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respect to cognitive and behavioral flexibility, emotional awareness and self-regulation, and sensory integration. Dissemination and Collaboration Presentations concerning recent developments in research at the Nordoff-Robbins Center have been well received by interdisciplinary audiences at annual conventions of the New York State Council on Exceptional Children, and Child Life of Greater New York. Forthcoming presentations will be given at a meeting of the Northeast Music Cognition Group at Yale University, and an international conference on autism and the creative arts at Hunter College, New York City. In order to develop a battery of psychosocial and neurological measures to study in depth the effects of music therapy in such areas as communication, interaction, and mirror neuron activity, the Center seeks to establish collaborations with researchers in various fields. Possible collaborators include child development research centers, behavioral neuroscience institutes, family and children’s mental health programs, and developmental pediatric practices. Our continuing research partnership with TOTS and newly established relationships with other preschools for children with special needs will form the basis for a future multi-site collaborative study. Outcomes of this quantitative research will enhance clinical practice, and will augment the strong tradition of qualitative research in Nordoff-Robbins music therapy and the vast accumulation of parents' anecdotal reports regarding successful outcomes of their children's therapy. References Accordino, R., Comer, R., & Heller, W.B. (2007). Searching for music’s potential: A critical examination of research on music therapy with individuals with autism. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 1, 101-115. Aigen, K. (1997). Here we are in music: One year with an adolescent creative music therapy group. St. Louis, MO: MMB Music. Aigen, K. (1998). Paths of development in Nordoff-Robbins music therapy. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers. Ansdell, G., Pavlicevic, M., & Procter, S. (2004). Presenting the evidence: A guide for music therapists responding to the demands of clinical effectiveness and evidence-based practice. London: Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Centre. Bruscia, K. (1991). Case studies in music therapy. Phoenixville, PA: Barcelona. Hummel-Rossi, B., Guerrero, N., Selim, N., Turry, A., Birnbaum, J., Marcus, D., & Ritholz, M. (2008). Music therapy communication and social interaction scale – group. Unpublished instrument, Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy, New York University. Koelsch, S. (2009). A neuroscientific perspective on music therapy. The neurosciences and music III—disorders and plasticity: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1169, 374–384.

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Nordoff, P., & Robbins, C. (2007/1977). Creative music therapy: A guide to fostering clinical musicianship. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona. Overy, K., & Molnar-Szakacs, I. (2009). Being together in time: Musical experience and the mirror neuron system. Music Perception, 26(5), 489-504. Ramachandran, V. S., & Oberman, L. M. (2006). Broken mirrors. Scientific American, 295(5), 62-69. Rizzolatti, G., Fogassi, L., & Gallese, V. (2006). Mirrors in the mind. Scientific American, 295(5), 54-61. Sparrow, S. S., Balla, D., & Cicchetti, D. (2005). Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales – 2nd ed. – Parent/caregiver rating form. Minneapolis, MN: Service. Pearson Assessments. Wigram, T., & Gold, C. (2006). Music therapy in the assessment and treatment of autistic spectrum disorders: Clinical application and research evidence. Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(5), 535-543. Whipple, J. (2003). Music therapy for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders: An analysis of the literature based on theoretical approach. Unpublished paper, The Florida State University, Tallahassee. Whipple, J. (2004). Music in intervention for children and adolescents with autism: A meta-analysis. Journal of Music Therapy, 16(2), 90-106. About the Authors Nina Guerrero, M.A, MT-BC, LCAT, NRMT, is Research Coordinator at the Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy. In the past, she has provided music therapy services at therapeutic preschools, and has assisted in research on speech perception and language development in young children with cochlear implants. Contact: mcg217@nyu.edu Alan Turry, D.A., MT-BC, LCAT, NRMT, Managing Director of the NordoffRobbins Center for Music Therapy at New York University, oversees the Center’s research, training and clinical programs. As the first certified trainer in Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy, he has helped to establish NordoffRobbins clinical programs in Korea and Japan, and teaches annually at the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Centre in London. Contact: alan.turry@nyu.edu

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Profile for imagine

imagine 2010  

Additional early childhood music therapy resources available at www.imagine.musictherapy.biz.

imagine 2010  

Additional early childhood music therapy resources available at www.imagine.musictherapy.biz.