTA Lifetime Achievement Award, the WRAMTA Betty Isern Howery Recognition Award, and AMTA and WRAMTA Publications Award. Contact: dwolfe001@dc.rr.com

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imagine 2010  

Additional early childhood music therapy resources available at www.imagine.musictherapy.biz.

imagine 2010  

Additional early childhood music therapy resources available at www.imagine.musictherapy.biz.